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-THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER is a monthly bulletin Of matters of interest to The Sydney ​Bi iSh Wiatkels::inc, Box 4476 GPO Sydney ​20051'​16 '​AdVertise ​in this magazine, please ​cotitkt ​the Business Manager. +====== THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER ====== 
-Editor'​.LGeorge ​Mawer + 
-42LIncolRoaGeorges ​Hall 2198 +THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER is a monthly bulletin Of matters of interest to The Sydney ​Bushwalkers ​inc, Box 4476 GPO Sydney ​2001. To advertise ​in this magazine, please ​contact ​the Business Manager. 
-Telephone 9707 1343 + 
-BUsiness ​Manager: Jan Roberts+|Editor: |George ​Mawer 
 +42 Lincoln Road Georges ​Hall 2198 
 +|Telephone 9707 1343| 
 +|Business ​Manager:Jan Roberts
 5 Sharland Av Chatswood 2067 5 Sharland Av Chatswood 2067
-Telephone 9411 551.7 (H) 9925 4000(B) +Telephone 9411 551.7 (H) 9925 4000(B)| 
-Production Manager: Fran Holland +|Production Manager:Fran Holland 
-Editorial Team: George Mavver, Jan Roberts +|Editorial Team:George Mavver, Jan Roberts 
-& Barbara Bruce, +& Barbara Bruce| 
-Printers: Kenn Clacher, Tom Wenman,+|Printers:Kenn Clacher, Tom Wenman,
 Barrie Murdoch, Margaret Niven Barrie Murdoch, Margaret Niven
-& Les Powell +& Les Powell| 
-Clubroom Reporter: Jan Roberts +|Clubroom Reporter:Jan Roberts
-THE SYDNEY BUSH WALKERS INCORPORATED was founded in 1927Club meetings are held every Wednesday evening at 8 prp ,at Kirribilli Neighbourhood Centre, 16 Fitzroi..Street, Kirribilli (near Milsons Point Railway Station). Visitors and prospective members are welcome any Wednesday. + 
- ​President:​ Tony Holgate Vice-President:​ Peter Miller Public ​Officef ​Fran Holland +THE SYDNEY BUSH WALKERS INCORPORATED was founded in 1927Club meetings are held every Wednesday evening at 8 pm at Kirribilli Neighbourhood Centre, 16 Fitzroy ​Street, Kirribilli (near Milsons Point Railway Station). Visitors and prospective members are welcome any Wednesday. 
-Treasurer: ​GFeta James + 
-Secretary: ​Mi'​ahele ​Powell +|President:Tony Holgate
-Walks Secretary: Eddy Giacomel +|Vice-President:​Peter Miller|  
-Social Secretary: ​'Jan Roberts +|Public ​Officer:​| ​Fran Holland| 
-Membership Secretary: Barry Wallace +|Treasurer:| Greta James| 
-New Members Secretary: ​Miriarri'​Kirwan +|Secretary:| Michele ​Powell| 
-Conservation Secretary: Alex Colley +|Walks Secretary:Eddy Giacomel| 
-Magazine Editor: George Mawer +|Social Secretary:Jan Roberts| 
-Committee Members: Morie Ward & +|Membership Secretary:Barry Wallace| 
-Jennifer ​-Trevor-Roberts +|New Members Secretary:| Miriam ​Kirwan| 
-Delegates to CcinfederatiOn: Ken Smith +|Conservation Secretary:Alex Colley| 
-and Jim Callaway+|Magazine Editor:George Mawer| 
 +|Committee Members:Morie Ward & 
 +Jennifer Trevor-Roberts| 
 +|Delegates to Confederation:Ken Smith 
 +and Jim Callaway
 February 1997 February 1997
-In This Issue +===== In This Issue ===== 
-P 2 A Letter to Sydney Water Alex Colley + 
-P 3 My First Visit to Coolana Ute Foster +|P 2A Letter to Sydney WaterAlex Colley| 
-P 4 Why Shouldn'​t it Happen Here Bill Holland +|P 3My First Visit to Coolana|Ute Foster 
-P 5 Tallowa Dam Revisited Don Cornell +|P 4Why Shouldn'​t it Happen HereBill Holland| 
-P 6 The Wrong Leader Maurice Smith +|P 5Tallowa Dam RevisitedDon Cornell| 
-P 7 A Glimpse of The Past Clio +|P 6The Wrong LeaderMaurice Smith| 
-P 8 Food For Walking Kaite Matilda +|P 7A Glimpse of The PastClio| 
-P 11 A Walk in The Gloucester Area Mouldy Harrison +|P 8Food For WalkingKaite Matilda| 
-********************** +|P 11A Walk in The Gloucester AreaMouldy Harrison| 
-MAGAZINE EMAIL ADDRESS: + 
-TERRY @ SYDNEY.NET+MAGAZINE EMAIL ADDRESS: TERRY @ SYDNEY.NET 
 Advertisers Advertisers
-P 5 Willis Walkabouts +|P 5Willis Walkabouts| 
-P 10 Alpsports +|P 10Alpsports| 
-P 12 Eastwood Camping Centre +|P 12Eastwood Camping Centre| 
-P 15 Paddy Pallin +|P 15Paddy Pallin| 
-2 The Sydney ​Bushwalker February ​1997 + 
-The S.B.W. appreciate the invitation to comment on the Draft Plan of Management. Access is probably of more concern to this Club than to any other recreational body and has been thoroughly considered at our monthly meetings. The Southern Blue Mountains were the cradle of bushwalking not only for this Club, but for the + 
-bushwalking movement. +===== A Letter to Sydney ​Water ===== 
-Organised bushwalking commenced with the formation in 1914 of our sponsors, the Mountain Trails Club, members of which formed the National Parks and Primitive Areas Council, which drafted the +by Alex Colley 03/02/1997 
-Greater Blue Mountains National Park proposal. This proposal was adopted by the + 
-S.B.W. as its principal conservation objective. The achievement of this objective (in fact, though not in name) presented the Kanangra Boyd wilderness from mining, pine plantations,​ rural subdivision +The S.B.W. appreciate the invitation to comment on the Draft Plan of Management. Access is probably of more concern to this Club than to any other recreational body and has been thoroughly considered at our monthly meetings. The Southern Blue Mountains were the cradle of bushwalking not only for this Club, but for the bushwalking movement. 
-and other forms of + 
-development. It is now the best +Organised bushwalking commenced with the formation in 1914 of our sponsors, the Mountain Trails Club, members of which formed the National Parks and Primitive Areas Council, which drafted the Greater Blue Mountains National Park proposal. This proposal was adopted by the S.B.W. as its principal conservation objective. The achievement of this objective (in fact, though not in name) presented the Kanangra Boyd wilderness from mining, pine plantations,​ rural subdivision and other forms of development. It is now the best protected part of the hydrological catchment of the 
-protected part of the +Warragamba River. The Southern Blue Mountains, because of its accessibility,​ dramatic scenery and wilderness quality, has been the favourite bushwalking area of this Club since its inception in 1927. Most of the features were named by Club members, many after Club members. 
-hydrological catchment of the + 
-Warragamba River. The +The Executive Summary recognises the "​potential"​ recreational value of the Special Area. We believe this potential has long since been confirmed. We hope your commitment to the State Parliament'​s Regulatory Review Committee to assess the feasibility of providing increased access will have regard to the above facts. 
-Southern Blue Mountains, + 
-because of its accessibility,​ +We are glad that you support the declaration of wilderness areas. There can be no doubt that wilderness preservation provides the best means of achieving your aim of protecting the quality of stored waters. The main aim of the NPWS wilderness policy is to preserve and enhance the distribution and abundance of native species. NPWS policy covers the control of introduced species. Easements and access trails are for management purposes only. 
-dramatic scenery and wilderness quality, has been the favourite bushwalking area of this Club since its inception in 1927. Most of the features were named by Club members, many after Club members. +Land clearance is not permitted. Fire control is essential. Mining is excluded. We believe that the NPWS would concur with your action in liaising with aviation authorities and the EPA to minimise the impact of aircraft on water quality and ecological integrity. If an airfield is located at Badgerys Creek or Holsworthy it is inevitable that the recreational value of the Blue Mountains parks will be degraded by the diversion of flight paths to the west. It is obvious that wilderness management according to the NPWS Guidelines covers all 
-The Executive Summary +the catchment protection principles of Sydney Water. 
-recognises the "​potential"​ recreational value of the Special Area. We believe this potential has long since been confirmed. We hope your commitment to the State Parliament'​s Regulatory + 
-Review Committee to assess the feasibility of providing +We are therefore unable to comprehend why there should be any problem in the divestment of lands to the NPWS. Responsibility and accountability of Sydney Water and NPWS for biodiversity and water quality would be identical under wilderness management. There is, however, one aspect of wilderness preservation beyond the means of NPWS; that is finance. NPWS policy precludes compulsory acquisition of inholdings. These are a menace both to conservation and water quality, since access must be provided and will be used by off road vehicle drivers and horse riders. If subdivision approval is obtained the cost of acquisition soars, as occurred in the case of the Schmidt subdivision in the Pilliga Nature Reserve. Sydney Water has the power, and the means, to acquire these inholdings, and should do so if only in the interests of water quality. The control of feral animals, particularly pigs, has so far been beyond the means of NPWS but should be undertaken for the same reason. 
-increased access will have regard to the above facts. + 
-We are glad that you support the declaration of wilderness areas. There can be no doubt that wilderness preservation provides the best means of achieving your aim of protecting the quality of stored waters. The main aim of the NPWS wilderness policy is to preserve and enhance the distribution and abundance of native species. NPWS policy covers the control of introduced +The S.B.W. are at a loss to know why there should be restriction of bushwalking access to any part of the catchment area. We are not aware of any damage caused by members of this Club since its foundation nearly 70 years ago. Any pollution to the immense body of stored water would be minimal in comparison with that caused by inadequate sewerage treatment by the towns of the Blue Mountains, ​Werri Berri Creek, the Southern Tablelands, and other sources, such as rural properties and feral animals. Of particular concern is the Schedule 1 land around the Cox Kowmung junction, which covers an historical and much favoured walking route. 
-species. Easements and + 
-access trails are for +Protection of the catchment is important, but so is the area's recreational value. A survey of participation in sport by the Daily Telegraph in 1995 rated bushwalking second only to swimming as the most popular sport. Urban public lands with a value of many $ billions as real estate have been reserved for recreational purposes. There is no reason why cost free public land should not be available for bushwalking. 
-management purposes only. + 
-Land clearance is not +Declaration of the Kanangra Boyd Wilderness, management by the NPWS, and financial support from Sydney Water would ensure the integrity of the special areas and remove any restriction on bushwalking. 
-permitted. Fire control is essential. Mining is excluded. We believe that the NPWS would concur with your action + 
-in liaising with aviation authorities and the EPA to minimise the impact of aircraft on water quality and ecological integrity. If an airfield is located +At the last general meeting of the S.B.W. it was suggested that appropriate notices placed at the entrances to the area, and car parks within it, could limit any waste disposal problems created by walkers not committed to the Confederation of Bushwalking Club's code of ethics. At least the effectiveness of this action could be tested over a trial period. 
-at Badgerys Creek or Holsworthy it is inevitable that the recreational value of the Blue Mountains parks will be degraded by the diversion of flight paths to the west. It is + 
-obvious that wilderness management according to the NPWS Guidelines covers all +(A. G. Colley ​OAM)\\  
-the catchment protection +Hon.Conservation Secretary  
-principles of Sydney Water. + 
-We are therefore unable to comprehend why there should be any problem in the divestment of lands to the NPWS. Responsibility and accountability of Sydney Water and NPWS for biodiversity and water quality would be identical under wilderness management. +**More Walking- Less Diabetes**\\
-There is, however, one aspect of wilderness preservation beyond the means of NPWS; that is finance. NPWS policy +
-precludes compulsory +
-acquisition of inholdings. These are a menace both to conservation and water quality, since access must be provided and will be used by off road vehicle drivers and horse riders. If subdivision approval is obtained the cost of acquisition soars, as occurred in the case of the Schmidt subdivision in the Pilliga Nature Reserve. Sydney Water has the power, and the means, to acquire these inholdings, and should do so if only in the interests of water quality. The control of feral animals, particularly pigs, has so far been beyond the means of NPWS but should be undertaken for the same reason. +
-The S.B.W. are at a loss to know why there should be restriction of bushwalking access to any part of the catchment area. We are not aware of any damage caused by members of this Club since its foundation nearly 70 years ago. Any pollution to the immense body of stored water +
-would be minimal in comparison with that caused by inadequate sewerage treatment by the towns of the Blue Mountains, ​VVerri ​Berri Creek, the Southern Tablelands, and other sources, such as rural properties and feral animals. Of particular concern is the Schedule 1 land around the Cox Kowmung junction, which covers an historical and much favoured walking route. +
-Protection of the catchment is important, but so is the area's recreational value. A survey of participation in sport by the Daily Telegraph in 1995 rated +
-bushwalking second only to +
-swimming as the most popular sport. Urban public lands with a value of many $ billions as real +
-The Sydney Bushwalker, February 1997 3  +
-estate have been reserved for recreational purposes. Thereno reason why cost free public land should not be available for bushwalking. +
-Declaration of the Kanangra Boyd Wilderness, management by the NPVVS, and financial support from Sydney Water would ensure the integrity of the special areas and remove any restriction on bushwalking. +
-At -the last general meeting of the S.B.W. it was suggested that appropriate notices placed at the entrances to the area, and car parks within it, could limit any waste disposal problems created by walkers not committed to the Confederation of Bushwalking Club's code of ethics. At least the effectiveness of this action could be tested over a trial period. +
-(A. G. Colley ​OAIVI) Hon.-Conservation Secretary  +
-More Walking +
-- Less Diabetes+
 About 1.5 million Australians will have diabOtes by the year 2010 at a cost of more than $1 billion a year unless people stop eating too much fat and doing too little exemise. About 1.5 million Australians will have diabOtes by the year 2010 at a cost of more than $1 billion a year unless people stop eating too much fat and doing too little exemise.
 A national program to increase physical activity, such as walking every, day is needed to reduce peoples'​ risk of developing the desease. A national program to increase physical activity, such as walking every, day is needed to reduce peoples'​ risk of developing the desease.
 Professor Don Chisholm, head of the Garvan Institute of Medical Research'​s Metabolic Division (Search May 1996)  Professor Don Chisholm, head of the Garvan Institute of Medical Research'​s Metabolic Division (Search May 1996) 
-John Bechervaise + 
-(born 1910) +**John Bechervaise**\\ 
-The explorer, writer and educationalist ​froth - Geelong Grammar school who, in 1949, made the first ascent of+(born 1910)\\ 
 +The explorer, writer and educationalist ​from Geelong Grammar school who, in 1949, made the first ascent of
 Federation Peak, the grey fang of 'rock that is as much a symbol of Tasmania'​s southwest wilderness as Lake Pedder. Bechervaise inspired generations of bushwalkers,​ and could lay claim to being the last in the long line of explorers of the Australian outback. ​ Federation Peak, the grey fang of 'rock that is as much a symbol of Tasmania'​s southwest wilderness as Lake Pedder. Bechervaise inspired generations of bushwalkers,​ and could lay claim to being the last in the long line of explorers of the Australian outback. ​
-Freda Du Faur + 
-(1882-1935)+**Freda Du Faur**\\ 
 +(1882-1935)\\
 The first woman to climb New Zealand'​s Mount Cook, Du Faur caused scandal on both sides of the Tasman by bivouacking with a man and taking a porter as chaperone, in societies unaware of her recently revealed preference for the company, of women. She took part in the first Grand Traverse of the three peaks of Mount Cook and many other firsts that remain tough and respected climbs to this day. Du Faurs exploits, like those of Marie Biles and pioneer climber Dorothy Butler, gave women in outdoor adventure a prominence that, despite social changes, has never been equalled in Australian life. Saddened by the death of her English lover Muriel Cardogan, she returned to Australia and gassed herself. The beautiful South island peaks of Du Faurs and Cardogan carry their names. ​ The first woman to climb New Zealand'​s Mount Cook, Du Faur caused scandal on both sides of the Tasman by bivouacking with a man and taking a porter as chaperone, in societies unaware of her recently revealed preference for the company, of women. She took part in the first Grand Traverse of the three peaks of Mount Cook and many other firsts that remain tough and respected climbs to this day. Du Faurs exploits, like those of Marie Biles and pioneer climber Dorothy Butler, gave women in outdoor adventure a prominence that, despite social changes, has never been equalled in Australian life. Saddened by the death of her English lover Muriel Cardogan, she returned to Australia and gassed herself. The beautiful South island peaks of Du Faurs and Cardogan carry their names. ​
-Ernest Giles + 
-(1835-1897) +**Ernest Giles**\\ 
-The last desert explorer to +(1835-1897)\\ 
-believe in an inland sea, Giles +The last desert explorer to believe in an inland sea, Giles wrote of his vision: "There was room for snowy mountains, for an inland sea, ancient rivers and palmy plains, and above all there was room for me." 
-wrote of his vision: "There was +After an early career as a postal clerk in Melbourne, Giles joined a range of pastoral and telegraph line expeditions when much of inland Australia remained only vaguely understood. He eventually succeeded in making a double crossing of the western half of the continent and filling in many of the gaps. His books about his journeys explore his mind and the culture of his times as well as observing the harshness of the interior. He ended up as an obscure mining clerk in Coolgardie, WA, where he died of pneumonia.  
-room for snowy mountains, for + 
-an inland sea, ancient rivers +===== My First Visit To Coolana ​===== 
-and palmy plains, and above all +By Ute Foster 
-there was room for me." +
-After an early career as a postal clerk in Melbourne, Giles joined a range of pastoral and telegraph line expeditions when much of inland Australia+
- remained only vaguely +
- understood. He eventually succeeded in making a double crossing of the western half of the continent and filling in many of the gaps. His books about his journeys explore his mind and the culture of his times as +
-well as observing the harshness of the interior. He ended up as an obscure mining clerk in Coolgardie, WA, where he died of pneumonia.  +
-My First Visit To +
-Coolana+
 Last weekend I visited Coolana for the first time and joined Joan Rigby and Helen & George Gray in the work of controlling the weeds which unfortunately have encroached on the Club's property. Last weekend I visited Coolana for the first time and joined Joan Rigby and Helen & George Gray in the work of controlling the weeds which unfortunately have encroached on the Club's property.
-found the place absolutely delightful and hope to go back again soon and I was very impressed by the 1, dedication and hard work put in by these three people, mostly; on their own. Everybody will benefit from their work eventually, so they deserve more support from the Club.+ 
 +found the place absolutely delightful and hope to go back again soon and I was very impressed by the dedication and hard work put in by these three people, mostly; on their own. Everybody will benefit from their work eventually, so they deserve more support from the Club. 
 Here's a suggestion worth trying out. Every member, including prospective members, should be encouraged to put in one day's work per year at Coolana (come for the weekend, work one day, use the other to relax, swim, walk, enjoy). That way the work is spread amongst more people and more company will mean more fun. Here's a suggestion worth trying out. Every member, including prospective members, should be encouraged to put in one day's work per year at Coolana (come for the weekend, work one day, use the other to relax, swim, walk, enjoy). That way the work is spread amongst more people and more company will mean more fun.
 +
 Why not give it a go, especially the newer people who have not been there yet? Why not give it a go, especially the newer people who have not been there yet?
-Ute Foster. ​ + 
-The Sydney Bushwalker February 1997 4 + 
-I was intrigued by the Pconcern" expressed by Mark Weatherly in his article in January magazine. Also by the Editorial Comment in the same issue on the same subject. Why do so many people have this reaction to granting land and access rights to the original owners of this country? +===== Why it shouldn'​t happen here ===== 
-Mark is oversimplifying the case when he says the form of title granted to Aboriginal Land Councils is "the same as for any suburban home site and most family homes"​. It is not. Our suburban home sites and family homes are not subject to National Park regulations and ministerial approval requirements. And by the way, +by Bill Holland 
-we shouldn'​t equate possession by Aboriginal Land Councils as equivalent to private ownership. For starters, the land cannot be sold to another party and there are other limitations attached to Land Council ownership. + 
-The new legislation continues the National Park classification for at least the period of leaseback ie. 30 years. This should be seen as a positive. At least the lands will not be open tO commercial exploitation to the extent seen in Victoria the next time the state government changes hands. The Act also gives access and hunting rights to the traditional owners but let's not forget that aboriginal groups have always had 'hunting rights in National Parks.+I was intrigued by the "​concern" expressed by Mark Weatherly in his article in January magazine. Also by the Editorial Comment in the same issue on the same subject. Why do so many people have this reaction to granting land and access rights to the original owners of this country? 
 + 
 +Mark is oversimplifying the case when he says the form of title granted to Aboriginal Land Councils is "the same as for any suburban home site and most family homes"​. It is not. Our suburban home sites and family homes are not subject to National Park regulations and ministerial approval requirements. And by the way, we shouldn'​t equate possession by Aboriginal Land Councils as equivalent to private ownership. For starters, the land cannot be sold to another party and there are other limitations attached to Land Council ownership. 
 + 
 +The new legislation continues the National Park classification for at least the period of leaseback ie. 30 years. This should be seen as a positive. At least the lands will not be open to commercial exploitation to the extent seen in Victoria the next time the state government changes hands. The Act also gives access and hunting rights to the traditional owners but let's not forget that aboriginal groups have always had hunting rights in National Parks. 
 Economic development rights may, be granted, but these are subject to the approval of the minister and must be in harmony with the plan of management for each park. Economic development rights may, be granted, but these are subject to the approval of the minister and must be in harmony with the plan of management for each park.
 +
 These rights already exist in other national parks. These rights already exist in other national parks.
-We have already seen proposals put up by the previous Coalition who, by the way, still remain committed to "​multiple use" and + 
-"​economically sustainable"​ +We have already seen proposals put up by the previous Coalition who, by the way, still remain committed to "​multiple use" and "​economically sustainable"​ development of state assets. 
-development of state assets.+
 The key point here is that Aboriginal cultural significance was a very significant factor in granting the seven sites. To qualify as significant the cultural influences must have continued over the centuries and be linked to current "​family groups"​. The key point here is that Aboriginal cultural significance was a very significant factor in granting the seven sites. To qualify as significant the cultural influences must have continued over the centuries and be linked to current "​family groups"​.
 +
 Mark refers to "​privately owned" Uluru and Kakadu. I have visited both of these on several occasions and although some areas are not accessible (due to sacred sites etc) I have never felt unduly restricted. Indeed, the only time I felt resentment in being excluded from some remarkable country was in the Gulf of Carpentaria where the land in question was owned by a large international mining company. Mark refers to "​privately owned" Uluru and Kakadu. I have visited both of these on several occasions and although some areas are not accessible (due to sacred sites etc) I have never felt unduly restricted. Indeed, the only time I felt resentment in being excluded from some remarkable country was in the Gulf of Carpentaria where the land in question was owned by a large international mining company.
 +
 The Carr Government should be congratulated on the number of new parks created and its attempts to redress past wrongs by giving the aboriginal people the opportunity to join in the management and control of a small number of these parks. The Carr Government should be congratulated on the number of new parks created and its attempts to redress past wrongs by giving the aboriginal people the opportunity to join in the management and control of a small number of these parks.
-Editorial Comment+ 
 +Editorial Comment//
 The "​views"​ expressed by Bill were referred to our Conservation Secretary Alex Colley for comment. His responses follow: The "​views"​ expressed by Bill were referred to our Conservation Secretary Alex Colley for comment. His responses follow:
-1. ConcernLand rights exclude access rights. +  * 1. ConcernLand rights exclude access rights. 
-The aborigines may well exclude walkers from all the park, as they propose in Kakadu. On aboriginal lands in Central Australia access is forbidden past one chain from the Gun-barrel Highway. +  ​* ​The aborigines may well exclude walkers from all the park, as they propose in Kakadu. On aboriginal lands in Central Australia access is forbidden past one chain from the Gun-barrel Highway. 
-2. Form of titleTrespass can apply to any land other than public land. +  ​* ​2. Form of titleTrespass can apply to any land other than public land. 
-3. HuntingI'm not sure about that One but they are specifically including hunting rights in the Kakadu plan of management. Don't know of any instance of hunting in NSW Parks. +  ​* ​3. HuntingI'm not sure about that One but they are specifically including hunting rights in the Kakadu plan of management. Don't know of any instance of hunting in NSW Parks. 
-4. Economic development rightsThey can be granted but look at Kosciusko. We should oppose all commercial development in parks. +  ​* ​4. Economic development rightsThey can be granted but look at Kosciusko. We should oppose all commercial development in parks. 
-5. Multiple usePerhaps but we should oppose if. +  ​* ​5. Multiple usePerhaps but we should oppose if. 
-6. The key pointYes, it was a factor, but there is no assurance that it will be confined to strongly culturally linked parks. +  ​* ​6. The key pointYes, it was a factor, but there is no assurance that it will be confined to strongly culturally linked parks. 
-7. Privately ownedKakadu is called a park but it is really a tourist area. I have spent some weeks in Kakadu without meeting an aboriginal. +  ​* ​7. Privately ownedKakadu is called a park but it is really a tourist area. I have spent some weeks in Kakadu without meeting an aboriginal. 
-We're not jumping up and down about land rights, only about giving the parks into private ownership instead of retaining them in public ownership. +  ​* ​We're not jumping up and down about land rights, only about giving the parks into private ownership instead of retaining them in public ownership. 
-8. The Carr Government brought on the legislation at a couple of days notice giving conservationists no time to protest.  +  ​* ​8. The Carr Government brought on the legislation at a couple of days notice giving conservationists no time to protest.  
-The Sydney Bushwalker February 1997 5  + 
-anoeists: Leader Ian & Joy + 
--Tony & Kay David & Diane Peter. - Jaquie ​Don & Jenny. +===== Tallowa Dam Picnic Area to Portion 40 and return ===== 
-Walkers: Leader Bill & Fran - Jim & Jo - Lorraine - Robin - Judy'- David - Frank - Peter.+Canoeists: Leader Ian & JoyTony & KayDavid & DianePeterJaquieDon & Jenny.\\ 
 +Walkers: Leader Bill & Fran - Jim & Jo - Lorraine - Robin - Judy- David - Frank - Peter. 
 Ten canoeists met at the Tallowa Dam Picnic Area on This very dull Saturday morning and having sorted out their gear and loaded it into the canoe set off about 9.30 am on the strenuous 10km paddle to a delightful grassed camping area on the shoreline set amongst wattle trees. Ten canoeists met at the Tallowa Dam Picnic Area on This very dull Saturday morning and having sorted out their gear and loaded it into the canoe set off about 9.30 am on the strenuous 10km paddle to a delightful grassed camping area on the shoreline set amongst wattle trees.
-Our paddle across the broad stretches of Lake Yarunga accompanied by occasional drizzle contrasted greatly with the walk we had enjoyed 28 years ago as we ducked and + 
-weaved our way along a narrow cattle track beside the then slender Kangaroo River to sample a pleasant camp site on Teamster Flat now covered by megalitres of water but that's progress. +Our paddle across the broad stretches of Lake Yarunga accompanied by occasional drizzle contrasted greatly with the walk we had enjoyed 28 years ago as we ducked and weaved our way along a narrow cattle track beside the then slender Kangaroo River to sample a pleasant camp site on Teamster Flat now covered by megalitres of water but that's progress. 
-By the time the canoes had been hauled up and unloaded and the tents erected the walk- in group led by Bill emerged from the surrounding forest and after friendly greetings they too erected tents and planned a suitable size fire for 20 people. + 
-Later Joy and Ian began to set up the awning and the tables and chairs and the light. As evening approached it began to resemble a backyard barbecue rather than a large group of bushwalkers gathered on a remote lake-side however their effort was greatly appreciated +By the time the canoes had been hauled up and unloaded and the tents erected the walk-in group led by Bill emerged from the surrounding forest and after friendly greetings they too erected tents and planned a suitable size fire for 20 people. 
-by everyone and the happy atmosphere with yarning - eating - drinking continued till late.+ 
 +Later Joy and Ian began to set up the awning and the tables and chairs and the light. As evening approached it began to resemble a backyard barbecue rather than a large group of bushwalkers gathered on a remote lake-side however their effort was greatly appreciated by everyone and the happy atmosphere with yarning - eating - drinking continued till late. 
 A fine sunny Sunday gave plenty of opportunity for everyone to indulge in their preferred activity so we saw swimming - fishing - walking and also the opportunity to paddle any of the variety of canoes available. A fine sunny Sunday gave plenty of opportunity for everyone to indulge in their preferred activity so we saw swimming - fishing - walking and also the opportunity to paddle any of the variety of canoes available.
 +
 With a deadline set to leave by 3pm we began the two hours back to the vehicles, this time favoured by a tail wind. We made record time and we had barely got the canoes tied down when Bill appeared, having climbed the hills and driven to the dam. So ended a very pleasant weekend. ​ With a deadline set to leave by 3pm we began the two hours back to the vehicles, this time favoured by a tail wind. We made record time and we had barely got the canoes tied down when Bill appeared, having climbed the hills and driven to the dam. So ended a very pleasant weekend. ​
-Cydone Rachel in January dropped enough rain on the Pilbara to guarantee exceptional water supplies and walking conditions for our expedition this year The trip is divided into two sections, either may be done on its own. + 
-Kariiini National Park: June 22 - July 6 +===== The Wrong Leader ===== 
-Walk through deep, red-walled gorges in a rugged landscape +by Maurice Smith 
-that seems to go on forever. We do two long walks, one of which includes an all-day lib + 
-trip through some of the deepest +I have read Tony Manes' letter on page 3 of the January 1997 club magazine and feel that I must defend myself. 
-gorges. For more information,​ see the +
-Kariiini feature in the January 1995 +
-Australian Geographic. +
-We plan to do a single long walk in one of the least known parts of the MillstrearnChichester National Park You will see gorges, waterfalls and wildflowers. You won't see people so few people know about this area that it's unlikely your group will see anyone else ,S during the entire walk +
-We can't put the details in a short ad like this. Ask for our trip notes. Get in early and take advantage of our advance purchase discounts. +
-6 The Sydney Biiihrtralker February 1997 +
-Sth +
-I have read Tony Manes' letter +
-on page 3 of the January 1997 club magazine and feel that I must defend myself.+
 But first of all, I am pleased to see that Tony agrees with me about excessive numbers on club trips. But first of all, I am pleased to see that Tony agrees with me about excessive numbers on club trips.
 +
 To answer Tony's assertions I feel that I should set out how I organise for club walks that I lead. To answer Tony's assertions I feel that I should set out how I organise for club walks that I lead.
-All the weekend walks that I lead are now limited to a maximum of eight walkers. If I grade the walk as a Test walk two spots are reserved for prospectives and this is stated in the club program for members and prospective members to see. If an + 
-insufficient number of prospective members book, then the vacant spot is assigned to a full member, but only in the last day or so before +All the weekend walks that I lead are now limited to a maximum of eight walkers. If I grade the walk as a Test walk two spots are reserved for prospectives and this is stated in the club program for members and prospective members to see. If an insufficient number of prospective members book, then the vacant spot is assigned to a full member, but only in the last day or so before the trip start dateUnlike a recent weekend test walk with another leader that I have heard about. That Walk was so popular with full members that prospective members could not 
-the trip start date Unlike a recent weekend test walk with another leader that I have heard about. That Walk was so popular with full members that prospective members could not +get a look in! What an appalling state of affairs. 
-get a look int! What an + 
-appalling state of affairs. +As an aside, on one of my trips late last year, there were four prospective members and four full members. I vividly remember my experience as a prospective member not that long ago and the advice received from members during that time. I endeavour to pass on to the prospective members who walk with me all of the advice, bushcraft and camperaft that I learned as a prospective member and that I have garnered subsequently. 
-As an aside, on one of ,my trips late last year, there were four prospective members and four full members. I vividly remember my experience as a prospective member not that long ago and the advice received from members during that time. I endeavour to pass on to the prospective members who walk with me all-si-the +
-advice, bushcraft and camperaft that I learned as a prospective member and that I have garnered subsequently.+
 I encourage prospective members who have the appropriate experience to come on my trips and enjoy the experience of a weekend walk. I encourage prospective members who have the appropriate experience to come on my trips and enjoy the experience of a weekend walk.
-I do not take bookings for any of my walks until the program is published and in the hands of members. Certainly there are a number of "​regulars"​ on my trips. By this I mean that some club members will regularly come on my trips. I have no doubt that other trip leaders also have their "​regulars"​. However, these regulars do not receive any special treatment from me to be able to get onto my trips. It is strictly a first come first served. On some of my trips of last, year, where any of my regulars did not book early they missed out on the trip. Unlike a few 'other leaders, I do not organise for my walks to be filled before being placed on the program. + 
-My trip booking sheet has two sectiOns. The first section has provision for two prospectives and five othermembers (plus myself). The second section is for the reserves, that is, those members who book for the trip after the first eight. These reserves are told that the trip is fully booked, however, they are invited to be a reserve who can be contacted in the event that one of the first eight has a change of plans and pulls out of the trip. +I do not take bookings for any of my walks until the program is published and in the hands of members. Certainly there are a number of "​regulars"​ on my trips. By this I mean that some club members will regularly come on my trips. I have no doubt that other trip leaders also have their "​regulars"​. However, these regulars do not receive any special treatment from me to be able to get onto my trips. It is strictly a first come first served. On some of my trips of last, year, where any of my regulars did not book early they missed out on the trip. Unlike a few other leaders, I do not organise for my walks to be filled before being placed on the program. 
-From memory only once in my walks in last year was there one occasion when I did not have a full complement of eight walkers. In that trip one member pulled out at the very last moment and even though I had a reserves list I was unable + 
-to organise for a replacement at very short notice.+My trip booking sheet has two sections. The first section has provision for two prospectives and five other members (plus myself). The second section is for the reserves, that is, those members who book for the trip after the first eight. These reserves are told that the trip is fully booked, however, they are invited to be a reserve who can be contacted in the event that one of the first eight has a change of plans and pulls out of the trip. 
 + 
 +From memory only once in my walks in last year was there one occasion when I did not have a full complement of eight walkers. In that trip one member pulled out at the very last moment and even though I had a reserves list I was unable to organise for a replacement at very short notice. 
 If it is perceived that I lead "​cliquey little walks which no one can book on" then I can only surmise that members have tried to book and have missed out. The areas in which I mostly lead walks are declared wilderness areas. Such areas are recognised by NPWS as having higher conservation value than national parks. I am extremely anxious to conserve the areas in which I walk. This is so that future generations of walkers will have the same opportunity to enjoy their walks in our magnificent wilderness areas. It is mostly for this reason that I place such strict limits on my walks. If it is perceived that I lead "​cliquey little walks which no one can book on" then I can only surmise that members have tried to book and have missed out. The areas in which I mostly lead walks are declared wilderness areas. Such areas are recognised by NPWS as having higher conservation value than national parks. I am extremely anxious to conserve the areas in which I walk. This is so that future generations of walkers will have the same opportunity to enjoy their walks in our magnificent wilderness areas. It is mostly for this reason that I place such strict limits on my walks.
 +
 So in summing up, Tony you have the wrong leader in your sights when you make such reckless statements about my walks. I invite you to book early for any of my trips on the next program. ​ So in summing up, Tony you have the wrong leader in your sights when you make such reckless statements about my walks. I invite you to book early for any of my trips on the next program. ​
-The January + 
-General Meeting+ 
 +===== The January General Meeting ​===== 
 Sorry folks, I know that you all look forward to reading Barry'​s highly entertaining version of what happened at the last general meeting but due to pressure of business, and other commitments he couldn'​t find enough time for it this month. Sorry folks, I know that you all look forward to reading Barry'​s highly entertaining version of what happened at the last general meeting but due to pressure of business, and other commitments he couldn'​t find enough time for it this month.
-Barry tenders his apologies to all his avid readers and assures + 
-me that he will try for a double whammy issue next month. Ed  +Barry tenders his apologies to all his avid readers and assures me that he will try for a double whammy issue next month. Ed  
-The Sydney Bushwalker February 1997 7+ 
 The National Film and Sound Archive was established to preserve the heritage of the nation. Details of the holdings are stored on CD ROM and can be viewed for a fee (84 Alexander Street Crows Nest). Copyright issues and copying costs make reproduction difficult. Items of interest are: The National Film and Sound Archive was established to preserve the heritage of the nation. Details of the holdings are stored on CD ROM and can be viewed for a fee (84 Alexander Street Crows Nest). Copyright issues and copying costs make reproduction difficult. Items of interest are:
 In 1927 three men took a car out to Kanangra Walls. A soundless black and white film (1) came out of this visit with views from the highest point on the plateau and across to Kanangra Falls. Whilst the Blue Breaks are visible haze,. the quality of the film makes In 1927 three men took a car out to Kanangra Walls. A soundless black and white film (1) came out of this visit with views from the highest point on the plateau and across to Kanangra Falls. Whilst the Blue Breaks are visible haze,. the quality of the film makes
199702.txt · Last modified: 2016/12/05 09:31 by joan