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199203 [2014/12/05 00:43]
sbw [Doing It On The Cheap (1)]
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kclacher
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 ===== SBW Office Bearers & Committee 1992 ===== ===== SBW Office Bearers & Committee 1992 =====
 The following Office Bearers and Committee Members as well as other Club workers were elected at the Annual General Meeting held on 11th March:- The following Office Bearers and Committee Members as well as other Club workers were elected at the Annual General Meeting held on 11th March:-
-|President|Ian Debert| ​ Phone 982 2615| +|President|Ian Debert| ​ Phone 982 2615| 
-|Vice-President|Spiro Hajinakitas| ​ 332 3452| +|Vice-President|Spiro Hajinakitas| ​ 332 3452| 
-|Public Officer|Helen Gray|  876 6263| +|Public Officer|Helen Gray|  876 6263| 
-|Treasurer|Ertith ​Hamilton| ​ 451 0652| +|Treasurer|* Erith Hamilton| ​ 451 0652| 
-|Secretary|George Floyd| ​ 929 4170| +|Secretary|George Floyd| ​ 929 4170| 
-|Walks Secretary|Bill Holland| ​ 484 6636| +|Walks Secretary|Bill Holland| ​ 484 6636| 
-|Social Secretary|Belinda McKenzie| ​ (B) 646 8413| +|Social Secretary|Belinda McKenzie| ​ (B) 646 8413| 
-|Membership Secretary|Barry Wallace| ​ (B) 436 1313| +|Membership Secretary|Barry Wallace| ​ (B) 436 1313| 
-|New Members Secretary|Laurie Bore|  605 9368| +|New Members Secretary|Laurie Bore|  605 9368| 
-|Conservation Secretary|Alex Colley| ​ 44 2707| +|Conservation Secretary|Alex Colley| ​ 44 2707| 
-|Magazine Editor|Deborah Shapira| ​ 798 0309| +|Magazine Editor|Deborah Shapira| ​ 798 0309| 
-|2 Committee Members|Joy Hynes| ​ 982 2615| +|2 Committee Members|Joy Hynes| ​ 982 2615| 
-| |Dick Weston| ​ (B) 766 3757| +| |Dick Weston| ​ (B) 766 3757| 
-|2 Delegates to Confederation|Spiro Hajinakitas| | +|2 Delegates to Confederation|Spiro Hajinakitas| | 
-| |Bill Holland| |+| |Bill Holland| | 
 + 
 +|2 Confederation Delegates **not** on Committee|Gordon Lee|  (043) 88 5589| 
 +| |Jim Callaway| ​ 520 7081| 
 +|Magazine Production Manager|George Gray|  876 6263| 
 +|Magazine Business Manager|Joy Hynes| ​ 982 2615| 
 +|Printers|Kenn Clacher| ​ (B) 968 0059| 
 +| |Margaret Niven, Les Powell| | 
 +| |Kay Chan & Barrie Murdoch| | 
 +|Assistant New Members Secretary|Margaret Niven| ​ 986 3537| 
 +|Archivist|Ian Debert| | 
 +|Hon. Solicitor|Barrie Murdoch| | 
 +|Hon. Auditor|Chris Sonter| | 
 +|Search & Rescue Contacts|Morrie Ward|  449 6381| 
 +| |George Mawer| ​ 707 1343| 
 +| |Margaret Niven| ​ 986 3537| 
 +|Kosciusko Huts Association Delegate|Ian Wolfe| | 
 + 
 +* Indicates members of Committee.  
 + 
 +For Annual Subscriptions see Page 9  
 + 
 +**Note**: All Club workers are Honorary
  
-• 2 Confederation Delegates  
-NOT on Committee Gordon Lee (043) 88 5589 
-.Jim Callaway 520 7081 
-Magazine Production Manager George Gray 876 6263 
-Business Manager -Joy • Hynes . 982 2615 
-Prfn•erb Kenn Clacher• (B) 968 0059 
-Margaret Niven, Les Powell  
-Kay Chan & Barrie Murdoch  
-.Assistant New Members Secretary Margaret Niven 986 3537 
-Archivist Ian Debert  
-Hon. Solicitor Barrie Murdoch  
-Hon. Auditor Chris Sonter  
-Search '& Rescue •Contacts Morrie Ward 449 6381 
-George Mawer 707 1343 
-Margaret Niven 986 3537 
-Kosciusko Huts Association  
-• Delegate Ian Wolfe 
-* Indicates members of .Committee. For. Annual Subscriptions 
-• NOTE:​ All Club workers are see Page .9 Honorary. 
-*-* * * * * * * 
-March 1992 The Sydney Bushwalker Page 3 
 ===== To Wander And Wonder ===== ===== To Wander And Wonder =====
  
 by One-of-the-Three by One-of-the-Three
  
-It was Boxing Day.Gully parked the Volvo at the Guthega power station and joined Captain and Old Son in the VW bound for Dead Horse Gap. It was Gully'​s first walking trip in the Kosciuszko NP and his eyes darted left and right as he took in the passing scene. At 6 pm the trio shouldered their 40 lb packs and began the haul up the old bridle path through snow gums to the Ramsheads. Manurial evidence of brumbies lay on the track.+It was Boxing Day. Gully parked the Volvo at the Guthega power station and joined Captain and Old Son in the VW bound for Dead Horse Gap. It was Gully'​s first walking trip in the Kosciuszko NP and his eyes darted left and right as he took in the passing scene. At 6 pm the trio shouldered their 40 lb packs and began the haul up the old bridle path through snow gums to the Ramsheads. Manurial evidence of brumbies lay on the track.
  
 Huffing and puffing and random thoughts were interrupted:​ "The bloody meths - still in the car!" Old Son dropped his pack and retreated down the path. Gully and Captain welcomed the rest. The path entered a snow-grass clearing and three pairs of eyes met without comment. They dropped their, packs and set off in different directions for water. Old Son followed the clearing to a trickle covered by bushes and soon the water was on the boil for tea. Huffing and puffing and random thoughts were interrupted:​ "The bloody meths - still in the car!" Old Son dropped his pack and retreated down the path. Gully and Captain welcomed the rest. The path entered a snow-grass clearing and three pairs of eyes met without comment. They dropped their, packs and set off in different directions for water. Old Son followed the clearing to a trickle covered by bushes and soon the water was on the boil for tea.
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 They pointed out Tom Groggin, The Pilot, the Cascades trail, and away at the horizon, Victoria'​s Mount Bogong with its mantle of snow. But Gully was not yet showing signs of enthusiasm, content to observe, to see what he could see. The middle-aged mates picked their way through the rocks below Ramshead and welcomed the sight and sound of a busy stream at the head of Bogong Creek. They pointed out Tom Groggin, The Pilot, the Cascades trail, and away at the horizon, Victoria'​s Mount Bogong with its mantle of snow. But Gully was not yet showing signs of enthusiasm, content to observe, to see what he could see. The middle-aged mates picked their way through the rocks below Ramshead and welcomed the sight and sound of a busy stream at the head of Bogong Creek.
  
-Dropping their packs yet again, they slowly ascended Ramshead in the mid-day heat of a blazing blue sky. Gully was intrigued with the Swampy Plains River as seen from Ramshead and he predicted that, in time, the plain would drain off into Leatherbarrel ​Cfeek on its course through gorges to the Murray River. For Gully, the absence of trees in this alpine setting meant no shade and no back-rest during lunch. His failure to enthuse about the Ramsheads caused his friends to shake their heads in disbelief. "​Knee-deep in wildflowers,​ you promied ​me." Gully bowled at them.+Dropping their packs yet again, they slowly ascended Ramshead in the mid-day heat of a blazing blue sky. Gully was intrigued with the Swampy Plains River as seen from Ramshead and he predicted that, in time, the plain would drain off into Leatherbarrel ​Creek on its course through gorges to the Murray River. For Gully, the absence of trees in this alpine setting meant no shade and no back-rest during lunch. His failure to enthuse about the Ramsheads caused his friends to shake their heads in disbelief. "​Knee-deep in wildflowers,​ you promised ​me." Gully bowled at them.
  
 Below Ramshead North they watched a young walker dash along and down a snow-drift to retrieve his wind-blown hat. Not a slip or a slide! Oh, to be young again. Captain and Old Son, both admirers of this tent-shaped mass of boulders, led Gully up the easy way through the tors of Ramshead North. Old Son was at it again. "​There'​s Twynam, Carruthers, Kosci and Etheridge,"​ he called from his perch upon the topmost rock. Captain and Gully pretended not to notice. Below Ramshead North they watched a young walker dash along and down a snow-drift to retrieve his wind-blown hat. Not a slip or a slide! Oh, to be young again. Captain and Old Son, both admirers of this tent-shaped mass of boulders, led Gully up the easy way through the tors of Ramshead North. Old Son was at it again. "​There'​s Twynam, Carruthers, Kosci and Etheridge,"​ he called from his perch upon the topmost rock. Captain and Gully pretended not to notice.
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 Wandering along the western bank of the lake, they observed grassy banks within the hollows. where snow and ice were melting. Yes, winter comes, the pond water freezes, the ice expands, gradually pushing the banks outwards over the years. Dandelions growing in the ruins of Albina Hut? Sadly, yes. The weary walkers hauled up on to Muellers Peak and made their individual ways back to the camp on Wilkinsons, each with his own thoughts, happy with a full day spent on the Main Range. Wandering along the western bank of the lake, they observed grassy banks within the hollows. where snow and ice were melting. Yes, winter comes, the pond water freezes, the ice expands, gradually pushing the banks outwards over the years. Dandelions growing in the ruins of Albina Hut? Sadly, yes. The weary walkers hauled up on to Muellers Peak and made their individual ways back to the camp on Wilkinsons, each with his own thoughts, happy with a full day spent on the Main Range.
  
-Shouldering heavy packs for the last full day of walking, they climbed out of Wilkinson Valley, had a last look and joined the lakes track to Muellers Pass. Stopping on Mount Northcote they looked down on Lake Albina and across to the steep slopes of Tounsend ​Spur where they had descended from Alice Rawson the previous day. Gully was impressed again and his forefinger traced the route of their descent. He was less impressed with the view acrose the Snowy Valley to Charlottes Pass. Below them were the ruins of Kunama Hut, victim of an avalanche in 1956, but Old Son could not recall its name nor the date of its demise. They looked down on Club Lake and wondered at the ski tracks an the snowy steep slopes of Carruthers. "Of course, the snow melts underneath and leaves the crust on top."+Shouldering heavy packs for the last full day of walking, they climbed out of Wilkinson Valley, had a last look and joined the lakes track to Muellers Pass. Stopping on Mount Northcote they looked down on Lake Albina and across to the steep slopes of Townsend ​Spur where they had descended from Alice Rawson the previous day. Gully was impressed again and his forefinger traced the route of their descent. He was less impressed with the view acrose the Snowy Valley to Charlottes Pass [Charlotte Pass]. Below them were the ruins of Kunama Hut, victim of an avalanche in 1956, but Old Son could not recall its name nor the date of its demise. They looked down on Club Lake and wondered at the ski tracks an the snowy steep slopes of Carruthers. "Of course, the snow melts underneath and leaves the crust on top."
  
 They wandered out on Carruthers Spur, Old Son looking down into a deep gully, probably author Elyne Mitchell'​s "​Little Austria",​ which turns and leads down to the canyon. After walking past The Sentinel - next time, maybe - the tiring trio lunched overlooking Blue Lake. Gully spotted a grasshopper slowly battling hypothermia on a snow patch as it made its way feebly to the snow grass. Without packs they sauntered out oh Watsons Crags, Old Son pointing out Elyne Mitchell'​s "​Friar'​s Alp", Mount Tate, and: "Yes, yes, there it is, Dicky Cooper Bogong, midway between Tate and Jagungal."​ They wandered out on Carruthers Spur, Old Son looking down into a deep gully, probably author Elyne Mitchell'​s "​Little Austria",​ which turns and leads down to the canyon. After walking past The Sentinel - next time, maybe - the tiring trio lunched overlooking Blue Lake. Gully spotted a grasshopper slowly battling hypothermia on a snow patch as it made its way feebly to the snow grass. Without packs they sauntered out oh Watsons Crags, Old Son pointing out Elyne Mitchell'​s "​Friar'​s Alp", Mount Tate, and: "Yes, yes, there it is, Dicky Cooper Bogong, midway between Tate and Jagungal."​
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 The mood of the mountains! Mist and rain, wet and cold. The packs were heavy with wet tents. A farewell "​daay-ooh"​ to the party up in the mist and the trio descended through boggy marshes, snow gum groves, and thigh-high flowering scrub. "Now you are knee-deep in wildflowers,"​ roared Captain to Gully. They crossed the Snowy on the bridge near Illawong Lodge and Gully led them along the track to Farm Creek. Captain and Old Son crossed the Creek on the flying fox for a lark. Gully, disdaining such boyish behaviour, rock-hopped across. The mood of the mountains! Mist and rain, wet and cold. The packs were heavy with wet tents. A farewell "​daay-ooh"​ to the party up in the mist and the trio descended through boggy marshes, snow gum groves, and thigh-high flowering scrub. "Now you are knee-deep in wildflowers,"​ roared Captain to Gully. They crossed the Snowy on the bridge near Illawong Lodge and Gully led them along the track to Farm Creek. Captain and Old Son crossed the Creek on the flying fox for a lark. Gully, disdaining such boyish behaviour, rock-hopped across.
  
-Guthega at 9.50 am was cheerless. Wet, misty, cold, and not a cup of coffee to be had. Guthega was closed. Gully set out to road-walk the 7 km to his car at the power station where the walk was originally planned to finish. While they waited, ​Captin ​and Old Son were strangely silent; there was little to enthuse about now. Their thoughts were of dry clean clothes, a hot shower, a home-cooked meal, and the comfort of one's own bed at home. They had wandered the Main Range and they would always have the memory of the highlights of the walk. And they would return, again to wander and wonder in these mountains.+Guthega at 9.50 am was cheerless. Wet, misty, cold, and not a cup of coffee to be had. Guthega was closed. Gully set out to road-walk the 7 km to his car at the power station where the walk was originally planned to finish. While they waited, ​Captain ​and Old Son were strangely silent; there was little to enthuse about now. Their thoughts were of dry clean clothes, a hot shower, a home-cooked meal, and the comfort of one's own bed at home. They had wandered the Main Range and they would always have the memory of the highlights of the walk. And they would return, again to wander and wonder in these mountains.
  
 ===== A Tribute To The Silent Dignity Of A Friend ===== ===== A Tribute To The Silent Dignity Of A Friend =====
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 by Brian Holden by Brian Holden
  
-It is ten years now but I still remember you each time I pass your old place. For most of your long life your environment was created entirely by the random forces of nature. But gradually that all went until there was just you. At first I gave you a respectful glance but with the passing of time, you seemed to draw me to you until Isaw you as dominating everything around you. I realised that in some abstract way you were communicating with me and it was a pleasant experience. As that is what friendship is all about. I do not suppose that I was being too eccentric to call you my friend - my poor friend surrounded by an alien world. As my affection for you grew, my unease grew because you looked so out of place - almost like an intruder.+It is ten years now but I still remember you each time I pass your old place. For most of your long life your environment was created entirely by the random forces of nature. But gradually that all went until there was just you. At first I gave you a respectful glance but with the passing of time, you seemed to draw me to you until I saw you as dominating everything around you. I realised that in some abstract way you were communicating with me and it was a pleasant experience. As that is what friendship is all about. I do not suppose that I was being too eccentric to call you my friend - my poor friend surrounded by an alien world. As my affection for you grew, my unease grew because you looked so out of place - almost like an intruder.
  
 One day I saw that you were gone. I was told that you had to go as your space was required. "​Required"​ they said coldly. Those few square meters that had been yours for all those years. I sensed that you felt the danger as when I looked at you, you seemed to look back to me for help - but I was helpless. I was helpless because the species I belong to, has, to the misfortune of the planet we shared, formed a social structure which has a great momentum to invade the space of all other life. That structure has me trapped as I depend upon it for my survival. Pathetically,​ I can only hope that its momentum decreases. One day I saw that you were gone. I was told that you had to go as your space was required. "​Required"​ they said coldly. Those few square meters that had been yours for all those years. I sensed that you felt the danger as when I looked at you, you seemed to look back to me for help - but I was helpless. I was helpless because the species I belong to, has, to the misfortune of the planet we shared, formed a social structure which has a great momentum to invade the space of all other life. That structure has me trapped as I depend upon it for my survival. Pathetically,​ I can only hope that its momentum decreases.
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 Your removal was justified as every injustice must be. You could not feel nor think as they could - and that was that. If only they could appreciate that you could communicate in another way. You radiated pure substance when all around you was purely superficial. Why had they not noticed this? Maybe I noticed a quality which was not there? I do not believe so for there is another world inside this world which modern social conditioning has dulled the receptors of most men to. Tragically, while that conditioned rigidity dominates, injustices will be done. Your removal was justified as every injustice must be. You could not feel nor think as they could - and that was that. If only they could appreciate that you could communicate in another way. You radiated pure substance when all around you was purely superficial. Why had they not noticed this? Maybe I noticed a quality which was not there? I do not believe so for there is another world inside this world which modern social conditioning has dulled the receptors of most men to. Tragically, while that conditioned rigidity dominates, injustices will be done.
  
-Now what eulogy would be suitable for my defenseless friend? To start with I could say that from your great girth that you were very old. I could say that you were probably born when Columbus was alive. That is the usual response to the death of those of your kind which have reached a great age - but I won't follow that tradition. Why should I link your worth to some event in the history of man? You can stand on your own dignity. The coexistance ​of man is not needed to dignify your existence. It was undignified man who wantonly put you out of existence.+Now what eulogy would be suitable for my defenseless friend? To start with I could say that from your great girth that you were very old. I could say that you were probably born when Columbus was alive. That is the usual response to the death of those of your kind which have reached a great age - but I won't follow that tradition. Why should I link your worth to some event in the history of man? You can stand on your own dignity. The coexistence ​of man is not needed to dignify your existence. It was undignified man who wantonly put you out of existence.
  
 I would rather say that you experienced many, many magic days of peace. which I imagine my spirit sharing with you. Sunrises reflecting off your leaves, cold winds and balmy breezes swaying your branches, afternoon showers washing over your trunk - and when the rain stopped, you glistened in the sunset. They were all much the same - those days - and yet they were entirely different. Little things made them so. Wonderful little things like the movement of insects and shadows and the changing of colours. I would rather say that you experienced many, many magic days of peace. which I imagine my spirit sharing with you. Sunrises reflecting off your leaves, cold winds and balmy breezes swaying your branches, afternoon showers washing over your trunk - and when the rain stopped, you glistened in the sunset. They were all much the same - those days - and yet they were entirely different. Little things made them so. Wonderful little things like the movement of insects and shadows and the changing of colours.
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 **1st & 2nd February** **1st & 2nd February**
  
-I met Laurie ​Waken and Rosemary Kenny (she was on a visit from Brisbane) in Eddy Avenue where we boarded the bus for Kogarah as the railway line was closed between Central and Kogarah. At Loftus Brian Bolton and John Jansons were waiting for us, wondering why we were half an hour late. We were surprised to see Brian had only a small day pack. It turned out he had to work on Sunday so he decided to join us for the Saturday.+I met Laurie ​Quaken ​and Rosemary Kenny (she was on a visit from Brisbane) in Eddy Avenue where we boarded the bus for Kogarah as the railway line was closed between Central and Kogarah. At Loftus Brian Bolton and John Jansons were waiting for us, wondering why we were half an hour late. We were surprised to see Brian had only a small day pack. It turned out he had to work on Sunday so he decided to join us for the Saturday.
  
 At the Information Centre at Audley we found that only the leader of the party had to carry a permit, but the permit is only valid until 31st March 1992. It makes one wonder what is going to happen after that date. I also picked up a permit for the Heathcote National Park to cover my "​Kingdom Come" trip on 14/15 March. At the Information Centre at Audley we found that only the leader of the party had to carry a permit, but the permit is only valid until 31st March 1992. It makes one wonder what is going to happen after that date. I also picked up a permit for the Heathcote National Park to cover my "​Kingdom Come" trip on 14/15 March.
199203.1417740195.txt.gz · Last modified: 2014/12/05 00:43 by sbw