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198908 [2019/05/16 06:20]
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198908 [2019/05/17 01:28]
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-===== The Saga Of zobel Gully. =====+===== The Saga Of Zobel Gully. =====
  
 On the 27th/28th of May, George Newer and Carol Lubbers decided to explore Zobel Gully. The route was: Mount Banks, Pierces Pass, Grose River, Zobel Gully, Explorers Range, Mount Banks. The result was as follows. On the 27th/28th of May, George Newer and Carol Lubbers decided to explore Zobel Gully. The route was: Mount Banks, Pierces Pass, Grose River, Zobel Gully, Explorers Range, Mount Banks. The result was as follows.
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 ---- ----
  
 +===== High On The Khumbu. =====
 +
 +by Wendy Lippiatt & Sever Sternhell
  
-HIGH ONTHE KHUMBU 
--by Wendy Lippiatt & Sever Sternhell 
 Trekking in Nepal is hardly an unusual adventure and the Everest region (The Khumbu) is one of the most popular destinations,​ but we feel that our trip with Jenny Pry and Peter Sternhell in early winter (December 2, 1988 to January 12, 1989) is worth describing because we managed to visit all the major accessible locations in the Khumbu quite comfortably and without any serious problems due to high altitude. In particular, none of us showed any signs of impending Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS), a non-trivial consideration given that the period of October-December 1988 saw at least six deaths of AMS in the Khimbu region alone. Trekking in Nepal is hardly an unusual adventure and the Everest region (The Khumbu) is one of the most popular destinations,​ but we feel that our trip with Jenny Pry and Peter Sternhell in early winter (December 2, 1988 to January 12, 1989) is worth describing because we managed to visit all the major accessible locations in the Khumbu quite comfortably and without any serious problems due to high altitude. In particular, none of us showed any signs of impending Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS), a non-trivial consideration given that the period of October-December 1988 saw at least six deaths of AMS in the Khimbu region alone.
-Our own happy cirumstances were undoubtedly at least partly due to inherent physiological make-up of our party and to good luck, but we claim credit for following a prudent route in the high country chosen with acclimatisation as the major consideration. We were certainly far better acclimatised to 16,000 feet than ever before (Peter and Wendy had one previous trip to Nepal each and &​eV ​had two - only Jenny was a kidnapped virgin). To some + 
-extent therefore this report is meant as a possible help for the planning of one type of Nepal trek without in any way attempting to fill the role of the ubiquitous trekking books of which that by Stephen Bezruchka ("A Guide to Trekking in Nepal"​) was found to be most helpful together with the Khumbu Himal 1:50,000 map printed in Germany and widely available in both Sydney and Nepal.+Our own happy cirumstances were undoubtedly at least partly due to inherent physiological make-up of our party and to good luck, but we claim credit for following a prudent route in the high country chosen with acclimatisation as the major consideration. We were certainly far better acclimatised to 16,000 feet than ever before (Peter and Wendy had one previous trip to Nepal each and Sev had two - only Jenny was a kidnapped virgin). To some extent therefore this report is meant as a possible help for the planning of one type of Nepal trek without in any way attempting to fill the role of the ubiquitous trekking books of which that by Stephen Bezruchka ("A Guide to Trekking in Nepal"​) was found to be most helpful together with the Khumbu Himal 1:50,000 map printed in Germany and widely available in both Sydney and Nepal. 
 We flew to Kathmandu by Thai Airways ($1240 return), which involves an overnight stop at Bangkok. It is useful to arrange a package price for overnight stay at the Airport Hotel ($38 per person, including breakfast) well ahead, otherwise one pays at least twice as much. We flew to Kathmandu by Thai Airways ($1240 return), which involves an overnight stop at Bangkok. It is useful to arrange a package price for overnight stay at the Airport Hotel ($38 per person, including breakfast) well ahead, otherwise one pays at least twice as much.
-We got in on the return trip, but had to pay the full amount on the trip out. In Kathmandu we lodged at the Kathmandu + 
-Guest House, which is at the +We got in on the return trip, but had to pay the full amount on the trip out. In Kathmandu we lodged at the Kathmandu Guest House, which is at the top ($12-$15 per double room with own shower operating about 50% of time) of the economy range and is situated ​right in the centre of Thamel, the area where most trekkers congregate. We booked well ahead by mail and also returned ​there after completing our trek. Kathmandu Guest Hause is built around an old palace, of which the most conspicuous ​remaining ​features are the intricately carved timber columns in the shapes of tigers with the most pronounced genitals, some with tiny monkeys attached. 
-top ($12-$15 per double room c.10 Ovu + 
-with own shower operating +[ Map of Khumbu Region ] 
-0 5 lo km + 
-about 50% of time) of the SCALE economy range and is sit- +Even though a weekend intervened, it took us only three days to organise a sherpa (guide) and two porters and obtain trekking permits, but we had an introduction and previous correspondence to help us. It would take a long article to describe our complex brush with the Nepalese bureaucracy:​ sufficient to state that we nearly caused a major trekking company to lose its licence and made endless trouble all around. We finished up with an arrangement which proved quite satisfactory:​ Bir Bohador, our sherpa (actually not a member of the Sherpa tribe but a Tamang) was most helpful and pleasant and our two porters, Buddha and Manbadhur, proved to be strong, willing and cheerful lads. These three cost us $US25 per day including all their expenses, somewhat above the going rate ($10 per day for a sherpa and $5 per day for porters) but well worth ir for the quality of the people and the avoidance of hassles. 
-uated right in the centre + 
-Ronoro +By the crack of dawn on December 6, all of us got on the bus to Jiri, which we reached after 13 hours of medium to severe discomfort. We sat two to a two-person seat, after persuading the Nepalese, who sit three to such a seat, that we were too fat for this arrangement. On the way back, although much thinner, we took the precaution of booking three places for each two of us. The alternative access by air in and/or out of Lukla was rejected hecause of possible problems with acclimatisation and the absolute certainty of shambles at the Lukla air strip. Proceeding the way we did costs 6 days extra each way walking to reach Namche Bazaar (3446 m, 11,300 ft), the gateway to the Everest region, but it delivers the trekker ​in a fit condition and is independent of flying weather as well as the corruption and chaos at Lukla. 
-of Thamel, the area where f Eversibi + 
-44:557) +This portion of the trek consists largely of terraced fields, rhodadendron forests, iittle villages and minor mountain passes. The topography is such that one tends to cross ridges rather than to follow valleys with the result that each day has at least one roughly 3000 foot climb. Relying on local accommodation ("tea housing"​) as we did, one gets somewhat closer to the people than trekking with an organised group using tents and, it being out of season, we never had the slightest problem finding a place to eat and sleep. For the benefit of anybody planning this trip, our stopping places were Bhandar, Sete, Jumbesi ​(a delightful little Sherpa town), Nunthala, Bubsia (above Khari Khola) and Choplung, where we had a fairly elaborate meal uniformly flavoured with kerosene. 
-most trekkers congregate. ​Everam.sr + 
-We booked well ahead by Ww4) +At Jumbesi we fell in with a Swedish lady travelling with her sherpa and a porter. She provided interesting additional company for a week as she subsisted principally on local beer, rum and cigarettes, eschewing the inevitable dhai baht (rice with lentils) or potatoes. ​We lost her at about 14,000 ft at Dingboche when she developed slight altitude problems, but learned ​later that she finally made it half-way up Kala Pater, which was her aim. 
-mail and also returned ​7 LHemec + 
-which the most conspicuous ​remaing ​features are the intricately carved timber columns in the shapes of tigers with the most pronounced genitals, some with tiny monkeys attached. +Just before Khara Khola, we crossed the Dudh Kosi (Milk River) and followed it upstream, walking high above it most of the time, until it turned east just before Namche Bazaar. The Dudh Kosi originates in a glacier near Gokyo (see sketch map) and is joined just west of Jengboche ​by Imja Khola, which originates from the Imja Glacier near the Island Peak. The system of the main valleys of the Khumbu region is completed by a river originating from the Khumbu glacier at the foot of Mount Everest, which joins Imja Khola near Periche. It was the aim of our trek to reach the settlements at the heads of all three valleys, i.e. Chhukhung, ​Jabuche ​and Gokyo and take day walks from each. We succeeded in carrying out most of this. 
-there after completing our trek. Kathmandu Guest Hause is built +
-prn.,.*, (61691 +
-around an old palace, ​of +
-LEGEND +
-Phok +
-A woo- ree,k Rdae. R1114 +
-Rivers'​ %Jai.% Le.ke. 0 VI 11c.3 +
-D )6,rhak +
-Air 51rip +
-  Reteleb +
-Reul& Walked +
-elMmTor. +
-Gle.eo'​cr +
-Even though a weekend intervened, it took us only three days to organise a sherpa (guide) and two porters and obtain trekking permits, but we had an introduction and previous correspondence to help us. It would take a long article +
-Page B The Sydney Bushwalker August 1989 +
-to describe our complex brush with the Nepalese bureaucracy:​ sufficient to state that we nearly caused a major trekking company to lose its licence and made endless trouble all around. We finished up with an arrangement which proved quite satisfactory:​ Bir Bohador, +
-our sherpa (actually not a member of the Sherpa tribe but a Tamang) was most helpful and pleasant and our two porters, Buddha and Manbadhur, proved to be strong, willing and +
-cheerful lads. These three cost us $US25 per day including all their expenses, somewhat above the going rate ($10 per day for a sherpa and $5 per day for porters) but well worth ir for the quality of the people and the avoidance of hassles. +
-By the crack of dawn on December 6, all of us got on the bus to Jiri, which we reached after 13 hours of medium to severe discomfort. We sat two to a two-person seat, after persuading the Nepalese, who sit three to such a seat, that we were too fat for this arrange- +
-ment. On the way back, although much thinner, we took the precaution of booking three places +
-for each two of us. The alternative access by air in and/or out of Lukla was rejected hecause of possible problems with acclimatisation and the absolute certainty of shambles at +
-the tukla air strip. Proceeding the way we did costs 6 days extra each way walking to reach Namche Bazaar (3446 m, 11,300 ft), the gateway to the Everest region, but it delivers the rrekker ​in a fit condition and is independent of flying weather as well as the corruption and rhaos at Lukla. +
-This portion of the trek consists largely of terraced fields, rhodadendron forests, iittle villages and minor mountain passes. The topography is such that one tends to cross +
-ridges rather than to follow valleys with the result that each day has at least one roughly +
-3000 foot climb. Relying on local accommodation ("tea housing"​) as we did, one gets somewhat closer to the people than trekking with an organised group using tents and, it being +
-.jut of season, we never had the slightest problem finding a place to eat and sleep. For +
-the benefit of anybody planning this trip, our stopping places were Bhandar, Sete, Jumbesi a delightful little Sherpa town), Nunthala, Bubsia (above Khari Khola) and Choplung, where we '​lad ​a fairly elaborate meal uniformly flavoured with kerosene. +
-At Jumbesi we fell in with a Swedish lady travelling with her sherpa and a porter. +
-She provided interesting additional company for a week as she subsisted principally on local beer, rum and cigarettes, eschewing the inevitable dhai baht (rice with ientils) or potatoes. ​WE lost her at about 14,000 ft at Dingboche when she developed slight altitude problems, but earned ​later that she finally made it half-way up Kale Pater, which was her aim. +
-lust before Khara Khola, we crossed the Dudh Kosi (Milk River) and followed it upstream, walking high above it most of the time, until it turned east just before Namche Bazaar. The ludh KOS3 originates in a glacier near Gokyo (see sketch map) and is joined just west of +
-rengboche ​by Imja Khola, which originates from the Imja Glacier near the Island Peak. The +
-system of the main valleys of the Khumbu region is completed by a river originating from the +
-Khumbu glacier at the foot of Mount Everest, which joins Imja Khola near Periche. It was +
-the aim of our trek to reach the settlements at the heads of all three valleys, i.e. Chhukhung, ​abuche ​and Gokyo and take day walks from each. We succeeded in carrying out most of this.+
 Early in the afternoon of Tuesday, December 13 we reached Namche Bazaar, a major town dramatically situated in an amphitheatre overlooked by spectacular peaks of Kongde (6093 m) and Tamserku (6623 m). The latter is one of the most beautiful mountains in the world and appears on innumerable postcards, film clips and posters. Early in the afternoon of Tuesday, December 13 we reached Namche Bazaar, a major town dramatically situated in an amphitheatre overlooked by spectacular peaks of Kongde (6093 m) and Tamserku (6623 m). The latter is one of the most beautiful mountains in the world and appears on innumerable postcards, film clips and posters.
-Namche, like Kathmandu itself, is a place for shopping, strolling and gaping: it has + 
-a high-mountain flavour with herds of Yaks driven through the main streets which are alternat wely muddy or hazardously frozen. We spent two nights there at the local "​Hilton"​ named +Namche, like Kathmandu itself, is a place for shopping, strolling and gaping: it has a high-mountain flavour with herds of Yaks driven through the main streets which are alternately ​muddy or hazardously frozen. We spent two nights there at the local "​Hilton"​ named the Tamserki View Lodge to acclimatise,​ clean up (one of us had not washed for eight days) and organize the main portion of the trip - cold weather gear can be bought/​hired here. Namche at 3446 m (11,300 ft) can be considered as the beginning of the high altitude section and we counted our "High on the Khumbu"​ days from there. 
-the Tamserki View Lodge to acclimatise,​ clean up (one of us had not washed for eight days) and organize the main portion of the trip - cold weather gear can be bought/​hired here. Namche at 3446 m (11,300 ft) can be considered as the beginning of the high altitude section and we counted our "High on the Khumbu"​ days from there. + 
-On day three, we set out in perfect weather on th@ direct and highly scenic route from Namche to Tengboche, which is only a few easy hours, but a critical 1400 feet up. Because the trail descends to cross the Dudh Kosi, there is in fact a 2040 ft climb to Tengboche +On day three, we set out in perfect weather on the direct and highly scenic route from Namche to Tengboche, which is only a few easy hours, but a critical 1400 feet up. Because the trail descends to cross the Dudh Kosi, there is in fact a 2040 ft climb to Tengboche which, given the altitude, is not trivial. Our party had no problems and enjoyed the day enormously, especially the early portion where there are spectacular views of Ama Dablam and the great wall of Nuptse/​Lhotse at the head of the valley with Mount Everest peeping as a black pyramid beyond Nuptse. The tips of Everest and Lhotse jut into the jet stream and are almost always surmounted by a plume of snow blown off their tops. 
-which, given the altitude, is not trivial. Our party had no problems and enjoyed the day + 
-enormously, especially the early portion where there are spectacular views of Ama Dablam and +On the narrow trail contouring high above the Dudh Kosi, one meets occasional trekkers and more often small strings of yaks carrying loads and equipped with sharp horns which must be passed inches away from various vital organs. Fortunately the beasts are generally placid and their handlers take great pains to protect tourists from direct contact with them, perhaps aware of the fact that there are three great religions in Nepal: Hinduism, Bhuddism and Tourism. Tengboche consists of a small group of buildings perched on a narrow ridge and grouped around a famous gompa (Bhuddist monastery). We chose the most dilapidated of the lodges, because the windows faced Ama Dablam which we could thus admire by moonlight and at sunrise from the warmth of our beds as well as at sunset. The night was the coldest yet, but it was not cold by the Khumbu standards where -20° is not uncommon in winter. 
-August 1989 The Sydney Bushwalker Page 9 + 
-the great wall of Nuptse/​Lhotse at the head of the valley with Mount Everest peeping as a black pyramid beyond Nuptse. The tips of Everest and Lhotse jut into the jet stream and are almost always surmounted by a plume of snow blown off their tops. +On day four, we reached Dingboche, once purely a yarsa (Sherpa encampment for summer grazing of yaks), but now also a group of trekking lodges. Dingboche is spectacularly situated under Ama Dablam and at about 14,350 ft it is a popular acclimatising spot. The trail between Tengboche and Dingboche follows the valley of Imja Khola at various altitudes and is very scenic. 
-On the narrow trail contouring high above the Dudh Kosi, one meets occasional trekkers and more often small strings of yaks carrying loads and equipped with sharp horns which must be passed inches away from various vital organs. Fortunately the beasts are generally placid and their handlers take great pains to protect tourists from direct contact with them, perhaps aware of the fact that there are three great religions in Nepal: Hinduism, Bhuddism and Tourism. Tengboche consists of a small group of buildings perched on a narrow ridge and grouped around a famous gompa (Bhuddist monastery). We chose the most dilapidated of the lodges, because the windows faced Ama Dablam which we could thus admire by moonlight and at sunrise from the warmth of our beds as well as at sunset. The night was the coldest yet, + 
-but it was not cold by the Khumbu standards where -20 is not uncommon in winter. +It was a most enjoyable day in perfect weather and we stopped for lunch at Pangboche, the site of another famous Bhuddist monastery which also boasts a (fake) yetti skull, which we duly inspected and photographed. We chanced upon a most impressive religious ceremony with haunting music. Two of us also received blessed scarves from the Lama (you have to buy them first, of course). There is no doubt that this blessing, and the fact that we always kept to the left of the mani stones, stupas and prayer flag poles (religious structures with the Great Mantra - Om Mani Phadme Hum on them) was responsible for the lack of untoward incidents on the trek. Equally, there is no doubt that the heavy unseasonal snowfall later in the trek was caused by Peter standing on top of a mani stone to take a photograph, to the great disgust and alarm of our sherpa. 
-On day four, we reached Dingboche, once purely a yarsa (Sherpa encampment for summer grazing of yaks), but now also a group of trekking lodges. Dingboche is spectacularly + 
-situated under Ama Dablam and at about 14,350 ft it is a popular acclimatising spot. The +To be continued. 
-trail between Tengboche and Dingboche follows the valley of Imja Khola at various altitudes and is very scenic. + 
-It was a most enjoyable day in perfect weather and we stopped for lunch at Pangboche, the site of another famous Bhuddist monastery which also boasts a (fake) yetti skull, which we duly inspected and photographed. We chanced upon a most impressive religious ceremony with haunting music. Two of us also received blessed scarves from the Lama (you have to buy +---- 
-them first, of course). There is no doubt that this blessing, and the fact that we always kept to the left of the mani stones, stupas and prayer flag poles (religious structures with the Great Mantra - Om Mani Phadme Hum on them) was responsible for the lack of untoward incidents on the trek. Equally, there is no doubt that the heavy unseasonal snowfall later in the trek was caused by Peter standing on top of a mani stone to take a photograph, to the great disgust and alarm of our sherpa. + 
-TO BE CONTINUED +=== Belvedere Taxis Blackheath. === 
-############​ + 
-BLACKHEATH TAXIS & TOURIST SERVICES +10 & 18 seater mini bus taxi. 047-87 8366. 
-10 & 19 SEATER MINI BUS TAXI + 
-047-87 8366 +Kanangra BoydUpper Blue Mountains. Six Foot Track
-KANANGRA BOYD + 
-UPPER BLUE MOUNTAINS +Pick up anywhere for start or finish of your walk by prior arrangement. 
-SIX FOOT TRACK + 
-PICK UP ANYWHERE FOR START OR FINISH OF YOUR WALK BY PRIOR ARRANGEMENT +Share the fare - competitive rates. 
-Share the Fare Competitive Rates + 
-Page 10 The Sydney Bushwalker August 1989 +---- 
-ANYONE CAN BE AGOOD COOK + 
-PART 2 by Stuart Brooks +===== Anyone Can Be A Cook - Part 2. ===== 
-I suppose the most casual, and yet most unlucky, cook I have met was Bob Duncan. + 
-Bob's method of packing for a weekend walk was simplicity itself. When, early on Saturday +by Stuart Brooks 
-morning, the leader yelled out, "​Moving off in two minutes!"​ Bob's frantic cry, "​Cripes I + 
-haven'​t started to pack yet!" would invariably cut the air. Rushing to the boot of his car, +I suppose the most casual, and yet most unlucky, cook I have met was Bob Duncan. Bob's method of packing for a weekend walk was simplicity itself. When, early on Saturday morning, the leader yelled out, "​Moving off in two minutes!"​ Bob's frantic cry, "​Cripes I haven'​t started to pack yet!" would invariably cut the air. Rushing to the boot of his car, he would drag forth a crumpled pack and stuff into it a jumper, sleeping bag, groundsheet and parka. Then, turning to a big old box full of tins of food in various stages of decay - some new with labels, some old and rusty without - he would commence thrusting tins into his pack, without really looking. Muttering "​Saturday lunch" - "​Saturday dinner"​ - "​Sunday breakfast"​ - "​Sunday Lunch" - "​spare"​ - "​emergency"​. Duncan'​s packing for a weekend walk has been timed at thirty five seconds. 
-he would drag forth a crumpled pack and stuff into it a jumper, sleeping bag, groundsheet and parka. Then, turning to a big old box + 
-full of tins of food in various stages of decay - some new with labels, some old and rusty without - he would commence thrusting tins into his pack, without really looking. Muttering "​Saturday lunch" - "​Saturday dinner"​ - "​Sunday breakfast"​ - "​Sunday Lunch" - "​spare"​ - "​emergency"​. Duncan'​s +I recall a tranquil Sunday morning on Kanangra Creek. We had come down Danae Brook the day before and I was basking in the early morning sun, enjoying the retrospect and perfectly cooked rolled oats with brown sugar and cream, half listening to the tinkle of Kanangra Creek and half to Dot Butler and Wilf Hilder arguing out a technicality. It was one of those idyllic moments. It was, however, completely shattered by the emergence ​of Duncan who commenced to slurp his way through "​Sunday breakfast"​ - a very large can of sliced beetroot. 
-packing for a weekend walk has been timed at thirty five seconds. + 
-I recall a tranquil Sunday morning on Kanangra Creek. We had come down Danae Brook the day before and I was basking in the early morning sun, enjoying the +But there was the time when Bob was anxious to impress. He had brought along steaks, marinated and wrapped in foil, vegetables the same, and goodness knows what for dessert. ​Most of us had finished cooking and the fire had died down to a heap of red embers when Bob decided it was time to put his steaks on. Carefully, he buried all his pre-wrapped food in the glowing embers and turned to carry on his discussions interspersed with the odd song. 
-retrospect and perfectly cooked rolled oats with brown sugar and cream, half listening to the tinkle of Kanangra Creek and half to Dot Butler and Wilf Hilder arguing out a technicality. It was one of those idyllic moments. It was, however, completely shattered by the emergence +
-nf Duncan who commenced to slurp his way through "​Sunday breakfast"​ - a very large can of sliced beetroot. +
-But there was the time when Bob was anxious to impress. He had brought along steaks, +
-marinated and wrapped in foil, vegetables the same, and goodness knows what for dessert. ​most of us had finished cooking and the fire had died down to a heap of red embers when Bob +
-decided it was time to put his steaks on. Carefully, he buried all his pre-wrapped food in +
-the glowing embers and turned to carry on his discussions interspersed with the odd song.+
 It was a chilly evening and, bit by bit, behind Bob's back, others were throwing sticks on the fire to generate a bit of warmth. I suppose you have seen the TV ad, "My God the chips!"?​ Duncan was halfway through the seventh verse of "The cat came back" when he stopped ir mid-chorus, "My God, the steaks!"​ It was a chilly evening and, bit by bit, behind Bob's back, others were throwing sticks on the fire to generate a bit of warmth. I suppose you have seen the TV ad, "My God the chips!"?​ Duncan was halfway through the seventh verse of "The cat came back" when he stopped ir mid-chorus, "My God, the steaks!"​
 +
 On hands and knees he scrabbled at the blazing inferno, eventually retrieving most of his victuals - a trifle overdone. I never did find out what impression that meal created ​ On hands and knees he scrabbled at the blazing inferno, eventually retrieving most of his victuals - a trifle overdone. I never did find out what impression that meal created ​
  
 I suppose one of the more charismatic cooks I have walked with would have to be Bill Gillam. Bill was a blend of gourmet, wine buff, professional scientist and frustrated actor. I suppose one of the more charismatic cooks I have walked with would have to be Bill Gillam. Bill was a blend of gourmet, wine buff, professional scientist and frustrated actor.
-Bill was gettinb ​a bit thin on top as a mere 40-year-old. However he was quick to point out a number of attributes balding men had that were not possessed by their more hairy brethren. Bill's lack of thatch was more than compensated for by a heavy and dark growth of beard. Invariably, on a walk, he would shave before dinner. With his high forehead, aquiline features + 
-and thespian leanings, shaving was not just the mundane chore most of us suffer. ​BIll, with +Bill was getting ​a bit thin on top as a mere 40-year-old. However he was quick to point out a number of attributes balding men had that were not possessed by their more hairy brethren. Bill's lack of thatch was more than compensated for by a heavy and dark growth of beard. Invariably, on a walk, he would shave before dinner. With his high forehead, aquiline features and thespian leanings, shaving was not just the mundane chore most of us suffer. ​Bill, with a few deft strokes of the razor and aided by flickering campfire light and a bit of acting ability, could have you believe he was anyone he chose. I have had dinner in the bush with Abraham Lincoln, Sir Francis ​Drake, Van Gogh, Roy Rene.... 
-a few deft strokes of the razor and aided by flickering campfire light and a bit of acting + 
-ability, could have you believe he was anyone he chose. I have had dinner in the bush with +One memorable evening was just after my wife had been raised to full membership of SBW. Bill insisted we have a celebratory dinner on our next walk. On the banks of the Wollongambe we had a perfect campsite. Bill had brought along a bottle of his best red and one of those old fashioned candles. The former, he opened - to breathe, of course - the latter he cut into about eight pieces each of which he lit and used to decorate a small rock face near our fire. Bill's camp fire was (unlike Duncan'​s) a masterpiece of controlled energy release. A heap of embers for the steaks, low flames to simmer the vegies in the centre and at the other end, a crackling fire for the soup and coffee water. 
-Abraham Lincoln, Sir Francis ​Dkake, Van Gogh, Roy Rene   +
-One memorable evening was just after my wife had been raised to full membership of SBW. Bill insisted we have a celebratory dinner on our next walk. On the banks of the Wollongambe +
-we had a perfect campsite. Bill had brought along a bottle of his best red and one of those +
-old fashioned candles. The former, he opened - to breathe, of course - the latter he cut into +
-about eight pieces each of which he lit and used to decorate a small rock face near our fire. +
-Bill's camp fire was (unlike Duncan'​s) a masterpiece of controlled energy release. A heap of +
-embers for the steaks, low flames to simmer the vegies in the centre and at the other end, a crackling fire for the soup and coffee water. +
-August 1989 The Sydney Bushwalker Page 11+
 That evening Bill had elected to be Profumo - disgraced and recently deposed Secretary of War in the British Cabinet. He (Profumo, not Bill) had been exposed by the Press - (so what else is new) - for dallying with a young lady who was also keeping company with (shock, horror) a senior member of the Russian embassy. What with the firelight and a newly-shaped beard, Bill made a passably good Profumo. That evening Bill had elected to be Profumo - disgraced and recently deposed Secretary of War in the British Cabinet. He (Profumo, not Bill) had been exposed by the Press - (so what else is new) - for dallying with a young lady who was also keeping company with (shock, horror) a senior member of the Russian embassy. What with the firelight and a newly-shaped beard, Bill made a passably good Profumo.
 +
 The steaks were retrieved without incident and were (unlike Duncan'​s) cooked to perfection. The red wine had not been bruised, the Wollongambe was playing a sort of Haydn quartet in the background. It was a memorable meal. The steaks were retrieved without incident and were (unlike Duncan'​s) cooked to perfection. The red wine had not been bruised, the Wollongambe was playing a sort of Haydn quartet in the background. It was a memorable meal.
-BUt I hear my mate's tenor voice carolling through the dripping wilderness on his way back to the cave. It is time to get the fire going and start dinner.+ 
 +But I hear my mate's tenor voice carolling through the dripping wilderness on his way back to the cave. It is time to get the fire going and start dinner. 
 Fortunately,​ with parboiled sausages in foil, "​surprise"​ peas and "​deb"​ potato, anyone can be a good cook. Fortunately,​ with parboiled sausages in foil, "​surprise"​ peas and "​deb"​ potato, anyone can be a good cook.
-* * * * * * * * + 
-Recently, the NPWS sent their new plan of management for Kanangramawd ​to various conservation groups, asking for submissions. The plan contained ominous references to '​development'​ within the park. The Victorian State Government has recently '​developed'​ +---- 
-The Grampians for mass market tourism, with some expensive, high profile publicity. This + 
-'​marketing'​ of National Parks means the public expects such things as cabins, car parks, visitors centres, hard surfaced roads, litter collection and guided tours. +===== kanangra-Boyd National Park - Sold. ===== 
-If you don't think it can happen here, remember that our present State Government believes that all public utilities should be self funding, and already there are 4WD tours operating in the Snowy Mountains. To be profitable, accommodation must have at least 60% + 
-occupancy, and that means mass consumption tourism. Lodges have to offer all md cons, including tennis courts, saunas and swimming pools. The '​wild'​ environment has to be urbanised and sanitised for those who are really terrified of wilderness, but are bored and want to do '​something different'​. +Recently, the NPWS sent their new plan of management for Kanangra-Boyd ​to various conservation groups, asking for submissions. The plan contained ominous references to '​development'​ within the park. The Victorian State Government has recently '​developed'​ The Grampians for mass market tourism, with some expensive, high profile publicity. This '​marketing'​ of National Parks means the public expects such things as cabins, car parks, visitors centres, hard surfaced roads, litter collection and guided tours. 
-In very short order Kanangra Walls could resemble Echo Point at Katoomba. A vast accommodation and recreation complex complete with a couple of golf courses built on Marrilman Heath, overlooking Colboyd Range. Tour operators would bring ever growing numbers of people into fragile areas. All the comforts of civilisation must be brought in, and frequently all the ,rubbish of civilisation left behind. The operators would inevitably demand more and more roads, to take their customers everywhere a itehicle ​could possibly be driven.+ 
 +If you don't think it can happen here, remember that our present State Government believes that all public utilities should be self funding, and already there are 4WD tours operating in the Snowy Mountains. To be profitable, accommodation must have at least 60% occupancy, and that means mass consumption tourism. Lodges have to offer all mod cons, including tennis courts, saunas and swimming pools. The '​wild'​ environment has to be urbanised and sanitised for those who are really terrified of wilderness, but are bored and want to do '​something different'​. 
 + 
 +In very short order Kanangra Walls could resemble Echo Point at Katoomba. A vast accommodation and recreation complex complete with a couple of golf courses built on Marrilman Heath, overlooking Colboyd Range. Tour operators would bring ever growing numbers of people into fragile areas. All the comforts of civilisation must be brought in, and frequently all the rubbish of civilisation left behind. The operators would inevitably demand more and more roads, to take their customers everywhere a vehicle ​could possibly be driven. 
 Do you think this would add to your wilderness experience? Do you think this would add to your wilderness experience?
-#41.k + 
--04A, 414 +---- 
------ + 
-YESACCIDENTS DO HAPPEN - +=== Yesaccidents do happen. === 
-although ​we are lucky they are so rare. Be prepared - come to the Search and Rescue Practice which Federation is holding on 16-17 September. The place - the Wattagans, + 
-meet at Pine Forest Picnic Area. Contact ​--- John Porter for all details. +Although ​we are lucky they are so rare. Be prepared - come to the Search and Rescue Practice which Federation is holding on 16-17 September. The place - the Wattagans, meet at Pine Forest Picnic Area. Contact John Porter for all details. Ph. 797 9784 (home)
-Ph. 797 97814 (home) + 
-Page 12 The Sydney Bushwalker August 1989+---- 
 KAKADU CAPERS ​ KAKADU CAPERS ​
 During last May-June, 26 mei-doers of the S.B.W. participated in extended walks in Keep River N.P. (NT), Bungle Bungle N.P.(10) and Kakadu N.P. (NT). Jan Mbbandas and Alex CiMbleris organized these walks through a commercial organization called "​Willis'​ Walkabouts",​ operated by Russell Willis from Darwin. During last May-June, 26 mei-doers of the S.B.W. participated in extended walks in Keep River N.P. (NT), Bungle Bungle N.P.(10) and Kakadu N.P. (NT). Jan Mbbandas and Alex CiMbleris organized these walks through a commercial organization called "​Willis'​ Walkabouts",​ operated by Russell Willis from Darwin.
198908.txt · Last modified: 2019/05/17 03:02 by tyreless