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199303 [2016/09/30 03:34]
tyreless
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tyreless
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 =====SBW Office Bearers & Committee 1993.===== =====SBW Office Bearers & Committee 1993.=====
  
-The following Office Bearers and Committee Members as well as other Club workers were elected ​atthe Annual general Meeting held on 10th March 1993:+The following Office Bearers and Committee Members as well as other Club workers were elected ​at the Annual general Meeting held on 10th March 1993:
  
 |President|Ian Debert*| |President|Ian Debert*|
-|Vice-President|Spiro ​Haginakitas*|+|Vice-President|Spiro ​Hajinakitas*|
 |Public Officer|Fran Holland*| |Public Officer|Fran Holland*|
 |Treasurer|Tony Holgte*| |Treasurer|Tony Holgte*|
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 |ConservationSecretary|Alex Colley*| |ConservationSecretary|Alex Colley*|
 |Magazine Editor|George Mawer*| |Magazine Editor|George Mawer*|
-|2 Committe ​Members|Morrie Ward*, Zol Bodlay*|+|2 Committee ​Members|Morrie Ward*, Zol Bodlay*|
 |2 Delegates to Federation|Jim Callaway*, Bill Holland*| |2 Delegates to Federation|Jim Callaway*, Bill Holland*|
 |2 Confederation Delegates not on Committee|Wendy Lippiatt, Belinda McKenzie| |2 Confederation Delegates not on Committee|Wendy Lippiatt, Belinda McKenzie|
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 A wet and blustery night gave way to a morning where low cloud shrouded the hilltops and passing showers kept us in bed. Only energetic Bruce left his tent to make a fire, everyone else stayed snug indoors until mid morning, when departing cloud indicated that we should do likewise for Valentine Hut. By the time we reached Duck Creek we were back to the sunshine-and-flowers scene, with patches of buttercups golden among the bushes. A wet and blustery night gave way to a morning where low cloud shrouded the hilltops and passing showers kept us in bed. Only energetic Bruce left his tent to make a fire, everyone else stayed snug indoors until mid morning, when departing cloud indicated that we should do likewise for Valentine Hut. By the time we reached Duck Creek we were back to the sunshine-and-flowers scene, with patches of buttercups golden among the bushes.
  
-The old track had dissapeared, so Wendy and Laurie mistakenly stayed on one bank while the rest of the party went on the other. After some skilled rock-leaping they rejoined us for a quick lunch at the newly painted hut.+The old track had disappeared, so Wendy and Laurie mistakenly stayed on one bank while the rest of the party went on the other. After some skilled rock-leaping they rejoined us for a quick lunch at the newly painted hut.
  
 Between Valentine and Mawson Hut all ground proved to be sloping, boggy, windswept, scrubby or creekless, and we wandered about like migratory birds trying to roost. A nice spot at last, with lovely views over Valentine River. Plenty of fallen wood from a recent storm, and the fire was built on a high spot. This proved unwise, for the swirling wind ensured that the smoke choked all of us in turn. All except Wendy. Perhaps her years in dusty shearing sheds had made her immune. Between Valentine and Mawson Hut all ground proved to be sloping, boggy, windswept, scrubby or creekless, and we wandered about like migratory birds trying to roost. A nice spot at last, with lovely views over Valentine River. Plenty of fallen wood from a recent storm, and the fire was built on a high spot. This proved unwise, for the swirling wind ensured that the smoke choked all of us in turn. All except Wendy. Perhaps her years in dusty shearing sheds had made her immune.
  
-[Cartoon of Wendy sitting peacefully whilst neighbouring campers choke on smoe. Caption: I just love going bushwalking,​ it's so healthy.]+[Cartoon of Wendy sitting peacefully whilst neighbouring campers choke on smoke. Caption: I just love going bushwalking,​ it's so healthy.]
  
 ===Tuesday, 29===  ===Tuesday, 29=== 
  
-Dry feet lasted about five minutes as we plodded ​accross ​the gully and toiled up over the next saddle. And the next, and the next. At last, Mawson Hut - looking smart and clean in the blazing sun. Morning tea and sunburn by Valentine River crossing, where brave Bruce went ahead to find a way through the 'rice '​paddy'​ - a brilliant green and far-too-deep ​swaup which lay between Valentine River and The Brassys.+Dry feet lasted about five minutes as we plodded ​across ​the gully and toiled up over the next saddle. And the next, and the next. At last, Mawson Hut - looking smart and clean in the blazing sun. Morning tea and sunburn by Valentine River crossing, where brave Bruce went ahead to find a way through the 'rice '​paddy'​ - a brilliant green and far-too-deep ​swamp which lay between Valentine River and The Brassys.
  
 [Cartoon of Bruce sinking in swamp watched by another walker. Caption: How deep is it there, Bruce?] [Cartoon of Bruce sinking in swamp watched by another walker. Caption: How deep is it there, Bruce?]
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 Lunch on a grassy patch just below Gungarten Trig, where a massive rookery was in full cry - perhaps this was their mating season. A group of day walkers joined us and said they wanted to visit Tin Hut. George tried to advise them, but as the route was trackless they seemed to have some difficulty following his directions. Lunch on a grassy patch just below Gungarten Trig, where a massive rookery was in full cry - perhaps this was their mating season. A group of day walkers joined us and said they wanted to visit Tin Hut. George tried to advise them, but as the route was trackless they seemed to have some difficulty following his directions.
  
-More paddling in a nice deep gully before Disappointment Ridge. What I wonder, was the disappointment - it looked fine to me. A brisk struggle through the shrubbery, and we were in the first saddle. "​Let'​s camp here," said George. Dick said it would be better on the western side, so opinions were divided. Some went up, some down and some sideways. We watched a stormy sunset over Main Range while the mosquitos marshalled their armies into suicide squads and zeroed in to any piece of bare skin. Fog filled the valley, but the sky was full of stars and we began again the discussion of Finding The South Pole With The Southern Cross. Peter explained the theory, but somehow we couldn'​t make it work. So we watched and timed the nightly parade of satellites ​ingtead. Peter said it took only 8 minutes for them to circle the globe, but that didn't seem to work, either.+More paddling in a nice deep gully before Disappointment Ridge. What I wonder, was the disappointment - it looked fine to me. A brisk struggle through the shrubbery, and we were in the first saddle. "​Let'​s camp here," said George. Dick said it would be better on the western side, so opinions were divided. Some went up, some down and some sideways. We watched a stormy sunset over Main Range while the mosquitos marshalled their armies into suicide squads and zeroed in to any piece of bare skin. Fog filled the valley, but the sky was full of stars and we began again the discussion of Finding The South Pole With The Southern Cross. Peter explained the theory, but somehow we couldn'​t make it work. So we watched and timed the nightly parade of satellites ​instead. Peter said it took only 8 minutes for them to circle the globe, but that didn't seem to work, either.
  
 [Cartoon of George looking at a map and advising a young lady. Caption: George: "Now you go 38°..."​ Young lady: "Oh... Is that left?"​] [Cartoon of George looking at a map and advising a young lady. Caption: George: "Now you go 38°..."​ Young lady: "Oh... Is that left?"​]
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 Near the end of 1991 the S.B.W. learned that the Wilderness Fund, established in 1987, had no money in it. This seemed a pity, so the S.B.W. donated $130 to the fund in commemoration of the 60th anniversary of our acquisition of Blue Gum Forest for 130 pounds. Tim Moore was glad to accept our gift and to add another $80,000 to it. Last September we learned that there was still no money in the Fund, so we wrote to the new Minister for Conservation,​ the Hon. Chris Hartcher, to ask where our money had gone. Mr Hartcher replied that the establishment of the Fund would require the National Parks & Wildlife Service to incur considerable expense in altering existing accounting systems. Near the end of 1991 the S.B.W. learned that the Wilderness Fund, established in 1987, had no money in it. This seemed a pity, so the S.B.W. donated $130 to the fund in commemoration of the 60th anniversary of our acquisition of Blue Gum Forest for 130 pounds. Tim Moore was glad to accept our gift and to add another $80,000 to it. Last September we learned that there was still no money in the Fund, so we wrote to the new Minister for Conservation,​ the Hon. Chris Hartcher, to ask where our money had gone. Mr Hartcher replied that the establishment of the Fund would require the National Parks & Wildlife Service to incur considerable expense in altering existing accounting systems.
  
-He told us that - "The Service has established a separate working account within the existing system, to accept any funding for wilderness that it received. It was into this fund tht the Sydney Bush Walkers'​ donation was deposited and I am pleased to be able to advise you that this money is to be used to purchase six copies of the publication by Michael Hall entitled 'From Wasteland to World Heritage'​ for use in reference libraries throughout the National Parks & Wildlife Service"​.+He told us that - "The Service has established a separate working account within the existing system, to accept any funding for wilderness that it received. It was into this fund that the Sydney Bush Walkers'​ donation was deposited and I am pleased to be able to advise you that this money is to be used to purchase six copies of the publication by Michael Hall entitled 'From Wasteland to World Heritage'​ for use in reference libraries throughout the National Parks & Wildlife Service"​.
  
 It is a pity that the Wilderness Fund is still empty. It might have been hoped that our donation would inspire others to donate and that the money could have been spent on projects such as the acquisition of inholdings in wilderness areas. Nobody is likely to donate to a NPWS account. From our viewpoint the money would have been better spent in purchasing copies of Pat Thompson'​s book on our founding member, Myles Dunphy OBE. We simple bushwalkers find it difficult to appreciate the expense incurred in crediting the S.B.W. and debiting the recipient. It is a pity that the Wilderness Fund is still empty. It might have been hoped that our donation would inspire others to donate and that the money could have been spent on projects such as the acquisition of inholdings in wilderness areas. Nobody is likely to donate to a NPWS account. From our viewpoint the money would have been better spent in purchasing copies of Pat Thompson'​s book on our founding member, Myles Dunphy OBE. We simple bushwalkers find it difficult to appreciate the expense incurred in crediting the S.B.W. and debiting the recipient.
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   * Non-active Member $9   * Non-active Member $9
   * Non-active Member plus Magazine $21   * Non-active Member plus Magazine $21
-  * Magazine ​subsctiption ​only $12+  * Magazine ​subscription ​only $12
  
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 ====Yerranderie - Another Broken Hill?===== ====Yerranderie - Another Broken Hill?=====
  
-On April 30th-May 1,2 Ray Hookway will be leading a walk in the Yerranderie area. Some years ago Ray did a did a deal of research into the history of the mining activities in the region, and his article, published in the June 1974 magazine, ​iz reproduced for the benefit of members planning to join his April/May walk.+On April 30th-May 1,2 Ray Hookway will be leading a walk in the Yerranderie area. Some years ago Ray did a did a deal of research into the history of the mining activities in the region, and his article, published in the June 1974 magazine, ​is reproduced for the benefit of members planning to join his April/May walk.
  
-In earlier years of the Club, Yerranderie often featured in Club Walks Programs as it gave access tot he Middle Kowmung, Colong Cave and the facinating ​Blue Breaks country. The town is in a spectular ​setting, with cliffs, gaps and plateaux filling the entire western and northern skylines. Access was not unduly difficult by reason of the road that came from Camden following the floor of Burragorang Valley along the Wollondilly River for about 15km. Indeed, there were regular buses from Camden on Friday evening, and a return from Yerranderie about 4.30pm on Sundays and hilidays ​until the early 1950s.+In earlier years of the Club, Yerranderie often featured in Club Walks Programs as it gave access tot he Middle Kowmung, Colong Cave and the fascinating ​Blue Breaks country. The town is in a spectacular ​setting, with cliffs, gaps and plateaux filling the entire western and northern skylines. Access was not unduly difficult by reason of the road that came from Camden following the floor of Burragorang Valley along the Wollondilly River for about 15km. Indeed, there were regular buses from Camden on Friday evening, and a return from Yerranderie about 4.30pm on Sundays and holidays ​until the early 1950s.
  
-However with the winding down of mining operations and in the knowledge that the flooding of the valley by Warragamba Dam would close thiz route, the population of the town had dwindled to a dozen or so people by obout 1955, and by 1959 road outlets to the east were being submerged. A few determined land owners around Bindook bull-dozed a rough trail along the old stock route to Mount Werong, south of Oberon, and this route has improved greatly over the years. There is, however, quite a complex of roads on the plateau between Oberon and Mount Werong and drivers unfamiliar with the route should consult Ray about it before attempting to find the way to Batsch Camp at night.+However with the winding down of mining operations and in the knowledge that the flooding of the valley by Warragamba Dam would close this route, the population of the town had dwindled to a dozen or so people by about 1955, and by 1959 road outlets to the east were being submerged. A few determined land owners around Bindook bull-dozed a rough trail along the old stock route to Mount Werong, south of Oberon, and this route has improved greatly over the years. There is, however, quite a complex of roads on the plateau between Oberon and Mount Werong and drivers unfamiliar with the route should consult Ray about it before attempting to find the way to Batsch Camp at night.
  
 Jim Brown. Jim Brown.
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 The extensive workings on the western side of the Tonalli Gap road belonged to the Silver Peak Mine which commenced in 1904 and in twenty years made $650,000. Mine workings were extensive. Three multipair boilers with a total capacity of 300 H.P. drove one surface winch and one underground winch on the main shaft. Fifty tons of material per shift could be handled and 30/40 tons milled in the steamdriven hammer and roller mill. Two concentrating tables handled the second grade ore. The extensive workings on the western side of the Tonalli Gap road belonged to the Silver Peak Mine which commenced in 1904 and in twenty years made $650,000. Mine workings were extensive. Three multipair boilers with a total capacity of 300 H.P. drove one surface winch and one underground winch on the main shaft. Fifty tons of material per shift could be handled and 30/40 tons milled in the steamdriven hammer and roller mill. Two concentrating tables handled the second grade ore.
  
-Recovery from the mill was 60/70% of the assay value and unrecovered metals left in the slime assayed 10/18 ozs silver to the ton. Most of the mess at Silver Peak resulted from the treatment of the slimes in 1935 torecover ​this residue.+Recovery from the mill was 60/70% of the assay value and unrecovered metals left in the slime assayed 10/18 ozs silver to the ton. Most of the mess at Silver Peak resulted from the treatment of the slimes in 1935 to recover ​this residue.
  
 Mr. Bartlett'​s Colon Peak Mine which was located about 500 feet N.W. of the rear of the Baker shop had four main shafts. One shaft 700 feet long extended under the Baker shop to a spot S.W. of the Post Office. Mr. Bartlett'​s Colon Peak Mine which was located about 500 feet N.W. of the rear of the Baker shop had four main shafts. One shaft 700 feet long extended under the Baker shop to a spot S.W. of the Post Office.
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 All mines closed during the general mining strike in 1929/30 when miners who earned $10 for a 44 hour week struck for higher wages and a 40 hour week, and from then till 1938 only sporadic mining or treatment of the mullock heaps was carried out. The total production of all mines to 1930 was over $4 million. All mines closed during the general mining strike in 1929/30 when miners who earned $10 for a 44 hour week struck for higher wages and a 40 hour week, and from then till 1938 only sporadic mining or treatment of the mullock heaps was carried out. The total production of all mines to 1930 was over $4 million.
  
-In 1927 there were over 500 people in Yerranderie. Three general stores, a Baker, a Butcher, a Milkman and a Hotel which took up to $240 in good weeks. (The license was later transferred to St. Mary'​s.) Three established churches attended to the community'​s religious needs and crib games, picture shows and dances in the community hall provided ​entertaintent. Fourteen differently pitched mine whistles regulated their working day.+In 1927 there were over 500 people in Yerranderie. Three general stores, a Baker, a Butcher, a Milkman and a Hotel which took up to $240 in good weeks. (The license was later transferred to St. Mary'​s.) Three established churches attended to the community'​s religious needs and crib games, picture shows and dances in the community hall provided ​entertainment. Fourteen differently pitched mine whistles regulated their working day.
  
 In 1955 a visiting journalist reported a population of 25, all former miners and most on silicosis pensions, and in 1959 the filling of the Warragamba Dam spelt the end for Yerranderie. In 1955 a visiting journalist reported a population of 25, all former miners and most on silicosis pensions, and in 1959 the filling of the Warragamba Dam spelt the end for Yerranderie.
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-=====Confederation of Bushwalking ​Blubs NSW - February General Meeting.=====+=====Confederation of Bushwalking ​Clubs NSW - February General Meeting.=====
  
 by Spiro Hajinakitas by Spiro Hajinakitas
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 Detailed Confederation Notes are somewhere in the magazine so we will not attempt to cover those matters here.  Detailed Confederation Notes are somewhere in the magazine so we will not attempt to cover those matters here. 
  
-There was no General ​Busines ​so after announcements the meeting closed at 2118.+There was no General ​Business ​so after announcements the meeting closed at 2118.
  
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 ===Drysdale River National Park: May 30 - June 20, June 20 - July 4=== ===Drysdale River National Park: May 30 - June 20, June 20 - July 4===
  
-Drysdale River is the largest and least accessible of the Kimberley parks. It contains a variety of landscapes, a wealth of aboriginal art and numerous beautiful pools, perfect for swimming and fishing. The first expedition ​willbe ​a leisurely exploration of the northern part of the park, using a food drop so that we won't need to carry more than a week's food at a time. The second is planned as a through walk from the southern end through the central section.+Drysdale River is the largest and least accessible of the Kimberley parks. It contains a variety of landscapes, a wealth of aboriginal art and numerous beautiful pools, perfect for swimming and fishing. The first expedition ​will be a leisurely exploration of the northern part of the park, using a food drop so that we won't need to carry more than a week's food at a time. The second is planned as a through walk from the southern end through the central section.
  
 ===Mitchell Plateau: May 9-30, August 22 - September 4=== ===Mitchell Plateau: May 9-30, August 22 - September 4===
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 Fires, in destroying the alpine woody scrub and alpine ash, initiated erosion in the high country and gullying in the freehold properties below 700 metres. The velocity of the degradation process was increasing in geometrical proportion to the extent that in areas where alpine ash had completely disappeared,​ landslides were occurring. Gutters and gullies were forming on the grass slopes of the Kosciusko tops and in the lower altitudes soil had been completely washed away from under fence posts. Ninety-nine per cent of the fires occurring were lit to clear away the collection of rank unpalatable grasses or to remove scrub from the stock routes. Fires, in destroying the alpine woody scrub and alpine ash, initiated erosion in the high country and gullying in the freehold properties below 700 metres. The velocity of the degradation process was increasing in geometrical proportion to the extent that in areas where alpine ash had completely disappeared,​ landslides were occurring. Gutters and gullies were forming on the grass slopes of the Kosciusko tops and in the lower altitudes soil had been completely washed away from under fence posts. Ninety-nine per cent of the fires occurring were lit to clear away the collection of rank unpalatable grasses or to remove scrub from the stock routes.
  
-At the time of the report approximately two-thirds of the area originally covered by the alpine woody scrub type had been compeltely ​cleared by fire. All the species forming this cover are extremely fire sensitive and once burnt out do not coppice and their powers of seed production are light. Where grass formerly grew it may thrive after a fire, however where the soil is too shallow the organic layer dries up and blows away to be followed by the loose sandy soil, leaving bare granite rocks and stones.+At the time of the report approximately two-thirds of the area originally covered by the alpine woody scrub type had been completely ​cleared by fire. All the species forming this cover are extremely fire sensitive and once burnt out do not coppice and their powers of seed production are light. Where grass formerly grew it may thrive after a fire, however where the soil is too shallow the organic layer dries up and blows away to be followed by the loose sandy soil, leaving bare granite rocks and stones.
  
 In only one place did Byles see a snow gum stand to the almost natural state, but even then this had been badly burnt around the butts. Although snow gums coppice abundantly after burning, successive burnings kill them altogether. In the more accessible country no signs of original stands were left. Where an original snow gum stand is killed by fire, fairly dense undergrowth comes in which, with further burnings causes the scrub to disappear and a final stage of snow grass to be reached. In only one place did Byles see a snow gum stand to the almost natural state, but even then this had been badly burnt around the butts. Although snow gums coppice abundantly after burning, successive burnings kill them altogether. In the more accessible country no signs of original stands were left. Where an original snow gum stand is killed by fire, fairly dense undergrowth comes in which, with further burnings causes the scrub to disappear and a final stage of snow grass to be reached.
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 Whereas today we are used to paved motor roads and fire trails, 60 years ago Kosciusko could have been defined, apart from the grazing, as an almost true wilderness area. The report lists access points: motor vehicles could only reach Possum Point on the Tooma River, Khancoban, Wollondiby near Jindabyne, Adaminaby, Snowy Plain on the Gungahlin and Kiandra. Access was gained by bullock teams to Wheelers selection and Round Mountain on a track described as very bad; Grey Mare and Mawsons Hut by bullock team; and from Adaminaby, Pretty Plain and Geehi by pack horse. Groggin was reached by bridle track from Geehi. From Groggin a bridle track led up to Dead Horse Gap from where a poorly defined track led to the Pilot and on to Omeo. Whereas today we are used to paved motor roads and fire trails, 60 years ago Kosciusko could have been defined, apart from the grazing, as an almost true wilderness area. The report lists access points: motor vehicles could only reach Possum Point on the Tooma River, Khancoban, Wollondiby near Jindabyne, Adaminaby, Snowy Plain on the Gungahlin and Kiandra. Access was gained by bullock teams to Wheelers selection and Round Mountain on a track described as very bad; Grey Mare and Mawsons Hut by bullock team; and from Adaminaby, Pretty Plain and Geehi by pack horse. Groggin was reached by bridle track from Geehi. From Groggin a bridle track led up to Dead Horse Gap from where a poorly defined track led to the Pilot and on to Omeo.
  
-A recent track led from Geehi up to the main range at Kosciusko and a metre and half track from Groggin to Limestone Creek was impassable because of fallen logs and washouts. From Jindabyne a motor road led to Thredbo River and from there a bridle track led to Dead Horse Gap and on to Kosciusko. The remaining ​desriptions ​only cover bridle track routes and from them it can be seen how much of the alpine area has been opened-up with the aid of bulldozers and graders since World War Two.+A recent track led from Geehi up to the main range at Kosciusko and a metre and half track from Groggin to Limestone Creek was impassable because of fallen logs and washouts. From Jindabyne a motor road led to Thredbo River and from there a bridle track led to Dead Horse Gap and on to Kosciusko. The remaining ​descriptions ​only cover bridle track routes and from them it can be seen how much of the alpine area has been opened-up with the aid of bulldozers and graders since World War Two.
  
 It is well to reflect upon how much more of the Kosciusko plateau would have been degraded if Baldur Byles had not drawn attention to the serious erosion occurring in 1931-32. In 1931 Myles Dunphy did a grand walking tour of 200 km from Beloka to the Snowy and on to Mount Kosciusko and Thredbo. It would be probably no coincidence that Myles with his association with Marie Byles, both of the Sydney Bush Walkers, talked about the degradation of Kosciusko and formed his idea for a national park. It is well to reflect upon how much more of the Kosciusko plateau would have been degraded if Baldur Byles had not drawn attention to the serious erosion occurring in 1931-32. In 1931 Myles Dunphy did a grand walking tour of 200 km from Beloka to the Snowy and on to Mount Kosciusko and Thredbo. It would be probably no coincidence that Myles with his association with Marie Byles, both of the Sydney Bush Walkers, talked about the degradation of Kosciusko and formed his idea for a national park.
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 by Bill Gamble by Bill Gamble
  
-The question, allegedly vexed, with which Confederation is grappling, namely about what cohstitutes ​an "​experienced walker"​ for media purposes, reported by Barry Wallace in the December meeting notes (January 1993 issue, page 16), may not be without interest, as many members of this Club would claim to be experienced bush walkers of some kind.+The question, allegedly vexed, with which Confederation is grappling, namely about what constitutes ​an "​experienced walker"​ for media purposes, reported by Barry Wallace in the December meeting notes (January 1993 issue, page 16), may not be without interest, as many members of this Club would claim to be experienced bush walkers of some kind.
  
 Barry'​s report reminded me that a beaut little booklet (48 pages put out by the Federated Mountain Clubs of New Zealand in 1978, 6th edition, entitled "​Safety in the Mountains"​) which I carry on extended walks as a memory jog, contains all sorts of practical advice, hints and reminders, including a definition of __Experience__. Barry'​s report reminded me that a beaut little booklet (48 pages put out by the Federated Mountain Clubs of New Zealand in 1978, 6th edition, entitled "​Safety in the Mountains"​) which I carry on extended walks as a memory jog, contains all sorts of practical advice, hints and reminders, including a definition of __Experience__.
199303.txt · Last modified: 2016/09/30 03:40 by tyreless