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 === Sunday 7th May 89: === === Sunday 7th May 89: ===
  
-Porridge with sultanas or Muesli for breakfast. We had the same breakfast everyday. We left the caravan park at 8.40 am. A number of bushfires on the way, sometimes very close to the road. We reached Victoria river town at 10.45 am and left at 11.00 am. Good facilities at the caravan park. We all had ice cream, biscuits, iced coffee etc. at the Victoria river inn. Very pleasant weather for travelling, about 25 C and nice breeze. Not humid at all. Total driving distance to Keep R NP is 850 km along Stuart and Victoria highways. We reached Timber creek town at 11.55 am and left after 40 min. 2 pubs, 2 petrol stations and other shops. Victoria River runs parallel to the road. About240 km from Timber Creek to Kununurra. Boab trees everwhere. After 200 km we turned off to Keep R NP information centre and Ranger'​s quarters at 2.30 pm [6 hours from Katherine]. This NP is in NT, bordering WA and north of Victoria Hwy. Russel had lengthy discussions with the Ranger about where we could walk and on which locations we could camp. We left at 3.10 pm for the picnic area, adjacent to the Keep river, about 30 mins drive away along a fire trail towards north-east. When we got there, Andrew Griffiths (another guide working for Russell) had already got to Keep R NP before us with another walking group. Russell suspected that they couldn'​t get to Mitchell'​s plateau where they were supposed to be, due to recent heavy rain. After lunch we went to the aboriginal "​Cockatoo dreamtime"​ art site and natural arch location near the picnic area, crossing the Keep River. There were many paintings including the sacred rainbow serpent. We found a delightful camping area on sand upstream in the Keep River. We had the tents up and fire going at 6.00 pm. Chris made Tabouli and Russell cooked dried fish, potatoes and fresh vegetables (pumpkin, choko and carrots) mixed with canned tomatoes. Sue, Neil, Judy, Brian and others helped in cooking dinner and organizing breakfast and lunch everyday. Russell cooked potatoes in his camp oven. We had wine and then dinner. Russell also cooked a damper in the camp oven. After a series of jokes and singing everyone retired before 10.30 pm. All of us used mosquito nets every night.+Porridge with sultanas or Muesli for breakfast. We had the same breakfast everyday. We left the caravan park at 8.40 am. A number of bushfires on the way, sometimes very close to the road. We reached Victoria river town at 10.45 am and left at 11.00 am. Good facilities at the caravan park. We all had ice cream, biscuits, iced coffee etc. at the Victoria river inn. Very pleasant weather for travelling, about 25 C and nice breeze. Not humid at all. Total driving distance to Keep R NP is 850 km along Stuart and Victoria highways. We reached Timber creek town at 11.55 am and left after 40 min. 2 pubs, 2 petrol stations and other shops. Victoria River runs parallel to the road. About240 km from Timber Creek to Kununurra. Boab trees everywhere. After 200 km we turned off to Keep R NP information centre and Ranger'​s quarters at 2.30 pm [6 hours from Katherine]. This NP is in NT, bordering WA and north of Victoria Hwy. Russel had lengthy discussions with the Ranger about where we could walk and on which locations we could camp. We left at 3.10 pm for the picnic area, adjacent to the Keep river, about 30 mins drive away along a fire trail towards north-east. When we got there, Andrew Griffiths (another guide working for Russell) had already got to Keep R NP before us with another walking group. Russell suspected that they couldn'​t get to Mitchell'​s plateau where they were supposed to be, due to recent heavy rain. After lunch we went to the aboriginal "​Cockatoo dreamtime"​ art site and natural arch location near the picnic area, crossing the Keep River. There were many paintings including the sacred rainbow serpent. We found a delightful camping area on sand upstream in the Keep River. We had the tents up and fire going at 6.00 pm. Chris made Tabouli and Russell cooked dried fish, potatoes and fresh vegetables (pumpkin, choko and carrots) mixed with canned tomatoes. Sue, Neil, Judy, Brian and others helped in cooking dinner and organizing breakfast and lunch everyday. Russell cooked potatoes in his camp oven. We had wine and then dinner. Russell also cooked a damper in the camp oven. After a series of jokes and singing everyone retired before 10.30 pm. All of us used mosquito nets every night.
  
 [ Map of Bungle Bungle National Park ] [ Map of Bungle Bungle National Park ]
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 === Thursday, 11th May 89: === === Thursday, 11th May 89: ===
  
-We had breakfast and left the base camp at 9.15 am. We walked downstream a short while, crossed the main creek and took the first side creek on the eastern side of the campsite. After doing some scrambling up to the right side of the creek we saw a nice reasonably big rock pool. At 9.45 am we walked through a cave (the creek was flowing through) and saw some aboriginal paintings. Then as we walked up, we saw another big water hole. After climbing up, we saw a gigantic water hole. Russell said that these two pools were permanent water holes. We walked upstream scrambling up rocks as well as walking in sand. At 11.00 am we came to a fork in the creek, left towards south and right towards west. We decided to take the left creek and walk right through the massif and to camp at the bottom. At about 1.00 pm we came near some rocky area, on top of the massif. Russell climbed up to the top of one of the high rocky outcrops to get some idea about exactly where we were. Most of the people rested under a rock in the shade. We walked east till 1.35 pm and found a shady spot beside a high rocky area and had lunch. It was getting very hot. Aroung ​3.00 pm several of us went up to the top of the rocky area, to look at the wonderful views. We were able to see the "​Cockatoo dreamtime"​ art site at about 85 degrees bearing. We could also see the highest conical shaped mountain in Keep R NP to the north. We left at 3.40 pm. We walked to the east, downhill through a gorge and a waterfall. At 4.00 pm we changed direction to the south and walked for 30 minutes through thick tall grass. We stopped beside a creek at 5.00 pm. It turned out to be an excellent camping spot. We all went to have a dip in the creek and then sat around the fire and had cups of tea, nuts and other things. Chris then made cream of mushroom soup. Russell made wholemeal spaghetti with vegetables and dried fish. Then we had stewed apples and sultanas and custard. Russell produced the rest of the Port wine. The last of the walkers went to sleep around 11.00 pm. The moon was beginning to look very bright.+We had breakfast and left the base camp at 9.15 am. We walked downstream a short while, crossed the main creek and took the first side creek on the eastern side of the campsite. After doing some scrambling up to the right side of the creek we saw a nice reasonably big rock pool. At 9.45 am we walked through a cave (the creek was flowing through) and saw some aboriginal paintings. Then as we walked up, we saw another big water hole. After climbing up, we saw a gigantic water hole. Russell said that these two pools were permanent water holes. We walked upstream scrambling up rocks as well as walking in sand. At 11.00 am we came to a fork in the creek, left towards south and right towards west. We decided to take the left creek and walk right through the massif and to camp at the bottom. At about 1.00 pm we came near some rocky area, on top of the massif. Russell climbed up to the top of one of the high rocky outcrops to get some idea about exactly where we were. Most of the people rested under a rock in the shade. We walked east till 1.35 pm and found a shady spot beside a high rocky area and had lunch. It was getting very hot. Around ​3.00 pm several of us went up to the top of the rocky area, to look at the wonderful views. We were able to see the "​Cockatoo dreamtime"​ art site at about 85 degrees bearing. We could also see the highest conical shaped mountain in Keep R NP to the north. We left at 3.40 pm. We walked to the east, downhill through a gorge and a waterfall. At 4.00 pm we changed direction to the south and walked for 30 minutes through thick tall grass. We stopped beside a creek at 5.00 pm. It turned out to be an excellent camping spot. We all went to have a dip in the creek and then sat around the fire and had cups of tea, nuts and other things. Chris then made cream of mushroom soup. Russell made wholemeal spaghetti with vegetables and dried fish. Then we had stewed apples and sultanas and custard. Russell produced the rest of the Port wine. The last of the walkers went to sleep around 11.00 pm. The moon was beginning to look very bright.
  
 === Friday 12th May 89: === === Friday 12th May 89: ===
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 by Ainslie Morris by Ainslie Morris
  
-In the rugged ranges of south-east NSW, the moist eucalypt forests have been logged for timber all of this century, supporting small villages such as Wyndham with its huge log in its little park, and small towns such as Nimitabel and Eden. The late 1960's saw a dramatic change from saw logging for the building industry to clear-felling for the manufacture of woodchips. The Total Environment Centre drew attention to the coupes, large ares denuded of all trees by bulldozers, and the consequent soil erosion and depletion of wildlife habitat. Harris-Daishowa,​ the company permitted by the NSW Forestry Commission, has had tours of the woodchip mill on the south side of Twofold Bay, near Eden, and its coloured publicity brochure admits that the wildlife is "​temporarily disadvantaged"​.+In the rugged ranges of south-east NSW, the moist eucalypt forests have been logged for timber all of this century, supporting small villages such as Wyndham with its huge log in its little park, and small towns such as Nimitabel and Eden. The late 1960's saw a dramatic change from saw logging for the building industry to clear-felling for the manufacture of woodchips. The Total Environment Centre drew attention to the coupes, large areas denuded of all trees by bulldozers, and the consequent soil erosion and depletion of wildlife habitat. Harris-Daishowa,​ the company permitted by the NSW Forestry Commission, has had tours of the woodchip mill on the south side of Twofold Bay, near Eden, and its coloured publicity brochure admits that the wildlife is "​temporarily disadvantaged"​.
  
 Now the fully Japanese owned Daishowa International,​ the company wants to cling on to an extraordinarily cheap supply of timber, logged and chipped by an extraordinarily compliant, supportive and uncritical local populace. Now the fully Japanese owned Daishowa International,​ the company wants to cling on to an extraordinarily cheap supply of timber, logged and chipped by an extraordinarily compliant, supportive and uncritical local populace.
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 Enter the Wilderness Society, now a successful Australia-wide conservation lobby group since the Franklin campaign in Tasmania. With T.E.C. as well as numerous local groups, forming the South-East Forest Alliance, or S.E.F.A., it has tried for years to have the national parks extended in the area to include Coolangubra,​ Tantawangalo and Egan Peaks. All are listed for National Estate approval because of their high wilderness value, especially as habitats for endangered species of arboreal mammals such as possums, gliders and koalas. Enter the Wilderness Society, now a successful Australia-wide conservation lobby group since the Franklin campaign in Tasmania. With T.E.C. as well as numerous local groups, forming the South-East Forest Alliance, or S.E.F.A., it has tried for years to have the national parks extended in the area to include Coolangubra,​ Tantawangalo and Egan Peaks. All are listed for National Estate approval because of their high wilderness value, especially as habitats for endangered species of arboreal mammals such as possums, gliders and koalas.
  
-The media have told the story more recently so there should be no need to reiterate details here; they are obtainable on information sheets from The Wilderness Society, 53 Liverpool Street, Sydney. The campaign, however, changed at the end of February from the level of polite scientific submissions and letter-writing to direct action. The Federal Government renewed the export licence for woodchips in 1988 and after a moratorium and failed negotiations,​ the bulldozers moved back in. It appears provocative for them to have moved into the heart of the best forest areas. This is where the loggers meet protestors, meet police. This is called __Direct Action__.+The media have told the story more recently so there should be no need to reiterate details here; they are obtainable on information sheets from The Wilderness Society, 53 Liverpool Street, Sydney. The campaign, however, changed at the end of February from the level of polite scientific submissions and letter-writing to direct action. The Federal Government renewed the export licence for woodchips in 1988 and after a moratorium and failed negotiations,​ the bulldozers moved back in. It appears provocative for them to have moved into the heart of the best forest areas. This is where the loggers meet protesters, meet police. This is called __Direct Action__.
  
 I think you need a philosophy of life, well mixed with scientific facts, to give you a __Greenie__ view on the forest debate. I believe that we need: I think you need a philosophy of life, well mixed with scientific facts, to give you a __Greenie__ view on the forest debate. I believe that we need:
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 === December deadline for Coolangubra. === === December deadline for Coolangubra. ===
  
-In December the woodchipping licence is due to be renewed for 15 years. According to the Forestry Commission, by year 2013 only 350,000 tonnes of pulpwood will be available each year. Yet if the supply falls below 800,000 tonnes, Harris Daishowa will close. The imputation is clear. Having razed the forest for 15 years, Harris Daishowa will simply go elsewhere. Then what will the people of Eden do for jobs? It is unlikely there will be enough suitable logs to support ​evan a small mill. If this disaster is to be averted, start writing __now__, preferably to the Editors of the Sydney papers. ​ Perhaps also a few words of complaint to Messrs Causley, Cook, Carr and Hawke.+In December the woodchipping licence is due to be renewed for 15 years. According to the Forestry Commission, by year 2013 only 350,000 tonnes of pulpwood will be available each year. Yet if the supply falls below 800,000 tonnes, Harris Daishowa will close. The imputation is clear. Having razed the forest for 15 years, Harris Daishowa will simply go elsewhere. Then what will the people of Eden do for jobs? It is unlikely there will be enough suitable logs to support ​even a small mill. If this disaster is to be averted, start writing __now__, preferably to the Editors of the Sydney papers. ​ Perhaps also a few words of complaint to Messrs Causley, Cook, Carr and Hawke.
  
 Editor. Editor.
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 Day eleven was spent trekking up the valley of Dudh Kosi to Machermo and, although the track is nearly all above 14,000 ft, we were so well acclimatsed that altitude presented no difficulty. In the tiny hamlet of Mechem (best known for Yeti sightings) there was only one open lodge and it was full of trekkers, mainly a group of Brits serving with the British Army on the Rhine in West Germany. Although quite pleasant, they showed no inclination to crowd together. Our sherpa and porters squeezed in somehow while we pitched our tents (finally making use of them) in front of the lodge and spent a comfortable night at about 10°. Day eleven was spent trekking up the valley of Dudh Kosi to Machermo and, although the track is nearly all above 14,000 ft, we were so well acclimatsed that altitude presented no difficulty. In the tiny hamlet of Mechem (best known for Yeti sightings) there was only one open lodge and it was full of trekkers, mainly a group of Brits serving with the British Army on the Rhine in West Germany. Although quite pleasant, they showed no inclination to crowd together. Our sherpa and porters squeezed in somehow while we pitched our tents (finally making use of them) in front of the lodge and spent a comfortable night at about 10°.
  
-Day twelve saw high cloud and the half-day trip to Gbkyo was icy but uneventful. Just before Gokyo, the trail passes two small lakes each one with a pair of brightly-coloured ducks floating on the ice-free patches in the middle. It is a mystery how these creatures survive the winter. We put up for the night in the less smoky of the two lodges which were open and slept soundly at 16,000 feet, while outside snow starting falling, turning our host's black ill-tempered yaks in the yard, white.+Day twelve saw high cloud and the half-day trip to Gokyo was icy but uneventful. Just before Gokyo, the trail passes two small lakes each one with a pair of brightly-coloured ducks floating on the ice-free patches in the middle. It is a mystery how these creatures survive the winter. We put up for the night in the less smoky of the two lodges which were open and slept soundly at 16,000 feet, while outside snow starting falling, turning our host's black ill-tempered yaks in the yard, white.
  
 By the morning of day thirteen, the landscape was pure white, the snow was still falling and spirits were low. We spent the morning watching our host attempting to round up his yaks before closing the lodge and going down the valley with the herd. At the outset, he had two out of the reputed 14 in the yard. By the time he came back with the third, the two escaped and trotted up in decreasing visibility up the slope of Gokyo Ri - we had no way of controlling the large surly beasts. By noon, we decided that staying at Gokyo was too risky - it is a very remote spot to be snowed in. We left behind our irrate host, 14 yaks, 3 Swiss, two Americans and the didi (literally elder sister, but in fact the term is used to describe any youngish woman) who ran the second lodge. Given what happened next, they must have had a very uncomfortable week. By the morning of day thirteen, the landscape was pure white, the snow was still falling and spirits were low. We spent the morning watching our host attempting to round up his yaks before closing the lodge and going down the valley with the herd. At the outset, he had two out of the reputed 14 in the yard. By the time he came back with the third, the two escaped and trotted up in decreasing visibility up the slope of Gokyo Ri - we had no way of controlling the large surly beasts. By noon, we decided that staying at Gokyo was too risky - it is a very remote spot to be snowed in. We left behind our irrate host, 14 yaks, 3 Swiss, two Americans and the didi (literally elder sister, but in fact the term is used to describe any youngish woman) who ran the second lodge. Given what happened next, they must have had a very uncomfortable week.
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 Thus we spent a total of 17 days in the high country and, with the exception of our retreat Prom Gokyo, we achieved all of our objectives with the minimum of fuss in spite of the unseasonal snow falls. It can be done and easily done at that. Thus we spent a total of 17 days in the high country and, with the exception of our retreat Prom Gokyo, we achieved all of our objectives with the minimum of fuss in spite of the unseasonal snow falls. It can be done and easily done at that.
  
-The trip back to Jiri was a virtual play-back of our approach journey. We spent a pleasant New Year's Eve in Khari Khola drinking a negligible amount of beer and eating some tins of Thai sardines to mark the festive occasion with a couple of Kiwi girls and other trekkers. One of us found some aspect of this party too much for the system, spent the rest of the night throwing up and greeted 1989 looking like a ghost. Nevertheless,​ she managed to climb 4,500 feet next day over the Tragsindo Pass and, too tired to complain, collapsed without eating at Ringmo while the rest of us sat up sampling locally made apple brandy - the only potable drink produced in Nepal. A third unseasonal snowfall caught us on the Lamjura Pass (3530 m, 11,580 ft) to be followd ​by even more unseasonal rain as we descended on the other side.+The trip back to Jiri was a virtual play-back of our approach journey. We spent a pleasant New Year's Eve in Khari Khola drinking a negligible amount of beer and eating some tins of Thai sardines to mark the festive occasion with a couple of Kiwi girls and other trekkers. One of us found some aspect of this party too much for the system, spent the rest of the night throwing up and greeted 1989 looking like a ghost. Nevertheless,​ she managed to climb 4,500 feet next day over the Tragsindo Pass and, too tired to complain, collapsed without eating at Ringmo while the rest of us sat up sampling locally made apple brandy - the only potable drink produced in Nepal. A third unseasonal snowfall caught us on the Lamjura Pass (3530 m, 11,580 ft) to be followed ​by even more unseasonal rain as we descended on the other side.
  
 The bus trip from Jiri to Kathmandu was only moderately uncomfortable and we recovered during four days in Kathmandu catching up on eating well, showering, shopping and visiting exotic historic spots (Bhaktapur, Patan, Swayambunath - all very rewarding). The total experience can be recommended to all and sundry. The bus trip from Jiri to Kathmandu was only moderately uncomfortable and we recovered during four days in Kathmandu catching up on eating well, showering, shopping and visiting exotic historic spots (Bhaktapur, Patan, Swayambunath - all very rewarding). The total experience can be recommended to all and sundry.
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 Treasurer Spiro reported that receipts for the last month amounted to $1687 (including about $1240 in subscriptions from people who just missed the axe as unfinancial). Disbursements included the standard items of rental, postages on two issues of the magazine, grog for the Mid-Winter Feast, and the like, and a request for approval to pay the Federation dues. The bank balance stood at $2480. Treasurer Spiro reported that receipts for the last month amounted to $1687 (including about $1240 in subscriptions from people who just missed the axe as unfinancial). Disbursements included the standard items of rental, postages on two issues of the magazine, grog for the Mid-Winter Feast, and the like, and a request for approval to pay the Federation dues. The bank balance stood at $2480.
  
-On to the Walks Report. For several months lately the customary plaint was "​wet... wet... wet". Since the end of the Big Wet in June, this time it tended to be "​cold... cold... cold". The flavour of the month was ski-touring - with five out of the 17 trips listed on the program coming into that catagory. The first weekend included Morrie Ward's walking at Barrington and on Wangat River (very cold). Nine folk were there, a giant snail shell was discovered, and the trip included a steep ridge ascent and a longish trail march on the last day, but was very satisfying. That weekend Jan Mohandas had a walk from Kanangra to Gangerang, Kanangra Creek and Paralyser, and it is known that it went ahead, but no information was available. The same "nil report"​ covered Ian Debert'​s weekend at Coolana, and George Walton'​s day walk from Katoomba.+On to the Walks Report. For several months lately the customary plaint was "​wet... wet... wet". Since the end of the Big Wet in June, this time it tended to be "​cold... cold... cold". The flavour of the month was ski-touring - with five out of the 17 trips listed on the program coming into that category. The first weekend included Morrie Ward's walking at Barrington and on Wangat River (very cold). Nine folk were there, a giant snail shell was discovered, and the trip included a steep ridge ascent and a longish trail march on the last day, but was very satisfying. That weekend Jan Mohandas had a walk from Kanangra to Gangerang, Kanangra Creek and Paralyser, and it is known that it went ahead, but no information was available. The same "nil report"​ covered Ian Debert'​s weekend at Coolana, and George Walton'​s day walk from Katoomba.
  
 On the following weekend 21/24 July there were two ski-touring jaunts programmed, and both went. Ian Wolfe (party of 4) arrived at Cesjacks to find snow on the ground and "about 8 inches overnight"​. Their trip proceeded, and finished in driving sleet on the last day. Chris Perry'​s "​easy"​ ski trip from Dead Horse Gap was reported by Les Powell as including a camp on the snow "​desperately cold"​... but "we survived"​. Of those not on skis, it appears Jim Oxley'​s trip into the Jenolan country did not go, and one potential starter joined Don Finch'​s walk from Carlons to Kennel Flat, which had 16 members, included a side trip to Mount Mouin, and encountered rain on Sunday which sent the party back to the cars by about 3.00 pm. Of the day walk on 23rd July, Alan Mewett reported it was taken over by Mark Weatherby as he was recovering from recent surgery. Sixteen members and five prospectives went into the Mangrove Creek area, west of Gosford, and fortunately found a generous overhang to shelter them for lunch near Mount Lockyer. On the following weekend 21/24 July there were two ski-touring jaunts programmed, and both went. Ian Wolfe (party of 4) arrived at Cesjacks to find snow on the ground and "about 8 inches overnight"​. Their trip proceeded, and finished in driving sleet on the last day. Chris Perry'​s "​easy"​ ski trip from Dead Horse Gap was reported by Les Powell as including a camp on the snow "​desperately cold"​... but "we survived"​. Of those not on skis, it appears Jim Oxley'​s trip into the Jenolan country did not go, and one potential starter joined Don Finch'​s walk from Carlons to Kennel Flat, which had 16 members, included a side trip to Mount Mouin, and encountered rain on Sunday which sent the party back to the cars by about 3.00 pm. Of the day walk on 23rd July, Alan Mewett reported it was taken over by Mark Weatherby as he was recovering from recent surgery. Sixteen members and five prospectives went into the Mangrove Creek area, west of Gosford, and fortunately found a generous overhang to shelter them for lunch near Mount Lockyer.
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 ---- ----
  
-CARRYINGS ON IN CORNWELL+===== Carryings On In Cornwell. ===== 
 by Almis Simankevicius by Almis Simankevicius
-Reports of rain were dismissed with a casual air of nonchalance by us experienced + 
-travellers. Anyway, we had our wet weather gear. Still, one sunny day out of three rain +Reports of rain were dismissed with a casual air of nonchalance by us experienced travellers. Anyway, we had our wet weather gear. Still, one sunny day out of three rain soaked ones was very appreciated. We left the Penzance Youth Hostel, reputedly built many years ago by smugglers furthering their business enterprises. Guy would return while the St Just hostel was my next goal. The bus dropped us at St Just, the last town before ​Land's End, the most westerly point on the British mainland. 
-soaked ones was very appreciated. We left the Penzance Youth Hostel, reputedly built many + 
-years ago by smugglers furthering their business enterprises. Guy would return while the +After a fortifying lunch of chicken and chips (and half a pint of Guiness for my cold), we followed the walking track to the coast. This is "​Poldark"​ country, the boom of the sea swell against the cliffs, the lonely ruins of tin mining operations and legends of pirates and smugglers. A brisk sea breeze accompanied us as we walked the five miles around to Sennen Cove and Land's End. 
-St Just hostel was my next goal. The bus droppedus ​at St Just, the last town befere ​Land's + 
-End, the most westerly point on the British mainland. +The experienced travellers had not checked the local bus timetables, so had missed the return bus by ten minutes. Well, that gave us two hours to look at souveniers and have coffee. Mostly English tourists here. We finally boarded the 5.06 bus to Penzance. ​Here I found that the next bus from there to St Just was at 8.00 pm! As the bus was grinding its way along saw a sign to my destination,​ said goodbye to my companion ​and asked the bus driver to let me out. I was angry at myself for not paying more attention to the timetables as these services are infrequent ​and we hostellers ​do enough walking as it is. With a  ​lift ​from a kindly local, I was soon safely ensconced ​in the cosy hostel. Warm log fire, dinner and rest. 
-After a fortifying lunch of chicken and chips (and half a pint of Guiness for my cold), we followed the walking track to the coast. This is "​Poldark"​ country, the boom of the sea swell against the cliffs, the lonely ruins of tin mining operations and legends of pirates + 
-and smugglers. A brisk sea breeze accompanied us as we walked the five miles around to Sennen Cove and Land's End. +Devouring Cornish pasties with a cup of tea is de rigeur ​in these parts, as are raincoats. Originally ​created ​so that the workers would have a filling meal out on the fields or in the mines, the Cornish ​pastie has been exported around the world. 
-rhe experienced travellers had not checked the local bus timetables, so had missed the return bus by ter minutes. Well, that gave us two hours to look at + 
-souveniers and have coffee. Mostly English tourists +The seaside towns of Marazion, ​St Ives and Newquay all have a beguiling charm about them. The tidal changes around the Cornish peninsula are amazing. To visit the castle on St Michael'​s Mount, you have to wait for low tide to walk across the causeway or pay a quid to be ferried over. 
-here. We finally boarded the 5.06 bus to Penzance. + 
-her I found that the next bus from there to St Just +The amenities and charm of Newquay attracts the English holiday ​makers and there are plenty ​of amusement arcades here.  I set off for a delightful ten mile coastal walk towards Perranporth. It was very sunny and a delightful sea-breeze kept the pesky flies and bumble bees away. The marvellous smell of the sea sharpened my appetite and the Treguth Public ​House was happy to feed me. 
-was at 8.00 pm! As the bus was grinding its way along + 
-saw a sign to my destination,​ said goodbye to my ompanior ​and asked the bus driver to Let me out. I +It's surprising ​to see surfboards in Britain, but here on the two mile long surf beach were a few daring wetsuit clad riders enjoying the beaut conditions. 
-was angry at myself for not paying more attention to the timetables as these services are Lnfrequent ​and + 
-we rlostellers ​do enough walking as it is. With a ,Ift from a kindly local, I was soon safely ensconced +Perranporth Hostel kitchen overlooked the sea, as David (a nuclear engineer), his wife Claire ​and myself prepared our meals. Really, they should play down the "​Youth"​ prefix of these hostels as there is no age limit or professional ​discrimination. Next morning, after you nave completed ​your assigned ​task they add another ink stamp to your little book. 
-lp the cosy hostel. Warm log fire, dinner and rest. + 
-Devouring Cornish pasties with a cup of tea is de rigeur ​In these parts, as are raincoats. Originally +It was raining again as I climbed off the bus at Tintagel. This is the supposed birthplace of King Arthur. A neat-as-a-pin town certainly geared to the tourist trade. 
-reated ​so that the workers would have a filling meal out on the fields or in the mines, the urrish ​pastie has been exported around the world. + 
-The seaside towns of Marazion, ​5t Ives and Newquay all have a beguiling charm about them. '​he ​tidal changes around the Cornish peninsula are amazing. To visit the castle on St Michael'​s +King Arthur'​s this and King Arthur'​s that, but it was all good fun. The ruins of Arthur'​s castle were perched high above the cliffs leaving very little access for those ancient marauders. The road to the hostel passed down by an ancient ​chapel in which you could light a candle. Then up to an eleventh century church with its Norman tower. The managers of this hostel provide homemade meals and keep a relaxed friendly place. 
-Mount, you have to wait fo9low ​tide l'​h ​walk across the causeway or pay a quid to be ferried over. + 
-rhe amenities and charm of Newquay attracts the Englis''​)4 oliday ​makers and there are plenty +The "​famous five" had burst onto the scene. Five Australian girls; two Janes, Kim, Georgie, Angie; and all were thirsty. So I joined them at the "​Cornishman"​ pub for dinner and a number of pints. On the way back we dared each other to walk through the church'​s graveyard. Three of us did, and as we peered through one of the stained glass windows we saw an eerie moving light. We broke the speed limit getting back to the hostel. 
-if amusement arcades here.  I set off for a delightful ten mile coastal walk towards Perranporth. + 
-It was very sunny and a delightful sea-breeze kept the pesky flies and +The village squares are quaint and the cathedrals ancient. I popped inside one and listened to the evensong. Very soothing. 
-bumble bees away. The marvellous +
-smell of the sea sharpened my appetite and the Treguth Public ​Hause was happy to feed me. +
-It's surprising ​tb see surfboards in Britain, but here on the two mile long surf beach were a few daring wetsuit clad riders enjoying the beaut conditions. +
-Perranporth Hostel kitchen overlooked the sea, as David (a nuclear engineer), his wife flaire ​and myself prepared our meals. Really, they should play down the "​Youth"​ prefix of +
-these hostels as there is no age limit or proffessional ​discrimination. Next morning, after +
-you nave completed ​yOur assigf/​ed ​task they add another ink stamp to your little book. +
-It was raining again as I climbed off the bus at Tintagel. This is the supposed birthplace +
-of King Arthur. A neat-as-a-pin town certainly geared to the tourist trade. +
-September 1989 The Sydney Bushwalker Page 17 +
-King Arthur'​s this and King Arthur'​s that, but it was all good fun. The ruins of Arthur'​s castle were perched high above the cliffs leaving very little access for those ancient marauders. The road to the hostel passed down by an ancient ​chapelimlutdch ​you could +
-light a candle. Then up to an eleventh century church with its Norman tower. The managers +
-of this hostel provide homemade meals and keep a relaxed friendly place. +
-The "​famous five" had burst onto the scene. Five Australian girls; two Janes, Kim, +
-Georgie, Angie; and all were thirsty. So I joined them at the "​Cornishman"​ pub for dinner +
-and a number of pints. On the way back'we dared each other to walk through the church'​s +
-graveyard. Three of us did, and as we peered through one of the stained glass windows we +
-saw an eerie moving light. We broke the speed limit getting back to the hostel. +
-The village squares are quaint and the cathedrals ancient. I popped inside one and +
-listened to the evensong. Very soothing.+
 The Cornish have a more sedate rhythm to their lives, although that is gradually changing due to the encroaching tourist industry and money from London. They always have time for a chat and are hospitable, but don't ever make the mistake of calling a Cornishman - "​English"​. The Cornish have a more sedate rhythm to their lives, although that is gradually changing due to the encroaching tourist industry and money from London. They always have time for a chat and are hospitable, but don't ever make the mistake of calling a Cornishman - "​English"​.
-41 if itit 41 itit * + 
-THE CLUB AUCTION +---- 
-On Wednesday 30th August the Club Auction was held with about 50 people present and Charlie Brown as auctioneer. With his amazing patter that keeps things going, Charlie cleared the decks and brought in the money in double quick time. Most items for sale were of a bushwalking nature - packs, tents, sleeping bags, groundsheets and jackets. These + 
-were bought up quickly, some for little money (a good pack went for $2), but where there was some competition the prices were higher, but still bargains. +===== The Club Auction===== 
-A pushbike with a reserve of $50 eventually sold for $115. (The reserve goes to the + 
-seller, the balance to the Club.) Five bottles of sparkling wine went, as a lot, for $11.50, a Japanese enamel pendant for $10.50, a compass for $15, an old down sleeping bag for $10. There were also sundry household items, some of which were sold, some were given away as + 
-extras with items that were paid for. It was great fun, lots of laughter, and a total of +On Wednesday 30th August the Club Auction was held with about 50 people present and Charlie Brown as auctioneer. With his amazing patter that keeps things going, Charlie cleared the decks and brought in the money in double quick time. Most items for sale were of a bushwalking nature - packs, tents, sleeping bags, groundsheets and jackets. These were bought up quickly, some for little money (a good pack went for $2), but where there was some competition the prices were higher, but still bargains. 
-$251 was raised for Club funds. Many thanks to Charlie for his good work. + 
-*******#+A pushbike with a reserve of $50 eventually sold for $115. (The reserve goes to the seller, the balance to the Club.) Five bottles of sparkling wine went, as a lot, for $11.50, a Japanese enamel pendant for $10.50, a compass for $15, an old down sleeping bag for $10. There were also sundry household items, some of which were sold, some were given away as extras with items that were paid for. It was great fun, lots of laughter, and a total of $251 was raised for Club funds. Many thanks to Charlie for his good work. 
 + 
 +---- 
 For those who have difficulty in estimating how far they walk in a given period, Federation News recently printed a useful little guide. For those who have difficulty in estimating how far they walk in a given period, Federation News recently printed a useful little guide.
-On Track 12 minutes per kilometre + 
-Open Scrub 20 .  ​ +|On Track|12 minutes per kilometre| 
-Meduim ​Scrub 30 . +|Open Scrub|20 minutes per kilometre| 
-Thick Scrub 40  ee +|Medium ​Scrub|30 minutes per kilometre| 
-Rock Hopping 30  el se +|Thick Scrub|40 minutes per kilometre| 
-NEW MEMBERS+|Rock Hopping|30 minutes per kilometre| 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=== New Members. === 
 Please add the following names etc to your List of Members:- Please add the following names etc to your List of Members:-
-CAMERON, Ms Brenda, 5/41 Doomben Avenue, Eastwood 2122 858 2013 + 
-CHURCHER, Mr Paul, 40 Wilson STreet, Kogarah 2217 587 2617 +  * CameronN, Ms Brenda, 5/41 Doomben Avenue, Eastwood2122858 2013. 
-WASIELEWSKI, Mr Patrick, 18 Crookwell Avenue, ​Mirands ​2228 (B) 516 7634 +  * Churcher, Mr Paul, 40 Wilson STreet, Kogarah2217587 2617. 
-Page 18 The Sydney Bushwalker September 1989 +  * Wasielewski, Mr Patrick, 18 Crookwell Avenue, ​Miranda, ​2228(B) 516 7634
-SOCIAL ​ NOTES by Dot Butler + 
-Wednesday 20th Sept. UP DOWN NEW ZEALAND ​by Jim Oxley. +---- 
-Edited slides of Routeburn, Caples, Rees-Dart, Dusky, Copeland, Arthur'​s Pass, Nelson Lakes, Tongeriro, etc Tracks. + 
-Friday 22nd Sept. BUSHWALKERS BALL Petersham Town Hall. Theme "The Greenhouse Effect"​. +===== Social Notes. ===== 
-$8 pay at door 8 pm till midnight B.Y.O. Food & Drink Band "The Hotfoot String Band" Contact Beverley Foulds if you would like to join the S.B.W. party. Phone 798 5650. + 
-CLUBROOM CLOSED ​on Wednesday 27th Sept. and Wednesday 4th October.+by Dot Butler 
 + 
 +Wednesday 20th Sept. __Up Down in New Zealand__ ​by Jim Oxley. Edited slides of Routeburn, Caples, Rees-Dart, Dusky, Copeland, Arthur'​s Pass, Nelson Lakes, Tongeriro, etc Tracks. 
 + 
 +Friday 22nd Sept. __Bushwalkers Ball__, ​Petersham Town Hall. Theme "The Greenhouse Effect"​. $8 pay at door8 pm till midnightB.Y.O. Food & DrinkBand "The Hotfoot String Band"Contact Beverley Foulds if you would like to join the S.B.W. party. Phone 798 5650. 
 + 
 +__Clubroom closed__ ​on Wednesday 27th Sept. and Wednesday 4th October. 
 Wednesday 18th Oct. "​Hazardous Chemicals"​ by Dr. Kate Short (Total Environment Centre). Dinner before the meeting at Da Carlo Italian Restaurant, 175 Ramsay St. Haberfield. Wednesday 18th Oct. "​Hazardous Chemicals"​ by Dr. Kate Short (Total Environment Centre). Dinner before the meeting at Da Carlo Italian Restaurant, 175 Ramsay St. Haberfield.
-Wednesday 25th Oct. Peter Treseder tells of his rOn across Australia from Nprth to South. + 
-(See also Page 10 of this magazine). +Wednesday 25th Oct. Peter Treseder tells of his run across Australia from North to South. (See also Page 10 of this magazine). 
-* * * * * * * + 
-FEDERATION NOTES by Jeff Bridger +---- 
-'​he ​Federation of Bushwalkersis ​trying hard to have the Nattai area declared a National Park before mining interests ​:an lay claim to it. Can we lead more trips there? + 
-rhis would add weight to the claim that it is '​extensively ​usedlby ​walkers. +===== Federation Notes. ===== 
-Recently sighted near Hilltop was a collection of truly massive earth-moving equipment, beside the beginnings of a road. Enquiries brought the response that it was 'a private road' + 
-a very rich farmer9). Perhaps those mining companies are getting in quickly, before any +by Jeff Bridger 
-conservation order can be issued. + 
-The L.(V.W. have just finished marking an alternative route around the Big Swamp near Lorang ​Peak. During the past wet years it has been 'mud to the armpits'​. The new track +The Federation of Bushwalkers is trying hard to have the Nattai area declared a National Park before mining interests ​can lay claim to it. Can we lead more trips there? ​This would add weight to the claim that it is '​extensively ​used' by walkers. 
-will allow you to keep your feet ;relatively) dry. + 
-Bad news about Barrington. The advisory committee for Barrington Tops is being +Recently sighted near Hilltop was a collection of truly massive earth-moving equipment, beside the beginnings of a road. Enquiries brought the response that it was 'a private road' ​(a very rich farmer?). Perhaps those mining companies are getting in quickly, before any conservation order can be issued. 
-Ire-organised'​. F.B.W. advises that those members who want to close roads and emphasise + 
-conservation are being pushed to the sidelines,​while those with a desire to 'open up' the area +The C.M.W. have just finished marking an alternative route around the Big Swamp near Corang ​Peak. During the past wet years it has been 'mud to the armpits'​. The new track will allow you to keep your feet (relatively) dry. 
-are being given positions of power. We had better start signing petitions NOW, or it will be another case of 'too little too late'​. + 
-######## *# +Bad news about __Barrington__. The advisory committee for Barrington Tops is being 're-organised'​. F.B.W. advises that those members who want to close roads and emphasise conservation are being pushed to the sidelines, while those with a desire to 'open up' the area are being given positions of power. We had better start signing petitions NOW, or it will be another case of 'too little too late'​. 
-JOINOTES: + 
- It isn't often that the club makes trips to the Kimberleys, but if anyone is interested they could contact ​THE FRIENDS OF THE KIMBERLEYS, who meet at 7 pm in the Wilderness ​ciociety ​rooms, 1st floor, 53 Liverpool Street, Sydney, on the first and third Thursday of +---- 
-EVERY MONTHOi they could ring The Wilderness Society on 267 7929. + 
- qctober ​20th, Friday Wilderness Society Dance - begins 7.30 pm at Petersham Town Hall. Celebrate the coming of spring with '​Eureka!'​ and their genuine Australian folk music. +===== Footnotes. ===== 
-z CONFERENCE: "The State of our Rivers"​ to be held at the A.N.U. in Canberra, 28/29 Sept. It will examine the evolving legal and administrative structures, the competing demands and impart ​of different uses, including agricultural,​ urban and industrial, which affect the health + 
-of the river system. For further information contact 'The State of our Rivers Conference',​ Phone (062) 49 4580 or GPO Box 4, Canberra ACT 2601. +It isn't often that the club makes trips to the Kimberleys, but if anyone is interested they could contact ​the __Friends of The Kimberleys__, who meet at 7 pm in the Wilderness ​Society ​rooms, 1st floor, 53 Liverpool Street, Sydney, on the first and third Thursday of every monthOr they could ring The Wilderness Society on 267 7929. 
-DEMONSTRATION OF NEW PRINTER+ 
 +October ​20th, Friday Wilderness Society Dance - begins 7.30 pm at Petersham Town Hall. Celebrate the coming of spring with '​Eureka!'​ and their genuine Australian folk music. 
 + 
 +Conference: "The State of our Rivers"​ to be held at the A.N.U. in Canberra, 28/29 Sept. It will examine the evolving legal and administrative structures, the competing demands and impact ​of different uses, including agricultural,​ urban and industrial, which affect the health of the river system. For further information contact 'The State of our Rivers Conference',​ Phone (062) 49 4580 or GPO Box 4, Canberra ACT 2601. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=== Demonstration of new printer. === 
 At the General Meeting on 11th October it is expected that there will be a demonstration of the proposed new printer. This should help members make up their minds about the necessary expenditure. At the General Meeting on 11th October it is expected that there will be a demonstration of the proposed new printer. This should help members make up their minds about the necessary expenditure.
-########​*###​ 
  
 +----
198909.txt · Last modified: 2019/05/21 02:51 by tyreless