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 |Subscriptions|Jo Newland| |Subscriptions|Jo Newland|
  
-===== CONTENTS ===== +^Contents^^^
 |Index||1| |Index||1|
 |The Chase|H.I.S.|2| |The Chase|H.I.S.|2|
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-===== THE LEGEND OF LALINGTON NATIONAL PARK =====+===== THE LEGEND OF LAMINGTON NATIONAL PARK =====
  
 by Jack Debert (from a book on Lamington prepared by Qld.Forestry Dept). by Jack Debert (from a book on Lamington prepared by Qld.Forestry Dept).
  
-Back in the Dawn of Creation, Mount Wanungara, the Queen of the Mountains, +Back in the Dawn of Creation, Mount Wanungara, the Queen of the Mountains, had twin daughters, Princess Tooloona and Princess Caningera, who with silver laughter leapt and played in spray and foam throughout the ages, growing with the passing of Time in a playground of changing forests; until the day came when they wished to run away from their Mother, Wanungara, each to seek a husband. Each had heard from the rare North Wind of young Jamborin, a 
-had twin daughters, Princess Tooloona and Princess Caningera, who with silver +bold mountain twenty miles North, overlooking the blue waters of the Ocean, and already nearly wedded to the dashing foaming Koomooroo Princesses, daughters of Illimbah and Hobwee, who wore a little older. 
-laughter leapt and played in spray and foam throughout the ages, growing with the passing of Time in a playground of changing forests; until the day came when they wished to run away from their Mother, Wanungara, each to seek a husband. Each had hoard from the rare North Wind of young Jamborin, a + 
-bold mountain twenty miles North, overlooking the blue waters of the Ocean, +Princess Tooloona and Princess Caningeta thought if they could force their way out between Jamborin and the sea they would also take the waters of Jamborin and the Koomooroo Princesses, and carry them all to the Ocean where existed peace and reward. 
-and already nearly wedded to the dashing foaming Koomooroo Princesses, + 
-daughters of Illimbah and Hobwee, who wore a little older. +But Queen Wanungara had other ideas. For ages she had watches across a great valley of trees to Mount Nimbin; and she wished her daughters to go that way to the Ocean, for Nimbin was lonely and isolated, though majestic 
-Princess Tooloona and Princess Caningeta thought if they could force +and proud. Throughout the years Queen Wanungara thus craated rain and wind and flood, which gradually beat her, and secretly helped the young Princesses to carve their way North instead of South, so that the time came when Queen 
-their way out between Jamborin and the sea they would also take the waters of Jamborin and the Koomooroo Princesses, and carry them all to the Ocean where existed peace and reward. +Wanungara, in her most violent eruption of wrath and despair, frightened them together, and they joined as one, and in full flood raced wildly North, trying vainly to cross the barrier of hills to the East, beyond which the
-But Queen 7anungara had other ideas. For ages she had watches across a great valley of trees to Mount Nimbin; and she wished her daughters to go that way to the Ocean, for Nimbin was lonely and isolated, though majestic +
-and proud. Throughout the years Queen Tanungara thus craated rain and wind and +
-flood, which gradually boat her, and secretly helped the young Princesses to carve their way North instead of South, so that the time came when Queen +
-Tanungara, in her most violent eruption of wrath and despair, frightened them together, and they joined as one, and in full flood raced wildly North, trying vainly to cross the barrier of hills to the East, beyond which the+
 Koomoroo Princesses had flooded for centuries and gone down past Illinbah, over the spreading foot of young Jamborin, Eastward to the Ocean. Koomoroo Princesses had flooded for centuries and gone down past Illinbah, over the spreading foot of young Jamborin, Eastward to the Ocean.
-But young Jamborin remained faithful to the Koomoroo Princesses who had washed his feet for so long. Drenched by the echo from Queen 77anungarats torrential wrath he sent his flood waters racing Eastward into the valleys to feed the Princesses from Koomoroo, and only the sweat of his backrolled rest6e. ward+ 
-And now the Mountains and Rivers and Valleys have grown very, very old. Today you may stand on old Tamborinets (Jamborints) Southern shoulder and see the valleys of the Coomera (Koomoroo) and Canungra (Caningara) carved by the ages so deep that there can be no turning back or joining together. The Coomera River takes most of the Tamborine (Jamborin) waters and quickly reached the ocean while the Canungra meanders slowly away west of Tamborine. +But young Jamborin remained faithful to the Koomoroo Princesses who had washed his feet for so long. Drenched by the echo from Queen Wanungara'torrential wrath he sent his flood waters racing Eastward into the valleys to feed the Princesses from Koomoroo, and only the sweat of his back rolled Westward. 
-High up in the middle of the Lamington National Park you may stand and watch gnarled old 77anungara, still gazing out at lonely Nimbin, with the strong South land often blowing her hair back through the ancient Beech Trees, to carry a tale of sorrow to the two Princesses, -- Tooloona and Caningura -- who are still rUniling away, and always will. + 
-9. +And now the Mountains and Rivers and Valleys have grown very, very old. Today you may stand on old Tamborine'(Jamborin's) Southern shoulder and see the valleys of the Coomera (Koomoroo) and Canungra (Caningara) carved by the ages so deep that there can be no turning back or joining together. The Coomera River takes most of the Tamborine (Jamborin) waters and quickly reached the ocean while the Canungra meanders slowly away west of Tamborine. 
-),,r>.---Nr- +High up in the middle of the Lamington National Park you may stand and watch gnarled old Wanungara, still gazing out at lonely Nimbin, with the strong South land often blowing her hair back through the ancient Beech Trees, to carry a tale of sorrow to the two Princesses, - Tooloona and Caningura - who are still running away, and always will. 
- 047:9? c'.-) 6 4.,, j + 
- , 1 , \ +[Image missing] 
-LTNi-it.) 4LL'' +
- ii ....--,--- +
-\( - ,) Dcrs-wo, ',z) cQ=51 +
-+
-+
-I( j'7+
 "V.D.C. or not, I reckon you've carried your ideas on camouflage a bit too far this time, Coffey:" "V.D.C. or not, I reckon you've carried your ideas on camouflage a bit too far this time, Coffey:"
-(Note: The fauna is the property ci-J: Emile Mercier, but we feel sure he would not object to it being Of service to Bushwalkers.) +(Note: The fauna is the property of Emile Mercier, but we feel sure he would not object to it being Of service to Bushwalkers.) 
-10. + 
-THE SfDUTT=T'T STCY by "CANOPUS" +===== THE SOUTHERN SKY ===== 
-Apart from the Southern Cross, the Southern sky conaains no striking constellations, nor is there any mythology relating to this region. This + 
-is for the very sim-nle reason that the anci_nts lived too far north to see this part of the sky. But there are some vary brilliant stars there. The rogion contains Cantzpus, the second bri,shtest star, All)#Centauri, the +by "CANOPUS" 
-third brightest star, and Achonar, the ninth brightest star. The brilliant + 
-Canopus is a groat dist moo away and is probably of enormous size and lumin- +Apart from the Southern Cross, the Southern sky contains no striking constellations, nor is there any mythology relating to this region. This is for the very simple reason that the ancients lived too far north to see this part of the sky. But there are some vary brilliant stars there. The region contains Canopus, the second brightest star; Alpha Centauri, the third brightest star, and Achonar, the ninth brightest star. The brilliant Canopus is a great distance away and is probably of enormous size and luminosity. The region also contains the Magellanic clouds. These look like wisps of the Milky Way that have floated away from the main mass and this is, in 
-osity. The region also contains the Magellanic clouds. These look like wif:ps of the Milky Way that have floated away from the main mass and this is, in +fact, believed to have been their origin. Like the Milky Way they are composed of a great number of stars, clusters and nebulae. They were first fully described by Magellan, hence their name. 
-fact, believed to have been their origin. Like the Milky Way they are composed of a great number of stars, clusters and nebulae. They were first + 
-fully described by Magellan, hence their name. +All the stars in the diagram move around the South Celestial polo, making a complete circle in a year. Most of them are visible all the year. (They will be in the position shown below at 9 p m. on 6th November 1942). 
-All the stars in the diagram move around the South Celestial polo, making a complete circle in a yotir. Most of them are visible allltho year. (They will be in the position shown below at 9 p m. on 6th November 1942). + 
-There are throe easy ways of finding the polo+There are three easy ways of finding the pole: 
-(I) By projecting the vertical axis of the Cross three and a half 'times its own length.+ 
 +(1) By projecting the vertical axis of the Cross three and a half times its own length.
 (2) It forms a nearly equilateral triangle with the Magellanic clouds. (2) It forms a nearly equilateral triangle with the Magellanic clouds.
 (3) It is about half way between Beta Contatrk and Achonar. (3) It is about half way between Beta Contatrk and Achonar.
-Aeilenar 4t, 
-94 Lesser Magtllanic Cloud 
-Y 
-Pole t, 
-gGrcLter Magellanic iCloud 
-pha Centauris 4E, Canopus 
-_ Horizon 
-.. . 
-. 
-_ 
-*Beta Centauris 
-4:\ . L: , 
-*outhern Ci-osS f,o,  
-11, 
-LETTERS FROM THE LADS AND LASSES Letters this month received from:- 
-Jack Dobort - S.D.T. David Martin - Y.M.C.A. 
-Dick Schofi...ad 7.R.7ood - Rover Ramblers 
-Alf Watts - S.B.W. John Green 
-Doug McKellar - Rucksack 
-DICK SCHOF=D: I am ri,ht in the centre of a snot of "toughening up" at present with the Armoured Division and this is my first opportunity for a few Iv.,:ks to pen a line. One thing is certain - the Army doesn't cater for a true Bushwalker appetite. Our rations always seem to be short and iAlenever we halt in the field there is always a frantic chasing after rabbits to cup;)lement the rations. I've seen a flock of 10,000 sheep driven into our bivouac area and simply vanish. 11-.rd to believe isn't it? I hope that I-may droP in and see you all sometime soon if I got any leave, and renew friendships and perhaDs listen to a few yarns and the latest club scandal. 
-CPL.IUILLI:IMS of the Y.M.C.A. Ramblers writesL "It was most pleasant to receive your unvolol)e containing two selections from S.D.7% Annual Photo Exhibition. Here in New Guinea they brought back memories of cool gullies, and shady crocks, and I dwelt for some minutes ot pleasant hours opent among the exhilarating air of our own Blue Mountains. 
-I must confess ignorance, however, of the location of the Elal)ana Falls and if perchance I am fortunate enough to receive another communication from you I should be glad if you would explain just where it is. 
-New Guinea is a place of hills and mountains and they commence right at the coast. I understand that on the first range of mountains scenery similar to that of our Blue Mountains can be viewed, but I have not yet had the cortunity of journeying in that dir_ction so I cannot give you my own opinion. On the other side of this range is the well known Owen Stanley Range which rises at its highest point to 13,000 ft. 
-within the region of my own activities I have seen a ty-e of wallaby or small kangaroo (I express the doubt because of the finely shaped head of the animal), and also what is known commonly as the New Guinea Kookaburra which is similar to our own "Kooka" excuPt that it is smaller and has blue coloured wings, however, the cry of this bird is ot at all like ollr (Dun, it is a raucous jumble of noises and sometimes nearly geta that laugh we know so won, I've an idea that if we im.--;orted one of OUT own birds we would soon teach them how to laugh in the conventional manner." 
-JACK DERERT: "Tit the moment I am on some organising work before joining my squadron. It is great fun--building up somethin:f: from nothing. I made this damp- site fear a small ;pass. Thu prevailing winds come in over that pass, and it is usually a very cooling and refreshing breeze. As thi sun gets higher the mosquitoes go to bed--or to 1)laces whero mosquitoes go when the sun comes up. 
-About 8 o'clock last night we rode down to a nearby-camp for a shower. The performance the little cows of moaquitous put up was nobody's business. They dive bombed and did everything while we were under the shower and drying ourselves. Early morning and late evening we trick them by getting into overalls. 
-There's tons of work to do, but it's real camp lifethe sort I love. 
-There are all s6rts of things to arrange for--tent sites, hr,ls for latrines. The kitchen is nearly corn leted and th:- messing hut for the men is all but finished." 
-12. 
-FED=IOU NOTS. 
-Dealing with the C.M.7's letter o-Teosin:, the erection of a Youth Hostel at 
-Little Marley, it was decided to suggest an'alternative site to the Youth 
-Hostels Associvtion. DA.egatus felt that Little Marley was too close to Bundeena and suggested somewhere on South-west-arm Creek near Flat Rock Crossing as being much more suitable. Delegates were asked to got rulings from their 
-clubs before next Council mooting as to their clubs' attitudeto Youth Hostels generally. - 
-The Editor of "The Bushwalker", No.6 reportod progress: Everything was 
-ready for Printing and the Publication Committee had that day received the necessary 1.yermission to publish a magazine this year. 
-The President reported with great regret that the V.D.C. Guide and Reconnaissance Corps had been disbanded. The military authorities claimed it was 
-serving no useful pur-oose, and they had dispensed with the services of the 
-part-time members, (who had never been attested) and of the O.C., who had been 
-censured for exceeding his authority by issuing rail warrants to men who had 
-not been attested and enrolled in the V.D.C. by the powers-that-be! Another 
-very regrettable feature was that those members who had atteSted for full time duty in the Guide and Reconnaissance Corps had been transferred to guard and garrison duty. The question of a protJst was discussed but the decision was thatit 
-, was inadvisable to take any action. 
-It was decided to revive and re-organise the Search and Rescue Section so 
-as to provide for the increasing number of inexperienced walkers, to make use of the work and knowledge of the G. & R.C. to provide a group of bushwalkers available at short notice if ne..ded in a national emergency. 
-AT OUR MN MEETING 
-One new member, Miss Grace Moroney, was welcomed into the Club. Roly Cotter's resignation from the office of Vice-President was accepted with regret, 
-Mario Kinsella was elected as a delegatt to the Youth Parliament in place of Joyce Kennedy, who is unable to attend the next meeting. 
-The Services Committee is busy sending parcels to the lads for Christmas, It is still in need of magazines. 
-The attitude of the Club to Youth Hostels was then discussed (sou Federation notes). In opening the discussion iLlex Colley put the question m7hy do youths 
-need hostels?" Ho said that the idea of Youth Hostels came from Euro-13e. In 
-Europe they wore a necessity because most of the land was privately owned and not available for camping, because firewood was scarce and fires often forbidden, 
-and because the climate was cold and wet. Here there was plenty of land avail- 
-able for camping, fires could be lit in most places and the climate was mild and sunny. Bushwalkers disliked being shut off from the trees and sun by walls and a roof, and sharing cramped quarters with a number of others whom they may 
-never have met before. But, if youths desired hostels, Buslr-alkers should co-operate with the Hostel movement in the same way as they did with the 
-- so long as the cause of conservation was furthered. He therefore moved "That "That this Club suT)orts Youth Hostels, provided that hostels are not placed in areas suitable for primitive reserves." 
  
-In seconding the motion Myles Dunphy said that the M.T.C. had considered Youth Hostels from two aspects, that of the necessity f'Ir Youth Hostels and that of the situation of hostels. It was in favour of establishing -nuth Hostels, but only in suitable areas. He -eointd out that the only primitive part of National Park is around little 1.1arley; where it is proposed to build the -Zirct hostel. A hostel needs fuel aeld0.Da,,91 therefore vehicular traffic is necessary, and a track or road oust he elade. The timber around would soon go. 20 people for one week would use up all the timber in the vicinity. A 'hostel was for peo-ele who did not want to become Dushwalkers.+[image missing]
  
-Dorothy Lawry pointed out that many of the hostel users would probably become bushwalkers, and Mr.Grose, a visitor from Melb-ourne, said that there were 300 people in the Victorian hostels movement and that there had been a definite increase in new members of walking clubs as the result of the hostel movement.+===== LETTERS FROM THE LADS AND LASSES =====
  
-Mouldy Harrison drew a distinction between primitive areas and parks with roads and other improvements, National Park was wanted as a primitive area park. For this reason Era, which was well placed for a short weekend trip, was a better site than Little MarleyHe thought that the Youth Hostels Movement and the Dushwalking movement would remain separateThis was so in Europe, where the campers were distinct from the hostel users.+Letters this month received from:- 
 +|Jack Debert - S.B.W.\\ David Martin - Y.M.C.A.\\ Dick Schofield S.B.W.\\ W.R. Wood - Rover Ramblers\\ Alf Watts - S.B.W.\\ John Green - Y.M.C.A.\\ Doug McKellar - Rucksack|
  
-Laurie Rayner said that walkers in Europe, who have to carry fuel, only carry a tent if they have to. Youth Hostels were for people commencing tbeir walking career. We -should offer them a helping hand. We should send a bush walker to the hostel every weekend to organise walks and teach bushcraft. We should not be snobs and keel'them out of our garden because they don't know anything about bushwalking,+**DICK SCHOFIELD:** I am right in the centre of a spot of "toughening up" at present with the Armoured Division and this is my first opportunity for a few weeks to pen a line. One thing is certain - the Army doesn't cater for a true Bushwalker appetite. Our rations always seem to be short and whenever we halt in the field there is always a frantic chasing after rabbits to supplement the rations. I've seen a flock of 10,000 sheep driven into our bivouac area and simply vanish. Hard to believe isn't it? I hope that I-may drop in and see you all sometime soon if I get any leave, and renew friendships and perhaps listen to a few yarns and the latest club scandal. 
 + 
 +**CPL. WILLIAMS of the Y.M.C.A. Ramblers writes:** "It was most pleasant to receive your envelope containing two selections from S.B.W Annual Photo Exhibition. Here in New Guinea they brought back memories of cool gullies, and shady crocks, and I dwelt for some minutes on pleasant hours spent among the exhilarating air of our own Blue Mountains. 
 + 
 +I must confess ignorance, however, of the location of the Elabena Falls and if perchance I am fortunate enough to receive another communication from you I should be glad if you would explain just where it is. 
 + 
 +New Guinea is a place of hills and mountains and they commence right at the coast. I understand that on the first range of mountains scenery similar to that of our Blue Mountains can be viewed, but I have not yet had the opportunity of journeying in that direction so I cannot give you my own opinion. On the other side of this range is the well known Owen Stanley Range which rises at its highest point to 13,000 ft. within the region of my own activities I have seen a type of wallaby or small kangaroo (I express the doubt because of the finely shaped head of the animal), and also what is known commonly as the New Guinea Kookaburra which is similar to our own "Kooka" except that it is smaller and has blue coloured wings, however, the cry of this bird is not at all like our own, it is a raucous jumble of noises and sometimes nearly gets that laugh we know so well, I've an idea that if we imported one of our own birds we would soon teach them how to laugh in the conventional manner." 
 + 
 +**JACK DEBERT:** "At the moment I am on some organising work before joining my squadron. It is great fun building up something from nothing. I made this camp site near a small pass. The prevailing winds come in over that pass, and it is usually a very cooling and refreshing breeze. As the sun gets higher the mosquitoes go to bed - or to places where mosquitoes go when the sun comes up. 
 + 
 +About 8 o'clock last night we rode down to a nearby camp for a shower. The performance the little cows of mosquitoes put up was nobody's business. They dive bombed and did everything while we were under the shower and drying ourselves. Early morning and late evening we trick them by getting into overalls. 
 + 
 +There's tons of work to do, but it's real camp life - the sort I love. 
 + 
 +There are all sorts of things to arrange for - tent sites, holes for latrines. The kitchen is nearly completed and the messing hut for the men is all but finished." 
 + 
 +===== FEDERATON NOTES ===== 
 + 
 +Dealing with the C.M.W's letter opposing the erection of a Youth Hostel at Little Marley, it was decided to suggest an alternative site to the Youth Hostels Association.  Delegates felt that Little Marley was too close to Bundeena and suggested somewhere on South-west-arm Creek near Flat Rock Crossing as being much more suitable. Delegates were asked to get rulings from their clubs before next Council meeting as to their clubs' attitude to Youth Hostels generally. 
 + 
 +The Editor of "The Bushwalker", No.6 reported progress: Everything was ready for Printing and the Publication Committee had that day received the necessary permission to publish a magazine this year. 
 + 
 +The President reported with great regret that the V.D.C. Guide and Reconnaissance Corps had been disbanded. The military authorities claimed it was serving no useful purpose, and they had dispensed with the services of the 
 +part-time members, (who had never been attested) and of the O.C., who had been censured for exceeding his authority by issuing rail warrants to men who had not been attested and enrolled in the V.D.C. by the powers-that-be! Another 
 +very regrettable feature was that those members who had attested for full time duty in the Guide and Reconnaissance Corps had been transferred to guard and garrison duty. The question of a protest was discussed but the decision was that it was inadvisable to take any action. 
 + 
 +It was decided to revive and re-organise the Search and Rescue Section so as to provide for the increasing number of inexperienced walkers, to make use of the work and knowledge of the G. & R.C. to provide a group of bushwalkers available at short notice if needed in a national emergency. 
 + 
 +===== AT OUR OWN MEETING ===== 
 + 
 +One new member, Miss Grace Moroney, was welcomed into the Club. Roly Cotter's resignation from the office of Vice-President was accepted with regret. 
 + 
 +Marie Kinsella was elected as a delegate to the Youth Parliament in place of Joyce Kennedy, who is unable to attend the next meeting. 
 + 
 +The Services Committee is busy sending parcels to the lads for Christmas. It is still in need of magazines. 
 + 
 +The attitude of the Club to Youth Hostels was then discussed (see Federation notes). In opening the discussion Alex Colley put the question "why do youths need hostels?" He said that the idea of Youth Hostels came from Europe. In 
 +Europe they were a necessity because most of the land was privately owned and not available for camping, because firewood was scarce and fires often forbidden, and because the climate was cold and wet. Here there was plenty of land available for camping, fires could be lit in most places and the climate was mild and sunny. Bushwalkers disliked being shut off from the trees and sun by walls and a roof, and sharing cramped quarters with a number of others whom they may never have met before. But, if youths desired hostels, Buslwalkers should co-operate with the Hostel movement in the same way as they did with the N.R.M.A. - so long as the cause of conservation was furthered. He therefore moved "That this Club supports Youth Hostels, provided that hostels are not placed in areas suitable for primitive reserves." 
 + 
 +In seconding the motion Myles Dunphy said that the M.T.C. had considered Youth Hostels from two aspects, that of the necessity for Youth Hostels and that of the situation of hostels. It was in favour of establishing Youth Hostels, but only in suitable areas. He pointed out that the only primitive part of National Park is around little Marley; where it is proposed to build the first hostel.  A hostel needs fuel and goods, therefore vehicular traffic is necessary, and a track or road must be made. The timber around would soon go. 20 people for one week would use up all the timber in the vicinity. A hostel was for people who did not want to become Bushwalkers. 
 + 
 +Dorothy Lawry pointed out that many of the hostel users would probably become bushwalkers, and Mr. Grose, a visitor from Melbourne, said that there were 300 people in the Victorian hostels movement and that there had been a definite increase in new members of walking clubs as the result of the hostel movement. 
 + 
 +Mouldy Harrison drew a distinction between primitive areas and parks with roads and other improvements.  National Park was wanted as a primitive area park. For this reason Era, which was well placed for a short weekend trip, was a better site than Little Marley. He thought that the Youth Hostels Movement and the Bushwalking movement would remain separate. This was so in Europe, where the campers were distinct from the hostel users. 
 + 
 +Laurie Rayner said that walkers in Europe, who have to carry fuel, only carry a tent if they have to. Youth Hostels were for people commencing their walking career. We should offer them a helping hand. We should send a bush walker to the hostel every weekend to organise walks and teach bushcraft. We should not be snobs and keep them out of our garden because they don't know anything about bushwalking
 + 
 +Wal Roots said that the hostels movement will give recruits to the Bushwalking movement if we adopt the right attitude towards it. If we were to get behind the movement we could decide where the next hostel would be placedand there would be no need to make any stipulations about primitive areas.
  
-Wal Roots said that the hostels movement will give recruits to the Bush walking movement if we adopt the right attitude towards it. If we were to get behind the movement we could decide where the next hostel would be placed, and there would be no need to make any stipulations about primitive areas. 
 Charles Jones said that the main point to consider was that hostels would bring people out of the city and into the bush. Hostels were not designed for bushwalkers. Charles Jones said that the main point to consider was that hostels would bring people out of the city and into the bush. Hostels were not designed for bushwalkers.
  
-Ray Kirkby said that there was already accommodation for those who wanted to do walks in places close to Sydney. Hostels should be put in worth while places so enabling people who did not want to carry packs to do interesting walks.+Ray Kirkby said that there was already accommodation for those who wanted to do walks in places close to Sydney. Hostels should be put in worthwhile places so enabling people who did not want to carry packs to do interesting walks.
  
 Marie Byles said that she thought the Hostels Movement was anxious for a lead from the Bushwalking movement, 5 of the 10 members of the Youth Hostels Committee were bushwalkers and could exert a determining influence on the placing of hostels. She therefore moved that the second portion of the motion be amended to read "provided the Federation has some say in their management and location". The amendment was carried. The motion was then put and carried. Marie Byles said that she thought the Hostels Movement was anxious for a lead from the Bushwalking movement, 5 of the 10 members of the Youth Hostels Committee were bushwalkers and could exert a determining influence on the placing of hostels. She therefore moved that the second portion of the motion be amended to read "provided the Federation has some say in their management and location". The amendment was carried. The motion was then put and carried.
  
-Alex Colley then moved that the motion of the last General Meeting, approving of tile -erection of a hostel at Marley should be rescinded. The rescinding of this motion was approved by the meeting. It was also resolved that members should be acquainted with other proposed hostel sits and the matter be discussed at the next meeting (See article on page 7).+Alex Colley then moved that the motion of the last General Meeting, approving of the erection of a hostel at Marley should be rescinded. The rescinding of this motion was approved by the meeting. It was also resolved that members should be acquainted with other proposed hostel sites and the matter be discussed at the next meeting (See article on page 7).
  
-INNOCUOUS ITEMS+===== INNOCUOUS ITEMS =====
  
-Quite a lot of old bushwalkers were present at the Services Committee +Quite a lot of old bushwalkers were present at the Services Committee Concert on Friday 23rd OctoberCharles Kilpatrickthe first Club Secretarybrought along several Mountain Trails Club members. They hurried through their meeting in order to be present. Several clubs were representedCoast and Mountain Walkers, Rucksacks, Rover Ramblers etc.  "House full" sign was hung out early in the evening and after the door was shut members and visitors were fleeced to the extent of £ll.
-Concert on Friday 23rd OctoberCharles Kilpatrick the first Club Secretary +
-brought along several Mountain Trails Club members. They hurried through their meeting in order to be present. Several clubs were representedCoast and Moun- +
-tain Walkers, Rucksacks, Rover Ramblers etc. "House full" sign was hung out early in the evening and after the door was shut members and visitors were fleeced +
-to the extent of Ell,+
  
-The S.U.D.S. staged "The Blister" by ETDrake-Brockman, a one-act play of life in the raw in a North Australian town; a play of passions and pearls +The S.U.D.S. staged "The Blister" by E Drake-Brockman, a one-act play of life in the raw in a North Australian town; a play of passions and pearls where the no-class girl with the heart of gold sacrificed her happiness for the sake of the man she loved (several steps above her in the social scale). It was a pleasure to watch a play so well acted and well produced.
-where the no-class girl with the heart of gold sacrificed her happiness for the sake of the man she loved-(several steps above her in the social scale). It was a pleasure to watch a play so well acted and well produced.+
  
-We would like to offer our congratulations to Edgar Yardley for his portrayal +We would like to offer our congratulations to Edgar Yardley for his portrayal of the hard ruthless captain of the pearling lugger. It was for this piece of characterization that Edgar was recently awarded the British Drama League Cup for the best male actor.
-of the hard ruthless captain of the pearling lugger. It was for this piece of characterization that Edgar was recently a arded the British Drama League Cup for the best male actor.+
  
-From the rudelcrude stark realism of Passion and pearls we were wafted to the delightfully sweet land of make-believe-the land of Faetie and Frolicwhere little girls and little boys with all their illusions still clinging to themlsang Dainty Little Ditties which took us way back to the Kindergarten. But now we can understand why Miss Muff ett always had such an appeal even in those far off days. Frills! What Frills! But usen't Miss M. wear them round the ankles Joan?+From the rude, crude stark realism of passion and pearls we were wafted to the delightfully sweet land of make-believe - the land of Faetie and Frolic where little girls and little boys with all their illusions still clinging to them, sang Dainty Little Ditties which took us way back to the Kindergarten. But now we can understand why Miss Muffett always had such an appeal even in those far off days. Frills! What Frills! But doesn't Miss M. wear them round the ankles Joan?
  
-Joan Savage told us the story of the Holly Tree and the Christmas Bells --,a a tale which stirred the heart of even the most hardened Bushwalker present. A few surruptitious sniffs were heard and even th- strong and stalwart Morrie Stephenson was seen to wipe away a tear.+Joan Savage told us the story of the Holly Tree and the Christmas Bells -a tale which stirred the heart of even the most hardened Bushwalker present. A few surreptitious sniffs were heard and even the strong and stalwart Morrie Stephenson was seen to wipe away a tear.
  
-Who said the elephant never forgets? Well we believe it now. Our dancing +Who said the elephant never forgets? Well we believe it now. Our dancing Jumbo tricked us completely. Next time we'll bring along our favourite white mouse and watch the effect.
-Jumbo tricked us completely. Next time we'll bring along our favourite white mouse and watch the effect.+
  
-Next came the Mill Girl. The story of a cunning plot which did not come off. +Next came the Mill Girl. The story of a cunning plot which did not come off.  True love won the day and virtue brought its own reward. But surely even the poor, ignorant mill-girl might be told that the darning needle is now a weapon of war.
-True love won the day and virtue brought its own reward. But surely even the +
-poor, hignorant mill-girl might be told that the darning needle is now a weapon_ of war.+
  
-R.L.Paynes' singing and Marjorie McDonald's dancing added to the pleasure of the evening while Frank Duncan's Wal Roots's Act "The Golden Fleece" completely justified the title.+R.L. Paynes' singing and Marjorie McDonald's dancing added to the pleasure of the evening while Frank Duncan's Wal Roots's Act "The Golden Fleece" completely justified the title. 
 + 
 +---------
  
 Mr & Mrs Fred Svensen have a son, we give them our blessing. It is with no little interest that we learn that Grace Edgecombe is sewing a table centre!!! If she starts a supper cloth we may be able to tell you something. More congratulations to Edith Findlay and Bill Watson who were recently married and Lola Bennett and John Manson who were married last Wednesday. Mr & Mrs Fred Svensen have a son, we give them our blessing. It is with no little interest that we learn that Grace Edgecombe is sewing a table centre!!! If she starts a supper cloth we may be able to tell you something. More congratulations to Edith Findlay and Bill Watson who were recently married and Lola Bennett and John Manson who were married last Wednesday.
  
-IMPORTANT DATES +===== IMPORTANT DATES FOR YOUR SOCIAL CALENDAR ===== 
-FOR + 
-YOUR SOCIAL CALENDAR +|November 27th (Friday)|Miss Esme Brown will tell us of her experience in "Fiji Today"| 
-NOVEIDER 27th MISS ESIT BROWN will tell us of her exoerience in (Friday) +|November 28th/29th|Federation Reunion - Don'miss it!| 
-"FIJI TO-DAY!. +|December 18th (Friday)|Christmas Party at the Club Room\\ Let us see what you forecast as the bushwalking outfit of 20 years after rationing| 
-28th/29th DTL Don'mis it + 
-DECEIMER 18th + 
-(Friday) pERIS:TMAS PARTY - at the CLUB ROOM. +|FOR ALL YOUR PHOTOGRAPHIC REQUIREMENTS\\ and for\\ EXCELLENT DEVELOPING WORK\\ and\\ ENLARGING SERVICE\\ \\ GOODMAN BROS.\\ 20 Hunter Street, Sydney. (opp. Wynyard)\\ Tel. B3438.\\ | 
-Let us see what you forecast as the Bushwalking outfit of WITTY YEARS AFTER RATIONING + 
-gC-CCa:-COMECCOCCa-CC-,CCOL:,ZL12.C.a...a.T;C_CX g(10.._IL-Ci,_,T:.:,,,:_.Q,.-20.. ,CCC,11? +===== YOU CAN NEVER TELL! ===== 
-@ @ +
-@ (.7) 0 FOR ALL YOUR PHOTOGRAPHIC REQUIREMENTS +
-vz.. @ and f or +
-@ @ +
-0. +
-EXCELLENT DEVELOPING WORK C;) +
-Q 0 +
-El) and +
-O EN:LARGMTG SERVICE +
-0 r +
-0. C.-) +
-0 (-) +
-,:. +
-(:.) (7-.) +
-_GOODMAN BROS. +
- a 0 +
-20 Hunter Street, Sydney. +
-(ovip. Wynyard) +
-Tel. B3438. 0 +
-C._......._ _....._....... e +
-r) (,) +
-aY.:_axmala,c,:c=ccactccrffacaDaalco-.K.,:-ccaLcaxrccmzam @ +
-YOU CAN NEVER+
 Recently an Allied Nations Naval Officer walked into the shop. We were busy demonstrating waterproof sleeping bags to a couple of soldiers. Recently an Allied Nations Naval Officer walked into the shop. We were busy demonstrating waterproof sleeping bags to a couple of soldiers.
-?Thar_ it came to the A.N.N.O. (Allied Nations Naval Officer) we wondered what he wanted. Naval men don't go in for camipin,gear as a rule. He explained that ordinairily he slept in his bunk below but when it was hot he liked to rig up a temporairy bed on deck and sleeD there. Thinking something good and solid would suit the Navy, we showed him all the heavy weight duck bags we had about the place, but imagine our surprise when he picked out a "Paddymade" Midget Tont - the feather weight tent cum groundsheet cum mosquito net and "reckoned that was just about his seed+ 
-You can nevc;tell what folks will choose - yet you can be sure of +When it came to the A.N.N.O. (Allied Nations Naval Officer) we wondered what he wanted. Naval men don't go in for camping gear as a rule. He explained that ordinarily he slept in his bunk below but when it was hot he liked to rig up a temporary bed on deck and sleep there. Thinking something good and solid would suit the Navy, we showed him all the heavy weight duck bags we had about the place, but imagine our surprise when he picked out a "Paddymade" Midget Tent - the feather weight tent cum groundsheet cum mosquito net and "reckoned that was just about his speed". 
-"PADDY-MADE".+ 
 +You can never tell what folks will choose - yet you can be sure of "PADDY-MADE". 
 PADDY PALLIN, PADDY PALLIN,
-CAMP GEAR FOR 17ALKERS1 +CAMP GEAR FOR WALKERS 
-327 lleorge Street+327 George Street
 SYDNEY SYDNEY
-16. +Phone B3101.
-'Phone B3101.+
  
194211.1465716535.txt.gz · Last modified: 2016/06/12 07:28 by vievems