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- TEE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER  +======The Sydney Bushwalker.====== 
-.A monthly Bulletin devoted to matters of interest to The Sydney Bushwalkerss.5 Hamilton Street, Sydney + 
-No. AUGUST 1944 +A monthly Bulletin devoted to matters of interest to The Sydney Bushwalkers, 5 Hamilton Street, Sydney. 
- Al=1IPr-ic;e'Ed, + 
-Editor C. Kinsella -Production: Yvonne Ro:Ife +---- 
-Asst. Jolley AsstAlice Wybozn + 
-Bus.ManagerJ.Johnson Sales & Subs:Retty Dickenson. +===No. August, 1944. Price 6d.=== 
-CONTENTS  + 
-Page +|**Editor**|C. Kinsella|   
-0.0 +|**Assistant Editor**|G. Jolly| 
-F.Leydon 2 Edna Garrad +|**Business Manager**|J. Johnson
-8 D.Lawry 9 +|**Production**|Yvonne Rolfe| 
-10 +|**Production Assistant**|Alice Wyborn| 
-11 +|**Sales & Subs**|Betty Dickenson| 
-12 + 
-Index +=====In This Issue:===== 
-2nd Canberra Trip + 
-The Scurce cf the Thredbo +| | |Page| 
-Chatter 4.0 Fea,lration Report +|Index| | 1| 
-,Lette-c efrom Lads +|2nd Canberra Trip|F. Leydon2
-'-GoodmanIs'Advertisement +|The Source of the Thredbo|Edna Garrad| 7| 
-Paddy .4+|So Much Chatter| | 8
-+|Federation Report|D. Lawry9| 
-HOW RESTFUL'ARE MILS: +|Letters from Lads| |10| 
-How restful are the far-bills4 + 
-the gre,plains,to.:cityeyes+=====Advertisements:===== 
 + 
 +| |Page| 
 +|Goodman's Advt.|11| 
 +|Paddy|12| 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====How Restful Are Hills.===== 
 + 
 +How restful are the far hills,\\ 
 +the green plainsto city eyes\\ 
 +Tired with the ills\\ 
 +Of brick and weatherboard,\\ 
 +And iron soaring to the skies!\\ 
 +Lord,\\ 
 +The hills and plains are Thine,\\ 
 +And yet, I know the strength will dissipate,\\ 
 +This pleasure turn to wretchedness\\ 
 +As deep as joy is now elate\\ 
 +And, in the loud canyon of the street,\\ 
 +The sweet ...\\ 
 +Of this swift moment soon will pass\\ 
 +From consciousness
 + 
 +Paul Grano
 + 
 +---
 + 
 +=====2nd Canberra TripEaster1944.=====
  
-Tie. with iEe;:e ills .  
-Of 7!-2a71%erbciard.,.: 
-And to the skiest 
-JviLot'd. - . 
-The 
-J.: nr-he o7reng'7.h will dissipate, Thd.27 tnrno.74tchedness 
-AF 3.-.7 joy La. now elate..  
-And,7LL:71ieIou.-canyonof:the- street The :-,1:zet-, 
-Cf this swift mOment ,soon will pass From consciousness. 
-- 
-PAUL GRANO 
-2. 
-2nd C1=RRA TRIP EAS=L 
 By Frank Leyden. By Frank Leyden.
-"Kosciusko Express, Platform 8. There's Colin, Hal" "Where'thc chart;? These two back carriages are full. The rest haven''f?,11 :,Launtod in,+ 
-"Come up tho flout,"+"Kosciusko Express, Platform 8. There's Colin, Ha!" 
 + 
 +"Where'the others? These two back carriages are full. The rest haven'been shuunted in." 
 + 
 +"Come up the front." 
 "There's Johno and the Scotlands," "There's Johno and the Scotlands,"
-"Humphi+ 
-"Here she comeE:, Get ready",+"Humph!" 
 + 
 +"Here she comes. Get ready." 
 "We're in. Good seats, Fancy coming an hour early." "We're in. Good seats, Fancy coming an hour early."
-"All out These carriages not going. Engine couldn't pull all these carriages" + 
-"Is everybody else getting cut? Come a couple of carriages back." "He wont let us in 07)er the windows, LenPut the packs on window sills ready to go in or out,+"All outThese carriages not going. Engine couldn't pull all these carriages." 
-"No, she's going out ec:ain, Here's a couple of scouts going to Kosci. Come with us and welli all rush it together." + 
-"Look! There's the sleepers on the other line. They've got to be put down the back. '7,:Jat's. wnat it is +"Is everybody else getting out? Come a couple of carriages back." 
-"There's George and Ken And Rolla in the sleeper. Doreen too." "They'll all be telling, as usual, how they were asleep before the train got to Strathfield, son,+ 
-"Here she comes, the sleepers, tooHere's our window." "Hal Hal We're in. Empty carriage." +"He won'let us in. Open the windows, LenPut the packs on window sills ready to go in or out." 
-"Colin came in with a swallow drive,+ 
-"I saw Johno with his face on the floor and his feet in the lugage rack." Thought my boots got someone. I heard a klunk-klunk." "No mine. A bunch of flowers, I think." +"No, she's going out again. Here's a couple of scouts going to Kosci. Come with us and we'll all rush it together." 
-"I can'stid it I tell you I can't stand it' + 
-"Shut up Scotland. The window's going to stay shut,+"Look! There's the sleepers on the other line. They've got to be put down the back. That'what it is." 
-"Good on you, Johno. Keep it down,+ 
-"Here's GoulburnLook out for Cosgrove." +"There's George and Ken And Rolls in the sleeper. Doreen too." 
-"He got the early train. Reckoned this would be half empty when it got here,+ 
-"Didn't know it was first stop Goulburn. Aha! Ahal+"They'll all be telling, as usual, how they were asleep before the train got to Strathfield, son." 
-"There he goes! Out the window and get hiTJos."+ 
 +"Here she comes, the sleepers, tooHere's our window." 
 + 
 +"Ha! Ha! We're in. Empty carriage." 
 + 
 +"Colin came in with a swallow drive." 
 + 
 +"I saw Johno with his face on the floor and his feet in the luggage rack.
 + 
 +"Thought my boots got someone. I heard a klunk-klunk." 
 + 
 +"No mine. A bunch of flowers, I think." 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +"I can'stand itI tell you I can't stand it' 
 + 
 +"Shut up Scotland. The window's going to stay shut." 
 + 
 +"Good on you, Johno. Keep it down." 
 + 
 +"Here's GoulburnLook out for Cosgrove." 
 + 
 +"He got the early train. Reckoned this would be half empty when it got here." 
 + 
 +"Didn't know it was first stop Goulburn. Aha! Aha!" 
 + 
 +"There he goes! Out the window and get himJoe." 
 "What! You haven't even got a seat for me. I had a seat down the back. Why was I persuaded to come up here." "What! You haven't even got a seat for me. I had a seat down the back. Why was I persuaded to come up here."
 +
 "But you've got our company, Bill." "But you've got our company, Bill."
 +
 "Joe will give you his seat and get out in the passage." "Joe will give you his seat and get out in the passage."
-  OOOOO + 
-"Williamsdale at last. What a louse of a night." "There are the sleepers getting out." +---- 
-"Theres Alex on the rlatfo-om,+ 
-And with rfIGtan wt)nt civilisation. Surrounding us were those big r(-11-_,.n.,; -,nd 0711; -Ten spaces, much wider than the railway +"Williamsdale at last. What a louse of a night." 
-carrtbE-7, whio".-1 ,/(1 eLlbedded all nigilt, Beyond the sheep country + 
-rose Er:.nt c CiCOCcGu3enby K,?.11-y and the Brindabella - +"There are the sleepers getting out." 
-our goa,.. So across the paddocks and down to the Murrumbidgee for breakfast. The river is somewhat like the Cox above Black Jerry's - good water, good + 
-3. +"There'Alex on the platform." 
-flow, but a bit silted and with bare slopes. + 
-"'Dftving ,off in five minutes, Rolls. Come on Grge.""Te won't be druv." +And with the train went civilisation. Surrounding us were those big rolling hills and wide open spaces, much wider than the railway carriage in which we were embedded all night. Beyond the sheep country rose a ring of 6000ftpeaks - GudgenbyKelly and the Brindabella - our goal. So across the paddocks and down to the Murrumbidgee for breakfast. The river is somewhat like the Cox above Black Jerry's - good water, good flow, but a bit silted and with bare slopes. 
-Crossing the low ridges to the Naas Valley we approached the 4500 ft. Tennent. This mountain is well isolated and thickly timbered, but has a rock outcrop on the summit, ,Would be interesting to climb. So would theosawtoothed peaks of the 5000ft Tinderry rangethe other side of Michelato, which we eoulet see so well in the clear morning air. + 
-Wa walked along an old roadWe went through gates. We walked along a good roadWe put on sticking plaster. Then we walked along an old road. Murmurinc;and mutterings. Tennent went through all silhouettes and grew small in the distance only as our blisters grew large in the foreground.+"Moving off in five minutes, Rolls. Come on George." "We won't be druv." 
 + 
 +Crossing the low ridges to the Naas Valley we approached the 4500 ft. Tennent. This mountain is well isolated and thickly timbered, but has a rock outcrop on the summitWould be interesting to climb. So would the saw-toothed peaks of the 5000ft Tinderry rangethe other side of Michelago, which we could see so well in the clear morning air. 
 + 
 +We walked along an old roadWe went through gates. We walked along a good roadWe put on sticking plaster. Then we walked along an old road. Murmurings and mutterings. Tennent went through all silhouettes and grew small in the distance only as our blisters grew large in the foreground. 
 "Here is water for lunch." "Here is water for lunch."
-"No, dirty. Keep going before the others catch up or they'll want to stop here." "To think Michelago is just across the Mt.Clear Range there" + 
-"But that :climb would have been the death of us." +"No, dirty. Keep going before the others catch up or they'll want to stop here." 
-"Here's water. Look there's a calf jammed between two rocks."+ 
 +"To think Michelago is just across the Mt. Clear Range there." 
 + 
 +"But that climb would have been the death of us." 
 + 
 +"Here's water. Lookthere's a calf jammed between two rocks." 
 "Can't move it. Try after lunch when we're not so tired." "Can't move it. Try after lunch when we're not so tired."
-"Len and Joe will give it somewater. Bill ad I will go back to the farm. Ready to 'move off?" + 
-"What's up with you now, Joe? He had three raisins more than me for lunch. Now the rubber had slipped off his hip strap. I can't do anythin:; with him. See what you can do with him, Frank." . +"Len and Joe will give it some water. Bill ad I will go back to the farm. Ready to move off?" 
-"Hurry up. Gudgenby creek is a long _one. We'll never catch 'em up." "Which track"+ 
-"To the right up the xidiKel of courseLen's not far behind." +"What's up with you now, Joe? He had three raisins more than me for lunch. Now the rubber had slipped off his hip strap. I can't do anything with him. See what you can do with him, Frank." 
-"Where are you, Joe? Where areyou, Joe?" + 
-Me,climbed and climbed that steep ridge. We shouted to Len who shouted to Joe. We shouted to the others but our echoes died into silence as the 5/200ft Booth grew an our left and the valley sank into an abyss in the shadow of dusk and the coming storm. A tree- -clothed ridge, straight as a ruler, ran from the Nas Valley over 3,000 ft. below/ ri ht to the summit of Booth. Far away _in the depths, deep in the abyss, growiqg fainter and fainter into the all pervading silence, like the wail of the banshee or the cry of -a departed - +"Hurry up. Gudgenby creek is a long one. We'll never catch 'em up." 
-"Where aaare you, Joe? Whore aaare you Joe-000?" + 
- a IP OOOOOO  0  a 4: +"Which track?
-ftWhich wayld those ahead go, Bill?" + 
-"We'll go flat out to catch the otters and tell 'em we've lost the Scotlands. Look, there's 'George." +"To the right up the ridge, of courseLen's not far behind." 
-"Hey, George Something's happened." + 
-George watts a little whileout of respect, then plods silently on. We soon realized that, after that ridge, George was in no mood for anything happening. From the top we looked down into the wide expanse of the Gudgenby river valley. Far below us in the distance were the little black specks of those ahead. No shouts could penetrate the distance. No blisters could catch the fleet of foot. Threefold we were split. No shaft of hope in the gloom. Alas fr the lost ones/ +"Where are you, Joe? Where are you, Joe?" 
-When we reached the valley and the road, there was bother. Which way had they gone, up or down? Everything was in the wrong place. Map was wrong and George in a "go no further', camp right here" mood. So we rested George and went back to the farm where we learned our fate. This was Glendale and we had to walk "4-6" miles to Gudgenby that night to make up lost schedule + 
-through climbingthe wrOng ridgeWoe to him that leads up a wrong rUge+We climbed and climbed that steep ridge. We shouted to Len who shouted to Joe. We shouted to the others but our echoes died into silence as the 5,200 ft Booth grew on our left and the valley sank into an abyss in the shadow of dusk and the coming storm. A tree clothed ridge, straight as a ruler, ran from the Naas Valley over 3,000 ft. below, right to the summit of Booth. Far away in the depths, deep in the abyss, growiqg fainter and fainter into the all pervading silence, like the wail of the banshee or the cry of a departed spirit - 
-Perspiring with cur shirts off in a freezing drizzleand ikith blister scorched t. wci ;:ctinc'.6,5. it ct I1P,that steep interminable read in a semi- Comatose conditicpLt the t6p'then &min the other side with torches in the blaCis5.1.t,s-e,W%--3' had ;1.n6Ft abandoned hoDt,:of finding those ahead and intended camping at'tLE.,catcs:r, LO; 1=c: cecretly -believed that Roley + 
-would havc rL ar d iouLd c:7Lt7Jh thezr_ At RendezvousCreek they were camped l Johm,;,2c ey ai dK,3r, ntar the roa A:d the other people further away for a littlo qui*H-.nt,5sTie cc o.tvyl the. rcads; everything was abused and +"Where aaare you, Joe? Where aaare you Joe-ooo?" 
-the Scotlands whrever wor c74 were better off than us; especially seeing that they had boon given a map that morning. Beware of being given a map in like cirvumstances; + 
-Gudgenby is a rolliHg grassy plain 3,000 ft high and surrounded by forested mountains topped with granite boulders above the tree line. Weeping willows and a clump of tall poplars, green meadows and a fine flowing stream were welcoming sights,Welrampoi cver the tussock grass and through the fine forested slorm of +---- 
-"I think wei,ae c.:r14:,.T.nat must be Mount Kelly on our right. Nothing as high afi that an7,-hcre else." + 
-"But the direotion ic w:ong, Look at the map." +"Which way'those ahead go, Bill?" 
-"The map'' + 
-Stop here fc.) 2.1.u a while we're sure of water." +"We'll go flat out to catch the others and tell 'em we've lost the Scotlands. Look, there's 'George." 
-"This climb ha e been worse than AannellS Spur." + 
-"donl t like iho look of things." . +"Hey, GeorgeSomething's happened." 
-After lunch we climbed again with more energy,till suddenly a little plain-came into view. Snow daisies and orchids, alpine plants of iarions., types were scattered in profusion in the snow grass of the natural clearing. Below to the right was the Cotter country and surrounding us high mountain peaks. Everyone was not happy with the spell of these beautiful surroundings and the uncertainty of the morning banished. A high peak to thi south was + 
-,decided to be Mount telly and a section of the party proceeded to the attack. The remainder of the party headed-for Cr Cotter Homestead.:. +George watts a little whileout of respect, then plods silently on. We soon realized that, after that ridge, George was in no mood for anything happening. From the top we looked down into the wide expanse of the Gudgenby river valley. Far below us in the distance were the little black specks of those ahead. No shouts could penetrate the distance. No blisters could catch the fleet of foot. Threefold we were split. No shaft of hope in the gloom. Alas for the lost ones
-Mount Kelly is one of the most satisfYing peaks I have climbed.-Itis - isolated and possesres anuninterrupted view in all directions containing ioreground,,middTe cli-sta:ce and backgroundPhotographs from there with good telephoto -a7.paratoz Tould be startling. In the-east is the golden coloured siaeep oollA7.:v) Gudgenby taain 3s000 ft below and Booth just behind i then T,Ils fa ltz,ptic sake of the Tinderry Range, like mountains in a + 
-fairy St6ryAVid naarby are the and ridges of the Boboyan, Gudgenby,+When we reached the valley and the road, there was bother. Which way had they gone, up or down? Everything was in the wrong place. Map was wrong and George in a "go no further, camp right here" mood. So we rested George and went back to the farm where we learned our fate. This was Glendale and we had to walk "4-6" miles to Gudgenby that night to make up lost schedule through climbing the wrong ridgeWoe to him that leads up a wrong ridge. 
-and Scabby Range Tp_the south, Kosciusko's main range is conspicuous by the steep north west face of.Jagungal. From Half-Moon Peak and Bimberi, the Brindabella Range stretaheS* across the western horizon and deep below the thick forested slopes is the valley of the Cotter. Far to the west through the Murray gap is seen thT steep pointed peaks of the Fiery Range. Nameless peaks ir the foreground, endless ridges in the distance, all covered with a faint blue haze, but, shPrp and clear in outline and detail. This would be a great .p.15c e. 1;0 'be in winter, with the mountainsdraped in a mantle of + 
-snow. An fines long steep ski runs,- tool are awaiting someone's skis. +Perspiring with our shirts off in a freezing drizzle and with blister scorched feet we pounded it out up that steep interminable road in a semi-comatose condition. At klast the top, then down the other side with torches in the blacknessWe had almost abandoned hope of finding those ahead and intended camping at the first waterBut we secretly believed that Roley would have rebelled and we would catch them. At Rendezvous Creek they were camped; Johnoroley and Ken near the road and the other people further away for a little quietnessThe countrythe roads, everything was abused and the Scotlands, wherever they were, were better off than us; especially seeing that they had been given a map that morning. Beware of being given a map in like circumstances! 
-The PKi..11:7 eve.:4ually overtook "the rabbits" camped below the + 
-Cotter d, The raptures of Mou4t Kelly were received,with disbelief, +---- 
-criticism, c;,yaicism, sarcasm, ennui and eventually indifference; which only shows how -successful the raptures were. + 
-Next morning we beat it out down the Cotter with many desulory excursions up sundry ridges lookin for imaginery trchlsrand much flapping +Gudgenby is a rolliHg grassy plain 3,000 ft high and surrounded by forested mountains topped with granite boulders above the tree line. Weeping willows and a clump of tall poplars, green meadows and a fine flowing stream were welcoming sights. We tramped over the tussock grass and through the fine forested slopes of middle creek. 
-of groundsheets amid the pouring rain in the prickly undergrowth.Lunch was in the rain at a place we decided to name Kangaroo Creek, so that, at least, some resemblance would exist betwe n the country and the map. + 
-"The rabbits are checking out +"I think we've gone wrongThat must be Mount Kelly on our right. Nothing as high as that anywhere else." 
-"We'll follow up the creek if therel8 a track.If not, we'll try the ridge. They'll have to get on the ridge." + 
-"The creek looks evil", +"But the direction is wrong. Look at the map." 
-"The ridge is going up and up:. We ought to turn back." + 
-"Too lateWe'll never catch them."- +"The map'useless." 
-"Ahl thats the finiidh,,We're separatec4. We'll never see them again now. an only keep going." + 
-"Here's a bottleWonder if the track goes over the saddle."+"Stop here for lunch, while we're sure of water." 
 + 
 +"This climb has been worse than Hannel'Spur." 
 + 
 +"don't like the look of things." 
 + 
 +After lunch we climbed again with more energy till suddenly a little plain came into view. Snow daisies and orchids, alpine plants of various types were scattered in profusion in the snow grass of the natural clearing. Below to the right was the Cotter country and surrounding us high mountain peaks. Everyone was not happy with the spell of these beautiful surroundings and the uncertainty of the morning banished. A high peak to the south was decided to be Mount Kelly and a section of the party proceeded to the attack. The remainder of the party headed for the Cotter Homestead. 
 + 
 +Mount Kelly is one of the most satisfying peaks I have climbed. It is isolated and possesses an uninterrupted view in all directions containing foregroundmiddle distance and backgroundPhotographs from there with good telephoto aparatus would be startling. In the east is the golden coloured sheep country, with Gudgenby plain 3,000 ft below and Booth just behind, then the fantastic peaks of the Tinderry Range, like mountains in a fairy storyAnd nearby are the peaks and ridges of the Boboyan, Gudgenby, and Scabby Ranges. To the south, Kosciusko's main range is conspicuous by the steep north west face of Jagungal. From Half-Moon Peak and Bimberi, the Brindabella Range stretches across the western horizon and deep below the thick forested slopes is the valley of the Cotter. Far to the west through the Murray gap is seen the steep pointed peaks of the Fiery Range. Nameless peaks in the foreground, endless ridges in the distance, all covered with a faint blue haze, but, sharp and clear in outline and detail. This would be a great place to be in winter, with the mountains draped in a mantle of snow. And some fine, long steep ski runs, too, are awaiting someone's skis. 
 + 
 +The "Kelly Gang" eventually overtook "the rabbits" camped below the Cotter homestead. The raptures of Mount Kelly were received with disbelief, criticism, cynicism, sarcasm, ennui and eventually indifference; which only shows how successful the raptures were. 
 + 
 +Next morning we beat it out down the Cotter with many desulory excursions up sundry ridges looking for imaginery tracks, and much flapping of groundsheets amid the pouring rain in the prickly undergrowth. Lunch was in the rain at a place we decided to name Kangaroo Creek, so that, at least, some resemblance would exist between the country and the map. 
 + 
 +"The rabbits are checking out." 
 + 
 +"We'll follow up the creek if there'a track. If not, we'll try the ridge. They'll have to get on the ridge." 
 + 
 +"The creek looks evil." 
 + 
 +"The ridge is going up and up. We ought to turn back." 
 + 
 +"Too lateWe'll never catch them." 
 + 
 +"Ah! that'the finish. We're separated. We'll never see them again now. Can only keep going." 
 + 
 +"Here's a bottleWonder if the track goes over the saddle." 
 "Not a sign of it." "Not a sign of it."
-"Gosh, that creek looks like the Upper Kowmung. Won't they be hostile." "Coo-eel C9o-eel+ 
-"Listen! A reply. Can hear their voicesMust be coming up."+"Gosh, that creek looks like the Upper Kowmung. Won't they be hostile." 
 +"Coo-ee! Coo-ee!" 
 + 
 +"Listen! A reply. Can hear their voicesMust be coming up." 
 "Over there. Let's keep on following the ridge." "Over there. Let's keep on following the ridge."
-The voices died in the silence of the depthsA view magnificent opened up through the mists behind us. Tongues of white vapour rose from + 
-the valley of the Cotter and graced the misty diadem of the Brindabella range. Through the rifts in the mist gleamed the deep blue of the mountains Rna the bright shafts of the sunbeams emblazoned the ever changing scene. Huge grinite boulders, round as eggs, big as houses, jumbled together and bilanced on each other, toi-ped the ridge above US. Mount McKeahnie, 419O0ft. Ano4-1,er peak falls to the conquerors!+The voices died in the silence of the depthsA view magnificent opened up through the mists behind us. Tongues of white vapour rose from the valley of the Cotter and graced the misty diadem of the Brindabella range. Through the rifts in the mist gleamed the deep blue of the mountains and the bright shafts of the sunbeams emblazoned the ever changing scene. Huge granite boulders, round as eggs, big as houses, jumbled together and balanced on each other, topped the ridge above us. Mount McKeahnie, 4,9O0 ft. Another peak falls to the conquerors! 
 "Its too dark now. I'll give Doreen the torch." "Its too dark now. I'll give Doreen the torch."
 +
 "I don't mind being behind. I can hear you crashing through in front." "I don't mind being behind. I can hear you crashing through in front."
-"Its freezingMy hands are numb. We've been wet throl,sh all the afternoon." mWish we knew where we really were. The others won't stand a ch nce down there. They'll be well and truly lost now." + 
-"You better take Role's seat in the train, Frank." +"Its freezingMy hands are numb. We've been wet through all the afternoon." 
-"The food party is split and everything. All vegetables with me, and all the meat with Colin,+ 
-"Lookl the lights of Canberra throuh the glIa." +"Wish we knew where we really were. The others won't stand a chance down there. They'll be well and truly lost now." 
-"That'll be our gar). Aha!" + 
-Then we left the ridge and plunged through the dripping jungle of a gully in search of water in the dark. Huge granite boulders formed Our campsite - a typical Colley campsite, but none the less a home from home with that blazing fire to quell the icy wind and rain. -7 - +"You better take Roley's seat in the train, Frank." 
-Next morning we found the Kangaroo Creek track in the gap and on it the footprints of our separated ones. After walking hard for seven miles down Gibraltar Creek (and the dog-proof fence) to Paddy's River, we discoverPa ';hem a mile ahead on the Tidbinbilla RoadNo amount of shouting and waving could get them off the-safety of the road and we lost them again as we cll:abad the ridge. Hours after, 'while having lunch on the Murrumbidgee River, Goorg,.? turned up alone. Later we met the others in the paddocks after their qut,:hour lunch. The car for Canberra was met at the appointed place. + 
-Ch. the station we met the Scotlands. They went to the Cotter via +"The food party is split and everything. All vegetables with me, and all the meat with Colin." 
-Crear37 Flats and returned through the Cotter Gap to Orroral, then to Naas and back to Canberra+ 
-E 304L,Afct.-1, +"Look! the lights of Canberra through the gap." 
-ToE, rf,r,7:(I\)9,(.fe,E,4,fy!) /3EPI13 + 
-\ r1/41 r "TMEY 13E +"That'll be our gap. Aha!" 
-o q4Zy + 
-Iona e 0 rice", +Then we left the ridge and plunged through the dripping jungle of a gully in search of water in the dark. Huge granite boulders formed our campsite - a typical Colley campsite, but none the less a home from home with that blazing fire to quell the icy wind and rain. 
-cif + 
-'--- +Next morning we found the Kangaroo Creek track in the gap and on it the footprints of our separated ones. After walking hard for seven miles down Gibraltar Creek (and the dog-proof fence) to Paddy's River, we discovered them a mile ahead on the Tidbinbilla RoadNo amount of shouting and waving could get them off the safety of the road and we lost them again as we climbed the ridge. Hours after, while having lunch on the Murrumbidgee River, George turned up alone. Later we met the others in the paddocks after their quarter hour lunch. The car for Canberra was met at the appointed place. 
-+ 
-ury'LLftEvEci' A et, F u S +On the station we met the Scotlands. They went to the Cotter via Creamy Flats and returned through the Cotter Gap to Orroral, then to Naas and back to Canberra. 
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 THE SOURCE OF THE THREDBO THE SOURCE OF THE THREDBO
 THE BIG BOGGY) EDNA GARRAD. THE BIG BOGGY) EDNA GARRAD.
194408.txt · Last modified: 2018/03/28 12:19 by sbw