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194211 [2016/06/12 08:41]
vievems
194211 [2016/06/12 09:19]
vievems
Line 150: Line 150:
 by Jack Debert (from a book on Lamington prepared by Qld.Forestry Dept). by Jack Debert (from a book on Lamington prepared by Qld.Forestry Dept).
  
-Back in the Dawn of Creation, Mount Wanungara, the Queen of the Mountains, +Back in the Dawn of Creation, Mount Wanungara, the Queen of the Mountains, had twin daughters, Princess Tooloona and Princess Caningera, who with silver laughter leapt and played in spray and foam throughout the ages, growing with the passing of Time in a playground of changing forests; until the day came when they wished to run away from their Mother, Wanungara, each to seek a husband. Each had heard from the rare North Wind of young Jamborin, a 
-had twin daughters, Princess Tooloona and Princess Caningera, who with silver +bold mountain twenty miles North, overlooking the blue waters of the Ocean, and already nearly wedded to the dashing foaming Koomooroo Princesses, daughters of Illimbah and Hobwee, who wore a little older. 
-laughter leapt and played in spray and foam throughout the ages, growing with the passing of Time in a playground of changing forests; until the day came when they wished to run away from their Mother, Wanungara, each to seek a husband. Each had hoard from the rare North Wind of young Jamborin, a + 
-bold mountain twenty miles North, overlooking the blue waters of the Ocean, +Princess Tooloona and Princess Caningeta thought if they could force their way out between Jamborin and the sea they would also take the waters of Jamborin and the Koomooroo Princesses, and carry them all to the Ocean where existed peace and reward. 
-and already nearly wedded to the dashing foaming Koomooroo Princesses, + 
-daughters of Illimbah and Hobwee, who wore a little older. +But Queen Wanungara had other ideas. For ages she had watches across a great valley of trees to Mount Nimbin; and she wished her daughters to go that way to the Ocean, for Nimbin was lonely and isolated, though majestic 
-Princess Tooloona and Princess Caningeta thought if they could force +and proud. Throughout the years Queen Wanungara thus craated rain and wind and flood, which gradually beat her, and secretly helped the young Princesses to carve their way North instead of South, so that the time came when Queen 
-their way out between Jamborin and the sea they would also take the waters of Jamborin and the Koomooroo Princesses, and carry them all to the Ocean where existed peace and reward. +Wanungara, in her most violent eruption of wrath and despair, frightened them together, and they joined as one, and in full flood raced wildly North, trying vainly to cross the barrier of hills to the East, beyond which the
-But Queen 7anungara had other ideas. For ages she had watches across a great valley of trees to Mount Nimbin; and she wished her daughters to go that way to the Ocean, for Nimbin was lonely and isolated, though majestic +
-and proud. Throughout the years Queen Tanungara thus craated rain and wind and +
-flood, which gradually boat her, and secretly helped the young Princesses to carve their way North instead of South, so that the time came when Queen +
-Tanungara, in her most violent eruption of wrath and despair, frightened them together, and they joined as one, and in full flood raced wildly North, trying vainly to cross the barrier of hills to the East, beyond which the+
 Koomoroo Princesses had flooded for centuries and gone down past Illinbah, over the spreading foot of young Jamborin, Eastward to the Ocean. Koomoroo Princesses had flooded for centuries and gone down past Illinbah, over the spreading foot of young Jamborin, Eastward to the Ocean.
-But young Jamborin remained faithful to the Koomoroo Princesses who had washed his feet for so long. Drenched by the echo from Queen 77anungarats torrential wrath he sent his flood waters racing Eastward into the valleys to feed the Princesses from Koomoroo, and only the sweat of his backrolled rest6e. ward+ 
-And now the Mountains and Rivers and Valleys have grown very, very old. Today you may stand on old Tamborinets (Jamborints) Southern shoulder and see the valleys of the Coomera (Koomoroo) and Canungra (Caningara) carved by the ages so deep that there can be no turning back or joining together. The Coomera River takes most of the Tamborine (Jamborin) waters and quickly reached the ocean while the Canungra meanders slowly away west of Tamborine. +But young Jamborin remained faithful to the Koomoroo Princesses who had washed his feet for so long. Drenched by the echo from Queen Wanungara'torrential wrath he sent his flood waters racing Eastward into the valleys to feed the Princesses from Koomoroo, and only the sweat of his back rolled Westward. 
-High up in the middle of the Lamington National Park you may stand and watch gnarled old 77anungara, still gazing out at lonely Nimbin, with the strong South land often blowing her hair back through the ancient Beech Trees, to carry a tale of sorrow to the two Princesses, -- Tooloona and Caningura -- who are still rUniling away, and always will. + 
-9. +And now the Mountains and Rivers and Valleys have grown very, very old. Today you may stand on old Tamborine'(Jamborin's) Southern shoulder and see the valleys of the Coomera (Koomoroo) and Canungra (Caningara) carved by the ages so deep that there can be no turning back or joining together. The Coomera River takes most of the Tamborine (Jamborin) waters and quickly reached the ocean while the Canungra meanders slowly away west of Tamborine. 
-),,r>.---Nr- +High up in the middle of the Lamington National Park you may stand and watch gnarled old Wanungara, still gazing out at lonely Nimbin, with the strong South land often blowing her hair back through the ancient Beech Trees, to carry a tale of sorrow to the two Princesses, - Tooloona and Caningura - who are still running away, and always will. 
- 047:9? c'.-) 6 4.,, j + 
- , 1 , \ +[Image missing] 
-LTNi-it.) 4LL'' +
- ii ....--,--- +
-\( - ,) Dcrs-wo, ',z) cQ=51 +
-+
-+
-I( j'7+
 "V.D.C. or not, I reckon you've carried your ideas on camouflage a bit too far this time, Coffey:" "V.D.C. or not, I reckon you've carried your ideas on camouflage a bit too far this time, Coffey:"
-(Note: The fauna is the property ci-J: Emile Mercier, but we feel sure he would not object to it being Of service to Bushwalkers.) +(Note: The fauna is the property of Emile Mercier, but we feel sure he would not object to it being Of service to Bushwalkers.) 
-10. + 
-THE SfDUTT=T'T STCY by "CANOPUS" +===== THE SOUTHERN SKY ===== 
-Apart from the Southern Cross, the Southern sky conaains no striking constellations, nor is there any mythology relating to this region. This + 
-is for the very sim-nle reason that the anci_nts lived too far north to see this part of the sky. But there are some vary brilliant stars there. The rogion contains Cantzpus, the second bri,shtest star, All)#Centauri, the +by "CANOPUS" 
-third brightest star, and Achonar, the ninth brightest star. The brilliant + 
-Canopus is a groat dist moo away and is probably of enormous size and lumin- +Apart from the Southern Cross, the Southern sky contains no striking constellations, nor is there any mythology relating to this region. This is for the very simple reason that the ancients lived too far north to see this part of the sky. But there are some vary brilliant stars there. The region contains Canopus, the second brightest star; Alpha Centauri, the third brightest star, and Achonar, the ninth brightest star. The brilliant Canopus is a great distance away and is probably of enormous size and luminosity. The region also contains the Magellanic clouds. These look like wisps of the Milky Way that have floated away from the main mass and this is, in 
-osity. The region also contains the Magellanic clouds. These look like wif:ps of the Milky Way that have floated away from the main mass and this is, in +fact, believed to have been their origin. Like the Milky Way they are composed of a great number of stars, clusters and nebulae. They were first fully described by Magellan, hence their name. 
-fact, believed to have been their origin. Like the Milky Way they are composed of a great number of stars, clusters and nebulae. They were first + 
-fully described by Magellan, hence their name. +All the stars in the diagram move around the South Celestial polo, making a complete circle in a year. Most of them are visible all the year. (They will be in the position shown below at 9 p m. on 6th November 1942). 
-All the stars in the diagram move around the South Celestial polo, making a complete circle in a yotir. Most of them are visible allltho year. (They will be in the position shown below at 9 p m. on 6th November 1942). + 
-There are throe easy ways of finding the polo+There are three easy ways of finding the pole: 
-(I) By projecting the vertical axis of the Cross three and a half 'times its own length.+ 
 +(1) By projecting the vertical axis of the Cross three and a half times its own length.
 (2) It forms a nearly equilateral triangle with the Magellanic clouds. (2) It forms a nearly equilateral triangle with the Magellanic clouds.
 (3) It is about half way between Beta Contatrk and Achonar. (3) It is about half way between Beta Contatrk and Achonar.
-Aeilenar 4t, 
-94 Lesser Magtllanic Cloud 
-Y 
-Pole t, 
-gGrcLter Magellanic iCloud 
-pha Centauris 4E, Canopus 
-_ Horizon 
-.. . 
-. 
-_ 
-*Beta Centauris 
-4:\ . L: , 
-*outhern Ci-osS f,o,  
-11, 
-LETTERS FROM THE LADS AND LASSES Letters this month received from:- 
-Jack Dobort - S.D.T. David Martin - Y.M.C.A. 
-Dick Schofi...ad 7.R.7ood - Rover Ramblers 
-Alf Watts - S.B.W. John Green 
-Doug McKellar - Rucksack 
-DICK SCHOF=D: I am ri,ht in the centre of a snot of "toughening up" at present with the Armoured Division and this is my first opportunity for a few Iv.,:ks to pen a line. One thing is certain - the Army doesn't cater for a true Bushwalker appetite. Our rations always seem to be short and iAlenever we halt in the field there is always a frantic chasing after rabbits to cup;)lement the rations. I've seen a flock of 10,000 sheep driven into our bivouac area and simply vanish. 11-.rd to believe isn't it? I hope that I-may droP in and see you all sometime soon if I got any leave, and renew friendships and perhaDs listen to a few yarns and the latest club scandal. 
-CPL.IUILLI:IMS of the Y.M.C.A. Ramblers writesL "It was most pleasant to receive your unvolol)e containing two selections from S.D.7% Annual Photo Exhibition. Here in New Guinea they brought back memories of cool gullies, and shady crocks, and I dwelt for some minutes ot pleasant hours opent among the exhilarating air of our own Blue Mountains. 
-I must confess ignorance, however, of the location of the Elal)ana Falls and if perchance I am fortunate enough to receive another communication from you I should be glad if you would explain just where it is. 
-New Guinea is a place of hills and mountains and they commence right at the coast. I understand that on the first range of mountains scenery similar to that of our Blue Mountains can be viewed, but I have not yet had the cortunity of journeying in that dir_ction so I cannot give you my own opinion. On the other side of this range is the well known Owen Stanley Range which rises at its highest point to 13,000 ft. 
-within the region of my own activities I have seen a ty-e of wallaby or small kangaroo (I express the doubt because of the finely shaped head of the animal), and also what is known commonly as the New Guinea Kookaburra which is similar to our own "Kooka" excuPt that it is smaller and has blue coloured wings, however, the cry of this bird is ot at all like ollr (Dun, it is a raucous jumble of noises and sometimes nearly geta that laugh we know so won, I've an idea that if we im.--;orted one of OUT own birds we would soon teach them how to laugh in the conventional manner." 
-JACK DERERT: "Tit the moment I am on some organising work before joining my squadron. It is great fun--building up somethin:f: from nothing. I made this damp- site fear a small ;pass. Thu prevailing winds come in over that pass, and it is usually a very cooling and refreshing breeze. As thi sun gets higher the mosquitoes go to bed--or to 1)laces whero mosquitoes go when the sun comes up. 
-About 8 o'clock last night we rode down to a nearby-camp for a shower. The performance the little cows of moaquitous put up was nobody's business. They dive bombed and did everything while we were under the shower and drying ourselves. Early morning and late evening we trick them by getting into overalls. 
-There's tons of work to do, but it's real camp lifethe sort I love. 
-There are all s6rts of things to arrange for--tent sites, hr,ls for latrines. The kitchen is nearly corn leted and th:- messing hut for the men is all but finished." 
-12. 
  
-===== FEDERATON NOTES=====+[image missing] 
 + 
 +===== LETTERS FROM THE LADS AND LASSES ===== 
 + 
 +Letters this month received from:- 
 +|Jack Debert - S.B.W.\\ David Martin - Y.M.C.A.\\ Dick Schofield S.B.W.\\ W.R. Wood - Rover Ramblers\\  
 +Alf Watts - S.B.W.\\ John Green - Y.M.C.A.\\ Doug McKellar - Rucksack 
 + 
 +**DICK SCHOFIELD:** I am right in the centre of a spot of "toughening up" at present with the Armoured Division and this is my first opportunity for a few weeks to pen a line. One thing is certain - the Army doesn't cater for a true Bushwalker appetite. Our rations always seem to be short and whenever we halt in the field there is always a frantic chasing after rabbits to supplement the rations. I've seen a flock of 10,000 sheep driven into our bivouac area and simply vanish. Hard to believe isn't it? I hope that I-may drop in and see you all sometime soon if I get any leave, and renew friendships and perhaps listen to a few yarns and the latest club scandal. 
 + 
 +**CPL. WILLIAMS of the Y.M.C.A. Ramblers writes:** "It was most pleasant to receive your envelope containing two selections from S.B.W Annual Photo Exhibition. Here in New Guinea they brought back memories of cool gullies, and shady crocks, and I dwelt for some minutes on pleasant hours spent among the exhilarating air of our own Blue Mountains. 
 + 
 +I must confess ignorance, however, of the location of the Elabena Falls and if perchance I am fortunate enough to receive another communication from you I should be glad if you would explain just where it is. 
 + 
 +New Guinea is a place of hills and mountains and they commence right at the coast. I understand that on the first range of mountains scenery similar to that of our Blue Mountains can be viewed, but I have not yet had the opportunity of journeying in that direction so I cannot give you my own opinion. On the other side of this range is the well known Owen Stanley Range which rises at its highest point to 13,000 ft. within the region of my own activities I have seen a type of wallaby or small kangaroo (I express the doubt because of the finely shaped head of the animal), and also what is known commonly as the New Guinea Kookaburra which is similar to our own "Kooka" except that it is smaller and has blue coloured wings, however, the cry of this bird is not at all like our own, it is a raucous jumble of noises and sometimes nearly gets that laugh we know so well, I've an idea that if we imported one of our own birds we would soon teach them how to laugh in the conventional manner." 
 + 
 +**JACK DEBERT:** "At the moment I am on some organising work before joining my squadron. It is great fun building up something from nothing. I made this camp site near a small pass. The prevailing winds come in over that pass, and it is usually a very cooling and refreshing breeze. As the sun gets higher the mosquitoes go to bed - or to places where mosquitoes go when the sun comes up. 
 + 
 +About 8 o'clock last night we rode down to a nearby camp for a shower. The performance the little cows of mosquitoes put up was nobody's business. They dive bombed and did everything while we were under the shower and drying ourselves. Early morning and late evening we trick them by getting into overalls. 
 + 
 +There's tons of work to do, but it's real camp life - the sort I love. 
 + 
 +There are all sorts of things to arrange for - tent sites, holes for latrines. The kitchen is nearly completed and the messing hut for the men is all but finished." 
 + 
 +===== FEDERATON NOTES =====
  
 Dealing with the C.M.W's letter opposing the erection of a Youth Hostel at Little Marley, it was decided to suggest an alternative site to the Youth Hostels Association.  Delegates felt that Little Marley was too close to Bundeena and suggested somewhere on South-west-arm Creek near Flat Rock Crossing as being much more suitable. Delegates were asked to get rulings from their clubs before next Council meeting as to their clubs' attitude to Youth Hostels generally. Dealing with the C.M.W's letter opposing the erection of a Youth Hostel at Little Marley, it was decided to suggest an alternative site to the Youth Hostels Association.  Delegates felt that Little Marley was too close to Bundeena and suggested somewhere on South-west-arm Creek near Flat Rock Crossing as being much more suitable. Delegates were asked to get rulings from their clubs before next Council meeting as to their clubs' attitude to Youth Hostels generally.
194211.txt · Last modified: 2016/06/15 06:15 by vievems