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195608 [2018/09/24 02:59]
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195608 [2018/09/25 04:04]
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-SINK OR SWIM WITH Tilt ADMIRAL +===== Sink Or Swim With The Admiral. ===== 
-- Dot Butler ​IT WAS ALL THE ADMIRAL'S FAULT+ 
-The gods who shape the course ​of4man ​sat together on Mt. OlYmpus locking down on the 15 unsuspecting individuals who had embarked on the Admiral'​s Paralyser trip. 'It's time we had some fun,"they rumbled, rubbing their hands togetherin ​anticipation. +- Dot Butler 
-The Admiral was very cocky right from the start; Garth was on time at the Hyde Post Office, I was on time at Hyde station with the down train, Brian was on time with the up train. Despite a last- minute dash of packing Stan was not late to pick us up and we drove an towards Parramatta collecting a waiting Dawn, aad Vivian was on time at Parramatta station. "This is faatastic,"​ crowed the Admiral. "This is the first time a trip of mine has gone according to schedule!' ​"​Don'​t speak too soon," we warned him. (The gods winked and moved + 
-in their seats. "Not yet," they smirked - Not yetl") +=== It was all the Admiral's fault=== 
-We made good time and reached Katoomba by 9 , and there was our hired bus waiting to take us on to Kanangra just as soon as the train should arrive with the rest of the party. The Admiral glowed visibly (and audibly) at this further sign of his good management. Stan shot off down Lurline St. and parked his car at Snow's parents'​ house and was back in a quarter of an hour as the train was due in at 9.15. Then we settled ourselves into the bus to await the ,..thrs And we waited ​andwaited.....and waited. By about 10.15 Garth could stand the suspense no longer and went over and asked the Station Master the reason for the delay. "An overhead bridge at Linden has subsided due to an explosion and the engines can't fit through,"​ said the Station Master. "​They'​re shunting the carriages through and some engines will be sent down from this end to fetch them on their way. It'll take a couple of hours."​ Garth came back and reported the matter + 
-The Admiral'​s self-esteem had been undergoing a bout of slow deflation, but now he perked up again as a bright thought struck him. "IT WAS ALL GARTH'S FAUIT!" he shouted. "He shouldn'​t have thrown that bottle of gin out the window at Linden. He's blown up the bridge':​. ​"What bottle of gin?" asked Garth in surprise. "​What ​boitle ​of gin:" echoed the Admiral derisively, in a tone of voice which implied "​Don'​t try and put that one over us; we're not suckers"​ +The gods who shape the course ​of man sat together on Mt. OlYmpus locking down on the 15 unsuspecting individuals who had embarked on the Admiral'​s Paralyser trip. "It's time we had some fun," they rumbled, rubbing their hands together in anticipation. 
-Nothing for it but to get into our sleeping bags and, lying down on the long seats of the bus, try to get some sleep. + 
-("So far so good," grinned the gods. "​Now ​that else?"​) +The Admiral was very cocky right from the start; Garth was on time at the Hyde Post Office, I was on time at Hyde station with the down train, Brian was on time with the up train. Despite a last-minute dash of packing Stan was not late to pick us up and we drove on towards Parramatta collecting a waiting Dawn, and Vivian was on time at Parramatta station. "This is faatastic,"​ crowed the Admiral. "This is the first time a trip of mine has gone according to schedule!" ​"​Don'​t speak too soon," we warned him. (The gods winked and moved in their seats. "Not yet," they smirked - Not yet!") 
-,out midnight the others arrived. We made room for them and the reluctant driver moved off on the long journey to -Morong Creek which we reached about 3 a.m. "​Don'​t let's make it too easy farthe4 ​murmured Hughie, so he generously scattered the landscape with patches of snow to greet us on arrival."​Huh,"​ said we, not particularly + 
-abashed by this joke as snow is really very pleasant stuff. Some of us threw some bark under a bush and crept in, and some put up tents, and we had 4 or 5 hours sleep. +We made good time and reached Katoomba by 9, and there was our hired bus waiting to take us on to Kanangra just as soon as the train should arrive with the rest of the party. The Admiral glowed visibly (and audibly) at this further sign of his good management. Stan shot off down Lurline St. and parked his car at Snow's parents'​ house and was back in a quarter of an hour as the train was due in at 9.15. Then we settled ourselves into the bus to await the others. And we waited... and waited.... and waited. By about 10.15 Garth could stand the suspense no longer and went over and asked the Station Master the reason for the delay. "An overhead bridge at Linden has subsided due to an explosion and the engines can't fit through,"​ said the Station Master. "​They'​re shunting the carriages through and some engines will be sent down from this end to fetch them on their way. It'll take a couple of hours."​ Garth came back and reported the matter
-Breakfast and away by 8.30. Whether by good luck or good management I can't say, but by use of maps and compasses and a half-conscious + 
-17. +The Admiral'​s self-esteem had been undergoing a bout of slow deflation, but now he perked up again as a bright thought struck him. "__It was all Garth's fault__!" he shouted. "He shouldn'​t have thrown that bottle of gin out the window at Linden. He's blown up the bridge!" ​"What bottle of gin?" asked Garth in surprise. "​What ​bottle ​of gin!" echoed the Admiral derisively, in a tone of voice which implied "​Don'​t try and put __that__ ​one over us; we're not suckers!" Nothing for it but to get into our sleeping bags and, lying down on the long seats of the bus, try to get some sleep. ("So far so good," grinned the gods. "​Now ​what else?"​) 
-awareness of where the sun was through the mist we got successfully on to Paralyser ridge. We trailed along in the blurring mist. + 
-"I like this," remarked Garth to anyone ​Who was there to hear, " - the mist opening up on a little world and closing behind it...",​ and I pondered the poetry of that remark for the next four miles. +About midnight the others arrived. We made room for them and the reluctant driver moved off on the long journey to Morong Creek which we reached about 3 a.m. "​Don'​t let's make it too easy for them," ​murmured Hughie, so he generously scattered the landscape with patches of snow to greet us on arrival. "​Huh,"​ said we, not particularly abashed by this joke as snow is really very pleasant stuff. Some of us threw some bark under a bush and crept in, and some put up tents, and we had 4 or 5 hours sleep. 
-We found the bulldozed track where they brought out the crashed plane and followed it, aad then continued on without eventualities to Cyclops. At this stage we were all together, but going slowly as + 
-Dawn and her friend Vivian were beginning to tire. We pieced together the story of Vivian'​s presence amongst us. It went like this: The Admiral'​s little friend, ​Dam, had asked could she bring along someone who had done a previous bushwalk and thought she could do the trip. ("You see," said the Admiral, "IT WAS ALL DAWN'S FAULT") The Admiral warned her the trip might be tough, but agreed, so having hired a sleeping bag and a large framed pack from Paddy the two girls filled it up and poor unsuspecting Vivian'​s frail little craft was allowed to be launched in the protective shadow of the Admiral'​s flagship. (Oh, Admiral, how truly it is said, "When love flies in the window +Breakfast and away by 8.30. Whether by good luck or good management I can't say, but by use of maps and compasses and a half-conscious awareness of where the sun was through the mist we got successfully on to Paralyser ridge. We trailed along in the blurring mist. "I like this," remarked Garth to anyone ​who was there to hear, " - the mist opening up on a little world and closing behind it...",​ and I pondered the poetry of that remark for the next four miles. 
-judgement flies out the door."​) As to Vivian'​s experience, it + 
-turned out that the only other trip theI,​-or ​lass had ever done was +We found the bulldozed track where they brought out the crashed plane and followed it, and then continued on without eventualities to Cyclops. At this stage we were all together, but going slowly as Dawn and her friend Vivian were beginning to tire. We pieced together the story of Vivian'​s presence amongst us. It went like this: The Admiral'​s little friend, ​Dawn, had asked could she bring along someone who had done a previous bushwalk and thought she could do the trip. ("You see," said the Admiral, "__It was all Dawn's fault__!") The Admiral warned her the trip might be tough, but agreed, so having hired a sleeping bag and a large framed pack from Paddy the two girls filled it up and poor unsuspecting Vivian'​s frail little craft was allowed to be launched in the protective shadow of the Admiral'​s flagship. (Oh, Admiral, how truly it is said, "When love flies in the window judgement flies out the door."​) As to Vivian'​s experience, it turned out that the only other trip the poor lass had ever done was from __Audley to Waterfall__!!! 
-from IfiEJ22,​7_12_221211111111 + 
-At Paralyser trig we all assembled about mid-day. Here my fatal optimism got the better of me and to cheer Vivian up I told her all her troubles were nearly over - indeed we were almost there (with a little stretch of the imagination on our part); all we had to do now was to drop down a spur to the Kanangra Creek/River junction for lunch, then amble down creek a couple of miles in the afternoon to Kanangra Clearing where we would camp fcr the night. Then next day a delightful loaf up the Cox to Breakfast Creek and home the easy way via Devil'​s Hole or Nelly'​s Glen. It all sounded so simple. Poor Vivian. +At Paralyser trig we all assembled about mid-day. Here my fatal optimism got the better of me and to cheer Vivian up I told her all her troubles were nearly over - indeed we were almost there (with a little stretch of the imagination on our part); all we had to do now was to drop down a spur to the Kanangra Creek/River junction for lunch, then amble down creek a couple of miles in the afternoon to Kanangra Clearing where we would camp for the night. Then next day a delightful loaf up the Cox to Breakfast Creek and home the easy way via Devil'​s Hole or Nelly'​s Glen. It all sounded so simple. Poor Vivian. 
-With the Junction in sight, half the party bashed ahead to get a lunch fire.going, leaving the leader to follow at a slower pace with the others. The vanguard were just shooting off on the wrong spur when Garth recognised the right one and we called the Madden crowd back. But no TO retrace their steps a hundred yards would be too great an effort - they would go down their spur. The result was Garth and I were down at the junction at 1.30 and it was well over half an hour before the Madden group showed up after a mile or so extra along the ridge and fighting their way down the overgrown creek. + 
-By 3 o'​clock all the early arrivals had finished lunch but we were still minus the others. But now into our peaceful midst crashed numerous ​bode declaring hotly that IT WAS ALL SNOW'S FAULT! He had set off with them down one cpur, which wasn't the rightone, admitted his blunder and returned, to go down another. The Admiral, ​shepherdint ​his harem along, followed. His blood pressure was just sinking to normal after his ire at having been led down a wrong ridge when Snow's voice came quavering up from below, "​Admiral,​ I've blundered again" About turn. Back up again with an anxious eye on Vivian and Dawn who by this time were visably wilting, and off on a third attempt. This brought Snow's gang into our midstbut it was some time before the volcanic Admiral put in an appearance. ​AND WHERE THE HELL IS +With the Junction in sight, half the party bashed ahead to get a lunch fire going, leaving the leader to follow at a slower pace with the others. The vanguard were just shooting off on the wrong spur when Garth recognised the right one and we called the Madden crowd back. But no! To retrace their steps a hundred yards would be too great an effort - they would go down their spur. The result was Garth and I were down at the junction at 1.30 and it was well over half an hour before the Madden group showed up after a mile or so extra along the ridge and fighting their way down the overgrown creek. 
-ERNIE? He had been with the Admiral ten minutes ​bacon the ridge, + 
-18. +By 3 o'​clock all the early arrivals had finished lunch but we were still minus the others. But now into our peaceful midst crashed numerous ​bods declaring hotly that __it was all Snow's fault__! He had set off with them down one spur, which wasn't the right one, admitted his blunder and returned, to go down another. The Admiral, ​shepherding ​his harem along, followed. His blood pressure was just sinking to normal after his ire at having been led down a wrong ridge when Snow's voice came quavering up from below, "​Admiral,​ I've blundered again!" About turn. Back up again with an anxious eye on Vivian and Dawn who by this time were visably wilting, and off on a third attempt. This brought Snow's gang into our midstbut it was some time before the volcanic Admiral put in an appearance... __and where the hell is Ernie__? He had been with the Admiral ten minutes ​back on the ridge, but now? Odearodearodear! ​(So __it was all Ernie's fault__, ​huh?) The Admiral wiped his fevered brow and decided ​to camp right where he was and collect Ernie, then come on and join us at Kanangra Clearing by 8 o'​clock tomorrow. So the rest of us pushed off to Kanangra Clearing, which took little over an hourhad tea and a short session ​round the camp fire till the rain started, then hit the bracken and didn't wake up till 7 a.m. 
-but now? Odearodearodearl ​(So IT WAS ALL ERNIE'S FAULT huh?) The Admiral wiped his fevered brow-E17-Te-cided ​to camp right there + 
-he was and collect Ernie, then come on and join us at Kanangra Clearing by 8 o'​clock tomorrow. So the rest of us pushed off to Kanangra Clearing, which took little over an hour had tea and a short session ​7?​ound ​the campfire till the rain started,then hit the bracken and didn't wake up till 7 a.m. +No sign of the rear party by 8, so off pushed Jack Perry who had been up and warbling round the breakfast fire since crack of dawn. No sign by 9. At 9.15 action seemed to be called for. Stan and Snow would burn through to Katoomba and bring Stan's car back to Megalong ​Post Office for the Admiral'​s halt and lame. The rest of the party would go with them except Garth and I who would run back and take the girls' packs and see what was delaying the Admiral - perhaps a search party for Ernie was on the cards. However we hadn't gone very far when whom should we see but good old Ern himself plodding through the white water down the centre of the stream and giving the uncaring air the benefit of his opinions. "Hi there, Ernie!"​ we called, whereupon the flow of his imprecations becare more audible.... "fine b-- trip! Four b-- parties and not a b-- one of them knows what the b-- other is doing!" 
-No sign of the rear party by 8, so off pushed Jack Perry who had been up and warbling round the breakfast fire since crack of dawn. No sign by 9. At 9.15 action seemed to be called for. Stan and Snow would burn through to Katoomba and bring Stan's car back to Masalong ​Post Office for the Admiral'​s halt and lame. The rest of the party would go with them except Garth and I who would run back and take the girls' packs and sec 'what was delaying the Admiral - perhaps a search party for Ernie was an the cards. However we hadn't gone very far when whom should we see but good old Ern himself plodding through the white water down the centre of the stream and giving the uncaring air the benefit of his opinions. "Hi there, Ernie!"​ we called, whereupon the flow of his imprecations'becare more audible ​...... "fine b-- trips Four b-- parties and not a b-- one of them knows what the b-- other is doing:+ 
-"Did you meet up with the Admiral,"​ we asked. Yes, he had, and had left them back yonder still having breakfast. So we brought Ernie up to date on the movements of the rest of the nob and despatched him in pursuit, and continued back. Hal Here at last is the valiant Anderson leading his party from behind with a vengeance. We took the girls' packs and trotted back through the rain to Kanangra Clearing. By now it was after 109 I kept Vivian'​s great heavy unweildy pack and gave her my light one, and Garth made it even lighter and took some of Dawn's weight as well, and so we began to tick off the long miles up the Cox. +"Did you meet up with the Admiral,"​ we asked. Yes, he had, and had left them back yonder still having breakfast. So we brought Ernie up to date on the movements of the rest of the mob and despatched him in pursuit, and continued back. Ha! Here at last is the valiant Anderson leading his party from behind with a vengeance. We took the girls' packs and trotted back through the rain to Kanangra Clearing. By now it was after 10. I kept Vivian'​s great heavy unweildy pack and gave her my light one, and Garth made it even lighter and took some of Dawn's weight as well, and so we began to tick off the long miles up the Cox. 
-You know, when you pound along the banks behind steam-engines like say Putt and Stitt and Wagc and Arnie the distance between Breakfast Creek and Kanangra River is a mere nothing - it hardly registers. But when yau_ glance behind and see someone crawling on hands and knees over the boulders it comes as a tremendous shock. But no complaining from Vivian - poor little game little wench - just a timid request, "Would you mind not going too fast in front, Dot, I want to sec where you put your feet." (II!) + 
-The rain, though not particularly heavy, had been steady and continuous, and as the already saturated ground could hold no more, the river gradually rose. However we crossed the Cox without undue qualms. On the level cowpads the Admiral stopped to rest the girls and we others kept moving, and at 1.30 behold Breakfast Creek. Garth dumped his hea'​vy ​pack and promptly went back to take the girls' while Ernie and I, with dry wood from the inside of a fallen tree, plus Ernie'​s tapers and much blowing, eventually got a fire going in the rain. No fears of being unable to get through that night had entered our minds. It would take a couple of hours to reach CanonsWhich we could easily do before dark if we didn't waste time over lunch, then the bit of road walk to Megalong would present no problems even though it were dark, and Stan should be there by 7 o'​clock with the car and drive us home in comfort. Thus we reasoned. (The gods on +You know, when you pound along the banks behind steam-engines like say Putt and Stitt and Wagg and Arnie the distance between Breakfast Creek and Kanangra River is a mere nothing - it hardly registers. But when you glance behind and see someone crawling on hands and knees over the boulders it comes as a tremendous shock. But no complaining from Vivian - poor little game little wench - just a timid request, "Would you mind not going too fast in front, Dot, I want to see where you put your feet." (!!!) 
-19. + 
-Mt. Olympus roared with laughter. "What a long time it takes for some people to wake upl" they Chortled.) +The rain, though not particularly heavy, had been steady and continuous, and as the already saturated ground could hold no more, the river gradually rose. However we crossed the Cox without undue qualms. On the level cowpads the Admiral stopped to rest the girls and we others kept moving, and at 1.30 behold Breakfast Creek. Garth dumped his heavy pack and promptly went back to take the girls' while Ernie and I, with dry wood from the inside of a fallen tree, plus Ernie'​s tapers and much blowing, eventually got a fire going in the rain. No fears of being unable to get through that night had entered our minds. It would take a couple of hours to reach Carlonswhich we could easily do before dark if we didn't waste time over lunch, then the bit of road walk to Megalong would present no problems even though it were dark, and Stan should be there by 7 o'​clock with the car and drive us home in comfort. Thus we reasoned. (The gods on Mt. Olympus roared with laughter. "What a long time it takes for some people to wake up!" they chortled.) 
-When at length Garth showed up with Dawn's pack, the girls behind him mad a worried Admiral whipper-in, it was after 2, and by the time lunch had been consumed and bandages and sticking-plaster applied it was twenty to 4 before we started. ( For the first time I began to suspect that that low rumbling in the sky wasn't thunder but laughter.) + 
-The 34 crossings (or whatever it is) of Breakfast Creek got' ​hairier and hairier as we proceeded. Rain continued to fall and the steep escarpments either side of the creek poured down their hundred and one contributing watercourses till eventually we found we could not make the crossings singly. So Garth organised us into a line and with arms linked New Zealand fashion we made all subsequent crossings, Garth breaking the force of the water upstream and the rest of ,us +When at length Garth showed up with Dawn's pack, the girls behind him and a worried Admiral whipper-in, it was after 2, and by the time lunch had been consumed and bandages and sticking-plaster applied it was twenty to 4 before we started. (For the first time I began to suspect that that low rumbling in the sky wasn't thunder but laughter.) 
-sheltering in his wake with the Admiral as backstop. When he was in to his Waist we knew that the flood was up to Dawn's shoulders, and + 
-Oh Dean i Don't even think of the sodden packs end clothes and sleeping ​bags: +The 34 crossings (or whatever it is) of Breakfast Creek got hairier and hairier as we proceeded. Rain continued to fall and the steep escarpments either side of the creek poured down their hundred and one contributing watercourses till eventually we found we could not make the crossings singly. So Garth organised us into a line and with arms linked New Zealand fashion we made all subsequent crossings, Garth breaking the force of the water upstream and the rest of us sheltering in his wake with the Admiral as backstop. When he was in to his waist we knew that the flood was up to Dawn's shoulders, and Oh Dear! Don't even think of the sodden packs and clothes and sleeping ​bags1 
-Instead of getting shallower, as we-got higher up the crossings got deeper. Garth would test them first, and when he found them above his waist he would pronounce them too dangerous without a rope so we would make heroic sidles ​Up the.side.....aad Time laughed up his sleeve as the hours slid swiftly by. We had only just passed ​apple Tree Flat and here it was a quarter to fiVe. Less than half an hourof daylight ​gad many more miles yet to go. Ernie'​s face waS a blood- streaked mess from having ​,fallen face first on a sharp rock, and t1 girls had completely ​subMerged ​on several occasions. We knew we couldn'​t ​g6t them through the:river crossings in the dark, so....back to Apple Tree Flat and camp for the night. + 
-The low-lying part of the flatwas seVeral ​inches under water. We went up to higher ground and the two tents up and lit a fire and Spent about 4 hours In the rain dr7ing ​out cl.-Ithes ​and sleeping bags, and cooking up half a billy of rice and dried apples and sultanaE ​which luckily our provident leader still had left in his food tins. Our hydrologist went down to the creek and stuck up a measuring ​Stick in the bank, then we crawled into our limited quarters and slept while the flood roared and the rain tapped a staccato on the tent roof mad its walls got wetter and wetter and More eager to transfer their burden of water to our sleeping bags. +Instead of getting shallower, as we got higher up the crossings got deeper. Garth would test them first, and when he found them above his waist he would pronounce them too dangerous without a rope so we would make heroic sidles ​up the side.... ​and Time laughed up his sleeve as the hours slid swiftly by. We had only just passed ​Apple Tree Flat and here it was a quarter to five. Less than half an hour of daylight ​and many more miles yet to go. Ernie'​s face was a blood-streaked mess from having fallen face first on a sharp rock, and the girls had completely ​submerged ​on several occasions. We knew we couldn'​t ​get them through the river crossings in the dark, so.... back to Apple Tree Flat and camp for the night. 
-Next morning we crawled out and cooked up half a cup of oatmeal and put on it the last of our milk powder and sugar, than packed our wet tents and off again to the flood. Why harrow you with the rest of it? Garth'​s measuring stick had been washed away, Which meant the water was even higher, so we kept mainly to bluff sidling and eventual- ​ ly came to CarlenTs ​creek. ​It, thetop of the steep pull into GazIons eve. findgood old tirkid ​Ernie,infected by Garth'​s selflessness,​ dropping his pack and going back dawn for Dawns. So to Carlon'​s by + 
-1 pm,It appeared Jim Brown, Dot Barr and.Geof Broadhead had got to Canon'​s after dark the previous evening. Jim had gone on but the Other two had spent the night with the Canons ​and had left only about an hour ago. Snow and Stan and the rest of the gang had been first +The low-lying part of the flat was several ​inches under water. We went up to higher ground and got the two tents up and lit a fire and spent about 4 hours in the rain drying ​out clothes ​and sleeping bags, and cooking up half a billy of rice and dried apples and sultanas ​which luckily our provident leader still had left in his food tins. Our hydrologist went down to the creek and stuck up a measuring ​stick in the bank, then we crawled into our limited quarters and slept while the flood roared and the rain tapped a staccato on the tent roof and its walls got wetter and wetter and more eager to transfer their burden of water to our sleeping bags. 
-20. + 
-there at 4 and after a cup of tea had pushed off via Devil'​s Hole to Katoomba, leaving a messagethat if we came through we should go to Snow's place at Katoomba ​cnd collect their return tickets to Sydney for our own use, and he would drive the others home in his car. +Next morning we crawled out and cooked up half a cup of oatmeal and put on it the last of our milk powder and sugar, than packed our wet tents and off again to the flood. Why harrow you with the rest of it? Garth'​s measuring stick had been washed away, which meant the water was even higher, so we kept mainly to bluff sidling and eventually ​came to Carlon'​s ​creek. ​At the top of the steep pull into Carlons we find good old tired Ernie, infected by Garth'​s selflessness,​ dropping his pack and going back down for Dawn's. So to Carlon'​s by 1 pmIt appeared Jim Brown, Dot Barr and Geof Broadhead had got to Canon'​s after dark the previous evening. Jim had gone on but the other two had spent the night with the Carlons ​and had left only about an hour ago. Snow and Stan and the rest of the gang had been first there at 4 and after a cup of tea had pushed off via Devil'​s Hole to Katoomba, leaving a message that if we came through we should go to Snow's place at Katoomba ​and collect their return tickets to Sydney for our own use, and he would drive the others home in his car. However, we didn't get there, as you already know. 
- However, we didn't get there, as you already know. + 
-We had a cup of tea with the Canons ​and fed the tame finchet, then off along the road to Megalong Post OfftcH. The-Admiral bee.! lined for the telephone ​nnd sent throlIgh ​half a dozen messages to all and sundry reporting our safe arrival, including one for our Search & Rescue contact ​mall* Hooper, designed to curb his enthusiasm. We had heard that 1a*a4fgone 'north with Pete Stittto Kempsey to photograph forty ..stran-e4-. ​whales, and we rather hoped he would be stranded among _4s-s,​tranded ​whales while we were stranded among our flooded ​creeka olndo give us time to get home unnoticed. +We had a cup of tea with the Carlons ​and fed the tame finches, then off along the road to Megalong Post Office. The Admiral bee-lined for the telephone ​and sent through ​half a dozen messages to all and sundry reporting our safe arrival, including one for our Search & Rescue contact ​man, Hooper, designed to curb his enthusiasm. We had heard that he had gone north with Pete Stitt to Kempsey to photograph forty stranded ​whales, and we rather hoped he would be stranded among his stranded ​whales while we were stranded among our flooded ​creeks, and so give us time to get home unnoticed. 
-, + 
-Garth and Ernie made afire t-2nd cooked up our lunch...one (1) packet' ​of Chicken Noodle, ​:soup with some bread crusts in it. Then with a grin on his face Garth brought out his final trIumph ​- a square inch of cheese.end we etch had a piece the size and thickness of a postage stamp - 'a reallysatisfying meal, everrything ​from soup to cheese to be precise. Then we put on our dry clothes just as our phoned-for taxi whirled up the track, ​r.nd so :up to Blackheath by +Garth and Ernie made a fire and cooked up our lunch... one (1) packet of Chicken Noodle, soup with some bread crusts in it. Then with a grin on his face Garth brought out his final triumph ​- a square inch of cheese, ​and we each had a piece the size and thickness of a postage stamp - a really satisfying meal, everything ​from soup to cheese to be precise. Then we put on our dry clothes just as our phoned-for taxi whirled up the track, ​and so up to Blackheath by 5 o'​clock. We filled in the next hour at the hamburgery ​and caught the train out at 6.5 p m. - six typical S.B.W.s. __S__toney __B__roke ​to the __W__ide, owing the Admiral for phone callsGarth for the taxi, Dawn for 
-5 o.' clock. We filled in the ne-xt hbur t the It;​drab_urgery ​and caught +the hamburgers, and Ernie for the train fare home. 
-the train out at 6.5 p m. - Six 'typicalS,,,,...E34-vir44, ,t66-ney Broke to the Wide, owing the Admiral for phone calld..-_G4tti fo,brr7the. ​taxi, Dawn for + 
-fhe hamburgers ​end Ernie for the "​tr:​airk-',​f-412%- Yomee-- +So into town by 9 p.m. Then as I'd promised myselft ​to see a New Zealand Alpine Club couple who were passing through Sydney ​this day I went straight to the Wentworth Hotel, ​gum leaf scented pants smoke-impregnated jumper and all, sodden pack dripping on the on the carpet, and edged my way through the dress-shirtedevening ​robed throng ​in the foyer. To the mountaineering Sims my arrival ​was like a keen blast of mountain air, but I must say I felt a bit conspicuous. Up to the Sims bedroom ​where we sat on the beds and talked ​Alpine Club doings for the rest of the evening. ​As I slunk out at midnight ​through the still-crowded lounge room an immaculate overdressed ​gentleman remarked to his consort in an incredulous ​voice "She's going hiking!" 
-to  + 
-So into town by 9 p.m. Then", ​as I r:​_d,​app.1114-,​Ised`to, ,​se,​e, ​a New Zealand Alpine Club couple who were pass Jclao:Up dey this day I went +"Guess again, brother. I'​m'​ going home to bed." 
-straight to the Wentworth Hotel, ​,  sctedea, + 
-impregnated jumper and all, so,​d1:​01.4.pa:​ '​clrI430..epg oil the_;carpet, and odd my way through the dres,s4i,isbted, frg,​eriprig- ​robed throng ​In the foyer. To the mountaineering Sims rnyanival ​was like a keen blast +"Let her go," yawned the gods on their mountain height, "The joke's over."​ 
-of mountain air, but I must_ _sti.7, ​I felt._ tlit, _conspicuous  ​Up to the + 
-+---- 
-Sims bedrofem -where we sat -c3ti-it:​1*-',​ 13-94:​64sr""​and taJed Alpine ​:Club doings for the re-1st ​of the evening.- ,;s link ouT at-4nidnight ​through + 
-aa.4:​1,​7;​o-L- +Into the sleeping ​camp\\ 
-the still-crowded lounge' ​room ,a,k , Anytiraci:​Arat'​e Overtriassed ​gentleman remarked to his consort in an In'​ain`duld-us ​voice 'lithe's going hikingi," "Guess again, brother. I'​m'​ going home to Ved'." +Glideth late or soon\\ 
-"Let her go," yawned the gods on their mountain height, "The joke 's over."​ +That gentle companion,\\ 
-......1 +The lovely ​speechless ​moon. 
-,ce + 
-Into the sleeping ​cemp +Soft as a dewdrop,\\ 
-Glideth late or soon +Cool ss a willow,\\ 
-That gentle companion,​ +She layeth her bright head\\ 
-The lovely ​spL:​echless ​moon. +Beside mine on the pillow. 
-Soft as a (3.6wdrop+ 
-Cool ss a willow, +---- 
-She layeth her bright head Beside mine on the pillow. +
-21.+
 GHASTLY ITTRESSIONS GHASTLY ITTRESSIONS
 or - Dawn Askew. or - Dawn Askew.
195608.txt · Last modified: 2018/09/26 02:56 by tyreless