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194411 [2017/11/24 02:18]
tyreless
194411 [2017/11/27 02:04]
tyreless
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 In the morning we followed the creek till the going became rough then struck up a spur towards Coree. Again we were lucky to find an easy ridge. Half way up we had our first view of Coree, which looked exactly like pictures I have seen of the Tasmanian mountains. The top was an almost sheer wall of bare yellow granite towering several hundred feet above the surrounding mountains. From the top we had a magnificent view in every direction, while just below nestled a little clearing on Condor Creek, our campsite for that night. But it took us nearly three hours of pushing over loose granite covered with thin wattles, and through other types of undesirable flora before we made camp in the last of the fading daylight. In the morning we followed the creek till the going became rough then struck up a spur towards Coree. Again we were lucky to find an easy ridge. Half way up we had our first view of Coree, which looked exactly like pictures I have seen of the Tasmanian mountains. The top was an almost sheer wall of bare yellow granite towering several hundred feet above the surrounding mountains. From the top we had a magnificent view in every direction, while just below nestled a little clearing on Condor Creek, our campsite for that night. But it took us nearly three hours of pushing over loose granite covered with thin wattles, and through other types of undesirable flora before we made camp in the last of the fading daylight.
  
-This was the last of our never-to-be-forgotten campsites. Here we left the intrepid Jean and Joan to journey through the trackless pine forests to the Cotter Dam and thence to the Mount Stromlo turn-off where they were met by a car/+This was the last of our never-to-be-forgotten campsites. Here we left the intrepid Jean and Joan to journey through the trackless pine forests to the Cotter Dam and thence to the Mount Stromlo turn-off where they were met by a car.
  
 Now we are back in buildings and streets, working as we must, but just around the corners of memory are visions of mountain and valley, of streams and fire-lit campsites, and, most vivid of all, our little hanging valley on Gingera still and white in the moonlight. Now we are back in buildings and streets, working as we must, but just around the corners of memory are visions of mountain and valley, of streams and fire-lit campsites, and, most vivid of all, our little hanging valley on Gingera still and white in the moonlight.
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 ---- ----
  
-OCTOBER NEWS +=====October News.===== 
-Alust to offset the touch conditions imposed by the Railway Comissioners, the Clerk of the Weather looked kindly on all holiday makers for the 6 hour + 
-week end. This annual endurance test fixture, Holiday Handicap-Christmas +Just to offset the tough conditions imposed by the Railway Comissioners, the Clerk of the Weather looked kindly on all holiday makers for the 6 hour week end. This annual endurance test fixture, Holiday Handicap-Christmas Elimination Trials is we think, designed by the Railways, not as a staff entertainment as we had supposed, but to test the strength of their rolling stock and the fortitude of travellers generallyMost Bushwalkers passed the fortitude test brilliantly. We did hear of a couple who having passed the Barrier Trials, failed miserably in the Boarding testNo doubt the S.B.W. Committee will deal with the two members who proved so spineless and we expect to hear of their tratsference to the Non-Active list. Of oourse they weren'Old members. 
-Elimination Trials is ethink, designed by the.Railways, not as a staff entertainment as we had suloposed, but to test the strength of their rolling + 
-stock and the fortituAe of travellers generallyMost Bushwalkers passed +A large party debouched-on to Honeymoon Bay and enjoyed ideal conditions, they say. But there were no fishSilly to expect to fish we say. 
-the fortitude test brilliantly. We did hear of a couple who having passed + 
-the Barrier Trials, failed miserably in the Boarding testNo doubt the +Another party touring Lithgow and Newnes expressed surprise because there was no beer at NewnesPossibly as a result of this failure there was a certain want of co-operation in the partyOne member optimistically carrying a camera, called, early in the morning for someone as foreground, as one might call for water in the desert. The result was the same as the desert sceneNo one answered, and as one of the party explained, "when he (the optimist) caught up with us __that night__ he seemed a bit cool towards us." He then had dinner alone, no not quite alone, he communed, with a dead cow, for preference perhaps. We have heard of that party before. 
-S.B.W. Committee will deal withthe two members who proved so spineless and we expect to hear of their tratsference to the Non-Active list. Of oourse they werent Old members.. + 
-A large party debouched-on to Honeymoon Bay and enjoyed ideal con- +The Services Committee had a picture evening in the Club Friday 20th. Natures Symphony in Kodachrome, coloured slides. Some we had seen before but enjoyed as much as ever and quite a few new ones, were shown. An appreciative audience stayed on for the auction of unwanted goods. 
-ditions, they say. But there were no fishSilly to expect to fish we say. + 
-Another Tarty touring Lithgow and Newnes expressed surprise because.. there was no beer at NewnesPossibly as a result of this failure there was a certain want of co-operation in the ,partyOne member opttmistically. carrying a camera, called, early in the morning for someone as foreground,as one might call for water in the desert. The reSult was the same as the desert sceneNo one answered, and as one of the party explained, "when +Len and Dot Webb were in this night. They report the youngster as thriving. Both Len and Dot looked thriving also
-he (the optimist) caught up with us that night he seemed a bit cool towards + 
-us." He then had dinner alone, no not quite alone, he communed, with a dead cowl for preference perhaps. We have heard of that party before. +After some months strenuous training, Flo Allsworth together with Jean Harvey and Jean Moppet departed for a holiday per bicycle, taking in Canberra and Tumut and lots of other places. Flo still hasn't realised her ambition of riding her bike with her feet on the handlebars. We won't tell you any more of the trip because if you find yourself anywhere in the vicinity of any of the three you will be told about the trip whether you want to hear or not. 
-The Services Committee had a picture evening in the Club Friday 20th. Natures Symphony in Kodachrome, coloured slides. Some we had seen before + 
-but enjoyed as much as ever and quite a few new ones, were shown. An'. +Wal Roots party of holiday makers returned to Sydney after fortnight away. The five of them, Wal, Charlie Pryde, Tom Herbert, Dorothy Lawry and Phil White spent the first week on and about the Shoalhaven (nothing said about IN the Shoalhaven) and the second week they were near Canons dining there at night. They also were away while the hot spell was on
-appreciative audience stayed on for the auction of unwanted goods. + 
-Len and Dot Webb wore in thistight.They report the youngster as thriving. Both Len and Dot looked thriving also +---- 
-After some months strenuous training, Flo Allsworth together with + 
-Jean Harvey and Jean Mop-oet departed for a holiday l'er bicycle., taking in Canberra and Tumut and lots of other places. Flo still hasn' +=====The Timber Shortage In New South Wales And Protection Of Primitive Areas.===== 
-realised her ambition of riding her bike with her feet on the handlebars. We won't tell you any more of the trip becauae if you find yourSelf, anywhere in the vicinity of any of the three you'will be told abei4t the + 
-trip whether you want to hear or not. +by the Secretary of the Federation
-:. + 
-Wal Roots party of holiday makers returned to Sydney after.61 fortnight away.. The five of them, Wall Charlie Pryde, Tom Herbettl : Dorothy Lawry and Phil White spent the first week on and about the +Bushwalkers long to be able to say, "Hands off the trees except in the State Forests where re-planting is the rule." The Federation has asked the Forestry Commission whether it needed more money, more men or more land to enable it to supply the whole of the timber needs of the State from the State Forests, and, if it had all it wanted of these things, how long it would be before we could reasonably cry "Hands off the trees except in State Forests." 
-. , . +
-Shoalhaven (nothing said about IN the-ShoalhaVen) and theSec'ena'wee  -,:-. +
-they were near Canons dining there -at Iiigh. They also were away while : : :, +
-, .. ., +
-the hot spe,ll: was oxi, ' ' -: .. - '. - re +
-. .., , , . +
-,   +
-.,__. +
- .. . +
-.  +
-THo] TIMB,3R SHORTAGE IN NEW SOUTH WALES AND PROnCTION OF PRIMITIVE AREAS +
-by the Secretary of the Federation, +
-Bushwalkers long to be able to say, "Hands off the trees except in +
-the State Forests where re-planting is rule," The Federation has asked the Forestry Commission whether it needed more money, more men or more +
-land to enable it to supply the whole of the timber needs of the State from the State Forests, and, if it had all it wanted of these things, how long it would be before we could reasonably ,cry "Hands off the trees except in State Forests,"+
 The following is the reply; perhaps it will give you some idea of the shocking devastation of our forests that has been going on, and must continue to go on unless we give up wanting houses and furniture as well as other things. The following is the reply; perhaps it will give you some idea of the shocking devastation of our forests that has been going on, and must continue to go on unless we give up wanting houses and furniture as well as other things.
-"(1) Proper forest management would be impossible without the equiValent of the whole of the royalties from timber being handed over to the Commission. Actually in 1941-43 the forest revenue was ,E,3934201, and + 
- the expenditure 528,393,but this expenditure includes little reforestation, which has been suspended for the period of the war. The programmed expenditure, post-war, is on the scale of 2-3 million per annum against an anticipated revenue of 300,000. +"(1) Proper forest management would be impossible without the equivalent of the whole of the royalties from timber being handed over to the Commission. Actually in 1941-43 the forest revenue was £393,201, and the expenditure £528,393, but this expenditure includes little reforestation, which has been suspended for the period of the war. The programmed expenditure, post-war, is on the scale of £2-3 million per annumagainst an anticipated revenue of £300,000. 
-(2) Owing to excessive alienation in the past, the existing forest reser-vation is inadecuate to maintain the native timber industryIndeed, sawmills, post-war, will fall out in large numbers,+ 
 +(2) Owing to excessive alienation in the past, the existing forest reservation is inadequate to maintain the native timber industryIndeed, sawmills, post-war, will fall out in large numbers
 (3) If the Forestry CoMmission had the money, and the land, and the staff - it would take at least 50 years to recover the situation. (3) If the Forestry CoMmission had the money, and the land, and the staff - it would take at least 50 years to recover the situation.
-Taking the Clarence Region for example of 3,000,000 acres in the five shires, 500,000 actes are reserved for the timber industry - the chief industry of the region - and of the 2,000,000 acres alienated, only one eighth is under crop or grass - the rest is despoiled forest"+ 
-The Forestry Commission adds the following as its attitude to -primitive areas:- +Taking the Clarence Region for example of 3,000,000 acres in the five shires, 500,000 acres are reserved for the timber industry - the chief industry of the region - and of the 2,000,000 acres alienated, only one eighth is under crop or grass - the rest is despoiled forest". 
-"The Commission gathers that the Bush Walking Clubs are concerned to retain primitive areasThe Commission's solution of this need would be to define areas within broad National Forests, these areas to be retained in a primitive condition. + 
-It is futile to declare areas primitive unless they be protected from fireThe Blue Mountains and the Hawkesbury Sandstone areas are largely fire- Wrecked areas - but the nature lover generally has been uneoncerned to remedy this default of policy. +The Forestry Commission adds the following as its attitude to primitive areas:- 
-The Commission's policy is an over-all one, to cater for all community needs for the multilole service providd by forests - from timber supply to forevt recreationIn Queensland, for instance, both National Forests and National Parks are managed and protected by one authority, viz. the Queensland Forest Service each for its dedicated ipur-ose+ 
-Even managed forests contribute amenity, as for instance, although in Europe the primitive 'Oak and Beach forests no lenger exist, the man-made pine mods +"The Commission gathers that the Bush Walking Clubs are concerned to retain primitive areasThe Commission's solution of this need would be to define areas within broad National Forests, these areas to be retained in a primitive condition. 
-10. + 
-........111.11, +It is futile to declare areas primitive unless they be protected from fireThe Blue Mountains and the Hawkesbury Sandstone areas are largely fire-wrecked areas - but the nature lover generally has been unconcerned to remedy this default of policy. 
-still firicasiopl. poeey. The New South Walet policy, however, would to retain primitive areas within the pattern fif protected woodlands. + 
-The Bush Walking Clubs could help best by defining areas of scenic content worthy of retention in the primitive,+The Commission's policy is an over-all one, to cater for all community needs for the multiple service provided by forests - from timber supply to forest recreationIn Queensland, for instance, both National Forests and National Parks are managed and protected by one authority, viz. the Queensland Forest Serviceeach for its dedicated purpose. 
-EXTRACTS FROM LONDON LETTER IRA BUTLER + 
-LONDON. So this is London, a great big dirty place with narrow winding streets. Have not been very favourably impressed so far. The more I see of other places the more I think Au.7tralia's a very fine place. We got across the Atlantic all right, but didn't see it - have not seen it yet, +Even managed forests contribute amenity, as for instance, although in Europe the primitive Oak and Beach forests no lenger exist, the man-made pine woods still occasion poeny. The New South Walet policy, however, would be to retain primitive areas within the pattern of protected woodlands. 
-Wandered round tonight with Noel Butlin, Got partly lost in the blackout. Wandered into a low pub down by the Thames, had_ two pints of "bitter" and a game of dartsSaw some real English life. Am at the Savoy at the moment - a most palati2aq,,,,hpptelry with a bathroom (in our suite) nearly as large as our Melbourne living_roor ail ,in chromium and marble and with telephoneletc. A garish Pilade deSigned for the exploitation of Indian princes, European diplomats and Andi.'4:ba*,i;,WWW0:14ove tomorrow. + 
-like'ObLI1L6V-Rb'kiday. We are being given the big hand in a big way. +The Bush Walking Clubs could help best by defining areas of scenic content worthy of retention in the primitive.
--r - + 
-We start' Work in real earnest after tomorrow. So far we have only been making the preliminary arrangementsand have had some time for seeing the place. +---- 
-Last night I went and saw Londoels best opera company (Sadlers) play The Bartered Bridp. It was bef,utifully done and I enjoyed every bit of itHad dinner at a cafe in Piccadilly afterwards and then had some fun getting home via tube. Capned the evening by forgetting to draw the blackout curtains and was visited by an A.R.P.man and a policeman. + 
-One certainly isn't encouraged to eat in London, but if one goes to the right places the food is quite good and in reasonable quantity if not variety. We found an interesting cafe in Soho the other day - the Comedy. The old chap who waited on us was like a waiter out of a comedy film and I could hardly refrain from open laughter every time h. us. We had a pint of beer served in huge glasses and a reasonable three course meal all very attractively prepared and in adequate quantityWe were eventually bowed out by our waiter, the head m6iter, and the doorkeeper. +=====Extracts From London Letter Ira Butler.===== 
-Today (Sunday) I went to Maidenhead with Noel Butlin. We had a meal and + 
-paida brief visit to a pub for a pint of bitter. There were some lasses +__London.__ 
-there wearing gold crosses, having repaired to the pub on their way home from church. Took a boat and rowed up the Thames - about as wide as the Yarra at Studly Park - plenty of boats, barges, swans - very beautiful reallyWe rowed no for a couple of hours through two locks, each lock raising us some + 
-five -or six feet higher upBeautiful white swans about the river everywhere, and dnd'had a family of five large dirty grey cygnets. Many large houses had frontages right 't'the water's edge - and there were plenty of notices, as around. 4elbourne''Private Property, KEEP OUT,'We had a short walk ashore to the top ,'of a, and got a good view of a typical English countryside with & Stretch of the Thames in front of us with yachts on it. Low hills with +So this is London, a great big dirty place with narrow winding streets. Have not been very favourably impressed so far. The more I see of other places the more I think Australia's a very fine place. We got across the Atlantic all right, but didn't see it - have not seen it yet
-p2clIghed fields, and green fields with cows, and then a village snugly and + 
-sm y nestling among trees by the river. A pleasant landscape, but a rather +Wandered round tonight with Noel Butlin, Got partly lost in the blackout. Wandered into a low pub down by the Thames, had two pints of "bitter" and a game of dartsSaw some real English life. Am at the Savoy at the moment - a most palatial hostelry with a bathroom (in our suite) nearly as large as our Melbourne living room - all in chromium and marble and with telephone, etc. A garish place designed for the exploitation of Indian princes, European diplomats and AmericansIntend to move tomorrow. 
-s67-2F.tisfied one, A grim note to the peaceful landscape was the hundreds + 
-of berobers passing overhead to and from the continent, and the vapour trails +Met all the notable today. We are being given the big hand in a big way. We start work in real earnest after tomorrow. So far we have only been making the preliminary arrangements and have had some time for seeing the place. 
-weaving across the eky, It was a beautiful sunny dayand we exposA our chests to the warm English sun. Some girls were in ,bathing costume and we saw one man actually swimming. + 
-II,  +Last night I went and saw London'best opera company (Sadlers) play The Bartered Bride. It was beautifully done and I enjoyed every bit of itHad dinner at a cafe in Piccadilly afterwards and then had some fun getting home via tube. Capped the evening by forgetting to draw the blackout curtains and was visited by an A.R.P. man and a policeman. 
-Ana getting to see more of London, bit by bit, uring a walk yesterday + 
-evening the number of churcheseeither built by Wren or in his style was most obvious. So far they are the most pleasing features of London architecture +One certainly isn't encouraged to eat in London, but if one goes to the right places the food is quite good and in reasonable quantity if not variety. We found an interesting cafe in Soho the other day - the Comedy. The old chap who waited on us was like a waiter out of a comedy film and I could hardly refrain from open laughter every time he addressed us. We had a pint of beer served in huge glasses and a reasonable three course meal all very attractively prepared and in adequate quantityWe were eventually bowed out by our waiter, the head waiter, and the doorkeeper. 
-I have seenSome of them are only shells now but their bell-towers are gE;irally intact and front view they look completeSt.Clem?ns is just in front + 
-of Australia House - you know, Oranges and Lemons the bells of St.ClemensThat's +Today (Sunday) I went to Maidenhead with Noel Butlin. We had a meal and paid a brief visit to a pub for a pint of bitter. There were some lasses there wearing gold crosses, having repaired to the pub on their way home from church. Took a boat and rowed up the Thames - about as wide as the Yarra at Studly Park - plenty of boats, barges, swans - very beautiful reallyWe rowed up for a couple of hours through two locks, each lock raising us some five or six feet higher upBeautiful white swans about the river everywhere, and one had a family of five large dirty grey cygnets. Many large houses had frontages right to the water's edge - and there were plenty of notices, as around Melbourne - Private Property, KEEP OUTWe had a short walk ashore to the top of a small hill, and got a good view of a typical English countryside with a stretch of the Thames in front of us with yachts on it. Low hills with ploughed fields, and green fields with cows, and then a village snugly and smugly nestling among trees by the river. A pleasant landscape, but a rather self-satisfied one. A grim note to the peaceful landscape was the hundreds of bombers passing overhead to and from the continent, and the vapour trails weaving across the sky. It was a beautiful sunny day and we exposed our chests to the warm English sun. Some girls were in bathing costume and we saw one man actually swimming. 
-whatfs wrong with London - most of its ch,erm derives from the history and literature of the place rather than from its nature. emember the eerly scenes in + 
-Pygmalion - some cilurch pillars in front of a market place. We passed by that yesterday - a di:Ay amellful place like Haymarket. +Am getting to see more of London, bit by bit. During a walk yesterday evening the number of churches either built by Wren or in his style was most obvious. So far they are the most pleasing features of London architecture I have seenSome of them are only shells now but their bell-towers are generally intact and front view they look completeSt. Clemens is just in front of Australia House - you know, Oranges and Lemons the bells of St. ClemensThat'what'wrong with London - most of its charm derives from the history and literature of the place rather than from its nature. Remember the early scenes in Pygmalion - some church pillars in front of a market place. We passed by that yesterday - a dirty smellful place like Haymarket. 
-Saw some fruit bnrro\-s yesterday. Peaches at Veach,- not such wonderful peaches eith4,:r. Grapes at 1/6 1),F,r ,(1-1;rter lb. I bought a couple of them and they were quite geed, Same small apnles were more reasonable at 8d a lb.+ 
 +Saw some fruit barrows yesterday. Peaches at 4__each__ - not such wonderful peaches either. Grapes at 1/6 per __quarter__ lb. I bought a couple of them and they were quite good. Spme small apples were more reasonable at 8d a lb. 
 I still expect to be back in Australia by the end of the year. I still expect to be back in Australia by the end of the year.
-Cheerio IRA+ 
 +Cheerio, Ira. 
 + 
 +---- 
 LETTERS FROM THE LADS AND LASSES LETTERS FROM THE LADS AND LASSES
 Chas. Jones. New Guinea,11.8,44, I wish to express my thanks to you for the number of papers and r iagazines I consistently receive from your committee, The arrival of my own club meq3azine is always pe rticularly welcome as in it I am able to read of the doings of the club and its members among places I know. Chas. Jones. New Guinea,11.8,44, I wish to express my thanks to you for the number of papers and r iagazines I consistently receive from your committee, The arrival of my own club meq3azine is always pe rticularly welcome as in it I am able to read of the doings of the club and its members among places I know.
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