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199001 [2020/04/08 20:55]
rogerbrowne [Portrait of a climber]
199001 [2020/04/10 09:07]
rogerbrowne [Mount Cameron to Bell]
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 Two new members were admitted to the Club at the December Committee Meeting. They are Peter Sternhell and Ed Franklin. Their addresses and telephone numbers will be included in the new List of Members to be sent to members during February. Two new members were admitted to the Club at the December Committee Meeting. They are Peter Sternhell and Ed Franklin. Their addresses and telephone numbers will be included in the new List of Members to be sent to members during February.
-===== THE DECEMBER GENERAL  MEETING =====+===== The December General Meeting =====
  
 by Barry Wallace by Barry Wallace
-It was around 2018 when the President in the chair called the 20 or so members present to order and declared the meeting begun. There were apologies from Carol Bruce, John Porter and Jeff Niven and the call for new members brought Ed Franklin and one Paul Churcher from a + 
-previous meeting for welcome in the usual way. Peter Sternhell was called, and although he +It was around 2018 when the President in the chair called the 20 or so members present to order and declared the meeting begun. There were apologies from Carol Bruce, John Porter and Jeff Niven and the call for new members brought Ed Franklin and one Paul Churcher from a previous meeting for welcome in the usual way. Peter Sternhell was called, and although he was not present at that time he arrived later and was swooped upon and welcomed. 
-was not present at that time he arrived later and was swooped upon and welcomed.+
 The Minutes of the previous meeting were read and received, with no matters arising. The Minutes of the previous meeting were read and received, with no matters arising.
-Correspondence saw a letter from the Total Environment Centre, thanking us for our recent donation, from Ian Wolfe notifying us of some scheduled private walks in the mistaken belief that such notification was still required. We discontinued our personal accident cover some + 
-while back and our Public Liability cover is only applicable to direct club activities and +Correspondence saw a letter from the Total Environment Centre, thanking us for our recent donation, from Ian Wolfe notifying us of some scheduled private walks in the mistaken belief that such notification was still required. We discontinued our personal accident cover some while back and our Public Liability cover is only applicable to direct club activities and property. There was also a news release from the NSW Minister for the Environment and outgoing letters to our new members and to Gestetner, ordering the new duplicator/printer. 
-property. There was also a news release from the NSW Minister for the Environment and outgoing letters to our new members and to Gestetner, ordering the new duplicator/printer.+
 The Treasurer's Report indicated that we received income of $217.50, spent $562.99 and closed with a balance in the current account of $1,883.81. The Treasurer's Report indicated that we received income of $217.50, spent $562.99 and closed with a balance in the current account of $1,883.81.
-The Walks Report was presented from the chair, the Walks Secretary being absent, and this resulted in a few gaps in the reports as you shall read. The first weekend covered was that + 
-of 10,11,12 November. Barry Wallace led a party of 8 on his Bonnum Pic walk in indifferent +The Walks Report was presented from the chair, the Walks Secretary being absent, and this resulted in a few gaps in the reports as you shall read. The first weekend covered was that of 10,11,12 November. Barry Wallace led a party of 8 on his Bonnum Pic walk in indifferent weather with a few showers. Bob King had 6 on his Quiltys Mountain trip, reporting some rain, and difficulties in getting off the far side of Quiltys. Of the day walks Judy Mehaffey led her 21 intrepid walkers up the side of Sublime Point to morning tea at the cafe. They must have emerged eventually, as they reported rain in the rainforest later in the trip. There was no report of Peter Miller's mapping instructional, and Ian Debert's Mount Carrialoo trip suffered a similar fate. 
-weather with a few showers. Bob King had 6 on his Quilty'Mountain trip, reporting some + 
-rain, and difficulties in getting off the far side of Quiltyls. Of the day walks Judy Mehaffey led her 21 intrepid walkers up the side of Sublime Point to morning tea at the cafe. They must have emerged eventually, as they reported rain in the rainforest later in the trip. There was no report of Peter Miller's mapping instructional, and Ian Debert's Mount Carrialoo trip suffered a similar fate. +The weekend of 17,18,19 November saw Wayne Steele's Christy's Creek trip, led by Les Powell with a party of 4. They reported generally good weather with rain overnight on the Saturday. Jim Percy's Mount Stormbreaker, Kanangra Creek trip had 14 starters and was slightly re-routed away from Murdering Gully and up Mount Berry, due to the damp conditions. Of Alan Mewett's day trip to Gunderman Creek there was no report, but we are told that Peter Miller's Grand Canyon trip, led by Brian Hart had a complement of around 10. 
-The weekend of 17,18,19 November saw Wayne Steele's Christy's Creek trip, led by Les Powell with a party of 4. They reported generally good weather with rain overnight on the + 
-Saturday. Jim Percy's Mount Stormbreaker, Kanangra Creek trip had 14 starters and was slightly re-routed away from Murdering Gully and up Mount Berry, due to the damp conditions. Of Alan Mewett's day trip to Gunderman Creek there was no report, but we are told that Peter Miller's Grand Canyon trip, led by Brian Hart had a complement of around 10. +Ian Debert's canoe trip of 24,25,26 November went unreported, we trust they are not still adrift out there somewhere. Kenn Clacher had a mixed party of 18 on his family walk to the Cox. The weather was fine and a challenge cricket match revealed the not-too-surprising fact that if you spent your time bushwalking you are likely to be a lousy cricketer. The "others" won by a mile. (That's odd, I thought you scored runs, or maidens, or something in cricket.) Jeff McIntosh led a party of 5 or 6 on his Grose River trip, starting mid-Saturday, and Les Powell's day trip to Eleanor Beach went to program after some initial delays, courtesy of State Rail. There were 10 starters enjoying the dense wet scrub on Govett Ridge. They claim to have made it to Eleanor Beach and returned in time to catch the 1911 train. 
-Ian Debert's canoe trip of 24,25,26 November went unreported, we trust they are not + 
-still adrift out there somewhere. Kenn Clacher had a mixed party of 18 on his family walk to +Jan Mohandas called off his trip to the Kosciusko Main Range over the weekend of 1,2,3,4 December due to a persistence of snow in the walk area. Don Finch had a party of 6 on his Colo weekend trip, and Bob King led a party of 7 on his canyons trip. The instructional days had varying success. The Saturday rock climbing was cancelled due to a lack of starters, but the abseiling instructional on the Sunday saw a cast of thousands (well around 20) enjoying a pleasant day of mucking about with ropes. Maurie Bloom's bike trip went, led by George Mawer, with a party of 4. There was no report of Ralph Pengliss's Sydney Harbour National Park walk. 
-the Cox. The weather was fine and a challenge cricket match revealed the not-too-surprising + 
-fact that if you spent your time bushwalking you are likely to be a lousy cricketer. The +The weekend of 8,9,10 December saw Mike Reynolds and Ainslie Morris leading 5 starters on their Durras Lake walk. There was no report of Rudy Dezelin's Newport to Palm Beach trip, and although we were assured that Errol Sheedy's Deer Pool trip went, there were no details. This rather inconclusive note brought the Walks Report to an end. 
-"others" won by a mile. (That's odd, I thought you scored runs, or maidens, or something in + 
-cricket.) Jeff NcIntosh led a party of 5 or 6 on his Grose River trip, starting mid-Saturday, and Les Powell's day trip to Eleanor Beach went to program after some initial delays, +There was no F.B.W. Report, so it is probably not covered elsewhere in this magazine. The Social Secretary reported on the coming Christmas party. Too late!! It will all be long gone by the time you read this. Likewise the closure of the clubrooms during certain Wednesdays in December and January, and the beach barbecue at Obelisk Beach come mosquito feast. 
-courtesy of State Rail. There were 10 starters enjoying the dense wet scrub on Govett Ridge. +
-They claim to have made it to Eleanor Beach and returned in time to catch the 1911 train. +
-Jan Mohandas called off his trip to the Kosciusko Main Range over the weekend of +
-1,2,3,4 December due to a persistence of snow in the walk area. Don Finch had a party of 6 +
-on his Colo weekend trip, and Bob King led a party of 7 on his canyons trip. The instructional +
-days had varying success. The Saturday rock climbing was cancelled due to a lack of starters, but the abseiling instructional on the Sunday saw a cast of thousands (well around 20) +
-enjoying a pleasant day of mucking about with ropes. Maurie Bloom's bike trip went, led by +
-George Mawer, with a party of 4. There was no report of Ralph Pengliss's Sydney Harbour +
-National Park walk. +
-The weekend of 8,9,10 December saw Mike Reynolds and Ainslie Morris leading 5 starters +
-on their Durres Lake walk. There was no report of Rudy Dezelin's Newport to Palm Beach trip, +
-and although we were assured that Errol Sheedy's Deer Pool trip went, there were no details. This rather inconclusive note broughtthe Walks Report to an end. +
-Page 12 The Sydney Bushwalker January 1990 +
-There was no F.B.W. Report, so it is probably not covered elsewhere in this magazine. The Social Secretary reported on the coming Christmas party. Too late!! +
-It will all be long gone by the time you read this. Likewise the closure of the clubrooms during certain Wednesdays in December and January, and the beach barbecue at Obelisk Beach come mosquito feast.+
 The Conservation Report indicated progress in the Colong Foundation's efforts to have the Blue Mountains National Park given World Heritage listing. There was also mention of a letter from the Water Board to the Nattai Foundation cautioning them about track making activities within the catchment area. The Conservation Report indicated progress in the Colong Foundation's efforts to have the Blue Mountains National Park given World Heritage listing. There was also mention of a letter from the Water Board to the Nattai Foundation cautioning them about track making activities within the catchment area.
 +
 General Business brought a motion that we produce a S.B.W. songbook, with Don Finch as the sub-committee. This was passed. General Business brought a motion that we produce a S.B.W. songbook, with Don Finch as the sub-committee. This was passed.
 +
 The question of a venue for the next Re-union was resolved in favour of Coolana, despite some misgivings about the ticks. Don Finch was elected as convenor. The question of a venue for the next Re-union was resolved in favour of Coolana, despite some misgivings about the ticks. Don Finch was elected as convenor.
 +
 Oliver Crawford has advised of his resignation from the position of Membership Secretary. On the position being thrown open Barry Wallace volunteered and was duly accepted. Oliver Crawford has advised of his resignation from the position of Membership Secretary. On the position being thrown open Barry Wallace volunteered and was duly accepted.
-There was some discussion of a recent clean-up of a section of the Woronora River and a suggestion that the Club become more active in restoring fouled areas of the bush. In 
-the absence of a substantive motion debate lapsed. 
-During the course of the meeting an interlude of showing members' slides of recent walking trips occurred, and although these were greatly appreciated by the members present It did lengthen the time of the meeting. 
-After announcements the meeting closed at 2200. 
-* * * * * * * * * 
--... 
-- --.m..:-. ,- 
-- --.: ----.-zi. 
- a a 
- 
-- - , 
-row-. 1  
  
-0611  +There was some discussion of a recent clean-up of a section of the Woronora River and a suggestion that the Club become more active in restoring fouled areas of the bushIn the absence of substantive motion debate lapsed.
-ex70 +
-Why wait until the land begins to dry out? See it at its most spectacular. +
-So what if it rains, our rains are warm! Flowers and waterfalls are everywhere. And, if it seems bit warm for walking, drop your pack into the river and let it carry you away. +
-to +
-ALki. q$ 444 +
-- 406 +
-,sv Phone (089) 85 2134 +
-12 Carrington Street +
-Millner, NT 0810 +
-i.1 +
-'a +
- +
-,e +
-THE SYDNEY BU +
-265 VICTORIA ROAD GLADESV1LLE 211 +
-PHONE (02) 817 5590 HOURS - NON-Pla 9-5.30 +
-TIMES - 4-7 +
-SAT - 9-4 (PAM:NO AT RA*, OFF PITTWATER ROAD)226 PRINCES HIGHWAY KOCARAH BAY 2217 +
-PHONE (02) 546 5455 HOURS --NON-TR1 9-5.30 +
-THURS - 9-7 +
-SAT - 9-4 +
-A LARGE RANGE OF LIGHTWEIGHT, QUALITY, BUSHWALKING It CAMPING GEAR +
- LIGHTWEIGHT FOOD FOR BACKPACKERS AND CANOEISTS +
- COLD WEATHER PROTECTION CLOTHING AND RAINGEAR +
- MAPS, BOOKS AND LEAFLETS +
-a INFORmATioN SERVICE FOR CANOEISTS AND WALKERS +
- KNIVES  COMPASSES  SURVIVAL GEAR +
-WE STOCK THE LARGEST RANGE OF CANOEING GEAR IN N.S.W. +
-QUALm, TOURING CRAFT Of ALi TYPES HIGH QUALITY PERFORMANCE COMPETITION CRAFT +
- A HUGE RANGE OF PADDLES FOR ALL TYPES OF CANOEING  WETSUITS  SURF SKIS +
- ALL TYPES OF SPRAY COVERS  WIDE RANGE OF JACKETS & CAGS  FACE MASKS +
- FOOTWEAR  MANY TYPES OF BUOYANCY & LIFE VESTS  HELMETS +
-Page 14 The Sydney Bushwalker January 1990+
  
 +During the course of the meeting an interlude of showing members' slides of recent walking trips occurred, and although these were greatly appreciated by the members present it did lengthen the time of the meeting.
  
 +After announcements the meeting closed at 2200.
 ===== Mount Cameron to Bell ===== ===== Mount Cameron to Bell =====
  
-by David Rostron\\+by David Rostron 
 (First published in the magazine July 1982) (First published in the magazine July 1982)
  
-A study of maps is possibly the best way to become inspired about a new route (for us). This resulted in the programmed car swap trip for lst and 2nd May, from Mount Cameron to Mount Tootie with Don Finch and I leading the respectable "legs". However, after learning of the experience of others on the 30km ridge section, over the Maiden and Mt. Mistake to the Colo (thick scrub, no views, 13 ridge junctions and one-mile-an-hour country) we decided to proceed as per programme only if the area had been burnt in the 1979 fires. When subsequently travelling by plane to Dubbo on two occasions I determined that the area had not been burnt and it was obvious that the trip would be "hard work". I walk to enjoy myself and I believe this is also Don's philosophy. Not for us the foolish belief quoted by many: "The greater the suffering, the greater the trip". Don readily agreed to a change of route - from Mt. Cameron to Mt. Wilson - but later considered Mt. Cameron to Bell would be the ideal trip. He felt the crossings of the canyons and creeks would provide sufficient "sport".+A study of maps is possibly the best way to become inspired about a new route (for us). This resulted in the programmed car swap trip for lst and 2nd May, from Mount Cameron to Mount Tootie with Don Finch and I leading the respectable "legs". However, after learning of the experience of others on the 30km ridge section, over the Maiden and Mt. Mistake to the Colo (thick scrub, no views, 13 ridge junctions and one-mile-an-hour country) we decided to proceed as per programme only if the area had been burnt in the 1979 fires. 
 + 
 +When subsequently travelling by plane to Dubbo on two occasions I determined that the area had not been burnt and it was obvious that the trip would be "hard work". I walk to enjoy myself and I believe this is also Don's philosophy. Not for us the foolish belief quoted by many: "The greater the suffering, the greater the trip". Don readily agreed to a change of route - from Mt. Cameron to Mt. Wilson - but later considered Mt. Cameron to Bell would be the ideal trip. He felt the crossings of the canyons and creeks would provide sufficient "sport".
  
 On the Wednesday night before the trip we had eight starters, but then Tony Marshall dropped out with a virus and Pat Harrison didn't appreciate the route change. So David Martin, Bob Hodgson, Don Finch, Spiro Hajinakitas, Barrie Murdoch and I, plus three vehicles, convened at Bell at 8.30 pm on Friday night. One vehicle was left at Bell, and we headed off along the maze of roads on the Newnes Plateau. After more than a few false leads (Don, of course, was navigating at this stage - allegedly on reliable information) we found the Mt. Cameron fire trail. After a few km we were stopped by a badly rutted hill. On the Wednesday night before the trip we had eight starters, but then Tony Marshall dropped out with a virus and Pat Harrison didn't appreciate the route change. So David Martin, Bob Hodgson, Don Finch, Spiro Hajinakitas, Barrie Murdoch and I, plus three vehicles, convened at Bell at 8.30 pm on Friday night. One vehicle was left at Bell, and we headed off along the maze of roads on the Newnes Plateau. After more than a few false leads (Don, of course, was navigating at this stage - allegedly on reliable information) we found the Mt. Cameron fire trail. After a few km we were stopped by a badly rutted hill.
  
-We had known it was not possible to drive past Natural Bridge, but this meant a further 2km on the 9km we had intended to walk that night. For me it was two hours of mental torment along a fire trail we did not know and with partial moon for only the first hour. I had the sensation of being on a treadmill - our surroundings didn't seem to change. After two hours we began the slight climb to the basalt cap of Mt. Cameron. With the change in vegetation there was a different aroma evident. There was the usual luxuriant grass on the cap which provided an ideal campsite.+We had known it was not possible to drive past Natural Bridge, but this meant a further 2 km on the 9 km we had intended to walk that night. For me it was two hours of mental torment along a fire trail we did not know and with partial moon for only the first hour. I had the sensation of being on a treadmill - our surroundings didn't seem to change. After two hours we began the slight climb to the basalt cap of Mt. Cameron. With the change in vegetation there was a different aroma evident. There was the usual luxuriant grass on the cap which provided an ideal campsite.
  
-The next morning we were up at 5.45 am and away by 7.05 am. We followed the fire trail over the cap until it turned east and we then headed south-west.+The next morning we were up at 5.45 am and away by 7.05 am. We followed the fire trail over the cap until it turned east and we then headed south-west. The map indicated a perfect route down to Nayook Creek at 535117 and an easy ridge up the other side. When 400m away the route down and up looked ideal. However, when almost on the creek 15-20 metre cliffs on both sides were evident. We headed west for 300 metres but there were no apparent routes, So it was back to the ridge top and along a south-west ridge for a possible crossing opposite a creek at 524107. Again the map indicated the route as feasible.
  
-The map indicated perfect route down to Nayook Creek at 535117 and an easy ridge up the other sideWhen 400m away the route down and up looked ideal. However, when almost on the creek 15-20 metre cliffs on both sides were evident. We headed west for 300m but there were no apparent routes. So it was back to the ridge top and along a SW ridge for a possible crossing opposite a creek at 524107. Again the map indicated the route as feasible.+When dropping off the ridge we had to negotiate a rocky ramp and then causeway 40 metres long and 2 metres wide at 524112We were able to drop off the causeway but when above the creek there were still 15 metre cliffs. We eventually found a gully down at 523108 and then a route through the cliffs on the other sideHowever, the diversions had cost us 1½ hours, so it was head down and tail up for the next 6 km and 1½ hours south across the plateau.
  
-When dropping off the ridge we had to negotiate a rocky ramp and then a causeway 40m long and 2m wide at 524112We were able to drop off the causeway but when above the creek there were still 15m cliffsWe eventually found gully down at 523108 and then a route through the cliffs on the other side. However, the diversions had cost us 1.5 hours, so it was head down and tail up for the next 6km and 1.5 hours south across the plateau.+We carried water for lunch and this was enjoyed at 507076 with extensive views to the southMt. Wilson was visible, many km to the south-eastLunch was brief affair of 35 minutes and then it was west for 1 km across the ridge top before heading south again towards Derailment Hill and, we hoped, a route to North Bungleboori Creek.
  
-We carried water for lunch and this was enjoyed at 507076 with extensive views to the south. Mt. Wilson was visible, many km to the SE. Lunch was a brief affair of 35 minutes and then it was west for 1 km across the ridge top before heading south again towards Derailment Hill and, we hoped, a route to North Bungleboori Creek. +After passing over Derailment Hill the route ahead had the appearance of a bushwalkers' minefield - cliffs, gendarmes, etc. We decided to descend to the creek to the west and follow it south to Bungleboori Creek. However it was about an hour later that we finally reached the first creek after negotiating gullys, chimneys and faces as well as exploring about four other possible routes.
- +
-After passing over Derailment Hill the route ahead had the appearance of a bushwalkers' minefield - cliffs, gendarmes, etc. We decided to descend to the creek to the west and follow it south to Bungleboori Creek. Howeverit was about an hour later that we finally reached the first creek after negotiating gulleys, chimneys and faces as well as exploring about four other possible routes.+
  
 The floor of the valley was slow going with heavy growth, but eventually we crossed Bungleboori at 493045 and then had afternoon tea. We decided to carry water just in case we didn't make South Bungleboori Creek before nightfall. We headed south up the ridge to reach a fire trail at 491035. David Martin had been troubled by a knee problem and decided to retire at this point - to try to find his car via the fire trail maze. The floor of the valley was slow going with heavy growth, but eventually we crossed Bungleboori at 493045 and then had afternoon tea. We decided to carry water just in case we didn't make South Bungleboori Creek before nightfall. We headed south up the ridge to reach a fire trail at 491035. David Martin had been troubled by a knee problem and decided to retire at this point - to try to find his car via the fire trail maze.
  
-Five of us then followed fire trails for 3 km - first SW and then SE and turned off south at 492018. Bob had walked along this part of the route before and was confident about finding a pass down to South Bungleboori Creek. We traversed a ridge to a cliff top about 100m above the creek at 496004 and then tried a number of gullies before finally reaching the creek just on dusk.+Five of us then followed fire trails for 3 km - first south-west and then south-east and turned off south at 492018. Bob had walked along this part of the route before and was confident about finding a pass down to South Bungleboori Creek. We traversed a ridge to a cliff top about 100m above the creek at 496004 and then tried a number of gullies before finally reaching the creek just on dusk.
  
-First impressions of the creek were that there would be no 5-star campsite that night. Bob was optimistic about a possible site 200m downstream, but to reach it took another 10 minutes. Well - it was about half-star rating. We had to clear sites for adjoining flies and then the fire on sand amongst fallen trees. The location was typical of the creeks in this area - 40m cliffs on both sides.+First impressions of the creek were that there would be no 5-star campsite that night. Bob was optimistic about a possible site 200 metres downstream, but to reach it took another 10 minutes. Well - it was about ½-star rating. We had to clear sites for adjoining flies and then the fire on sand amongst fallen trees. The location was typical of the creeks in this area - 40 metre cliffs on both sides.
  
-Next morning saw a later start at 7.30 am and then it was up ledges and cracks at 497003 with some rope work to emerge on top of the Western Arthurs (named by Bob on a previous trip). These are rocky tors extending over 2 km and provided some interesting scrambling and route-finding with good views. We headed west over these tops for about lkm and then it was south again over a high valley to the next ridge top. We crossed this and followed a ridge south - more scrambling - and then it was down a pass at 490985 which Bob had used before. We followed the creek south to North Dumbano Creek, which we crossed at 493978. It was then time for morning tea. Dumbano Creek at this point has only small cliff lines - 5m to 10m with numerous breaks.+Next morning saw a later start at 7.30 am and then it was up ledges and cracks at 497003 with some rope work to emerge on top of the Western Arthurs (named by Bob on a previous trip). These are rocky tors extending over 2 km and provided some interesting scrambling and route-finding with good views.
  
-We had contemplated visiting Wollangambe Crater but the ridge from Wollangambe River to Bell - about 7 km - was still an unknown quantity. We decided to continue by the easiest route to the river. We crossed the marshy area of South Dumbano Creek at 498966 and then followed a ridge SW to the Schay Ridge Fire Trail. A gallop along the trail for 4 km to the end was followed by open ridge walking and then a drop of about 100m to the Wollangambe. This was reached by a series of ledges and gullies at 505928.+We headed west over these tops for about lkm and then it was south again over a high valley to the next ridge top. We crossed this and followed a ridge south - more scrambling - and then it was down a pass at 490985 which Bob had used before. We followed the creek south to North Dumbano Creek, which we crossed at 493978. It was then time for morning tea. Dumbano Creek at this point has only small cliff lines - 5 m to 10 m with numerous breaks. 
 + 
 +We had contemplated visiting Wollangambe Crater but the ridge from Wollangambe River to Bell - about 7 km - was still an unknown quantity. We decided to continue by the easiest route to the river. We crossed the marshy area of South Dumbano Creek at 498966 and then followed a ridge SW to the Shay Ridge Fire Trail. A gallop along the trail for 4 km to the end was followed by open ridge walking and then a drop of about 100m to the Wollangambe. This was reached by a series of ledges and gullies at 505928.
  
 The lunch that followed was the most relaxed meal of the trip. We had the luxury of a fire in cool sunshine. The route up the other side looked reasonable and, from what we could see of the ridge to the Bell Road, our hopes for a easy final 10 km were rising.  The lunch that followed was the most relaxed meal of the trip. We had the luxury of a fire in cool sunshine. The route up the other side looked reasonable and, from what we could see of the ridge to the Bell Road, our hopes for a easy final 10 km were rising.
Line 349: Line 298:
 Then we were on the road on the north side of the rail line with 3 km to Bell. Foolishly we let Don set the pace. Whereas normal fit walkers are capable of 5,000 rpm Don appears to have 6,000 rpm available. With my longer legs I was just able to match his walking speed, but Spiro and Bob were periodically jogging whilst Barrie jogged all the way to keep up. Then we were on the road on the north side of the rail line with 3 km to Bell. Foolishly we let Don set the pace. Whereas normal fit walkers are capable of 5,000 rpm Don appears to have 6,000 rpm available. With my longer legs I was just able to match his walking speed, but Spiro and Bob were periodically jogging whilst Barrie jogged all the way to keep up.
  
-I think we all hoped to put on a final spurt for the last 150m up a hill to Bell, and overtake Don, but he started running before we did and all we could do was chew his dustIt was 4.15 pm and the end of a great exploratory trip.+I think we all hoped to put on a final spurt for the last 150 metres up a hill to Bell, and overtake Don, but he started running before we did and all we could do was chew his dustIt was 4.15 pm and the end of a great exploratory trip.
  
 I should add that the area around Mt Cameron was not burnt in the 1979 fires. These fires apparently extended to Nayook Creek, about 3 km south of Mt Cameron. There has been considerable regrowth since but the walking through most of the area is straightforward - there is no dense scrub to push through. Views are mainly restricted by low eucalypts which have recovered to an amazing degree. Throughout the area the waratahs, compared to most parts of the mountains, are prolific. An early spring walk would be a delight. I should add that the area around Mt Cameron was not burnt in the 1979 fires. These fires apparently extended to Nayook Creek, about 3 km south of Mt Cameron. There has been considerable regrowth since but the walking through most of the area is straightforward - there is no dense scrub to push through. Views are mainly restricted by low eucalypts which have recovered to an amazing degree. Throughout the area the waratahs, compared to most parts of the mountains, are prolific. An early spring walk would be a delight.
  
  
-* * * * * * * * * +===== Federation notes ===== 
-Page 16 the Sydney Bushwalker January 1990 +
-FEDERATION NOTES+
 Federation Meeting Place. From 16/1/90 the Federation will meet in Demountable Classroom No.4, Federation Meeting Place. From 16/1/90 the Federation will meet in Demountable Classroom No.4,
 Burwood Primary School, Conder Street, Burwood. Burwood Primary School, Conder Street, Burwood.
199001.txt · Last modified: 2020/04/10 09:33 by rogerbrowne