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199102 [2016/04/04 03:13]
tyreless
199102 [2016/04/20 02:33]
tyreless
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-=====The Sydney Bushwalker.=====+======The Sydney Bushwalker======
  
 Established June 1931 Established June 1931
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 A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to The Sydney Bush Walkers Incorporated,​ Box 4476 GPO, Sydney, 2001. Club meetings are held every Wednesday evening at 8 pm at Kirribilli Neighbourhood Centre, 16 Fitzroy Street, Kirribilli (near Milsons Point Railway Station). Visitors and prospective members are welcome any Wednesday. A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to The Sydney Bush Walkers Incorporated,​ Box 4476 GPO, Sydney, 2001. Club meetings are held every Wednesday evening at 8 pm at Kirribilli Neighbourhood Centre, 16 Fitzroy Street, Kirribilli (near Milsons Point Railway Station). Visitors and prospective members are welcome any Wednesday.
  
-|Editor|Morag Ryder, Box 347 PO, Gladesville 2111. Telephone 809 4241| +|**Editor**|Morag Ryder, Box 347 PO, Gladesville 2111. Telephone 809 4241| 
-|Production|Fran & Bill Holland Telephone 484 6636| +|**Production**|Fran & Bill Holland Telephone 484 6636| 
-|Typist|Kath Brown| +|**Typist**|Kath Brown| 
-|Illustrator|Morag Ryder| +|**Illustrator**|Morag Ryder| 
-|Printers|Kenn Clacher, Les Powell, Margaret Niven & Barrie Murdoch|+|**Printers**|Kenn Clacher, Les Powell, Margaret Niven & Barrie Murdoch|
  
 ====February 1991==== ====February 1991====
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 Last November Jim and Kath Brown wrote to Committee suggesting that Helen Gray, George Gray and Spiro Hajinakitas be added to our list of Honorary Active Members. At the December Committee Meeting the motion was unanimously passed to cries of "What a good idea!",​ and "We should have done it sooner!"​ The announcement was made at the Christmas Party and the certificates will be presented at the Annual General Meeting on 13th March. Last November Jim and Kath Brown wrote to Committee suggesting that Helen Gray, George Gray and Spiro Hajinakitas be added to our list of Honorary Active Members. At the December Committee Meeting the motion was unanimously passed to cries of "What a good idea!",​ and "We should have done it sooner!"​ The announcement was made at the Christmas Party and the certificates will be presented at the Annual General Meeting on 13th March.
  
-Such laurels are not easily won, but are given by the Club in sincere ​appretiation ​for years of service and support - as you will see by the following:-+Such laurels are not easily won, but are given by the Club in sincere ​appreciation ​for years of service and support - as you will see by the following:-
  
 ====Helen Gray==== ====Helen Gray====
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 Up down, up down, hotter and hotter. This was just not the day to be doing Boiler. Our throats were parched and the water we were carrying was rapidly running out. A quick lunch at noon before a dash along the flatter parts of the ridge to a large rock platform overlooking the ridge to the west which breaks up into a myriad of tors, spires and rocky outcrops. Up down, up down, hotter and hotter. This was just not the day to be doing Boiler. Our throats were parched and the water we were carrying was rapidly running out. A quick lunch at noon before a dash along the flatter parts of the ridge to a large rock platform overlooking the ridge to the west which breaks up into a myriad of tors, spires and rocky outcrops.
  
-From here the alternative plan of crossing Bungleboori directly back to Brakeevan ​Ridge had become a necessity, as we had run out of time and inclination to traverse the row of tors known as The Western Arthurs.+From here the alternative plan of crossing Bungleboori directly back to Brakevan ​Ridge had become a necessity, as we had run out of time and inclination to traverse the row of tors known as The Western Arthurs.
  
 It was five o'​clock by the time we reached Bungleboori after the descent from the nose of a hundred metre high, five metre thick tongue of rock into a slit canyon (oh, the glorious clear cold water!) leading out into the main canyon. Right opposite are what look like three possible routes up out of Bungleboori. However the lowest was blocked by an overhang at the base and the middle one was filled by a very recent land slide. The third was one of those deep narrow slits which __might__ have been negotiable, but if it wasn't it would have cost us at least an hour and a half that we did not have. It was five o'​clock by the time we reached Bungleboori after the descent from the nose of a hundred metre high, five metre thick tongue of rock into a slit canyon (oh, the glorious clear cold water!) leading out into the main canyon. Right opposite are what look like three possible routes up out of Bungleboori. However the lowest was blocked by an overhang at the base and the middle one was filled by a very recent land slide. The third was one of those deep narrow slits which __might__ have been negotiable, but if it wasn't it would have cost us at least an hour and a half that we did not have.
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 Dear Mrs Kirner, Dear Mrs Kirner,
  
-I recently visited the high mountain country of Victoria, and being quite keen on walking spent what would have been a glorious day walking in the Alpine National Park. I qualify my enthusiasm for this area becuase ​I was, frankly, surprised and quite appalled by the only too obvious results of the cattle grazing which is still allowed in this National Park - cattle excrement, resultant over-population of flies and the virtual denudation of the wild flowers which during the summer months would, and should be, carpeting the alpine plains.+I recently visited the high mountain country of Victoria, and being quite keen on walking spent what would have been a glorious day walking in the Alpine National Park. I qualify my enthusiasm for this area because ​I was, frankly, surprised and quite appalled by the only too obvious results of the cattle grazing which is still allowed in this National Park - cattle excrement, resultant over-population of flies and the virtual denudation of the wild flowers which during the summer months would, and should be, carpeting the alpine plains.
  
 I have often visited the New South Wales Kosciusko National Park during the summer months, ​ particularly the area between the Thredbo Chairlift and Mount Kosciusko, and this area never ceases to please and delight me - despite its ease of access, popularity and hence large numbers of people walking around this area, the fact that the cattle were banished from here some time ago has enabled the Park to return to its original splendour, the mess and abnormal quantities of flies being long gone and wild flowers once again flourish on the mountain sides and plains. I have often visited the New South Wales Kosciusko National Park during the summer months, ​ particularly the area between the Thredbo Chairlift and Mount Kosciusko, and this area never ceases to please and delight me - despite its ease of access, popularity and hence large numbers of people walking around this area, the fact that the cattle were banished from here some time ago has enabled the Park to return to its original splendour, the mess and abnormal quantities of flies being long gone and wild flowers once again flourish on the mountain sides and plains.
  
-These alpine regions particularly of South-East Australia are not only splendid places but they are also absolutely treasures of the nation. In a vast country such as ours, with so much space, it seems hard to justify use of our fine National ​Parke as grazing areas. Australia can, and should, preserve its National Parks in their natural state, as they always were, that is before the impact of man and his beasts upon the environment. There is room, and indeed greater know how and technology than previously, to enable cattle to be grazed on designated farmland and grazing areas outside the Parks. In my opinion, the Victorian Government in allowing this misuse of Alpine National Park is as guilty of spoiling a treasure of the nation as surely as if it were perpetrating a defacement of any other work of art. It is time to move the cattle out of the National Parks and preserve our heritage.+These alpine regions particularly of South-East Australia are not only splendid places but they are also absolutely treasures of the nation. In a vast country such as ours, with so much space, it seems hard to justify use of our fine National ​Parks as grazing areas. Australia can, and should, preserve its National Parks in their natural state, as they always were, that is before the impact of man and his beasts upon the environment. There is room, and indeed greater know how and technology than previously, to enable cattle to be grazed on designated farmland and grazing areas outside the Parks. In my opinion, the Victorian Government in allowing this misuse of Alpine National Park is as guilty of spoiling a treasure of the nation as surely as if it were perpetrating a defacement of any other work of art. It is time to move the cattle out of the National Parks and preserve our heritage.
  
 I would be interested in hearing of your government'​s future proposals on this subject. I would be interested in hearing of your government'​s future proposals on this subject.
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 ===Ingredients:​ (For One Person)=== ===Ingredients:​ (For One Person)===
  
-  * 1/2 Cp long grain rice+  * 1/2 Cup long grain rice
   * 1 Tablespoon oil   * 1 Tablespoon oil
   * Small stick of cinnamon   * Small stick of cinnamon
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 At lunch I got out my fishing line, as the river was filled to overflowing with monster trout. All I managed was a massive tangle in the line, and that was before I even got it in the water. Edith attempted to untangle it and was partly successful. At lunch I got out my fishing line, as the river was filled to overflowing with monster trout. All I managed was a massive tangle in the line, and that was before I even got it in the water. Edith attempted to untangle it and was partly successful.
  
-Today our aim for camp was the Chandler/​Macleay River junction. We made it at 5.45 pm, but then spent a fair time looking for a good campsite to see in the New Year. Bob found a big flat paddock, covered with green grass, where a bushfire had been through about ten months before. To celebrate New Year's Eve, Dave and Tanet emptied their humungus packs to reveal a feast. Vitawheats with Philly cheese and glace fruit, lollies and all sorts of other goodies. The rest of us managed to add a few things too. Halva, chocky, cashews, hot rum and lemon barley drinks, Violet Crumbles and two litres of port. We were all too full for dinner and at 10 pm Janet, Edith and myself crashed. The guys stayed up "To have a wee bit more port", and I believe Janet woke up close to midnight to again join the 'wild party'​... ​ should auld acquaintance be forgot.... zzzzzz.+Today our aim for camp was the Chandler/​Macleay River junction. We made it at 5.45 pm, but then spent a fair time looking for a good campsite to see in the New Year. Bob found a big flat paddock, covered with green grass, where a bushfire had been through about ten months before. To celebrate New Year's Eve, Dave and Janet emptied their humungus packs to reveal a feast. Vitawheats with Philly cheese and glace fruit, lollies and all sorts of other goodies. The rest of us managed to add a few things too. Halva, chocky, cashews, hot rum and lemon barley drinks, Violet Crumbles and two litres of port. We were all too full for dinner and at 10 pm Janet, Edith and myself crashed. The guys stayed up "To have a wee bit more port", and I believe Janet woke up close to midnight to again join the 'wild party'​... ​ should auld acquaintance be forgot.... zzzzzz.
  
 To be continued... To be continued...
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 The meeting closed at 2148. The meeting closed at 2148.
  
 +=====Impressions of Czechoslovakia - Winter 1990/​1991.=====
  
-February 1991 The $y4Huy.B6shwa1ker Page 13 
-IMPRESSIONS OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA 
-WINTER 1992L1991 
 by Helen Gray by Helen Gray
-Gabrielle and I met in Frankfurt and left in the evening for Czechoslovakia. In our + 
-sleeping compartment was a Czech woman who told us how wonderful it was for her to now be able to cross freely in and out of her country. "​Freely"​ it might be in her eyes; to me it was quite intimidating. We crossed the border just after midnight. The train stopped with a jerk that woke me, and looking through the window I could see only deep snow everywhere ​u-one lone building from which emerged two armed and uniformed men. These two then went through the train, waking everyone, scrutinising thoroughly every pasport ​and visa, asking many questions (we were lucky to have our Czech friend'​s ​interpetations) and finally, +Gabrielle and I met in Frankfurt and left in the evening for Czechoslovakia. In our sleeping compartment was a Czech woman who told us how wonderful it was for her to now be able to cross freely in and out of her country. "​Freely"​ it might be in her eyes; to me it was quite intimidating. We crossed the border just after midnight. The train stopped with a jerk that woke me, and looking through the window I could see only deep snow everywhere - one lone building from which emerged two armed and uniformed men. These two then went through the train, waking everyone, scrutinising thoroughly every passport ​and visa, asking many questions (we were lucky to have our Czech friend'​s ​interpretations) and finally, reluctantly satisfied with our answers, passing on. The train didn't move off for another hour or so. 
-reluctantly satisfied with our answers, passing on. The train didn't move off for another + 
-hour or so. +I'll jump ahead of myself to tell you about buying a railway ticket out of the country a few days later. We had plenty of Czech currency to buy the tickets, only to find that foreign currency (i.e. "​good" ​currency ​like Deutchmarks or U.S. dollars) is necessary for buying tickets out of the country. (My friend Jurgen in Germany ​__insisted__ ​on lending me 500 DM as I was leaving, insisting that Visa card was not good enough where I was going. How right he was!) Anyway, others without foreign cash - i.e. the ordinary Czechs - stood like us for 11 hours in a queue. We were treated with total indifference,​ they were treated like dirt. Endless form filling, then to another counter (i.e. another queue) to pay for the tickets, then given a receipt and told to come back in 3 hours for the ticket and - yes, another queue. Over half a day to buy a railway ticket! 
-I'll jump ahead of myself to tell you about buying a railway ticket out of the country a few days later. We had plenty of Czech currency to buy the tickets, only to find that foreign currency (i.e. "​good" ​curreny ​like Deutchmarks or U.S. dollars) is necessary for buying tickets out of the country. (My friend Jurgen in Germany ​insisted ​on lending me 500 DM as I was leaving, insisting that Visa card was not good enough where I was going. How right he was!) Anyway, others without foreign cash - i.e. the ordinary Czechs - stood like us for 11 hours in a queue. We were treated with total indifference,​ they were treated + 
-like dirt. Endless form filling, then to another counter (i.e. another queue) to pay for the tickts, then given a receipt and told to come back in 3 hours for the ticket and - yes, another queue. Over half a day to buy a railway ticket! +be lived like kings in Prague on the $30 a day we were required to change (and can neither take out of the country nor exchange). The most expensive restaurant meal costs about $4. But for the Czech life is very hard. Restaurants are empty except for the odd tourist. Every food shop had a long queue stretching down the street. The shortest queue I saw was three; that shop had, as total stock, broken onions, apples and one cabbage. The only women we saw were in shopping queues. The streets are full of wandering men. It was so frustrating not to be able to read or speak the language, and "where are all the women" was just one of a hundred questions we wanted answered. We spent two nights in the home of a family who were probably quite affluent by Czech standards ​as they had two rooms to rent and the husband had a job. Yet they were so very poor by Australian standards. And when we accidentally ​knocked on the wrong door when looking for our accommodation we saw depressing poverty. 
-be lived like kings in Prague on the $30 a day we were required to change (and can + 
-neither take out of the country nor exchange). The most expensive restaurant meal costs about $4. But for the Czech life is very hard. Restaurants are empty except for the odd tourist. Every food shop had a long queue stretching down the street. The shortest queue I saw was three; that shop had, as total stock, broken onions, apples and one callbage. The only women +Czechoslovakia intends/​hopes to be in the Common Market in '92, so I can't understand how the E.E.C. will work. Next door is Germany with about zero inflation, yet Czechoslovakia was expecting a 500% devaluation of money in January. 
-we saw were in shopping queues. The streets are full of wandering men. It was so frustrating not to be able to read or speak the language, and "where are all the women" was just one of a hundred questions we wanted answered. We spent two nights in the home of a family who were probably quite affluent by Czech.standaids ​as.they had two rooms to rent and the husband had a job. Yet they were so very poorby Australian standards. And when we accidently ​knocked on the wrong door when looking for our accommodation we saw depressing poverty. + 
-Czechoslovakia intends/​hopes to be in the Common Market in '92, so I can't understand +The people are quietIf I got separated from the others in a busy street, I could often hear them talking to one another even 25-35 yards away. It is probably the Slavic in them that gives most people broad faces and wide-set eyes, which result in a pleasant, open-faced look that is most appealing. People are courteous (even car drivers!) and warm and for me that meant a lot when communication was nil. I always felt very safe, even in the darkest alleys on the way "​home"​ from the opera late at night. (By the way, best-seat-in-the-house in the most glorious of opera houses - all gold, red velvet, cherubs, ceiling frescos etc - to see a world-class production of "​Fidelio"​ cost $2.50.) 
-how the E.E.C. will work. Next door is Germany with about zero inflation, yet Czechoslovakia + 
-was expecting a 500% devaluation ​-of moneyin January. +Prague is grubby and grimy because ​there is no money to clean buildings, but they (the buildings) are not falling ​down and every street and lane is a delight. There were buskers in town squares of the highest standard you've ever heard outside the Opera House. And jazz! New Orleans-style jazz is a feature of Prague, and that was __wonderful__
-The people are quietIf I got separated from the others in a busy street, I could often + 
-hear them talking to one another even 25-35 yards away. It is probably the Slavic in them that gives most people broad faces and wide-set eyes, which result in a pleasant, open-faced look that is most appealing. People are courteous (even car drivers!) and warm and for me that meant a lot when communication was nil. I always felt very safe, even in the darkest +=====Aftermath.===== 
-alleys on the way "​home"​ from the opera late at night. (By the way, best-seat-in-the-house in the most glorious of opera houses - all gold, red velvet, cherubs, ceiling frescos etc - to see a world-class production of "​Fidelio"​ cost $2.50.) + 
-Prague is grubby and grimy becausd ​there is no money to clean buildings, but they (the buildings) are not falling ​dqwn and every street and lane is a delight. There were buskers in town squares of the highest standard you've ever heard outside the Opera House. And jazz! +Smoke still gives a bitter taste\\ 
-New Orleans-style jazz is a feature of Prague, and that was wonderful+to the rain-washed air\\ 
-* * * ** * * * +stumps below the earth\\
-Page 14 The Sydney Bushwalker '​February 1991 +
-AFTERMATH +
- Smoke still gives a bitter taste +
-to the rain-washed air +
-stumps below the earth+
 still smoulder thin white plumes. still smoulder thin white plumes.
- Soaked ashes are warmly damp + 
-and full of cruffibling ​bones +Soaked ashes are warmly damp\\ 
-lizards, birds and possums which roasted in the blast. +and full of crumbling ​bones\\ 
-Skeleton trees and blackened rock +lizards, birds and possums\\ 
- make nightmare landscape +which roasted in the blast. 
-the ashen smell of death still rising after days of tardy rain , + 
- ​Procrastinating while the February Dragon roamed at will and seared the land devouring two centuries of growth'+Skeleton trees and blackened rock\\ 
 +make nightmare landscape\\ 
 +the ashen smell of death still rising\\ 
 +after days of tardy rain 
 + 
 +Procrastinating while the February Dragon\\ 
 +roamed at will and seared the land\\ 
 +devouring two centuries of growth\\
 in one greedy hour. in one greedy hour.
 +
 Morag Ryder Morag Ryder
-- 
-BLACKHEATH TAXIS & TOURIST SERVICES 
-10 & le SEATER MINI BUS TAXI 
-047-87 ,8366 
-KANANGRA BOYD 
- UPPER BLUE MOUNTAINS 
-SIX  FOOT TRACK 
-PICK UP ANYWHERE FOR START OR FINISH OF YOUR WALK - BY PRIOR ARRANGEMENT 
-Share the Fare Competitive Rates 
199102.txt · Last modified: 2016/04/20 02:33 by tyreless