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194109 [2016/02/18 02:42]
elddawt Up to page eleven. (NB OCRd text - pages out of order.)
194109 [2016/02/18 04:16] (current)
elddawt Complete. Ready for another pair of eyes.
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 +(( NB: In the OCRd text - pages out of order.  ))
 ====== The Sydney Bushwalker ====== ====== The Sydney Bushwalker ======
  
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 Apparently all bushwalkers are perfectly satisfied with the way the officers and delegates are carrying out the work of the Federation. Each year the attendance at the Annual Conference gets worse. This year the only non-delegate who came along was Daphne Ball, Hon.Secretary of the C.M.W. The members of the Council were glad they had arranged for the Annual Conference to be held in the same room immediately after their meeting on Tuesday, 19th August. Thus there was no extra cost for rent, and delegates were not asked to give up an extra night to the Federation's work. New members may ask, "What work does the Federation actually do?" Apparently all bushwalkers are perfectly satisfied with the way the officers and delegates are carrying out the work of the Federation. Each year the attendance at the Annual Conference gets worse. This year the only non-delegate who came along was Daphne Ball, Hon.Secretary of the C.M.W. The members of the Council were glad they had arranged for the Annual Conference to be held in the same room immediately after their meeting on Tuesday, 19th August. Thus there was no extra cost for rent, and delegates were not asked to give up an extra night to the Federation's work. New members may ask, "What work does the Federation actually do?"
  
-The Annual Report for the-year ended 30th June, 1941, shows that it is still working for conservation, and recently tried to save St. Helena by applying for a special lease of the area. This was refused, but the Federation was granted a permissive occupancy instead, so the result is much the same. About this time last year it saved Garawarra from probably being absorbed into The National Park when the Garawarra Trust's funds became exhausted. The Federation's donation of £10 (( Ten Pounds )) enabled the Garawarra Park Trust to carry on its work until a Government grant was received. Camping fees and rents from permissive occupancies since received have put the Park Trust into a much better position this year.+The Annual Report for the-year ended 30th June, 1941, shows that it is still working for conservation, and recently tried to save St. Helena by applying for a special lease of the area. This was refused, but the Federation was granted a permissive occupancy instead, so the result is much the same. About this time last year it saved Garawarra from probably being absorbed into The National Park when the Garawarra Trust's funds became exhausted. The Federation's donation of £10 (( ten pounds )) enabled the Garawarra Park Trust to carry on its work until a Government grant was received. Camping fees and rents from permissive occupancies since received have put the Park Trust into a much better position this year.
  
 Through the Federation the trustees of Bouddi Natural Park and The Blue Gum Forest enlisted the help of members of the affiliated clubs in those working bees that proved so enjoyable. Through the Federation the trustees of Bouddi Natural Park and The Blue Gum Forest enlisted the help of members of the affiliated clubs in those working bees that proved so enjoyable.
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- 
-(( NB: In the OCR text, page three between pages four and five.  )) 
  
 ===== Letters from the Lads - No.6. ===== ===== Letters from the Lads - No.6. =====
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-===== Notes On The Sports Carnival ===== +===== A Quiet Week-End At Bouddi. ===== 
-by the Assistant Social Secretary.+by Dorothy Lawry.
  
-Once again this year "Sunnysideproved a delightful site for our Sports Carnival.+"It's time you gave yourself a break and came bushwalking again", said Tuggie. "You haven't been out for weeksTurn your back on all your jobs and responsibilities; even leave your knitting at home; and relax for the whole week-end."
  
-About 36 attended the campfire and on Sunday there were about 65 competitors. think the majority of us felt that much of the enthusiasm would be lacking from the sports this year as so many of the energetic lads are in camp and overseas. However, each event was contested with great gusto.+It did sound good, and I was very stale, so we booked up the first week-end in August. I suggested that Bouddi Natural Park was too close to the sea for frosts and was sunny and sheltered from westerly winds. We decided that Bouddi would be an ideal place to spend a lazy week-end in winter.
  
-Dot English proved to be shining light and was successful in several eventsHer style in the walking race was too much for the rest of the competitors.+After dashing home from the club on Friday night to pack, and rising to the all-too-familiar sound of the alarm on Saturday morning, we caught the 9.30 a.m. train and soon were roaring northwards while the city and all our responsibilities faded behind usRelaxing happily on the cushioned seats, we rejoiced in the perfect morning and hoped the weather would hold for the whole week-end. It did.
  
-To those who are not walkers in the athletic sense of the word there is great deal of entertainment in watching men's walking race. I think the competithrs would perhaps be very amazed if they could see just how peculiar their+From Killcare to Little Beach we went by the "Scenic Road". Last time I went this way was in 1935, when I drove "Christine" and found that all the scenery I needed, and more, was in the road itself. However, since then it has been remade and even motorist could now spare glance occasionally for the many glimpses of Brisbane Water seen through the trees, or stop, as we did though on foot, to gaze southwards down the coast to Long Reef or northwards to Norah Head.
  
-gait is. +Though low, the creek was still running and the campsite as delightful as ever, but we were not at all pleased to have our preparations for a late lunch interrupted by the arrival of two Jersey bulls accompanied by a couple of heifers. While Tuggie finished the domestic duties, I impressed on the bulls that Little Beach is in a public park and we had every right to be there, while they were trespassing. However, apparently they were not convinced that continued trespass does not give a right to continued occupation for they and their girl friends were still grazing nearby when we finished lunch, repacked and hid our rucksacks, and left to walk over the hills to McMaster's Beach and Lake Cockrone.
- +
-The three-legged race and orange race provided the usual fun.. This year a new plan was adopted for the orange race. They were simply placed in a heap and competitors had to dash up and down the field collecting one at a time from the pile. You can just imagine how the first few persons to reach the oranges first fared. The balance of the field more or less tumbled all over them, and I know I staggered away not knowing whether I was still intact or if a nose, eye, or ear had been left with the fruit! +
- +
-Next year I have decided to use more discretion in entering events. I find that jumping once every twelve months tends to upset the muscles unduly and the following ddy they protest vigorously. I was somewhat consoled to know that Dot (who entered for everything) was doubtful during the following week as to whether she was suffering from pneumonia or lumbago in view of the peculiar pains she experienced In her back. +
- +
-The direction-finding contest was again popular. I was lazy - excuse a cold - and had a lot of amusement watching the serious figures - with Steady gait and expressions of intense concentration - striding around the paddocks. +
- +
-Some of the prospective members showed a good deal of enthusiasm. Ken +
- +
-; Joyce was outstanding, and Adrian Basser appeared to try very hard - but, alack, +
- +
-0 without much success. I noticed Joan Kilpatrick at one stage engaged in an apparently deep and scientific study of the teeth of a dead cow - the skeleton of which was in close proximity to the campfire site. Our members certainly have a variety of interests: Reggie produced a portable gramaphone, and I found I had no objection to music with my lunch. We also noticed his entrancing shorts. +
- +
-Maurie Berry snooped around looking for suitable subjects to snap for the lads overseas. Poor soul, in endeavouring to obtain a close-up in the hop, skip and a jump contest, he was literally amothered in sand. However, all in a good cause! +
- +
-- 16 - +
- +
-Bill Henley tells me that the crosscut saw we purchased was a great success. As usual Bill did yeoman service. I also noticed that one of our visitors, Darcy Frost, was a busy little man and proved most helpful, We hope he enjoyed himself, j and feel that he did.  +
- +
-. We are grateful to-the owners of "Sunnyside" for making the property' available to us, and hope that we may look forward to an equally enjoyable sports carnival nest year. +
- +
- +
- +
-CLUB GOSSIP. +
- +
-This month the boy to get our congratuaations is Ossie Brownlee. Did you meet his fiancee, Miss Violet Osborne, when he brought her to the Clubroom the other Friday night to meet the wild bushwalkers? She was quite unperturbed. Another night he was going to take her to meet the River Canoe Club Boys. +
- +
-Evidently the munitions works do give Ossie some time off occasionally for pleasure -- and he has made good use of it. +
- +
-Another hardworking member who dropped into the Clubroom for a while one +
- +
-Friday recently was Jack Debert looking. extremely we 1_, and very glad that his brief visit to Eydney on duty included a Friday. +
- +
-From Jack we heard that Max OfHalloran is also wearing the blue uniform now answers to "FlightLieut.",instead of "Dr." and is busy examining recruits. +
- +
-Frank Freeguard is still busy mapping Australia, but he recently had to have a few days in town to get a new uniform and-then he came in one Friday night I looking very smart with two pips up; said when he returned from the wilds of the bush he discovered that he had been a lieutenant for over a month without knowing it. It was just too bad that the B.S.C.is first parcel of "physical comforts" should have reached him during the short time he was at Strathfield; All properly sewn up in calico it was, too; +
- +
-In a letter of thanks to the B.S.C. exmember Arthur Austin sent his regards to. friends in the S,B,W. There are some still here, bIlt he will probablyfind a lot of them on the other side. Arthur is with the AckAcks. +
- +
-In a letter to Rene Browne from Syria Morris Stephenson also wished to be remembered to old friends. Morrie is a lieutenant in the Survey Regiment. +
- +
-Two other overseas letters that are floating sound the Club for anyone +
- +
-interested to read are from Evelyn Higinbotham from Suva and from Bob Savage from the Middle East. +
- +
-The boys seem to be getting all the publicity this month, but the girls are having some too, in the report on the Bushwalkerts Ball, which was held too late in July for us to include a description in the August issue. +
- +
-A QtTIET WEEK-END AT' BOUDDI. +
- +
--by Dorothy Lawry. +
- +
-"It's time you gave yourself a break and Came bushwalking again", said Tuggie. "You haven't been out for weeks. Turn your back on all your jobs and responsibilities; even leave your knitting at home; and relax for the whole weekend."+
- +
-It did sound good, and I was very stale, so we booked up the first week-end in August. I suggested that Bouddi Natural Park was too close to the sea for frosts and was sunny and sheltered from,westerly winds. We decided that Bouddi would be an ideal place to spend a lazy week-end in winter. +
- +
-After dashing home from the club on Friday night to pack, and rising to the all-too-familiar sound of the alarm on Saturday morning, we caught the 9.30 a m. +
- +
-train and soon were roaring northwards while the city and all our responsibilities +
- +
-faded behind us, Relaxing happily on the cushioned seats, we rejoiced in the perfect morning and hoped the weather would hold for the whole week-end. It did. +
- +
-From Killcare to Little Beach we went by the "Scenic Road". Last time I went this way was in 1935, when I drove "Christine" and found that all the 'scenery I needed, and more, was in the road itself. However, since then it has been remade and even a motorist could now spare a glance occasionally for the manY glimpses of Brisbane Water seen through the trees, or stop, as we did though on foot, to gaze southwards down the coast to Long Reef or northwards to Norah Head. +
- +
-Though low, the creek was still running and the campsite as delightful as ever, but we were not at all pleased to have o/r preparations for a late lunch interrupted by the arrival of two Jersey bulls accompanied by a couple of heifers. While Tuggie finished the domestic duties, I impressed on the bulls that Little Beach is in a public park and we had every right to be there, while they were trespassing. However, apparently they were not convinced that continued trespass does not give a right to continued occupation for they and their girl friends were still grazing nearby when we finished lunch, repacked and hid our rucksacks, and left to walk over the hills to McMaster's Beach and Lake Cockrone.+
  
 August may be late winter in most places, but on the hills of Bouddi that afternoon it was early spring, with a slight sea-breeze lifting our hair and the wildflowers adding splashes of colour to the many greens of the bush. One particularly lovely patch was where hundreds of wattles were lifting their pale green spears of leaves ahoulder high whilst hardenbergia twined amongst them and mingled its deep blue flowers with the pale golden balls of the wattle blossom. August may be late winter in most places, but on the hills of Bouddi that afternoon it was early spring, with a slight sea-breeze lifting our hair and the wildflowers adding splashes of colour to the many greens of the bush. One particularly lovely patch was where hundreds of wattles were lifting their pale green spears of leaves ahoulder high whilst hardenbergia twined amongst them and mingled its deep blue flowers with the pale golden balls of the wattle blossom.
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 On returning to camp we were glad to find the cattle had departed, While Tuggie prepared a delicious dinner, I put up the tent and collected a supply of firewood. Gaudy streaks of cloud emphasised the setting of the sun. Then the moon rode in the heavens, the sea broke quietly on the beach, and the only thing that marred the perfect peace was a cold draught of air that blew steadily down the gully at our backs on its way to the wide open spaces of the Tasman. On returning to camp we were glad to find the cattle had departed, While Tuggie prepared a delicious dinner, I put up the tent and collected a supply of firewood. Gaudy streaks of cloud emphasised the setting of the sun. Then the moon rode in the heavens, the sea broke quietly on the beach, and the only thing that marred the perfect peace was a cold draught of air that blew steadily down the gully at our backs on its way to the wide open spaces of the Tasman.
  
 +Though the nearest houses were only a quarter of a mile away, they were beyond the hill, and as we reclined by the fire after dinner the world was ours, the stars belonged to us, and there was no ugliness or unhappiness anywhere. We drank in the beauty all around us until our relaxed bodies demanded sleep, and we retired to the tent and our sleeping-bags.
  
 +Some time in the middle of the night I roused to turn on to the other ear and heard a strange, persistent noise. I was still trying to identify it when Tuggie roused, sat up, and exclaimed - "The bull! That's a bull making that noise!" Sliding out of my sleeping-bag and into my sandals, torch in hand and followed closely by Tuggle, I crawled out of the tent to find and deal with the enemy. A game of matadors at 2 a.m. had not been part of our plans, but one must defend one's hearth and home.....
  
-12 -+The moon had set; the fire was dead; and the trees and bushes dotted about the little, grassy valley were just darker blotches in the night. Have you ever looked for a black-headed bull in the dark? It was the bigger of the two bulls, the one with a ring through its nose, that was making the noise. When my torch beam picked him up he was standing about fifteen feet from the tent, facing it and challenging it, with his head down as though ready to charge past the fireplace and toss the tent out of his favourite camping place under the casuarinas. Apparently he could not make out what sort of animal the intruder was we had returned and pitched the tent while he and his friends were grazing elsewhere - and, being unsure of the calibre of his enemy, he was working himself up before charging. With his nose only about an inch from the ground, he looked fierce when I appeared. I waved my lump of firewood threateningly, made loud noises, and advanced stampingly like the biggest, baddest human I could make myself sound. Probably all the bull could see was the lights of the two torches, mine shining in his eyes, and Tuggie's waving searchingly around for the rest of the animals. To my relief, the bull turned and angrily retreated a few feet. I followed my advantage and drove him a little further off, then returned to my pal -- I did not want any of the others to get between me and the tent!
  
-Though the nearest houses were only a quarter of a mile away, they were beyond the hill, and as we reclined by the fire after dinner the world was ours, the stars belonged to us, and there vas no luglines'S-or'unhappiness anywhereWe drank ix the beauty all around us until our relaxed bodies demanded sleep, and we retired to the tent and our sleeping-bags.+We could hear the cattle moving about nearby among the bushes; the cold wind was still blowing down the valley, and we were two lone women in the dark of a winter's night - and no longer happy! While Tuggie worked the searchlight I got a fire going and gradually built up - the job being interrupted by various shoo-ing expeditions. Had there been only one animal I might have managed to herd it up the track and away over the hill, but there were four of them and one or other of the heifers __would__ break back among the bushesand then the others would bunch and refuse to move offI did not like to use force for fear of angering the bulls and starting some real trouble, so I retreated once more to the protection and comfort of the fire.
  
-Some time in the middle of the night I roused to turn on to the other ear and heard a strangepersistent noise. I was still trying to identify it when Tuggie rousedsat upand exclaimed - "The bull; That's a bull making that noisel" Sliding out of my sleeping-bag and into my sandalstorch in hand and followed closely by TuggleI crawled out of the tent to find and deal with the enemy. A game of matadors at 2 a m. had not been part of our plans, but one must defend one's hearth and home...+The grass was wet with a heavy dew, so were the bushes, and so were my pyjamas. The wind was chillyand I was only just recovered from a coldsoafter drying myself by the good big fire we now had burning brightly, I retired to my sleeping-bag inside the cosy tentwhile Tuggie, snug in her eiderdown coolie-coat but shivering in her shoeskept watch and stoked the fire for hours until she was satisfied (through nearly falling over him while looking for him) that the big bull had really settled down to rest and the others had departed.
  
-The moon had set; the fire was dead; and the trees and bushes dotted about the little, grassy valley were just darker blotches in the nightHave you ever looked for a black-headed bull in the dark? It was the bigger of the two bullsthe one with a ring through its nose, that was making the noiseWhen my torch beam picked him up he was standing about 'fifteen feet from the tentfacing it and challenging it, with his head down as though ready to charge past the fireplace and toss the tent out of his favourite camping place under the casuarinas. Apparently he could not make out what sort of animal the intruder was - we had returned and pitched the tent while he and his friends were grazing elsewhere - andbeing unsure of the calibre of his enemyhe was working himselfup before charging. With his nose only about an inch from the groundhe looked fierce when I appeared. I waved my lump of firewood threateningly, made loud noises, and advanced stampingly like the biggest, baddest human I could make myself soundProbably all the+At 5 a.mTuggie crawled into her sleeping-bag againand at 6.30 it was lightso we arosepackedand departed for Maitland Baywhere we could breakfastsleep, and lunch in peace.
  
-' bull could see was the lights of the two torches, mine shining in his eyes, and Tuggie's waving searchingly around for the rest of the animals. To my relief, the bull turned and angrily retreated a few feetI followed my advantage and drove him little further off, then returned to my pal.-- I did not want any of the others to get between me and the tents+The early morning freshness of another perfect day, more lovely wildflowers along the delightful track, and the beauties of the coastal views were compensation for our early rising and helped to soothe our nervesbut we were two hungry women who arrived at the camp of the official party at Maitland Bay just at nine o'clockAs soon as we were within hailing distance we greeted our friends with loud cries of "Is there Trustee in the house?" for we knew Marie Byles was to be with them and we wanted to make our complaint.
  
-We could hear the cattle moving about nearby among the bushes; the cold wind was 11 blowing down the valley, and we were two lone women in the dark of+After a large breakfast we settled to sleep in the sun, only rousing occasionally when we had to move to get our heads into the shade again. About half-past one we wakened with thoughts of lunch, and were just starting to prepare a salad when a small cloud of smoke was noticed rising behind the hill in the direction of Little Beach - a bushfire starting! Should we leave our lunch and go over and put it out? Where was it exactly? Who had started it? We knew we were not guilty - our fire had been extinguished when we left camp before eight o'clock. This fire was starting at half-past one, and it was closer than Little Beach. Perhaps someone's lunch fire had got away. Probably they would get the bushfire under control themselves. Anyway, let's have our lunch first!
  
-a winter's night - and no longer happy l While Tuggie worked the searchlight I got a fire going and gradually built up - the job being interrupted by various shoo-ing expeditions. Had there been only one animal I might have managed to herd it up the track and away over the hill, but there were four of them and one or other of the+So we ate and watched the smoke clouds rising and spreading, subsiding, only to spread again, die away once more, and rise yet again. By now we were all wondering "Where is Marie? Has she finished marking the route of that new track? Is she fighting the bushfire alone on her way back? Is she perhaps cut off by it?" for Marie alone had gone off over the hills soon after we arrived. The rest of the party had chosen to remain at Maitland Bay and bask in the warm sunshine.
  
-heifers would break back among the bushes, and then the others would bunch and refuse to move off. did not like to use force for fear of angering the bulls and starting some real troubleso I retreated once more to the protection and comfort of the fire.+Just about every time our consciences made themselves heard and told us we really should be up and off to fight the fire, the smoke died down as if the fire were under controlSo we washed up. Then we packed up. At least the fire did not seem to be spreading, even though it had apparently flared up again, and it was only a small fire, judging by the area from which the smoke was rising. We sorrowed for the beauty of the bush that was being destroyed. We decided that Marie was not likely to be in real dangerthough she might be wanting our help - she seemed to be getting it under control without anyway, for there was very little smoke coming up now. We told our consciences we did not think we were needed - and we set out along the homeward track, with our backs to the signs of fire and our faces to the magnifident view down the coast.
  
-The grass was wet with a heavy dew, so were the bushes, and so were my pyjamas. The wind was chilly, and I was only just recovered from a cold, so, after drying myself by the good big fire we now had burning brightlyI retired to my sleeping-bag inside the cosy tent, while Tuggie, snug in her eiderdown coolie- coat but shivering in her shoeskept watch and stoked the fire for hours until she was satisfied (through nearly falling over him while looking for him) that the big bull had really settled down to rest and the others had departed.+When Marie rejoined us at the ferry we were relieved to hear that the fire was not in Bouddi Natural Park at all, but in a holding adjoining, and was probably a deliberate burning off. Marie had seen it, and the bull, but had fought neither.
  
-At 5 mTuggie crawled into her sleeping-bag again, and at 6.30 it was+The launch made fast trip back to Woy Woy and, after depositingour packs on the station, two of us dashed back to the local pie shop for supplies before the train arrived. When it pulled into the platform an army of intending passengers attacked each door of each carriage. Somehow the seven bushwalkers had misjudged things no carriage door stopped opposite to them and they were left "on the outer" - butwith the usual bushwalkers' resource, they had soon remedied that and secured a guard's van to themselves!
  
- light, so we arose, packed, and departed for Maitland Bay, where we could breakfast, sleep, and lunch in peace.+Hurriedly I opened my pack and extracted the butter. In my haste to get into the local pie shop I had collided with its fly-proof door, and I did not want a black eye as a souvenir of my quiet week-end at Bouddi.
  
-The early morning freshness of another perfect day, more lovely wildflowers+----
  
-p along the delightful track, and the beauties of the coastal views were compensation+===== At Our Own Meeting =====
  
-J for our early rising and helped to soothe our nerves, but we were two hungry women who arrived at the camp of the official party at Maitland Bay just at nine o'clockAs soon as we were within hailing distance we greeted our friends with loud cries of "Is there Trustee in the house?" for we knew Marie Byles was to be with them and we wanted to make our complaint.+Two new members were welcomed at the August meeting - Miss Beryl English (a cousin of Dot) and Mr. Charles Jones. They are both starting off the way all bushwalkers should goThat night Beryl provided cake for the B.S.C., and the following Friday night Charles was deputising for the Walks Secretary with the next walks program.
  
-After ,a large breakfast we' -settled-to sleep-in the sun, only rousing occasionally when we had to move to get our heads into the shade againAbout half- past one we wakened with thoughts of lunchi and were just starting to prepare a salad when a small cloud of smoke was noticed rising behind the hill in the direction of 'Little Beach - a bushfire starting:, Should we leave our lunch and go over and put it out? Where was it exactly? Who had started it? We knew we were not guilty - our fire had been extinguished when we left camp before eight o'clockThis fire was starting at half-past one, and it was closer than Little Beach. Perhaps someone's lunch fire had got away. Probably they would get the bushfire under control themselves. Anyway, let's have our lunch firsts+The correspondence brought news of various absent membersand one letter to help the HonSec. It was from John Harvey, who is still in Bathurst but wrote advising a change of address there.
  
-So we ate and watched the smoke clouds rising and spreadingsubsidingonly to spread againdie away once more, and rise yet again. By now we were all wondering "Where is Marie? Has she finished marking the route of that new track? Is she fighting the bushf ire alone on her way back? Is she perhaps cut off by it?" for Marie alone had gone off over the hills soon after we arrived. The rest of the party had chosen to remain at Maitland Bay and bask in the warm sunshine.+John Manson has resigned from the Club. We understand there is no connection between this actiontaken for purely personal reasonsand the mixed reception accorded by walkers to his recent piton placing at Carlon Head. Incidentally, we heard that he was out there again on August Bank Holiday week-end doing some improvements to his original job.
  
-Just about every time our consciences made themselves heard and told us we really should be up and off to fight the five, the smoke died down as if the fire were under control. So we washed up,. Then we packed up. At least the fire did not seem to be spreading, even though it had apparently flared up again, and it was only _a small firejudging by the area from which the smoke was rising. We sorrowed for the beauty of the bush that was being destroyed. We decided that Marie was_mit likely to be in ma?. danger, though she might be wanting our help - she seemed to be getting it under Control without amranyvat, for there was very little smoke coming up-now. We told our consciences my did not think we were needed and we set out along the homeward track, with our backs to the signs of fire and our faces to the magnifident view down the coast.+All the usual reports were received and we learned that the Busktwalkers' Services Committee have already despatched 700 Articles to the boys, and that its members have discovered a market for used postage stampsso any of these received from Club Members will help to provide more "mental comforts" for the lads.
  
-When Marie rejoined us at the ferry we were relieved to hear that the fire was not in Bouddi Natural Park at all-but in a holding adjoining, and was probably deliberate burning off. Marie had seen it, and the bull, but had fought neither.+The question, Is there to be an .B.W. Concert this year? was raised by the Hon. Social Secretary. Joan Savage is not prepared to do the organisingthough she will gladly help in the entertainment. It was resolved that we will have Concert IF an organiser and helpers can be found, and all members interested are asked to attend a "__Concert Meeting__" at the Clubroom en Friday, __19th September__, at __7 p.m. sharp__. An interesting talk by a visiting lecturer will start at 8.15 p.m., but in an hour and a quarter we should be able to discover whether we can or cannot have a concert this year.
  
-The launch made a fast trip back to Way Woy andafter depositingour packs on the stationtwo of us Adashed back to the local pie shop for supplies before the train arrivedWhen it pulled into the platform an army of intending passengers attacked each door of each carriageSomehow the seven bushwalkers had misjudged things - no' carriage door stopped opposite to them and they were left "on the outer" - butwith the usual bushwalkers' resource, they had soon remedied that and secured a guard's van to themselves2+The attention of all members is being drawn to the fact that the Half Yearly Meeting on Friday12th September, will start at __8.00 p.m.__ As will be gathered from the notices receivedit promises to be a long meetingWe hope it will be well attendedThere is a paper shortage owing to the warso it will __not__ be reported in full in this magazine.
  
-14+----
  
-Hurriedly I opened my pack and extracted the butterIn zmy haste to get into the local pie shop I had collided with its fly`-proof door, and I did not want a black eye as a souvenir of my quiet week-end at ,Boudclie+===== Notes On The Sports Carnival ===== 
 +by the Assistant Social Secretary.
  
-AT+Once again this year "Sunnyside" proved a delightful site for our Sports Carnival.
  
--OUR ..OWN MEETING.+About 36 attended the campfire and on Sunday there were about 65 competitorsI think the majority of us felt that much of the enthusiasm would be lacking from the sports this year as so many of the energetic lads are in camp and overseasHowever, each event was contested with great gusto.
  
--+Dot English proved to be a shining light and was successful in several events. Her style in the walking race was too much for the rest of the competitors.
  
-.+To those who are not walkers in the athletic sense of the word there is a great deal of entertainment in watching a men's walking race. I think the competitors would perhaps be very amazed if they could see just how peculiar their gait is.
  
-7+The three-legged race and orange race provided the usual fun.. This year a new plan was adopted for the orange race. They were simply placed in a heap and competitors had to dash up and down the field collecting one at a time from the pile. You can just imagine how the first few persons to reach the oranges first fared. The balance of the field more or less tumbled all over them, and I know I staggered away not knowing whether I was still intact or if a nose, eye, or ear had been left with the fruit!
  
 +Next year I have decided to use more discretion in entering events. I find that jumping once every twelve months tends to upset the muscles unduly and the following day they protest vigorously. I was somewhat consoled to know that Dot (who entered for everything) was doubtful during the following week as to whether she was suffering from pneumonia or lumbago in view of the peculiar pains she experienced in her back.
  
 +The direction-finding contest was again popular. I was lazy - excuse a cold - and had a lot of amusement watching the serious figures - with steady gait and expressions of intense concentration - striding around the paddocks.
  
--+Some of the prospective members showed a good deal of enthusiasm. Ken Joyce was outstanding, and Adrian Basser appeared to try very hard but, alack, without much success. I noticed Joan Kilpatrick at one stage engaged in an apparently deep and scientific study of the teeth of a dead cow - the skeleton of which was in close proximity to the campfire site. Our members certainly have a variety of interests! Reggie produced a portable gramaphone, and I found I had no objection to music with my lunch. We also noticed his entrancing shorts.
  
-Two new members were welcomed at the August meeting Miss Beryl English (a cousin of Dotand Mr Charles JonesThey are both starting off the way all bushwalkers should go. That night Beryl provided cake for the and the following Friday night Charles was deputising for the Walks Secretary with the next walks program.+Maurie Berry snooped around looking for suitable subjects to snap for the lads overseas. Poor soul, in endeavouring to obtain a close-up in the hop, skip and a jump contest, he was literally amothered (( [sic] )) in sandHowever, all in good cause!
  
 +Bill Henley tells me that the crosscut saw we purchased was a great success. As usual Bill did yeoman service. I also noticed that one of our visitors, Darcy Frost, was a busy little man and proved most helpful, We hope he enjoyed himself, and feel that he did. 
  
 +We are grateful to-the owners of "Sunnyside" for making the property available to us, and hope that we may look forward to an equally enjoyable sports carnival next year.
  
-The correspondence brought news of various absent members, and one letter to help the Hon. Sec. It was from John Harvey, who is still in Bathurst but wrote advising a change of address there;+----
  
 +===== Club Gossip =====
  
 +This month the boy to get our congratuaations is Ossie Brownlee. Did you meet his fiancee, Miss Violet Osborne, when he brought her to the Clubroom the other Friday night to meet the wild bushwalkers? She was quite unperturbed. Another night he was going to take her to meet the River Canoe Club Boys. Evidently the munitions works do give Ossie some time off occasionally for pleasure -- and he has made good use of it.
  
-John Manson has resigned from the Club. We understand there is no connection between this action, taken for purely personal reasons, and the mixed reception accorded by walkers to his recent piton placing at Carlon Head. Incidentally, we heard that he was out there again on August Bank Holiday Weekend.+Another hardworking member who dropped into the Clubroom for a while one Friday recently was Jack Debert - looking extremely well, and very glad that his brief visit to Sydney on duty included a Friday.
  
 +From Jack we heard that Max O'Halloran is also wearing the blue uniform now answers to "Flight-Lieut." instead of "Dr." and is busy examining recruits.
  
 +Frank Freeguard is still busy mapping Australia, but he recently had to have a few days in town to get a new uniform and then he came in one Friday night looking very smart with two pips up; said when he returned from the wilds of the bush he discovered that he had been a lieutenant for over a month without knowing it. It was just too bad that the B.S.C.'s first parcel of "physical comforts" should have reached him during the short time he was at Strathfield! All properly sewn up in calico it was, too!
  
-All the usual reports were received and we -16-arned that -the Busktwalkerst Services Committee have already despatched i-700 Articles to the boys, and that its members have d iscovered market for usek postage stamps, so any of these -received from Club _Members Will help to provide more -,"mental comforts" for the lads. +In letter of thanks to the B.S.Cex-member Arthur Austin sent his regards to friends in the S.B.W. There are some still herebut he will probably find lot of them on the other sideArthur is with the Ack Acks.
- +
-- .$ -  +
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-The question., Is there to be an S.T4..W. Concert this year?-..wad raised by -the Hon. Social Secretary. Joan, Sav..ge is not _prepared -to do the organising, though she will gladly help in the entertainmentIt was resolved that we will have a Concert IF an organiser and helpers canbe ,f_oundi and all members interested are asked to attend a "Concert Meeting?' at the -Clubroom en Friday19th, September, at y_pom. sharp.. An interesting talk by a visiting ,lecturer will start ,at 8.15 p m., but in an hour and quarter- we should be 'Ole to discoVer Whether we can Or cannot have -a concert this-ye'ar: +
- +
-- _ +
- +
-. The attention of all members is being drawn to the Tact-that-the Half +
- +
-_ _ , +
- +
-Yearly Meeting on Friday, 12th September, will start at 8.00 p,m, As will be gathered from the notices received, it promises -to be a long meetingWe hope it will be Well attended. There is a paper ,-..shortage owing to the war., ,..so it will +
- +
-+
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-not be reported in. full. in this magazine. . , +
  
 +In a letter to Rene Browne from Syria Morris Stephenson also wished to be remembered to old friends. Morrie is a lieutenant in the Survey Regiment.
  
-doing some improvements to his original job.+Two other overseas letters that are floating sound the Club for anyone interested to read are from Evelyn Higinbotham from Suva and from Bob Savage from the Middle East.
  
 +The boys seem to be getting all the publicity this month, but the girls are having some too, in the report on the Bushwalker's Ball, which was held too late in July for us to include a description in the August issue.
  
194109.1455763336.txt.gz · Last modified: 2016/02/18 02:42 by elddawt