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199508 [2020/12/20 10:03]
joan
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joan [The July General Meeting]
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 There are currently 14 huts in the system with at least one more being built. The highest is Jackal hut at 11,660ft (3,550m) and the lowest Harry Gates hut at 9,700ft (2,950m). Two of the huts are privately owned but can be booked through the 10th Mountain Division Hut Association. Distances between huts are typically around 11km, with some shorter. Distances to the huts from vehicle-accessible trailheads are also of this order. There are currently 14 huts in the system with at least one more being built. The highest is Jackal hut at 11,660ft (3,550m) and the lowest Harry Gates hut at 9,700ft (2,950m). Two of the huts are privately owned but can be booked through the 10th Mountain Division Hut Association. Distances between huts are typically around 11km, with some shorter. Distances to the huts from vehicle-accessible trailheads are also of this order.
  
-The huts are equipped with every mod con you would expect to find in a mountain hut, and then some. Most are of two storey construction with bedrooms on the top floor and living, kitchen and eating areas on the bottom floor. Sixteen people can be accommodated in the dormitory of each hut. If necessary many times that number could be accommodated in an emergency, as the huts are large: Equipment provided in the huts in which we stayed included gas and wood cooking stoves, ​woOd-fired stove for room heating, chopped wood to feed these appliances, solar-powered electric lighting with back-up Coleman lamps, all kitchen needs such as crockery, cutlery, cooking utensils, detergent, kitchen sink, running water (recommended for cooking needs only); but alas, you bring your own chef? Then there was a pit toilet, shovels for clearing the way there, and toilet paper to reward the shoveller. The huts were all well insulated and double glazed. And the views_tttifittmim  +The huts are equipped with every mod con you would expect to find in a mountain hut, and then some. Most are of two storey construction with bedrooms on the top floor and living, kitchen and eating areas on the bottom floor. Sixteen people can be accommodated in the dormitory of each hut. If necessary many times that number could be accommodated in an emergency, as the huts are large: Equipment provided in the huts in which we stayed included gas and wood cooking stoves, ​wood-fired stove for room heating, chopped wood to feed these appliances, solar-powered electric lighting with back-up Coleman lamps, all kitchen needs such as crockery, cutlery, cooking utensils, detergent, kitchen sink, running water (recommended for cooking needs only); but alas, you bring your own chef? Then there was a pit toilet, shovels for clearing the way there, and toilet paper to reward the shoveller. The huts were all well insulated and double glazed. And the views!!!!!!!!!!!
-Our trip was intended to be from a trailhead near Aspen to Vail, taking eleven days and covering a distance of around 110km excluding side trips. Pretty easy, we anticipated,​ following set trails and having the luxury of huts at the end of each day's travel. Beeause the huts were fully booked for the Saturday night of our trip we would have to ski out to the town of Leadville halfway - through the journey. The alternative of camping out on this night would have meant that we would have to start out with eleven days' food instead'​of the five we did take, as well as some extra camping gear, and that did not appeal. We did however take a tent (Megamid, weighing only 1.5kg with pole and pegs for the three of us), and a stove in case we were forced to camp out for any reason. +
-A few clays' acclimation (American for acclimatisation,​ not the whistles and applause that were our due) was necessary and we joined in the last two days of the downhill season at Aspen Easter Saturday and Sunday. It had been a good' season and the snow was thick. It began to snow about midday of our first day downhilling (using our. XC skis) and a few centimetres of fresh powder made for some great skiing. Next day was just incomparable with a clear blue sky, no wind, no crowds,a,nd around 20 centimetres of fresh overnight powder. And it was the last day of the season! +
-AUGUST 1995 THE SYDNEY BUSH WALKER PAGE 11 +
-.Pa vid, who had,skied Aspen several times at the height of its seison, reckoned it was as good as e bad ever struck it there, and had to switch to &Within skis to extract maximum benefit.'​ The - next day David heard that there was a '​spread on for the resort employees at the top of Aspen Mountain so he skied the 1,000 metres or so of vertical to crash the party while Wayne and 1- nursed The Soreness that goes with two days of non-stop telemarking on no preparation. +
-Next morning we caught a taxi to the trailhod vvhich was about 25km distant, but 100km by road. There is a section of 10th Mountain Division trail from Aspen to our trailhead but it would have entailed an extra couple of days' skiing and, as it turned out, there was no snow on the Aspen side anyway. Our first day's travel entailed about 11km and 600m elevation gain, most of it along a well-graded road. +
-There had been some more snow overnight (as there was every night of our trip), which meant +
-hard going for whoever was breaking trail. It soon became apparent that I had made a good choice of ski to use. +
-I had agonised hard and long over which ski to use on the trip --the trusty Karhu XCD GTs which had served me faithfully and well in Australia and on a previous trip to the Sierra Nevada, or the Black Diamond Toute Neiges which 1 had originally purchased mainly as resort XCD skis. The Black Diamonds have no pattern, so it 'meant that if 1 took them 1 ,would have the aggravation of using wax and skins. On the other hand the downhills would be easier to handle, and of course they are great for the yo-yoing we would be doing to acclimate. I eventually opted for the Black Diamonds being swayed by the fact that all the Americans on our previous trip in the Sierra Nevada had used skis similar to them. When in Rome, do as the Romans! +
-To be continued in the September SBW Magazine... +
-And discover what makes Build Up Bushwalking such a special experience. +
-As the year progresses, the hOt, dry weather of September turns into the hotter, humid weather of October and +
-November. All but a few creeks have completely disappeared. Major rivers are reduced to a series of isolated +
-waterholes. The land lies brown and parched, waiting, still, silent and sweltering.  +
-+
-Suddenly, a wind springs up in a matter of minutes, the temperature drops five or even ten degrees The first few drops of rain turn into a torrent as lightning flashes and thunder roars. Then it is over and still once more The frogs began to call and the birds begin to sing. The land turns green again, almost as you watch.: All nature rejoices in the change. +
-Ever i in this the hottest time of year, there are a few beautiful, cool, shady creeks and gorges where the bush aiker can relax and watch the birds as they come in for a drink or listen to the cicada chorus which announces tile:coming Change. Knowledgeable locals head bush at every opportunity,​ leaving'​ the ignorant to swelter in the city. Out routes have been chosen with relaxation, swimming and shade in mind. Walking will generally be restricted to early in the morning and late in the afternoon. The hot +
-middle part of the day will devoted. to taking it easy and soaking up the sights ,s1WA14. +
-and sounds of the environment around us. On our final walk of the year, we +
-+
-finish with an overnight stay on a houseboat on the Mary River, allowing you 6 +
-to experience the wetlands wildlife at its Concentrated best.+
  
 +Our trip was intended to be from a trailhead near Aspen to Vail, taking eleven days and covering a distance of around 110km excluding side trips. Pretty easy, we anticipated,​ following set trails and having the luxury of huts at the end of each day's travel. Because the huts were fully booked for the Saturday night of our trip we would have to ski out to the town of Leadville halfway through the journey. The alternative of camping out on this night would have meant that we would have to start out with eleven days' food instead of the five we did take, as well as some extra camping gear, and that did not appeal. We did however take a tent (Megamid, weighing only 1.5kg with pole and pegs for the three of us), and a stove in case we were forced to camp out for any reason.
 +
 +A few days' acclimation (American for acclimatisation,​ not the whistles and applause that were our due) was necessary and we joined in the last two days of the downhill season at Aspen Easter Saturday and Sunday. It had been a good' season and the snow was thick. It began to snow about midday of our first day downhilling (using our. XC skis) and a few centimetres of fresh powder made for some great skiing. Next day was just incomparable with a clear blue sky, no wind, no crowds,and around 20 centimetres of fresh overnight powder. And it was the last day of the season!
 +
 +David, who had,skied Aspen several times at the height of its season, reckoned it was as good as he had ever struck it there, and had to switch to downhill skis to extract maximum benefit. The next day David heard that there was a spread on for the resort employees at the top of Aspen Mountain so he skied the 1,000 metres or so of vertical to crash the party while Wayne and I nursed the soreness that goes with two days of non-stop telemarking on no preparation.
 +
 +Next morning we caught a taxi to the trailhead which was about 25km distance, but 100km by road. There is a section of 10th Mountain Division trail from Aspen to our trailhead but it would have entailed an extra couple of days' skiing and, as it turned out, there was no snow on the Aspen side anyway. Our first day's travel entailed about 11km and 600m elevation gain, most of it along a well-graded road.
 +
 +There had been some more snow overnight (as there was every night of our trip), which meant hard going for whoever was breaking trail. It soon became apparent that I had made a good choice of ski to use.
 +I had agonised hard and long over which ski to use on the trip -the trusty Karhu XCD GTs which had served me faithfully and well in Australia and on a previous trip to the Sierra Nevada, or the Black Diamond Toute Neiges which 1 had originally purchased mainly as resort XCD skis. The Black Diamonds have no pattern, so it meant that if I took them I would have the aggravation of using wax and skins. On the other hand the downhills would be easier to handle, and of course they are great for the yo-yoing we would be doing to acclimate. I eventually opted for the Black Diamonds being swayed by the fact that all the Americans on our previous trip in the Sierra Nevada had used skis similar to them. When in Rome, do as the Romans!
 +
 +To be continued in the September SBW Magazine...
 =====THE 1995 GAMMON RANGES EXPEDITION===== =====THE 1995 GAMMON RANGES EXPEDITION=====
 ===By Bob Duncan=== ===By Bob Duncan===
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 David always books with Ansett just because he is in their frequent flyer scheme he doesn'​t seem to care a damn that I hold a Qantas frequent flyer card, and last year lost 6000 points by flying to Darwin and back by Ansett. This time I was determined to fly by myself with Qantas, and arrange to book a seat. But sad to say all the cheap tickets had gone. David always books with Ansett just because he is in their frequent flyer scheme he doesn'​t seem to care a damn that I hold a Qantas frequent flyer card, and last year lost 6000 points by flying to Darwin and back by Ansett. This time I was determined to fly by myself with Qantas, and arrange to book a seat. But sad to say all the cheap tickets had gone.
  
-A little later, the party met at David'​s house to arrange details for the McDonnell'​s trip. There, he told us that Ornm of rain had recently fallen in the Gammons and that as it was currently raining in Sydney and Vladivostok there was a chance that they might get more. Once again therefore, a Gammons trip was his favoured option. I quietly thanked my guardian angel for preventing my buying a Qantas ticket to Alice Springs.+A little later, the party met at David'​s house to arrange details for the McDonnell'​s trip. There, he told us that 9mm of rain had recently fallen in the Gammons and that as it was currently raining in Sydney and Vladivostok there was a chance that they might get more. Once again therefore, a Gammons trip was his favoured option. I quietly thanked my guardian angel for preventing my buying a Qantas ticket to Alice Springs.
  
 We were apprehensive,​ but obediently agreed to go to the Gammons if David rang the ranger again and was assured that the waterholes were no longer dry. Next morning he rang around and told us that the Gammons trip was on and to pay our money to Ansett immediately. We later learnt that he hadn't rung the ranger; he had just decided to go. We were apprehensive,​ but obediently agreed to go to the Gammons if David rang the ranger again and was assured that the waterholes were no longer dry. Next morning he rang around and told us that the Gammons trip was on and to pay our money to Ansett immediately. We later learnt that he hadn't rung the ranger; he had just decided to go.
-The (Ansett) plane left Sydney at 06:25 on Saturday the 3rd June and carried the whole party, David Rostron, Spiro Hajinakitis,​ Bill Caskey, Stephen Ellis, Geoff McIntosh, Wendy Lippiaft, Kerry Norris, and me to Adelaide. There we hired a Commodore and a Camray and drove the 550 km of bitumen and 120 km of dirt to the eastern side of the Gammon Ranges. We arrived in OW time to make camp in daylight Weetootla Creeka broad dry-river red-gum studded stream- bed which here left the ranges and, after joining Balcanoona Creek, went eastward through rocky foot hills to the salt pan of Lake Frome.+The (Ansett) plane left Sydney at 06:25 on Saturday the 3rd June and carried the whole party, David Rostron, Spiro Hajinakitis,​ Bill Caskey, Stephen Ellis, Geoff McIntosh, Wendy Lippiatt, Kerry Norris, and me to Adelaide. There we hired a Commodore and a Camray and drove the 550km of bitumen and 120km of dirt to the eastern side of the Gammon Ranges. We arrived in good time to make camp in daylight Weetootla Creeka broad dry-river red-gum studded stream- bed which here left the ranges and, after joining Balcanoona Creek, went eastward through rocky foot hills to the salt pan of Lake Frome.
  
-The next morning (Sunday 4th) we left the cars and walked up Weetootla Creek. ​almost ​immediately this narrowed and to our great joy we saw pools of recent water. David'​s forecast had proved correct; since the fateful Sydney meeting ​afurther 12 mm of rain had fallen. As it cut through a rocky range, the creek narrowed further and became a red-walled gorge. Then the cOuntry ​opened out again arid we came to the historic Grindell'​s hut spring, where we had an early lunch.. +The next morning (Sunday 4th) we left the cars and walked up Weetootla Creek. ​Almost ​immediately this narrowed and to our great joy we saw pools of recent water. David'​s forecast had proved correct; since the fateful Sydney meeting ​a further 12mm of rain had fallen. As it cut through a rocky range, the creek narrowed further and became a red-walled gorge. Then the country ​opened out again arid we came to the historic Grindell'​s hut spring, where we had an early lunch.
-NoWwe could see the lie of the land ahead. Ahead, to the north-west, lay the main spine of this part of the Gammons - the Blue Range. the top of this was by repute flattish and extremely scrubby, but this flank was heavily dissected, and it was this dissected, area of gorges and peaks which we would traverse during the next 8 days. +
-We approached by continuing up Weetootla Creek. As we followed this back towards the range it became an. ever deeper and more imposing gorge, and finally it split into two chasms, the apparent right of which Was B.unyip Chasm. This was a listed water source so, though it was still early afternoon, we choose a campsite, dropped our packs, put nibbles and wine-skins into our day packs and entered. After scrambling and climbing up rocks and dry waterfalls we came to a slot containing a few pools of darkish water. We pushed on until temporarily stopped. by an metre wall presenting oozing water and wet rocks. But our leader '​demonstrated that it had sufficient dry footholds and everyone followed. After further scrambling we reached an even bigger wall which led almost to the top of the range, but which only David climbed. +
-On the way back drizzle and consequent fear of wet rock caused us to hurry. But :we had no trouble, and At the lowest rock pool we filled our wine-skins, and then made our way down to our campsite for a lazy late afternoon. Kerry and Geoff went bird-watching and recorded six birds in their log book including a rare pie-eyed tit.+
  
-The next day (Monday ​the 5th) we planned a summit camp on MtJohn Roberts. We filled our wine-skins and walked back down Weetootla Creek a short distancebefore climbing a steep ridge onto the tops and the mountain. Mi. John Roberts is at the end of a narrow divide between Weetootla ​and North Italowie creeksand drops abruptly on three sides. To the cast we looked over otintarting pointWeetootla Gorge and Grindell'​s Hut, and in the far distance Lake Frome..To the south-west we looked across ​to our destination:​ Cleft Peak and McKinley Bluff. the night was extremely windy, but fortunately not unduly cold.+Now we could see the lie of the land aheadAhead, to the north-westlay the main spine of this part of the Gammons - the Blue Range. The top of this was by repute flattish ​and extremely scrubbybut this flank was heavily dissected, and it was this dissectedarea of gorges ​and peaks which we would traverse during ​the next 8 days. 
 +We approached by continuing up Weetootla CreekAs we followed this back towards ​the range it became an ever deeper and more imposing gorge, and finally it split into two chasms, the apparent right of which was Bunyip Chasm. This was a listed water source so, though it was still early afternoon, we choose a campsite, dropped our packs, put nibbles and wine-skins into our day packs and entered. After scrambling and climbing up rocks and dry waterfalls ​we came to a slot containing a few pools of darkish water. We pushed on until temporarily stopped by an metre wall presenting oozing water and wet rocks. But our leader demonstrated that it had sufficient dry footholds ​and everyone followedAfter further scrambling we reached an even bigger wall which led almost to the top of the range, but which only David climbed.
  
-In the morning (Tuesday the 6th) we set out in the wind south-westward along a ridge and down a steep gully to North Italowie CreekHere we found the Guide Book's reliable waterhole to be dry. But on. walking upstream until the creek became a gorge we found a good pool, where we dropped ​our packs before continuing. the creek became a steep narrow chasmShelf chasm, which lcd almost ​to the top of the Blue range. It reputedly Contains ​formation called 'The Old Man of Italowie, but there were so many bluffs ​and rock towers that we were unable to identify it. We retraced our steps and made camp at the POOL.+On the way back drizzle ​and consequent fear of wet rock caused us to hurryBut we had no trouble, and at the lowest rock pool we filled ​our wine-skinsand then made our way down to our campsite for lazy late afternoon. Kerry and Geoff went bird-watching ​and recorded six birds in their log book including a rare pie-eyed tit.
  
-Our prograin ​for Wednesday the 7th was RoverRockhole via Cleft Peak. As always, Spiro arose at 4am, cooked breakfast, and fed us at dawn. Then taking a little boiled water for lunch, we walked back down North Italowie Creek to the Wildflower Creek junction and then up Wildflower Creek to the Cleft Creek junction. +The next day (Monday the 5th) we planned a summit camp on Mt. John Roberts. We filled our wine-skins and walked back down Weetootla Creek a short distance, before climbing a steep ridge onto the tops and the mountain. Mi. John Roberts is at the end of a narrow divide between Weetootla and North Italowie creeks, and drops abruptly on three sides. To the east we looked over our starting point, Weetootla Gorge and Grindell'​s Hut, and in the far distance Lake Frome. To the south-west we looked across to our destination:​ Cleft Peak and McKinley Bluff. The night was extremely windy, but fortunately not unduly cold. 
-Cleft Creek is indeed a cleft. The ridge on its apparent left leads directly to Cleft Peak; the Guide Book said it Was hairy, and it was David'​s first option. The ridge on its apparent right led to a sUbsidiary ​peak joined to the main peak by a saddle; the Guide Book said it was easier, and it was the rest of the party'​s option. When we got to the top we had to admit that David was right; both ridges were negotiable and the left ridge would have led us more directly to the peak.+ 
 +In the morning (Tuesday the 6th) we set out in the wind south-westward along a ridge and down a steep gully to North Italowie Creek. Here we found the Guide Book's reliable waterhole to be dry. But on walking upstream until the creek became a gorge we found a good pool, where we dropped our packs before continuing. The creek became a steep narrow chasm, Shelf chasm, which led almost to the top of the Blue Range. It reputedly contains a formation called 'The Old Man of Italowie',​ but there were so many bluffs and rock towers that we were unable to identify it. We retraced our steps and made camp at the pool. 
 + 
 +Our program ​for Wednesday the 7th was Rover Rockhole via Cleft Peak. As always, Spiro arose at 4am, cooked breakfast, and fed us at dawn. Then taking a little boiled water for lunch, we walked back down North Italowie Creek to the Wildflower Creek junction and then up Wildflower Creek to the Cleft Creek junction. 
 +Cleft Creek is indeed a cleft. The ridge on its apparent left leads directly to Cleft Peak; the Guide Book said it was hairy, and it was David'​s first option. The ridge on its apparent right led to a subsidiary ​peak joined to the main peak by a saddle; the Guide Book said it was easier, and it was the rest of the party'​s option. When we got to the top we had to admit that David was right; both ridges were negotiable and the left ridge would have led us more directly to the peak
 + 
 +After lunching on the peak, we retraced our steps back to the subsidiary peak and part of the way down the climbing ridge, before descending a westerly side ridge which led to Rover Rockhole Creek. Here we made camp before taking our wine-sacks and climbing the dry waterfall which guards the rockholes. The water was coffee-coloured from dissolved goat knoblets, as usual, and our leader expressed concern that many of the tadpoles were lying belly-up. Some of us walked further up in search of better water. It was a wide deep canyon with horizontal rock strata and shelving steps. We found other pools but not of significantly better quality; anyway by this time we were used to drinking boiled goat knoblet water. In one of these pools, while Wendy vainly tried to locate a protesting frog, David, Bill, and I had a frigid (soapless) bath. We returned to the main rockholes, filled our wine-skins, placed them in string bags, and lowered them by rope to the campsite below.
  
-After lunching on the peak, we retraced our steps back to the subsidiary peak and part of the way down the climbing ridge, before descending a westerly side ridge which led to Rover Rockhole Creek.. Here we made camp before taking our wine-sacks and climbing the dry waterfall which guards the rockholes. The Water was coffee- coloured from dissolved goat knoblets, as usual, and our leader expressed concern that many of the tadpoles were lying belly-up. Some of us walked further up in search of better water. It was a wide deep canyon with horizontal rock strata and shelving steps. We found other pools but not of Significantly better quality; anyway by this time we were used to drinking boiled goat knoblet water. In one of these pools, while Wendy vainly tried to locate a protesting frog, David, Bill, and 1 had a frigid (soapless) bath. We returned to the main rockholcs, filled our wine-skins, placed them in string bags, and lowered them by rope to the campsite below. 
 To be continued in the September SBW. To be continued in the September SBW.
  
-Expressions of Interest +**Expressions of Interest**\\ 
-Do you have a body +Do you have a body\\ 
-and some money +and some money\\ 
-and a yen to do Kakadu? +and a yen to do Kakadu?\\ 
-me too! +me too!\\ 
-I am looking for +I am looking for expressions of interest from club members who would like to join me in May 1996 walking in Kakadu National Park.\\ 
-expressions of interest from club members who would like to join me in May 1996 walking in Kakadu National Park. +Please phone Ione Dean 9982 9866
-Please phone Lone Dean 9982 9866+
  
  
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 There were around 26, members present by 2006 so the president called them to order and began the meeting by calling for apologies. These there were for Ian Debert, Joy Hynes and Bill and Fran Holland. The minutes of the June general meeting were read and received with no matters arising. There were around 26, members present by 2006 so the president called them to order and began the meeting by calling for apologies. These there were for Ian Debert, Joy Hynes and Bill and Fran Holland. The minutes of the June general meeting were read and received with no matters arising.
 The welcome to new members saw a total of 8 new members come forward. They were: The welcome to new members saw a total of 8 new members come forward. They were:
-NAME ADDRESS HOME BUS. +^NAME ^ADDRESSHOMEBUS.^ 
-MS JANICE (JAN BROWN) 1 MALAIIIDE ​RD PENNANT HILLS 2120 484 3696687 2366 +|MS JANICE (JAN BROWN)MALAHIDE ​RD PENNANT HILLS 2120484 3696687 2366| 
-Ms MARYSIA (MISII) 35 GLEBE ST EDGECL1FF ​2027 228 5829 +|Ms MARYSIA (MISHDEREWLANY |35 GLEBE ST EDGECLIFF ​2027228 5829|363 0234 | 
-  ​363 0234  +|MR STEPHEN LILLIOJA5/9 CHELMSFORD RD WENTWORTHVILLE ​2145688 1727|828 4577| 
-DEREWLANY ​  +|MS CATHRYN OLLIF8/43 ASHBURNER ​ST MANLY 2095| 9977 0990285 7839| 
-MR-STEPHEN LILLIOJA 5/9 CHELMSFORD RD WENTWORITIVILLE ​2145 688 1727 828 4577 +|MR CHRISTOPHER ​POLESON165 EASTERN AVE KINGSFORD 2032663 2927752 1980| 
-MS CATHRYNOLLIF 8/43 ASIIBURNER ​ST MANLY2095 ​9977 0990 285 7839 +|MR JOHN POLESON|l ​GREYCLIFFE AVE. VAUCLUSE 2030337 5511 || 
-Maci IRISTOPHER ​POLESON 165 EASTERN AVE KINGSFORD 2032 663 2927 752 1980 +|MR MICHAEL SCHWARZ296 KISSING POINT RD TURRAMURRA 207444 2106547 2217| 
-MR JOHN pousoN Cl GREYCLIFFE AVE.VAUCLUSE 2030 337 5511  +|MR ROGER TREAGUS5/2 QUEENSCLIFF RD QUEENSCL1FF 20969905 1139795 5218|
-MR MICHAEL SCHWARZ 296 KISSING POINT RD TURRAMURRA 2074 44 2106 547 2217 +
-M'ROGER TREAGUS 5/2 QUEENSCLIFF RD QUEENSCL1FF 2096 9905 1139 795 5218+
 Other members who have recently joined are also welcomed, with their details as follows: Other members who have recently joined are also welcomed, with their details as follows:
-MR PETER DALTON ​MR FRANK DAVIS +|MR PETER DALTON56 EUROKA ST WAVERTON 2660 |9957 4907 |9955 8244| 
-MR ALLAN DONNELLY MR TED KELLY +|MR FRANK DAVIS|167 KARIMBLA RD MIRANDA 2228 |524 2661| | 
-MS MIRIAM KIRWAN MR SANDY LARSON MR PAUL MC CANN MS GAIL SICCARDI +|MR ALLAN DONNELLY| ​6/36 ARTHUR ST NORTH SYDNEY 2231 |9955 2957| 217 3179| 
-MR 'JOHN SICCARDI +|MR TED KELLY|11 RAGLAN ST TURRAMURRA 2074 |44 2854| | 
-+|MS MIRIAM KIRWAN| ​1 KURRABA RD NEUTRAL BAY 2089 |99661662| | 
-MR BILL SMALL WOOD MS LYNNE.YEAMAN MR WEIMAR TEM} +|MR SANDY LARSON| ​4/8 CURZON ST RYDE 2112|809 4525| 749 1488| 
-56 EUROKA ST WAVERTON 2660 167 KARIMBLA RD MIRANDA 2228 6/36 ARTHUR ST NORTH SYDNEY 2231 11 RAGLAN ST TURRAMURRA 2074 1 KURRABA RD NEUTRAL BAY 2089 4/8 CURZON ST RYDE 2112 +|MR PAUL MC CANN| 4 CENTENNIAL CLOSE ARMADALE 2350|067 726156 | | 
-4 CENTENNIAL CLOSE ARMADALE 2350 10 TONGA CLOSE,GREENACRE2190 10 TONGA CLOSE GREENACRE 2190 43 ROSEDALE RD GORDON 2072 23/16 CARR ST WAVERTON 2060 3 ORCHARD RD CHATSWOOD 2067 +|MS GAIL SICCARDI|10 TONGA CLOSE GREENACRE 2190|759 1208| | 
-9957 4907 9955 8244 +|MR JOHN SICCARDI|10 TONGA CLOSE GREENACRE 2190|759 1208 |502 2633| 
-524 2661 +|MR BILL SMALL WOOD| 43 ROSEDALE RD GORDON 2072 |418 1446 |9979 7999| 
-9955 2957 217 3179 +|MS LYNNE YEAMAN| ​23/16 CARR ST WAVERTON 2060 |9956 8886| 391 9268| 
-44 2854 +|MR WEIMAR TENG|3 ORCHARD RD CHATSWOOD 2067|411 8212417 6733
-+ 
-:99661662 + 
-809 4525 749 1488 +Correspondence saw a letter of thanks from Kath Brown (hi Kath) for the flowers the club sent her during a recent bout with some hospital or other. The Department of Gaming (or some entity with a name vaguely resembling that) has written demanding that we either take up or refuse their offer of an authority to hold games of chance for fund raising purposes. We have written declining the offer. We also received letters from the Kirribilli Neighbourhood Centre (KNC) regarding building security and a change of location for our cupboard, and from the Department of Mineral Resources responding in a passing way to the concerns we have expressed about damage to Bungonia Gorge by nearby mining activity. They responded in terms of our concern for the walking track rather than the gorge. ​Interesting! 
-067 726156 + 
-759 1208 +We sent letters to our new members and responded to the KNC letter. There was no business arising from the correspondence so in the absence of the treasurer we moved on to the Walks Reports. 
-759 1208 502 2633 + 
-418 1446 9979 7999 +The Walks Reports began with a couple of ring ins which had arrived too late for inclusion in last months report. Jim Rivers had 14 on his long weekend walk in Myall Creek, Jones Creek, Bullfrog Creek area. They enjoyed a diverse range of weathers and conditions but we have Jim's solemn word that they all enjoyed themselves. Errol Sheedy'​s day walk from Heathcote to Otford went with a party of 23 in sunny but breezy, conditions. 
-9956 8886 391 9268 +The weekend of 16, 17, 18 June could not be described as aunny but it was breezy, and quite cold. So much so that Bill Holland'​s Coolana training weekend for prospectives was relocated to Bill's place- out of the wind. Numbers varied over time but all agreed it was a marvellous ​time for the conditions. Zol Bodlay is reported to have had 16 on his orange grove walk in Marra Marra NP on the Saturday but there were no other details. Tony Crichton had 22 starters on his Pierces Pass walk and Geoff McIntosh reported 14 on his Waterfall to 0tford trip galloping along in sunny but breezy conditions and coming out early as a result. 
-411 8212 417 6733 + 
-Correspondence saw a letter of thanks from Kath Brown (hi Kath) for the flowers the dub sent her during a recent bout with some hospital or other. The Department of Gaming (or some entity with a name vaguely resembling that) has written demanding that we either take up Or refuse their offer of an authority to hold games of chance for fund raising purposes. We have written declining the offer. We also received letters from thc Kirribilli Neighbourhood Centre (1C1\1C) regarding building security and a :change of location for our cupboard, and fro m the Department of Mineral Resources responding in a passing way to the concerns we have expressed about damage to Bungonia'Gorge by nearby mining activity. They responded in terms of our concern for the walking track rather than the gorge. ​interesting+Tom Wenman led a party of 10 in cool but fine conditions for his Megalong Valley Saturday morning start walk over the weekend of 24, 25 June. There were no details for stages 17 and 18 of Wilf Hilder'​s Great South Walk the same weekend. Of the day walks, there were no details for Morag Ryder'​s Blaxland to Glenbrook Saturday walk, Ian Debert had 17 on his Victoria Falls to Perrys ​Lookdown enjoying fine sunny conditions on the same day, and Greta James led 14 on her Evans Lookout to Bluegum and return walk on the SundayMaureen Carter cancelled her beach bludge weekend scheduled for 30 June, 1,2, July. Greta James led a patty of 9 on her trip to the magnificent Red Rocks of Newnes. They reported a scarcity of water but good days for the walk. 
-We sent letters to our new members and responded to the KNC letter. There was no business arising from the correspondence so in the absence of the treasurer we Moved on to the Walks Reports. + 
--PAGE 16 THE SYDNEY BUSH WALKER AUGUST 1995 +On Saturday Ken Smith led a party of 5 on his Jack Evans track walk and Eddy Giacomel conducted a hard to medium hard version of his Hornsby to Brooklyn and return cycle trip, it seems there were headwinds whichever way they were heading. Sunday saw Tony Crichton leading a party of 21 sprinters on his Otford to Bundeena ​trip. Some of the party even caught the 1600 ferry. There was a rumour that Steve Ellis'​s Sunday walk out from Carlons ​went, but there were no details. The exploration weekend at Coolana attracted 8 or so walkers over the weekend of 8, 9 July. Maurice Smith led the walks and reported the discovery of various natural wonders on the block. He also remarked on just how little of the total area we use on trips to Coolana. ​John Hogan'​s Saturday walk in the historical Parramatta precinct went with 15 starters and perfect weather. There was a minor problem with one of the attractions being closed ​on the Saturday but a well disposed guide who was in catching up on some paperwork solved that for the mob. Errol Sheedy'​s Sunday walk from Cronulla to Waterfall went to program in good weather with a party of 20. Alan Mewett reported a lovely day and some signs of fire damage to tracks for the 12 starters on his Mill Creek walk in Dharug NP. Ken Smith'​s sprint out along Narrowneck and back had 7 starters and was reported as a wonderful day. 
-The Walks Reports began with a couple of ring ins which had arrived too late for inclusion in last months report. Jim Rivers had 14 on his long weekend walk in Myall Creek, ​,fg. Jones Creek, Bullfrog Creek area. They enjoyed a diverse range of weathers and conditions but we have Jim's solemn word that they all enjoyed themselves. Errol Sheedy'​s day walk from Heathcote to Otford went with a party of 23 in sunny but breezy, conditions. + 
-The weekeficrof ​16, 17, 18 June could not be described as' Sunny but it Was breezy, and quite cold. So math so that Bill Holland'​s Coolana training weekend for prospectives was relocated to Bill's place-out of the wind. Numbers varied over time but all agreed it was a marvellous ​tent for the conditions. Zol Bodlay is reported to have had 16 on his orange grove walk in Marra Marra NP on the Saturday but there were no other details. Tony Crichton had 22 starters on his Pierces Pass walk and Geoff McIntosh reported 14 on his ,Waterfall to 0tford trip galloping along in sunny butbreezy conditions and coming out early as a result. +The treasurer had arrived by this time so we took his report next. It seems we received income of $234.51 and closed the month with a balance of $6,876. 
-Tom Wenman led a party of 10 in cool but fine conditions for his Megalong Valley Saturday morning start walk over the weekend of 24, 25 June. There were no details for stages 17 and 18 of Wilf Hilder'​s Great South Walk the same weekend. Of the day walks, there were no details for Morag Ryder'​s Blaxland to Glenbrook Saturday walk, Ian Debert had 17 on his Victoria Falls to Pemys Lookdown enjoying fine sunny conditions on the same day, and Greta James led 14 on her-Evans Lookout to Bluegum and return walk on the Sunday Maureen Carter cancelled her beach bludge weekend scheduled for 30 June, 1,2, July.Greta James led a patty of 9 on her trip to the magnificent Red Rocks of Newnes. They reported a scarcity of water but good days for the walk. + 
-On Saturday Ken Smith led a party of 5 on his Jack Evans track walk and Eddy Giacomel conducted a hard to medium hard version of his Hornsby to Brooklyn and return cycle trip, it seems there were headwinds whichever way they were heading. Sunday saw Tony Crichton leading +Alex was away so we skipped the Conservation report and went on to the Confederation report. This brought some puzzlement over NPWS announcing they had cleared horses and cattle from the Bluegum Forest just the weekend before a party from the club encountered the usual numbers there on a walk. There was also mention that the service is attempting to clear the deer from the Royal and have asked walkers to report sightings. (A recent newspaper report seems to indicate that private enterprise is attempting to participate,​ with reports of a deer's head being found when rangers ​went to investigate reports of gunshots in the park.) 
-a party of 21 sprinters on his Otford to 13undeena ​trip. Some of the party even caught the 1600 ferry. There was a rumour that Steve Ellis'​s Sunday walk out from Canons ​went, but there were no details. The exploration weekend at Coolana attracted 8 or so walkers over the weekend of 8, 9 July. Maurice Smith led the walks and reported the discovery of various natural wonders on the block. He also remarked on just how little of the total area we use on trips toCoolana. ​john Hogan'​s Saturday walk in the historical Parramatta precinct went with 15 starters and perfect weather. There was a minor problem with one of the attractions being clased ​on the Saturday but a well disposed guide who was in catching up on some paperwork solved that for the mob. Errol Sheedy'​s Sunday walk from Cronulla to Waterfall went to program in good weather with a party of 20. Man Mewett reported a lovely day and some signs of fire damage to tracks for the 12 starters on his Mill Creek walk in Dharug NP. Ken Smith'​s sprint out along Narrowneck and back had 7 starters and was reported as a wonderful day. + 
-The treasurer had arrived by this time so we took his report next. It seems we received income of $234.51 and closed the month with a balance of +General business saw mention of a recent clean up of the hut at Coolana. Just personally I felt the reference to "​leprous frypans"​ was a bit of an exaggeration but I guess you just had to be there. 
-$6,876. + 
-Alex was away so we skipped the Conservation report and went on to the Confederation report. This brought some puzzlement over NPWS announcing they had cleared horses and cattle from the Bluegum Forest just the weekend before a party from the club encountered the usual numbers there on a walk. There was also mention that the service is attempting to clear the deer from the Royal and have asked walkers to report sightings. ( A recent newspaper report seems to indicate that private enterprise is attempting to participate,​ with reports of a deer's head being found when rangers ​wentto ​investigate reports of gunshots in the park.) +Then came the announcements and the President closed the meeting at 2100.
-General business sawmention of a recent clean up of the hut at Coolana. Just personally I felt the reference to "​leprous frypans"​ was a bit of an exaggeration but I guess you just had to be there. +
-Then came the announcements and the President closed the meeting at 2100.*+
  
199508.1608458624.txt.gz · Last modified: 2020/12/20 10:03 by joan