User Tools

Site Tools


199801

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
199801 [2015/12/07 23:41]
tyreless
199801 [2015/12/08 21:05] (current)
tyreless
Line 3: Line 3:
 **SYDNEY BUSHWALKER** is a monthly bulletin of matters of interest to The Sydney Bush Walkers Inc, Box 4476 GPO Sydney 2001. To advertise in this magazine, please contact the Business Manager. **SYDNEY BUSHWALKER** is a monthly bulletin of matters of interest to The Sydney Bush Walkers Inc, Box 4476 GPO Sydney 2001. To advertise in this magazine, please contact the Business Manager.
  
-|**Editor**|Patrick Jarnes, 5/2 Hardie Street, Neutral Bay 2089, Telephone 9904 1515|+|**Editor**|Patrick James, 5/2 Hardie Street, Neutral Bay 2089, Telephone 9904 1515|
 |**Business Manager**|George Mawer, 42 Lincoln Road, Georges Hall, Telephone 9707 1343| |**Business Manager**|George Mawer, 42 Lincoln Road, Georges Hall, Telephone 9707 1343|
 |**Production Manager**|Fran Holland| |**Production Manager**|Fran Holland|
-|**Printers**|Kenn Clacher, Tom VVenman, Barrie MurdoCh, Margaret Niven & Les Powell|+|**Printers**|Kenn Clacher, Tom Wenman, Barrie Murdoch, Margaret Niven & Les Powell|
  
 **THE SYDNEY BUSH WALKERS INCORPORATED** was founded in 1927. Club meetings are held every Wednesday evening at a pm at Kirribilli Neighbourhood Centre, 16 Fitzroy Street, Kirribilli (near Milsons Point Railway Station). Visitors and prospective members are welcome any Wednesday. **THE SYDNEY BUSH WALKERS INCORPORATED** was founded in 1927. Club meetings are held every Wednesday evening at a pm at Kirribilli Neighbourhood Centre, 16 Fitzroy Street, Kirribilli (near Milsons Point Railway Station). Visitors and prospective members are welcome any Wednesday.
Line 55: Line 55:
 If you would like to be involved in Conservation issues please phone Bill Holland, Conservation Secretary on 9484 6636 (business and after hours). If you would like to be involved in Conservation issues please phone Bill Holland, Conservation Secretary on 9484 6636 (business and after hours).
  
-===== Aboriginal Ownership of National Parks in NSW by Vivien Dunne*, from the Bushwalker, Nov. 1997. =====+===== Aboriginal Ownership of National Parks in NSW ===== 
 + 
 +by Vivien Dunne*, from the Bushwalker, Nov. 1997.
  
 The National Parks and Wildlife Amendment (Aboriginal Ownership) Act 1996# relating to Aboriginal Ownership of National Parks passed through both houses of the NSW Parliament unopposed in December 1996. For some more conservative members of the community the passing of The Act was seen as cause for concern and greeted with alarm, but for others it was heralded as a significant step in providing for the rights of Australia's indigenous peoples. The National Parks and Wildlife Amendment (Aboriginal Ownership) Act 1996# relating to Aboriginal Ownership of National Parks passed through both houses of the NSW Parliament unopposed in December 1996. For some more conservative members of the community the passing of The Act was seen as cause for concern and greeted with alarm, but for others it was heralded as a significant step in providing for the rights of Australia's indigenous peoples.
Line 61: Line 63:
 Joint management will be established for parks and reserves listed on Schedule 14 through the appointment of Boards of Management. The Boards will be required to exercise management, care and control in accordance with the provisions of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 and at this stage five parks have been listed for return to Aboriginal ownership. Joint management will be established for parks and reserves listed on Schedule 14 through the appointment of Boards of Management. The Boards will be required to exercise management, care and control in accordance with the provisions of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 and at this stage five parks have been listed for return to Aboriginal ownership.
  
-1. Mootwingee NP and Historic Site, and Coturaundee Nature Reserve near Broken Hill +  - Mootwingee NP and Historic Site, and Coturaundee Nature Reserve near Broken Hill 
-2. Mungo NP +  Mungo NP 
-3. NSW Jervis Bay NP near Nowra +  NSW Jervis Bay NP near Nowra 
-4. Mount Yarrowyck Nature Reserve near Armidale +  Mount Yarrowyck Nature Reserve near Armidale 
-5. Mount Grenfell Historic Site near Cobar+  Mount Grenfell Historic Site near Cobar
  
 The most important points to note in The Amendment are as follows:- National Parks will be approved for Aboriginal ownership subject to a lease-back arrangement between the indigenous owners and the relevant State or Commonwealth authority and will include the payment of rent for the lease of the land. The term of the lease will be for a period of 30 years with allowance made for renewal of the term, periodic review and provision for replacement. The most important points to note in The Amendment are as follows:- National Parks will be approved for Aboriginal ownership subject to a lease-back arrangement between the indigenous owners and the relevant State or Commonwealth authority and will include the payment of rent for the lease of the land. The term of the lease will be for a period of 30 years with allowance made for renewal of the term, periodic review and provision for replacement.
Line 85: Line 87:
 Advance Notice of a preliminary survey of birds at Coolana to be held on a weekend in March. The plan is for an initial survey of the avifauna at Coolana as input to a later more complete survey. You will need a note book, pen or pencil and ideally binoculars. Experience is not necessary, we will show you how. Other equipment could include field guides on birds, thermos flask, chair, blind, camera with telephoto lens, umbrella. Watchers in groups of two, will go out to different areas at Coolana in the morning and afternoon to spot the birds. Later the bird lists will be collated, the birds named and their habitat specified. This will be a valuable survey of our property. We do need a few people with bird watching skills and experience to assist. Before the event a Wednesday social night will be devoted to "How to Bird Watch". Call or write to the editor. Advance Notice of a preliminary survey of birds at Coolana to be held on a weekend in March. The plan is for an initial survey of the avifauna at Coolana as input to a later more complete survey. You will need a note book, pen or pencil and ideally binoculars. Experience is not necessary, we will show you how. Other equipment could include field guides on birds, thermos flask, chair, blind, camera with telephoto lens, umbrella. Watchers in groups of two, will go out to different areas at Coolana in the morning and afternoon to spot the birds. Later the bird lists will be collated, the birds named and their habitat specified. This will be a valuable survey of our property. We do need a few people with bird watching skills and experience to assist. Before the event a Wednesday social night will be devoted to "How to Bird Watch". Call or write to the editor.
  
-=====A BICYCLE IN BURGUNDY=====+=====A Bicycle in Burgundy===== 
 by Tom Wenman by Tom Wenman
  
Line 124: Line 127:
 Back downhill to the canal and the way was clear back to Savigny les Beaune and thence on to Beaune in the morning to catch the TGV, pronounced 'tay jay vay' I'd have you know, back to Paris. Fin. Back downhill to the canal and the way was clear back to Savigny les Beaune and thence on to Beaune in the morning to catch the TGV, pronounced 'tay jay vay' I'd have you know, back to Paris. Fin.
  
-=====SBW SONG BOOK=====+=====SBW Song Book=====
  
 The official **"SBW Song Book"** has been printed and is available to members at a cost of $5-00. Now you can sing around the campfire - no longer lost for words! There have been earlier songbooks, but this version has old songs (from 1930/40 etc.) and new songs (1960/70 etc.). **Price $5.00** (available in the Clubrooms or mailed if you include $1.00 for postage). The official **"SBW Song Book"** has been printed and is available to members at a cost of $5-00. Now you can sing around the campfire - no longer lost for words! There have been earlier songbooks, but this version has old songs (from 1930/40 etc.) and new songs (1960/70 etc.). **Price $5.00** (available in the Clubrooms or mailed if you include $1.00 for postage).
  
  
-=====TICKSFOES OR FRIENDS?=====+=====TicksFoes or Friends?=====
 By Stephen Doggett By Stephen Doggett
  
Line 182: Line 185:
 As ticks require animals as source for blood, the presence of ticks in an area suggests a healthy environment, usually with a variety of native marsupials. But, with urban development, bush fragmentation, feral animals, pollution and the many other forms of human activity which degrade native bushland, maybe it is the tick that is under the greater threat and not us humans. As ticks require animals as source for blood, the presence of ticks in an area suggests a healthy environment, usually with a variety of native marsupials. But, with urban development, bush fragmentation, feral animals, pollution and the many other forms of human activity which degrade native bushland, maybe it is the tick that is under the greater threat and not us humans.
  
-**FURTHER READING**+**Further Reading**
  
-PEARN J. (1977). **The Clinical Features of Tick Bite.** //Medical Journal of Australia.// 2: 313-6.+Pearn J. (1977). **The Clinical Features of Tick Bite.** //Medical Journal of Australia.// 2: 313-6.
  
-RUSSELL R.C., S.L. DOGGETT, R. MUNRO, J. ELLIS, D. AVERY, C. HUNT, and D. DICKESON. (1994). **Lyme disease: A search for the causative agent in ticks in southeastern Australia.** //Epidemiology and Infection.// 112: 375-384.+Russell R.C., S.L. Doggett, R. Munro, J. Ellis, D. Avery, C. Hunt, and D. Dickeson. (1994). **Lyme disease: A search for the causative agent in ticks in southeastern Australia.** //Epidemiology and Infection.// 112: 375-384.
  
-**WEB SITES**+**Web Sites**
  
 <http://www.peg.apc.org/~ullavet/tick.html#Life> (information on //Ixodes holocyclus//, largely from a veterinary aspect). <http://www.peg.apc.org/~ullavet/tick.html#Life> (information on //Ixodes holocyclus//, largely from a veterinary aspect).
Line 198: Line 201:
 **//About the author//**: Stephen Doggett is with the Department of Medical Entomology, University of Sydney & ICPMR, Westmead Hospital, Westmead NSW 2145. In November 1997 Stephen gave a talk about Ticks and other little things that bite to the SBW at the Kirribilli clubrooms. Stephen also can be reached via the Internet on E-mail <stephend@cidm.sahs.nsw.gov.au>. **//About the author//**: Stephen Doggett is with the Department of Medical Entomology, University of Sydney & ICPMR, Westmead Hospital, Westmead NSW 2145. In November 1997 Stephen gave a talk about Ticks and other little things that bite to the SBW at the Kirribilli clubrooms. Stephen also can be reached via the Internet on E-mail <stephend@cidm.sahs.nsw.gov.au>.
  
-SOCIAL NIGHT: 28 JAN. 1998+=====Social Night: 28 Jan. 1998===== 
 At the clubroom: Alan Norman, senior NP&WS ranger based at Ulladulla south of Nowra will talk on wilderness and national parks management from the ranger's perspective. Come and hear how the NP&WS manage land, flora and fauna (including homo sapiens). At the clubroom: Alan Norman, senior NP&WS ranger based at Ulladulla south of Nowra will talk on wilderness and national parks management from the ranger's perspective. Come and hear how the NP&WS manage land, flora and fauna (including homo sapiens).
-SOCIAL NIGHT: 18 FEB. 1998 + 
-Three round trips made by car in 1997 in Ireland, the south of England and New England, USA will feature in a slide presentation by Elwyn Mortis. and George Carter on Wednesday 18 February. The emphasis will be on scenic coasts and mountains where you could walk, hostel and/or camp. The few buildings shown will be mostly Irish ruins dating from about +=====Social Night: 18 Feb. 1998===== 
-4000 BC to 1500 AD, some English villages, and a couple of Arnerican lighthouses that enhance rather than spoil the landscape.+ 
 +Three round trips made by car in 1997 in Ireland, the south of England and New England, USA will feature in a slide presentation by Elwyn Morris and George Carter on Wednesday 18 February. The emphasis will be on scenic coasts and mountains where you could walk, hostel and/or camp. The few buildings shown will be mostly Irish ruins dating from about 4000 BC to 1500 AD, some English villages, and a couple of American lighthouses that enhance rather than spoil the landscape. 
 For those who would like to know how to cut travel costs to about $A50 per person per day for everything including airfares, Elwyn is giving a U3A course on Budget Travel in the First World at McMahons Point Community Centre from 2PM to 4PM every second Tuesday, starting on 17 February. For those who would like to know how to cut travel costs to about $A50 per person per day for everything including airfares, Elwyn is giving a U3A course on Budget Travel in the First World at McMahons Point Community Centre from 2PM to 4PM every second Tuesday, starting on 17 February.
-CLUB COOLANA There is still plenty + 
-of opportunity to assist with the Coolana maintenance in the January - February period. The Coolana dates are 17118 Jan., 31Jan/1 Feb., 14115 Feb. and 28 Feb./1 Mar. Gardening tools are still need at Coolana and the management and staff of Club Coolana would be happy with your cast offs. Some rakes, spades, shovels, clippers, secateurs, wheel barrow, lawn mower, whipper-snipper, Db, D8 or D10 dozer. +=====Club Coolana===== 
-NAMEADDRESS PHONE NUMBER CHANGES: Changes to + 
-name, address or phone numbers should be sent to Membership Secretary: Barry Wallace. Don't delay details must be in by the end of January +There is still plenty of opportunity to assist with the Coolana maintenance in the January - February period. The Coolana dates are 17/18 Jan., 31 Jan/1 Feb., 14/15 Feb. and 28 Feb./1 Mar. Gardening tools are still needed at Coolana and the management and staff of Club Coolana would be happy with your cast offs. Some rakes, spades, shovels, clippers, secateurs, wheel barrow, lawn mower, whipper-snipper, D6, D8 or D10 dozer. 
-1998. + 
-Looking Back - From Seven to +=====NameAddress Phone Number Changes:===== 
-Seventy Yearsby Frank Rigby. At the + 
-age of seventy years Frank Rigby has looked back on his life and written a series of personal anecdotes. Frank's life has been varied and, at times, adventurous, and the anecdotes reflect that kind of life. Humour, drama, happiness, sadness and philosophy are all to be found in this interesting and readable little book. Self published, A5 size, 94 pages with some bushwalking anecdotes of interest to SBW members. Available directly from the author - publisher Frank Rigby, 77 Creswell Street, Campbell, ACT 2612 (phone 02 6247 2035) at the cost price of $8 plus $2 p&p. +//Changes to name, address or phone numbers should be sent to Membership Secretary: Barry Wallace. Don't delay details must be in by the end of January 
-A Happy and Prosperous New Year to all. +1998.// 
-The Sydney Bushwalker, January 1998 page 11 + 
-NPWS draft NATURETOURISM RECREATION STRATEGYreview+=====Looking Back - From Seven to Seventy Years===== 
 +by Frank Rigby. 
 + 
 +At the age of seventy years Frank Rigby has looked back on his life and written a series of personal anecdotes. Frank's life has been varied and, at times, adventurous, and the anecdotes reflect that kind of life. Humour, drama, happiness, sadness and philosophy are all to be found in this interesting and readable little book. Self published, A5 size, 94 pages with some bushwalking anecdotes of interest to SBW members. Available directly from the author - publisher Frank Rigby, 77 Creswell Street, Campbell, ACT 2612 (phone 02 6247 2035) at the cost price of $8 plus $2 p&p. 
 + 
 +=====NPWS draft NatureTourism Recreation Strategyreview=====
 by Keith Muir. by Keith Muir.
-introduction+ 
 +**Introduction** 
 The NPWS Draft Nature Tourism and Recreation Strategy is a program for major change to national park management designed to benefit the tourism industry and make parks pay their way. The NPWS Draft Nature Tourism and Recreation Strategy is a program for major change to national park management designed to benefit the tourism industry and make parks pay their way.
 +
 Rather than managing NSW protected areas primarily for nature conservation, the NPWS will be adopting a "far more business-like approach" (p9* by focusing on marketing, promoting and facilitating tourism and recreation. This will be done in partnership with private and government tourism bodies and with increased "stakeholder" input to management decision making. As a result management direction will be significantly influenced by those wanting to exploit national parks for profit and inappropriate use, despite a stated concern for environmental impacts. Rather than managing NSW protected areas primarily for nature conservation, the NPWS will be adopting a "far more business-like approach" (p9* by focusing on marketing, promoting and facilitating tourism and recreation. This will be done in partnership with private and government tourism bodies and with increased "stakeholder" input to management decision making. As a result management direction will be significantly influenced by those wanting to exploit national parks for profit and inappropriate use, despite a stated concern for environmental impacts.
-* page numbers in the Draft Strategy +//page numbers in the Draft Strategy// 
-Restructuring parks for profit + 
-National parks are seen as having the potential to greatly increase tourist spending in NSW. There are currently 22 million visitors to NSW parks each year but this is predicted to rise to 32million by 2005 under the Strategy (p20). In seeking increased revenue, the NPWS will sell their "product" to those who are easy to charge and likely to bring in the most money - the organised recreational users and mass tourism market. This means providing more facilities in parks for visitors who prefer to stay in built accommodation or travel through them by vehicle. In turn the tourism industry will profit more from parks through increased touring and development opportunities. +**Restructuring parks for profit** 
-protected area or where existing planning processes have proposed the need for accommodation." (emphasis added) (p69). If adopted, this means that built accommodation will be provided where it is considered commercially viable (park privatisation). In the Warrumbungles National Park, for example, cabin developments have been proposed (p104).+ 
 +National parks are seen as having the potential to greatly increase tourist spending in NSW. There are currently 22 million visitors to NSW parks each year but this is predicted to rise to 32 million by 2005 under the Strategy (p20). In seeking increased revenue, the NPWS will sell their "product" to those who are easy to charge and likely to bring in the most money - the organised recreational users and mass tourism market. This means providing more facilities in parks for visitors who prefer to stay in built accommodation or travel through them by vehicle. In turn the tourism industry will profit more from parks through increased touring and development opportunities. 
 + 
 +Stage One of the plan is timed to be "completed and operational" for the Olympics (p71). In partnership with private enterprise and Tourism NSW, the NPWS will ensure that 15 "key destination" park areas are "directly linked with the marketing of the 2000 Olympics." (p9). 
 + 
 +**Development within national parks** 
 + 
 +The NPWS policy of "no new accommodation structures within protected areas" (p69) will be swept aside by: "Exceptions to this policy may apply to situations that demonstrate a net overall benefit to the conservation status of the affected 
 +protected area or //where existing planning processes have proposed the need for accommodation//." (emphasis added) (p69). If adopted, this means that built accommodation will be provided where it is considered commercially viable (park privatisation). In the Warrumbungles National Park, for example, cabin developments have been proposed (p104). 
 Existing structures in national parks will also be utilised for accommodation and other purposes to support tourism (p54). Existing structures in national parks will also be utilised for accommodation and other purposes to support tourism (p54).
-More commercial tourism and high impact recreation + 
-The NPWS licences 162 commercial tour operators in protected areas but this is only a fraction of the actual number and does not include coach tours (p32). Under the draft Strategy, commercial tour businesses will be helped by a system that will "lead to further licensed commercial tour opportunities within protected areas" (p9). This help will include advertising commercial tour opportunities, regular liaison meetings with "clients and stakeholders", "developing a special relationship" with the Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife (whose current main sponsor +**More commercial tourism and high impact recreation** 
-is Toyota) and developing "working+ 
 +The NPWS licences 162 commercial tour operators in protected areas but this is only a fraction of the actual number and does not include coach tours (p32). Under the draft Strategy, commercial tour businesses will be helped by a system that will "lead to further licensed commercial tour opportunities within protected areas" (p9). This help will include advertising commercial tour opportunities, regular liaison meetings with "clients and stakeholders", "developing a special relationship" with the Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife (whose current main sponsor is Toyota) and developing "working
 partnerships" with tour operators (p62). partnerships" with tour operators (p62).
 +
 The NPWS will broaden the range of experiences in national parks for all visitors including the mass tourism markets and "recreation pursuits" such as horseriding and four wheel driving (p27). Nature tourism in the document is defined to include all visitor use of parks (p27). Current infrastructure (roads, walkways, visitor centres etc.) will be upgraded, and "new or improved" tourist destinations will be established in national parks with assistance from the private sector and other partnerships (p33). The NPWS will broaden the range of experiences in national parks for all visitors including the mass tourism markets and "recreation pursuits" such as horseriding and four wheel driving (p27). Nature tourism in the document is defined to include all visitor use of parks (p27). Current infrastructure (roads, walkways, visitor centres etc.) will be upgraded, and "new or improved" tourist destinations will be established in national parks with assistance from the private sector and other partnerships (p33).
-Stage One of the plan is timed to be "completed and operational" for the Olympics (p71). In partnership with private enterprise and Tourism NSW, the NPWS will ensure that 15 "key destination" park areas are "directly linked with the marketing of the 2000 Olympics." (p9). + 
-Development within national parks +**Restructuring park finances** 
-The NPWS policy of "no new accommodation structures within protected areas" (p69) will be swept aside by: "Exceptions to this policy may apply to situations that demonstrate a net overall benefit to the conservation status of the affected + 
-The Sydney Bush Walkers, founded 1927. +The implementation of the Strategy's program will be resourced by reallocating existing NPWS funds (p10). No additional government funding is planned because increased revenue is expected from commercial opportunities. The draft Strategy states that the improved "planning and commercial management skills" of NPWS staff is expected to "significantly improve return of revenue" (p63) and management practices and techniques will be constantly reviewed to maintain customer service "even in environments of decreasing funding" (p52). Increased commercial tour licences will also earn the NPWS more money and a "whole of NPWS retail product line (or lines) will be developed in partnership with private enterprise"(p61). 
-Restructuring park finances + 
-The implementation of the Strategy's program will be resourced by reallocating existing NPWS funds (p10). No additional government funding is planned because increased revenue is expected from commercial opportunities. The draft Strategy states that the improved "planning and commercial management skills" of NPWS staff is expected to "significantly improve return of revenue" (p63) and management practices and techniques will be constantly reviewed to maintain customer service "even in +Internal NPWS funds will be realigned to reinvest in "improvements" to the key regional destinations (p56). However, it will be difficult to retain funds to protect an increasingly pressured environment, when those who pay to use the parks will demand visible value for money in the form of better roads, services and facilities. 
-Page 12 The Sydney Bushwalker, January 1998 + 
-environments of decreasing funding" (p52). Increased commercial tour licences will also earn the NPWS more money and a "whole of NPWS retail product 'line (or lines) will be developed in partnership with private enterprise"(p61). +**NPWS staff as tourist managers** 
-Internal NPWS fundswill be realigned to reinvest in "improvements" to the key regional destinations (p56). However, it will be difficult to retain funds to protect an increasingly pressured environment, when those who pay to use the parks will demand visible value for money in the form of better roads, services and facilities. +
-NPWS staff as tourist managers+
 Staff will be recruited with business, financial and management skills and existing senior management will be trained in "business management training skills, particularly in relation to financial and economic management principles, Staff will be recruited with business, financial and management skills and existing senior management will be trained in "business management training skills, particularly in relation to financial and economic management principles,
 marketing..." (p60). Staff performance will be measured in key aspects of business (eg. response time to commercial tour operating licence applications) (p60). New uniforms and badges will be introduced before the 2000 Olympics (p51). The emphasis on marketing and providing customer service distorts staff duty statements from primary environmental duties. In many cases staff will be reduced to little more than glorified tour agents and traffic wardens. marketing..." (p60). Staff performance will be measured in key aspects of business (eg. response time to commercial tour operating licence applications) (p60). New uniforms and badges will be introduced before the 2000 Olympics (p51). The emphasis on marketing and providing customer service distorts staff duty statements from primary environmental duties. In many cases staff will be reduced to little more than glorified tour agents and traffic wardens.
-Competing with other States + 
-Despite the already high visitor numbers relative to the rest of Australia, NSW is claimed to be lagging behind other States who "heavily market" their protected areas and are "far more organised for the holiday maker"(p27) such as Victoria (Wilson's Promontory resort), +**Competing with other States** 
-Queensland (Hinchinbrook resort) and+ 
 +Despite the already high visitor numbers relative to the rest of Australia, NSW is claimed to be lagging behind other States who "heavily market" their protected areas and are "far more organised for the holiday maker"(p27) such as Victoria (Wilson's Promontory resort), Queensland (Hinchinbrook resort) and
 Tasmania (Tarkine road). Tasmania (Tarkine road).
 +
 In NSW, visitor desires, determined by stakeholder surveys etc., will be big influences on how parks are managed (a demand driven ideology). "Supply and demand" will be managed through methods such as "strategic marketing and product distribution" (p53). In NSW, visitor desires, determined by stakeholder surveys etc., will be big influences on how parks are managed (a demand driven ideology). "Supply and demand" will be managed through methods such as "strategic marketing and product distribution" (p53).
-Parks targeted for development + 
-Parks in 15 regions will become prime tourist destinations through increased marketing and the identification, expansion and development +**Parks targeted for development** 
-of visitor facilities and commercial opportunities. These 15 regions are labelled in the Strategy as "key regional destinations proposed to be improved to "international destination product quality" (emphasis added) (p104) For example, in the Blue Mountains Govetts Leap at Blackheath and Valley of the Waters at Wentworth Falls will be upgraded for coach facilities (p104) and in Northern NSW at Mt Warning, rainforest boardwalks and a visitor centre/transport interchange will be provided (p56). + 
-Parks in "key destination" regions are to be th emed as follows: "Australia's Holiday Coast" (mid north coast), "Northern Rivers and Tropical NSW" (north NSW), "Explorer Country" (Central West), "The Living Outback" (Far West), Blue Mountains, "The Hunter", "Snowy Mountains", "South Coast", and "Southern Highlands". These areas have been targeted because of their "ability to sustain visitor use" (p56), however, environmental values in many of them are already threatened by inappropriate use such as the ski resorts at Kosciuszko.+Parks in 15 regions will become prime tourist destinations through increased marketing and the identification, expansion and development of visitor facilities and commercial opportunities. These 15 regions are labelled in the Strategy as "key regional destinations proposed to be improved to "//international destination product quality//" (emphasis added) (p104)For example, in the Blue Mountains Govetts Leap at Blackheath and Valley of the Waters at Wentworth Falls will be upgraded for coach facilities (p104) and in Northern NSW at Mt Warning, rainforest boardwalks and a visitor centre/transport interchange will be provided (p56). 
 + 
 +Parks in "key destination" regions are to be themed as follows: "Australia's Holiday Coast" (mid north coast), "Northern Rivers and Tropical NSW" (north NSW), "Explorer Country" (Central West), "The Living Outback" (Far West), Blue Mountains, "The Hunter", "Snowy Mountains", "South Coast", and "Southern Highlands". These areas have been targeted because of their "ability to sustain visitor use" (p56), however, environmental values in many of them are already threatened by inappropriate use such as the ski resorts at Kosciuszko. 
 Other parks, such as Barrington Tops and Myall Lakes will be marketed on a regional level for the domestic tourism market. (p58) Other parks, such as Barrington Tops and Myall Lakes will be marketed on a regional level for the domestic tourism market. (p58)
-Relationship to the NPWS Draft Access Strategy+ 
 +**Relationship to the NPWS Draft Access Strategy** 
 The Draft Tourism Strategy is a far more detailed and unambiguous program for change compared to its companion, the draft Access Strategy. This earlier policy document, which created expectations for more vehicular and other high impact access to national parks, will be rolled into this strategy (p13). Input to the Access Strategy will also be used for developing the final Nature Tourism and Recreation Strategy (p13). The Draft Tourism Strategy is a far more detailed and unambiguous program for change compared to its companion, the draft Access Strategy. This earlier policy document, which created expectations for more vehicular and other high impact access to national parks, will be rolled into this strategy (p13). Input to the Access Strategy will also be used for developing the final Nature Tourism and Recreation Strategy (p13).
-"Stakeholder" input: national park + 
-management +**"Stakeholder" input: national park management** 
-Greatly increased input from "key stakeholders" to national park management decisions is planned. This will be achieved through consultative forums and expanded advisory committee roles. The key stakeholders will include: tourism industry representatives, local government representatives, recreation user groups [4WD etc.], local residents, and conservationists (p40). This means management decisions will be more influenced by those + 
-A Happy and Prosperous New Year to all. +Greatly increased input from "key stakeholders" to national park management decisions is planned. This will be achieved through consultative forums and expanded advisory committee roles. The key stakeholders will include: tourism industry representatives, local government representatives, recreation user groups [4WD etc.], local residents, and conservationists (p40). This means management decisions will be more influenced by those interested in high impact use and profit rather than nature conservation. 
-The Sydney Bushwalker, January 1998 page 13 I + 
-interested in high'impact use and profit rather Environment +**Categorising parks for recreational State.** 
-than nature conservation. NSW National Parks make up about 5% of the + 
-Categorising parks for recreational State. There is a world-wide trend in loss of +NSW parks will be categorised using a "Recreational Opportunity Spectrum" (ROS) to indicate where, how much and what type of development, access, recreation etc. is permissible or appropriate within each park. Increased use can be directed to areas ranging from Class I (least developed) to Class 5 (suitable for resort development). This analysis is based on systems developed in Queensland and Victoria (p43). 
-opportunities habitat and the ensuing extinction of species. NSW parks will be categorised using a Globally Australia is one of only 12 megaakecreational Opportunity Spectrum" (ROS) to diverse countries that account for 75% of the indicate where, how much and what type of world's total biodiversity. In the last 200 years development, access, recreation etc. is however, 100 plant and animal species have permissible or appropriatewithin each park. become extinct with 82 of those in NSW. Increased use can be directed to areas ranging Another 600 known species in NSW are listed from Class I (least developed) to Class 5 as endangered or vulnerable with many others (suitable for resort development). This analysis deserving that status. (p11) These figures is based on systems developed in Queensland indicate the importance of putting areas aside +
-and Victoria (p43). simply for the sake of keeping them+
 The ROS has the potential of allowing parks to move up the scale to a category allowing more development. The ROS has the potential of allowing parks to move up the scale to a category allowing more development.
-Existing park access and facilities adequate There are currently 2136km of public access roads, 13341an of walking tracks, 158 camping grounds, 400 picnic areas, 115 lookouts and, 57 visitor centres in NSW national parks. (p20). + 
-A further 500Ian of roads and highways that ;pass through park areas, and private resort and lease arrangements already exist in places like Kosciuszko.+**Existing park access and facilities adequate** 
 + 
 +There are currently 2136km of public access roads, 13341an of walking tracks, 158 camping grounds, 400 picnic areas, 115 lookouts and, 57 visitor centres in NSW national parks. (p20). 
 + 
 +A further 500km of roads and highways that pass through park areas, and private resort and lease arrangements already exist in places like Kosciuszko. 
 + 
 +**Environment** 
 + 
 +NSW National Parks make up about 5% of the State. There is a world-wide trend in loss of habitat and the ensuing extinction of species. Globally Australia is one of only 12 mega-diverse countries that account for 75% of the  world's total biodiversity. In the last 200 years however, 100 plant and animal species have become extinct with 82 of those in NSW. Another 600 known species in NSW are listed as endangered or vulnerable with many others deserving that status. (p11) These figures indicate the importance of putting areas aside simply for the sake of keeping them. 
 The Strategy states that "Habitat fragmentation and clearing is the main cause of species extinction", (p11) yet the change of direction in NPWS management will lead to increased fragmentation and development in parks. The Strategy states that "Habitat fragmentation and clearing is the main cause of species extinction", (p11) yet the change of direction in NPWS management will lead to increased fragmentation and development in parks.
-This document dated December 1997 was prepared by Keith Muir of the Total Environment Centre. For more information contact Keith on (02) 9241 2702, or SBW Conservation Secretary Bill Holland on (02) 9484 6636. + 
-Trek the light %Meath! +//This document dated December 1997 was prepared by Keith Muir of the Total Environment Centre. For more information contact Keith on (02) 9241 2702, or SBW Conservation Secretary Bill Holland on (02) 9484 6636.// 
-For the first time ever, we are offering special light-pack trips. We provide lightweight equipment plus all meals. You bring yourself, your clothes, a good pair of walking shoes and we'll show you places that you could not have seen before without carrying a full pack. + 
-8 kg or less. We even offer trips where you need no more than a day pack. +=====Footnotes===== 
-We offer only three dry season light-pack trips in Kakadu, two in the Kimberley and two elsewhere in the Top End. Don't miss out. Ask for our new brochure. +**by Patrick James** 
-Willis's Walkabouts + 
-12 Carrington St 'dinner NT 0810 +What a Christmas party. Perfect weather, few if any mozzies. A turn-up of about 120 to 130 members; a huge crowd by SBW standards, some 25% of the membership. A wide and satisfying selection of food representing the wide and varied culinary imagination of bushwalkers.. The food was complimented by two types of wine (red and white), orange juice and beer. Plenty of people to talk to and possibly to talk about. A happy-way to end off a busy anniversary year. There was some confusion about the starting time. Oops, sorry about that. 
-Page 14 The Sydney Bush-walker, January 1998  + 
-FOOTNOTES by Patrick James What a Christmas party. Perfect weather, few if any mozzies. A turn-up of about 120 to 130 members; a huge crowd by SBW standards, some 25% of the membership. A wide and satisfying selection of food representing the wide and varied culinary imagination of bushwalkers.. The food was complimented by two types of wine (red and white), orange juice and beer. Plenty of peopleto talk to and possibly to talk about. A happy-way to end off a busyanniversary year. There was some confusion about the starting time. Oops, sorry about that. +The recent bushfires in the Kangaroo Valley did not affected Coolana as George Gray reported last month and others have confirmed. Coolana still needs maintenance; read about it on page 10. 
-The recent bushfires in the Kangaroo Valley did not affected Coolana as George Gray reported last month and others have confirmed. Coolana still need maintenance; read about it on page 10.+
 With hot summer nights and hotter summer days heat exhaustion, dehydration and bushfires are top of the worry list. See next column. With hot summer nights and hotter summer days heat exhaustion, dehydration and bushfires are top of the worry list. See next column.
-EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST 
-May/June 1998: Advance planning has started for a three week SBW walk in the Isdell River area, Kimberley WA. This is one of the most beautiful walking areas in Australia. This walk will be custom designed by Willis's Walkabouts for our group. Early cost indications are $1,500 
-$1,800. ex Kununarra., Interested? Contact Frances Holland , on 9484 '. 636 (business and after hours). 
-Walking in N.S.W. National Parks 
-A quite walk in a National Park may well becqme a thing of the Past like silent movies and 12 inch LP records and the many other casualties of modern living. A walk may entail dodging 4WD vehicles enjoying the quiet solitude of the Australian bush or slaloming around horse shit left as a cultural reminded of equality of access to all. A quite walk may also entail having a copy.. of your $zillion dollar public liability insurance with you at all times. At the December general meeting a motion was passed: 
-that it is SBW pOlicy that all activities comply with NP&W,S directions in regard to the closure of National Parks. If the park is open it's fine, if the park is closed we CANNOT walk in it. No, insurance-policy will cover illegal acts.  
-A Happy and ProspeExtracts from the SBW First Aid Notes. 
-HYPERTHERMIA (HEAT EXHAUSTION) (too hot). Included here are severe sunburn, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. For sunburn see burns below. Heat stress is an elevated body temperature and occurs when the body can no longer control its temperature by sweating.. It can occur on bushwalks when the temperature is high, the humidity is high, wearing too much clothing, strenuous walking such as climbing. Heat stroke is extreme heat exhaustion. 
-Signs & Symptoms Headache, dizziness, feeling hot, exhausted but restless, muscular cramps, fast and shallow breathing, skin pale and clammy, pulse rapid and weak. 
-Treatment Remove casualty to a cool or cooler place in the shade. remove as much clothing as possible, however there is no need to strip naked! Sponge down with cool water. Give plenty to drink; many small amounts in place of a few large amounts. Seek medical attention. 
-DEHYDRATION This can occur under strenuous exercise in hot weather or as the result of vomiting or diarrhoea. If you are experiencing cramps or headache you are probably dehydrated and may need to drink a litre or two of water to "catch up". The body can lose two litres of water in the first hour of strenuous activity and one litre per hour. subsequently. It is very difficult to drink enough to make up for this rate of liquid loss. It is important to realise that not feeling thirsty- is not always a good indication of your body's need for water. Somebody who needs to drink a litre of water may feel their thirst is satisfied after a few sips. Encourage a suspected dehydration patient to drink copiously. Treat by re-hydration with water or weak tea, and refrain from excessive quantities of tea, coffee, soft drink, beer, etc. as these are diuretic, i e. they cause the body to excrete water. For vomiting and diarrhoea do not give solid food until the casualty has stabilised, that is within 12 hours (or overnight) being able to retain liquids. If not stable continue re-hydration and consider giving simple, easily digested foods, seek medical assistance. Mild dehydration is usually experienced on mOst summer walks. The sign is that one's urine appears to be more concentrated. Drink plenty of water. 
-rous New Year to all. 
  
 +=====Expressions of Interest=====
 +
 +May/June 1998: Advance planning has started for a three week SBW walk in the Isdell River area, Kimberley WA. This is one of the most beautiful walking areas in Australia. This walk will be custom designed by Willis's Walkabouts for our group. Early cost indications are $1,500-$1,800 ex Kununarra. Interested? Contact Frances Holland on 9484 6636 (business and after hours).
 +
 +**Walking in N.S.W. National Parks**
 +
 +A quiet walk in a National Park may well become a thing of the past like silent movies and 12 inch LP records and the many other casualties of modern living. A walk may entail dodging 4WD vehicles enjoying the quiet solitude of the Australian bush or slaloming around horse shit left as a cultural reminded of equality of access to all. A quiet walk may also entail having a copy of your $zillion dollar public liability insurance with you at all times. At the December general meeting a motion was passed:
 +
 +//That it is SBW policy that all activities comply with NP&W,S directions in regard to the closure of National Parks.//
 +
 +If the park is open it's fine, if the park is closed we **CANNOT** walk in it. No, insurance policy will cover illegal acts.
 +
 +=====Extracts from the SBW First Aid Notes.=====
 +
 +**Hyperthermia (Heat Exhaustion) (too hot).**
 +
 +Included here are severe sunburn, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. For sunburn see burns below. Heat stress is an elevated body temperature and occurs when the body can no longer control its temperature by sweating. It can occur on bushwalks when the temperature is high, the humidity is high, wearing too much clothing, strenuous walking such as climbing. Heat stroke is extreme heat exhaustion.
 +
 +**Signs & Symptoms** Headache, dizziness, feeling hot, exhausted but restless, muscular cramps, fast and shallow breathing, skin pale and clammy, pulse rapid and weak.
 +
 +**Treatment** Remove casualty to a cool or cooler place in the shade. remove as much clothing as possible, however there is no need to strip naked! Sponge down with cool water. Give plenty to drink; many small amounts in place of a few large amounts. Seek medical attention.
 +
 +**Dehydration**
 +
 +This can occur under strenuous exercise in hot weather or as the result of vomiting or diarrhoea. If you are experiencing cramps or headache you are probably dehydrated and may need to drink a litre or two of water to "catch up". The body can lose two litres of water in the first hour of strenuous activity and one litre per hour subsequently. It is very difficult to drink enough to make up for this rate of liquid loss. It is important to realise that not feeling thirsty is not always a good indication of your body's need for water. Somebody who needs to drink a litre of water may feel their thirst is satisfied after a few sips. Encourage a suspected dehydration patient to drink copiously. Treat by re-hydration with water or weak tea, and refrain from excessive quantities of tea, coffee, soft drink, beer, etc. as these are diuretic, i.e. they cause the body to excrete water. For vomiting and diarrhoea do not give solid food until the casualty has stabilised, that is within 12 hours (or overnight) being able to retain liquids. If not stable continue re-hydration and consider giving simple, easily digested foods, seek medical assistance. Mild dehydration is usually experienced on most summer walks. The sign is that one's urine appears to be more concentrated. Drink plenty of water.
199801.1449531663.txt.gz · Last modified: 2015/12/07 23:41 by tyreless