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 We stopped in a saddle for a belated morning tea. Felt like taking off and flying without that load on my back. Scaled a small rock face with the pack on. Quite pleased with myself. Still more scrub as we moved on. We had practically swum through the confounded stuff for about four hours. Rain was threatening. Would we make the campsite before this settled in? Jim, losing concentration for a moment, hit the ground with an ominous thud, spraining his ankle. "​Nothing",​ he said, after lying on the ground and moaning for a while. We stopped in a saddle for a belated morning tea. Felt like taking off and flying without that load on my back. Scaled a small rock face with the pack on. Quite pleased with myself. Still more scrub as we moved on. We had practically swum through the confounded stuff for about four hours. Rain was threatening. Would we make the campsite before this settled in? Jim, losing concentration for a moment, hit the ground with an ominous thud, spraining his ankle. "​Nothing",​ he said, after lying on the ground and moaning for a while.
  
-It was well after noon and we hadn't yet stopped for lunch. But by this time the campsite was in our sights and on down and down a long and steep hill we pressed towards it. There was water. We breathed a collective sigh of relief. The rain had settled in and we hurriedly pitched our humpys (tents, fly sheets and even an old bit of tarpaulin!). We were tired to the very man. No matter; Oliver and those who felt like it departed on an exploratory. After all, this was what Oliver had come for. There simply was no time to be wasted finding a way down to Bunglebuori ​Creek. The rest rested, washed and got a rip-roaring fire going. Several hours later, the explorers returned looking wet and dejected.+It was well after noon and we hadn't yet stopped for lunch. But by this time the campsite was in our sights and on down and down a long and steep hill we pressed towards it. There was water. We breathed a collective sigh of relief. The rain had settled in and we hurriedly pitched our humpys (tents, fly sheets and even an old bit of tarpaulin!). We were tired to the very man. No matter; Oliver and those who felt like it departed on an exploratory. After all, this was what Oliver had come for. There simply was no time to be wasted finding a way down to Bungleboori ​Creek. The rest rested, washed and got a rip-roaring fire going. Several hours later, the explorers returned looking wet and dejected.
  
 Nothing 1ike a warm fire and billy tea to lift the spirits. Rum and lemon-barley to ward off the mosquitos. Everyone talkative and in a philosophical mood. Strange, yesterday we didn't know each other but today we were almost friends. Good to get away from the city. So glad I came, I thought. Slept peacefully that night listening to a mopoke as I dropped off. Nothing 1ike a warm fire and billy tea to lift the spirits. Rum and lemon-barley to ward off the mosquitos. Everyone talkative and in a philosophical mood. Strange, yesterday we didn't know each other but today we were almost friends. Good to get away from the city. So glad I came, I thought. Slept peacefully that night listening to a mopoke as I dropped off.
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 Currawongs chimed us awake in the morning. Discovered some new muscles as I turned. Neil, was already up and about muttering something about everybody snoring and a sleepless night. I was rather dejected to see eggs and even a tomato appear for breakfast. Someone grilled a chop. I had rationed my meals with portability in mind. Well, next time I'll know. Fascinated by George operating his coathanger, cum toaster, cum billy rest. Currawongs chimed us awake in the morning. Discovered some new muscles as I turned. Neil, was already up and about muttering something about everybody snoring and a sleepless night. I was rather dejected to see eggs and even a tomato appear for breakfast. Someone grilled a chop. I had rationed my meals with portability in mind. Well, next time I'll know. Fascinated by George operating his coathanger, cum toaster, cum billy rest.
  
-Bloody impossible to get down there was my first impression as I looked over the line of cliffs! Surely, 50 m down. We moved along the cliff line searching for a gap. Jim pointed to a possible break. Oliver, startd ​to descend without a moment'​s hesitation. I joined him in this madness. Down and sometimes sideways we scrambled from one rock to the next. I reminded Oliver that we had to come back up but he seemed unperturbed. Didn't take that long to make it down and we hollered signalling that we were there.+Bloody impossible to get down there was my first impression as I looked over the line of cliffs! Surely, 50 m down. We moved along the cliff line searching for a gap. Jim pointed to a possible break. Oliver ​started ​to descend without a moment'​s hesitation. I joined him in this madness. Down and sometimes sideways we scrambled from one rock to the next. I reminded Oliver that we had to come back up but he seemed unperturbed. Didn't take that long to make it down and we hollered signalling that we were there.
  
 What a stream! The water was crystal clear and clean. There were rapids and deep pools. My casting arm kept twitching. Might there be fish? Pity we couldn'​t stay to find out. We surveyed the cliff face on the other side. Nothing but sheer rock faces. I pitied the early Australian explorers while Oliver lamented having left his camera at home. Surprisingly,​ the ascent was a pushover. What a stream! The water was crystal clear and clean. There were rapids and deep pools. My casting arm kept twitching. Might there be fish? Pity we couldn'​t stay to find out. We surveyed the cliff face on the other side. Nothing but sheer rock faces. I pitied the early Australian explorers while Oliver lamented having left his camera at home. Surprisingly,​ the ascent was a pushover.
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 by Jeff Niven by Jeff Niven
  
-The week started with us all skiing in on Saturday with packs to Illawong Lodge - situated approximately two kilometres up the Snowy River from Gathega ​Ski Resort. After a cup of tea and lunch, we commissioned the Lodge, which entailed filling the water tank in the roof, lighting the water heater, choosing bunks, going through fire drill and sorting through food and clothing, and later, starting the generator to charge the batteries.+The week started with us all skiing in on Saturday with packs to Illawong Lodge - situated approximately two kilometres up the Snowy River from Guthega ​Ski Resort. After a cup of tea and lunch, we commissioned the Lodge, which entailed filling the water tank in the roof, lighting the water heater, choosing bunks, going through fire drill and sorting through food and clothing, and later, starting the generator to charge the batteries.
  
-Soon we were on the slope out front doing a few warm-up telemarks, unencumbered by the heavy packs we had skied in with. After a late decision, Pat, Barrie and I skied up to Little Twynam in time to see a beautiful sunset. The ski back whetted our appetities ​for the week ahead.+Soon we were on the slope out front doing a few warm-up telemarks, unencumbered by the heavy packs we had skied in with. After a late decision, Pat, Barrie and I skied up to Little Twynam in time to see a beautiful sunset. The ski back whetted our appetites ​for the week ahead.
  
-It had been arranged that Wayne Steele and Wendy Lippiat were to ski from Perisher, where they were staying, to Illawong, and join us for a day ski-tour on the Monday. We started by crossing the footbrldge ​over the Snowy River at 9 am in perfect, clear, still weather. Shozaburo, Fusae'​s brother, on holiday from Japan, only had alpine skis with skins which proved unsuitable for long day tours, so he decided to leave us and stay at Mt. Twynam for the day. Skiing solo didn't bother him, he told us that he had on his own climbed and skied up and down the 100 highest mountains in Japan.+It had been arranged that Wayne Steele and Wendy Lippiat were to ski from Perisher, where they were staying, to Illawong, and join us for a day ski-tour on the Monday. We started by crossing the footbridge ​over the Snowy River at 9 am in perfect, clear, still weather. Shozaburo, Fusae'​s brother, on holiday from Japan, only had alpine skis with skins which proved unsuitable for long day tours, so he decided to leave us and stay at Mt. Twynam for the day. Skiing solo didn't bother him, he told us that he had on his own climbed and skied up and down the 100 highest mountains in Japan.
  
 For the rest of us it was up to Little Twynam and then Mt. Twynam, where we stopped for a snack, photos and time to enjoy the view. We then skied towards Carruther'​s Peak where the view over Watson'​s Crags, Sentinel and country further west was sensational. For the rest of us it was up to Little Twynam and then Mt. Twynam, where we stopped for a snack, photos and time to enjoy the view. We then skied towards Carruther'​s Peak where the view over Watson'​s Crags, Sentinel and country further west was sensational.
  
-After an early lunch break on Carruther'​s Peak, we skied on to Mount Kosciusko where we had another snack and view stop. After some good telemarkirg off Kosciusko, we headed along the Summit Road, past Seaman'​s Hut down to Charlotte Pass Village and had hot chips and drinks, before the last leg dcwn the road and along Spencer'​s Creek to arrive back at the Lodge about 6 pm (yes, in the dark).+After an early lunch break on Carruther'​s Peak, we skied on to Mount Kosciusko where we had another snack and view stop. After some good telemarkirg off Kosciusko, we headed along the Summit Road, past Seaman'​s Hut down to Charlotte Pass Village and had hot chips and drinks, before the last leg down the road and along Spencer'​s Creek to arrive back at the Lodge about 6 pm (yes, in the dark).
  
 The skiing for the remainder of the week was varied consisting of a trip up Guthega Trig to the Rolling Grounds and back via Conset Stephen'​s Pass, a ski across to Perisher, then Blue Cow, where we bought and shared a 50 km lift ticket for downhilling - a very windy trip to Blue Lake where we sheltered for lunch, and watched a group of ice climbers, very brave to attempt ice climbing in the conditions, we thought. The skiing for the remainder of the week was varied consisting of a trip up Guthega Trig to the Rolling Grounds and back via Conset Stephen'​s Pass, a ski across to Perisher, then Blue Cow, where we bought and shared a 50 km lift ticket for downhilling - a very windy trip to Blue Lake where we sheltered for lunch, and watched a group of ice climbers, very brave to attempt ice climbing in the conditions, we thought.
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 ---- ----
  
-===== Wlking ​In England & Wales - Part 4. =====+===== Walking ​In England & Wales - Part 4. =====
  
 by Ainslie Morris & Mike Reynolds by Ainslie Morris & Mike Reynolds
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 As we left Grassington,​ which began as an Iron Age Settlement (pre-Roman),​ we left the river to the trout fishermen and climbed the smooth green pastures on to high hills, criss-crossed by innumerable grey-white stone walls. The limestone scars (cliffs) were used in prehistoric times as added protection to hill forts. For us, they added grandeur to a scene with splendid views of Wharfedale. Beyond Kettlewell ("​Katel"​ - bubbling spring) there is little habitation as the hills close in, and we headed up a source tributary of the Wharfe after our third camp. This was a "​free"​ camp using water from a spring from the limestone which we judged clean; we never trusted the river water anywhere because of the ubiquitous sheep. As we left Grassington,​ which began as an Iron Age Settlement (pre-Roman),​ we left the river to the trout fishermen and climbed the smooth green pastures on to high hills, criss-crossed by innumerable grey-white stone walls. The limestone scars (cliffs) were used in prehistoric times as added protection to hill forts. For us, they added grandeur to a scene with splendid views of Wharfedale. Beyond Kettlewell ("​Katel"​ - bubbling spring) there is little habitation as the hills close in, and we headed up a source tributary of the Wharfe after our third camp. This was a "​free"​ camp using water from a spring from the limestone which we judged clean; we never trusted the river water anywhere because of the ubiquitous sheep.
  
-We saw no one at all as we climbed, crossing little gills (side creeeks) and passing by a tall gloomy greystone house like Wuthering Heights itself, called Swarthgill. Soon we crossed the watershed at 1260 feet and crossed a stream which would end up in the Irish Sea. If you want to buy a bleak farm, Cam Houses is up for sale. We were glad its bunkhouse had been left unlocked as we scurried in out of the rain and wind to eat a bite of morning tea, later designated as lunch.+We saw no one at all as we climbed, crossing little gills (side creeks) and passing by a tall gloomy greystone house like Wuthering Heights itself, called Swarthgill. Soon we crossed the watershed at 1260 feet and crossed a stream which would end up in the Irish Sea. If you want to buy a bleak farm, Cam Houses is up for sale. We were glad its bunkhouse had been left unlocked as we scurried in out of the rain and wind to eat a bite of morning tea, later designated as lunch.
  
-At Cam End, below Cam Fell (fells are side slopes of moort), we turned onto the Pennine Way, and struck people and mud. After a six hour trudge in the rain, we dropped off the  moors to Horton-in-Ribblesdale,​ the fell-walkers'​ heaven. The charming Crown Inn looked even better from the inside than the outside, and as the dripping walkers poured in, the pile of raincoats and boots in the tiny entrance porch grew. They were all dried out after dinner in the kitchen, ready to get wet again on the morrow as we climbed Pen-Y-Ghent Hill (694 metres).+At Cam End, below Cam Fell (fells are side slopes of moors), we turned onto the Pennine Way, and struck people and mud. After a six hour trudge in the rain, we dropped off the  moors to Horton-in-Ribblesdale,​ the fell-walkers'​ heaven. The charming Crown Inn looked even better from the inside than the outside, and as the dripping walkers poured in, the pile of raincoats and boots in the tiny entrance porch grew. They were all dried out after dinner in the kitchen, ready to get wet again on the morrow as we climbed Pen-Y-Ghent Hill (694 metres).
  
 This is pot-holing country, a delight to cavers as well as walkers. Fountains Fell at 680 metres provided a challenge of mist and mud; it belonged to Fountains Abbey, founded in 1098 by the Cistercian Order. Although far away, the Abbey was given vast acres of land by landowners seeking favour with God. We descended to Malham Tarn, first clear evidence we'd had of glaciation in the last Ice Age. It was still showery as we pushed on over the Water Sinks, watery meadows crossed by yet more remarkable drystone walls, to Malham Cove. This is pot-holing country, a delight to cavers as well as walkers. Fountains Fell at 680 metres provided a challenge of mist and mud; it belonged to Fountains Abbey, founded in 1098 by the Cistercian Order. Although far away, the Abbey was given vast acres of land by landowners seeking favour with God. We descended to Malham Tarn, first clear evidence we'd had of glaciation in the last Ice Age. It was still showery as we pushed on over the Water Sinks, watery meadows crossed by yet more remarkable drystone walls, to Malham Cove.
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 The Walks Report began on the weekend of November 11,12,13 with Carol Bruce leading a party of 13 on her Pagoda Rocks ramble, and David Rostron and his party of 6 deciding that maybe the Colo wasn't all it was cracked up to be. Errol Sheedy had 13 starters, enjoying the swimming on his Waterfall to Heathcote day trip. The Walks Report began on the weekend of November 11,12,13 with Carol Bruce leading a party of 13 on her Pagoda Rocks ramble, and David Rostron and his party of 6 deciding that maybe the Colo wasn't all it was cracked up to be. Errol Sheedy had 13 starters, enjoying the swimming on his Waterfall to Heathcote day trip.
  
-The following weekend, November 18,19,20 saw Les Powell'​s Mt. Colong gallop cancelled and Barry Wallace leading 6 souls on his Tomat Falls the-long-way trip. It seems the river rose a metre or so while they were on the other side and only the kindly intervention of the local farmer, with a boat, saved them from having to swim for it. Jan Mohandas had 20 (or was it 21) on his Tootie Creek natural spa trip, which was reported as being O.K. Joe Marton'​s Waterfall to Otford trip had 7 starters. There were leeches in Frewe'​s Gully, ticks and leeches at Burning Palms, and it threatened rain all day. Other than that it was just another'day walk.+The following weekend, November 18,19,20 saw Les Powell'​s Mt. Colong gallop cancelled and Barry Wallace leading 6 souls on his Tomat Falls the-long-way trip. It seems the river rose a metre or so while they were on the other side and only the kindly intervention of the local farmer, with a boat, saved them from having to swim for it. Jan Mohandas had 20 (or was it 21) on his Tootie Creek natural spa trip, which was reported as being O.K. Joe Marton'​s Waterfall to Otford trip had 7 starters. There were leeches in Frewe'​s Gully, ticks and leeches at Burning Palms, and it threatened rain all day. Other than that it was just another day walk.
  
 November 25,26,27 saw Kenn Clacher with a party of 11 on his Galloping Jim's Route trip, pressing on through scrub and drizzle on the Saturday and rain and cold conditions on the Sunday. They said that what they saw of the countryside looked pleasant. The party of 11 on Ian Debert'​s Yalwal trip enjoyed similar weather and reported strange structures, which they called donkey tables, in the vicinity of Mission Point. There was no report of Derek Wilson'​s Waterfall to Heathcote trip but despite the Walks Sec. losing the submitted report we do know that Alan Mewett had 13 people and fine weather on his Wondabyne to Woy Way trip. Their punctuality or otherwise is not recorded. November 25,26,27 saw Kenn Clacher with a party of 11 on his Galloping Jim's Route trip, pressing on through scrub and drizzle on the Saturday and rain and cold conditions on the Sunday. They said that what they saw of the countryside looked pleasant. The party of 11 on Ian Debert'​s Yalwal trip enjoyed similar weather and reported strange structures, which they called donkey tables, in the vicinity of Mission Point. There was no report of Derek Wilson'​s Waterfall to Heathcote trip but despite the Walks Sec. losing the submitted report we do know that Alan Mewett had 13 people and fine weather on his Wondabyne to Woy Way trip. Their punctuality or otherwise is not recorded.
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 === From the city: === === From the city: ===
  
-__Route 438__ (Circular Quay to Abbotsford) via George Street, Railway Square, Broadway, Parramatta Road, Nurton ​Street, Marion Street, Ramsay Road to Haberfield: then continuing via Five Dock to Abbotsford.+__Route 438__ (Circular Quay to Abbotsford) via George Street, Railway Square, Broadway, Parramatta Road, Norton ​Street, Marion Street, Ramsay Road to Haberfield: then continuing via Five Dock to Abbotsford.
  
 Journeys depart Circular Quay (Opera House) at 6.41 pm, 6.56 pm, 7.11 pm, 7.26 pm, 7.41 pm, 7.56 pm. Journeys depart Circular Quay (Opera House) at 6.41 pm, 6.56 pm, 7.11 pm, 7.26 pm, 7.41 pm, 7.56 pm.
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 ---- ----
  
 +===== What's in A Name? Two Apocryphal Cases. =====
 +
 +by Jim Brown
 +
 +In this series of short essays titled "​What'​s In A Name?" I have so far told the truth, if not the whole truth, with the idea that others may care to develop my theme. However the two following examples of place names are, in my opinion, damned lies - although I have heard them quoted as true.
  
-WHAT'S IN A NAME? 
-TWO APOCRYPHAL. CASES by Jim Brown 
-In this series of short essays titled "​What'​s In A Name?" I have so far told the truth, U not the whole truth, with the idea that others may care to develop my theme. However the two following examples of place names are, in my opinion, damned lies - although I have heard them quoted as true. 
 1. Around about 1820 a surveying party was working on the ridges west from Mittagong, in the vicinity of the Wollondilly and Wingecarribee Rivers. At one stage the expedition'​s base camp was set up on the long ridge between the rivers. 1. Around about 1820 a surveying party was working on the ridges west from Mittagong, in the vicinity of the Wollondilly and Wingecarribee Rivers. At one stage the expedition'​s base camp was set up on the long ridge between the rivers.
 +
 The leader of the party returned from an exhausting day's walking and measuring and asked testily of the camp crew: "​Doesn'​t anyone else do anything? Has anyone had a look down into the valley yet? There looks to be a big tributary stream coming in from the west. What is it?" The leader of the party returned from an exhausting day's walking and measuring and asked testily of the camp crew: "​Doesn'​t anyone else do anything? Has anyone had a look down into the valley yet? There looks to be a big tributary stream coming in from the west. What is it?"
-The major domo of the camp, a North-Counties Englishman, explained "Naw. Naw. I've b'n awful busy getting in wood 'n water. Er...er...but t' cook b'n doon."+ 
 +The major domo of the camp, a North-Counties Englishman, explained "Naw. Naw. I've b'n awful busy getting in wood 'n water. Er... er... but t' cook b'n doon." 
 And thus the Cookbundoon River was named. And thus the Cookbundoon River was named.
-2. A few years earlier perhaps, a group of soldiers was returning towards Sydney from the Signal Station recently established at Pennant Hills (and that'how Pennant Hills got its name) They had a rough sketch map which showed that they should go around the very head of Lane Cove River, then turn south.+ 
 +2. A few years earlier perhaps, a group of soldiers was returning towards Sydney from the Signal Station recently established at Pennant Hills (and __that's__ how Pennant Hills got its name)They had a rough sketch map which showed that they should go around the very head of Lane Cove River, then turn south. 
 Coming to a patch of bare rock the sergeant in charge produced the sketch and compared its marking with some of the ridges visible to them. An Irish recruit approached and asked, a little forcefully "Where are we?" The sergeant gestured towards the landmarks and headed south. Unbeknown to them, an aboriginal of the local tribe and his son were observing them from behind the boulders and listening to their discourse. Coming to a patch of bare rock the sergeant in charge produced the sketch and compared its marking with some of the ridges visible to them. An Irish recruit approached and asked, a little forcefully "Where are we?" The sergeant gestured towards the landmarks and headed south. Unbeknown to them, an aboriginal of the local tribe and his son were observing them from behind the boulders and listening to their discourse.
 +
 The years passed and the aboriginal youth grew into a mature man who was presently engaged by a European who had ideas of obtaining a grant of land. Dismounting from his horse the white man asked "What name this place, Jacky?"​ at the same time gesturing in a manner reminiscent of the redcoats. The years passed and the aboriginal youth grew into a mature man who was presently engaged by a European who had ideas of obtaining a grant of land. Dismounting from his horse the white man asked "What name this place, Jacky?"​ at the same time gesturing in a manner reminiscent of the redcoats.
 +
 "​Warrawee"​ said Jacky. "​Warrawee"​ said Jacky.
--X+ 
-LETTER TO THE EDITOR +---- 
-Congratulations on the DECEMBER ​issue; the magazine is improving with every issue. Morag Ryder'​s cartoon article was superb and the overseas stories about Enandl. mad Marquesas made interesting reading.+ 
 +===== Letter To The Editor. ===== 
 + 
 +Congratulations on the December ​issue; the magazine is improving with every issue. Morag Ryder'​s cartoon article was superb and the overseas stories about England and Marquesas made interesting reading. 
 In the past I have contributed stories to the Bushwalker. As you say, I "got my start" in journalism through the magazine and have gone on to publications in commercial magazines here and overseas. In the past I have contributed stories to the Bushwalker. As you say, I "got my start" in journalism through the magazine and have gone on to publications in commercial magazines here and overseas.
-WAL LIDDLE+ 
-Page 12 The Sydney Bushwalker January 1989 +Wal Liddle
-BUSHWALKERS BLIGHT ​LYME DISEASE IN AUSTRALIA Department-of BacteriolognWestmead ​Hospital+ 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== Bushwalkers'​ Blight - Lyme Disease In Australia. ===== 
 + 
 +=== Department ​of Bacteriology,​ Westmead ​Hospital. === 
 by Matthew Dryden by Matthew Dryden
 +
 Bushwalking like many outdoor pursuits has its dangers. Fortunately most of the dangers of hiking in the bush can with foresight, common sense and experience be minimised. One danger which may often be overlooked and which is quite difficult to prevent is being bitten by arthropods. As most bushwalkers know from experience, these include a variety of tick species and flying insects, and some of these may transmit infections. Bushwalking like many outdoor pursuits has its dangers. Fortunately most of the dangers of hiking in the bush can with foresight, common sense and experience be minimised. One danger which may often be overlooked and which is quite difficult to prevent is being bitten by arthropods. As most bushwalkers know from experience, these include a variety of tick species and flying insects, and some of these may transmit infections.
 +
 A recently recognized infection transmitted by the bite of ticks is Lyme disease. Evidence suggests that Lyme disease is on the increase in Australia, although the exact incidence and distribution of the disease is unknown. The general public and indeed the medical profession are not very familiar with the condition and some cases may go undiagnosed. A recently recognized infection transmitted by the bite of ticks is Lyme disease. Evidence suggests that Lyme disease is on the increase in Australia, although the exact incidence and distribution of the disease is unknown. The general public and indeed the medical profession are not very familiar with the condition and some cases may go undiagnosed.
-Lyme disease was first recognised in Connecticut USA in 1975 but the causative organism, a spiral bacterium ​Borrelia burodorferi,was not identified until 1981. In three villages + 
-on the banks of the Connecticut river, Lyme, Old Lyme and East Haddam it was found that the incidence of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis was far greater than in the general population. An exhaustive investigation revealed that the arthritis was part of an infectious process. The infection was transmitted by ticks and the reservoir in the wild was the white tailed +Lyme disease was first recognised in Connecticut USA in 1975 but the causative organism, a spiral bacterium ​__Borrelia__ __burodorferi__, was not identified until 1981. In three villages on the banks of the Connecticut river, Lyme, Old Lyme and East Haddam it was found that the incidence of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis was far greater than in the general population. An exhaustive investigation revealed that the arthritis was part of an infectious process. The infection was transmitted by ticks and the reservoir in the wild was the white tailed deer. In recent years the population of deer had increased dramatically following conservation methods, so too had the number of ticks. The disease in humans was probably not a new one but transmission to humans in such numbers had precipitated its discovery. 
-deer. In recent years the population of deer had increased dramatically following conservation methods, so too had the number of ticks. The disease in humans was probably not a new one but transmission to humans in such numbers had precipitated its discovery. + 
-Since then the disease has been discoverd ​in several areas in Europe, USSR and now Australia. Strains of the Borrelia organism may vary geographically in terms of the severity of disease which they cause. The complications of the infection in Europe are often not as severe as in the USA.+Since then the disease has been discovered ​in several areas in Europe, USSR and now Australia. Strains of the Borrelia organism may vary geographically in terms of the severity of disease which they cause. The complications of the infection in Europe are often not as severe as in the USA. 
 Infection begins following the bite of an infected tick. Its first manifestation is a spreading red rash called erythema chronicum migrans (ECM). This may occur from 3-30 days following the bite. Multiple similar skin lesions may then appear elsewhere on the body and at the same time the person may feel generally unwell with symptoms such as fatigue, headache, muscle aches, joint pains and stiff neck. This may last for several weeks. Infection begins following the bite of an infected tick. Its first manifestation is a spreading red rash called erythema chronicum migrans (ECM). This may occur from 3-30 days following the bite. Multiple similar skin lesions may then appear elsewhere on the body and at the same time the person may feel generally unwell with symptoms such as fatigue, headache, muscle aches, joint pains and stiff neck. This may last for several weeks.
  
 Weeks to months later victims may develop neurological abnormalities (such as encephalitis,​ paralysis or palsy) or cardiac problems (such as palpitations). Months to years following the initial bite, swelling and pain in the large joints, especially the knees may occur, and recur for many years. Weeks to months later victims may develop neurological abnormalities (such as encephalitis,​ paralysis or palsy) or cardiac problems (such as palpitations). Months to years following the initial bite, swelling and pain in the large joints, especially the knees may occur, and recur for many years.
-At present Lyme disease seems to be uncommon in Australia and confined to the eastern sea board. It was first diagnosed in Australia in 1983 in a patient from the Hunter Valley. Since then almost 50 cases have been diagnosed by blood tests in Queensland and New South Wales. There are no confirmed reports from other states yet. Within New South Wales cases have been diagnosed from a number of areas including the Buladelah State Forest, Gosford region, ​Kanagaroo ​Valley, the Bowral region and the Royal National Park. + 
-The disease can be treated successfully with antibiotics. ​Ehrly diagnosis and treatment prevents development of later complications. The diagnosis can be made on a blood sample or if the rash is still present by a small biopsy of the edge of the rash. +At present Lyme disease seems to be uncommon in Australia and confined to the eastern sea board. It was first diagnosed in Australia in 1983 in a patient from the Hunter Valley. Since then almost 50 cases have been diagnosed by blood tests in Queensland and New South Wales. There are no confirmed reports from other states yet. Within New South Wales cases have been diagnosed from a number of areas including the Buladelah State Forest, Gosford region, ​Kangaroo ​Valley, the Bowral region and the Royal National Park. 
-Research into Lyme disease is being carried out in the bacteriology department at West- mead HospitalIf any ticks are encountered by bushwalkers,​ we would be most grateful to receive them, dead or alive. They can be collected in an empty film cannister. ​Yaur tick + 
-may make medical history, by being the first to yield the Borrelia organism in Australia. Should any bushwalkers feel that they might have contracted Lyme disease, then a blood sample taken by their local doctor or pathology laboratory and sent to our department can be tested. +The disease can be treated successfully with antibiotics. ​Early diagnosis and treatment prevents development of later complications. The diagnosis can be made on a blood sample or if the rash is still present by a small biopsy of the edge of the rash. 
-Further information can be obtained by contacting the author (Dr. Matthew Dryden) at Westmead Hospital (Tel. 633 6255). Address: Department of Bacteriology,​ Westmead Hospital, ​WestMead, NSW, 2145. + 
-January 1989 +Research into Lyme disease is being carried out in the bacteriology department at Westmead ​HospitalIf any ticks are encountered by bushwalkers,​ we would be most grateful to receive them, dead or alive. They can be collected in an empty film cannister. ​Your tick may make medical history, by being the first to yield the Borrelia organism in Australia. Should any bushwalkers feel that they might have contracted Lyme disease, then a blood sample taken by their local doctor or pathology laboratory and sent to our department can be tested. 
-The Sydney Bushwalker Page 13 + 
-.11 +Further information can be obtained by contacting the author (Dr. Matthew Dryden) at Westmead Hospital (Tel. 633 6255). Address: Department of Bacteriology,​ Westmead Hospital, ​Westmead, NSW, 2145. 
-(NOTE: Some areas that we frequent do have ticks. There is even a suggestion that there are ticks at Coolana. To check for ticks - remove all clothing, check all parts of the body, especially the hairy areas. Ask a friend to check the parts of your body which you cannot see. Return the compliment to your firend. Naked bushwalkers running their hands over each other means they are just checking for TICKS! !+ 
-Then contact Dr. Dryden. ​EDITOR+(Note: Some areas that we frequent do have ticks. There is even a suggestion that there are ticks at Coolana. To check for ticks - remove all clothing, check all parts of the body, especially the hairy areas. Ask a friend to check the parts of your body which you cannot see. Return the compliment to your friend. Naked bushwalkers running their hands over each other means they are just checking for TICKS!! Then contact Dr. Dryden. ​Editor.
---- + 
-********** +---- 
-SBW CLUBROOM+ 
 +===== SBW Clubroom. ===== 
 At the General Meeting held on 14th December 1988 the following motion was carried: At the General Meeting held on 14th December 1988 the following motion was carried:
-"That SOW Incorporated continue to use the Ella Community Centre at Haberfield as their Clubroom and efforts be made to improve access to the hall for members."​ 
-CAROL BRUCE, Hon. Secretary. 
-BELVEDERE TAXIS BLACKHEATH 
-10 SEATER MINI BUS TAXI 
-047-87 8366 
-KANANGRA BOYD 
-= UPPER BLUE MOUNTAINS 
-. SIX FOOT TRACK 
-PICK UP ANYWHERE FOR START OR FINISH OF YOUR WALK - BY PRIOR ARRANGEMENT 
-Share the Fare 
-Competitive Rates 
-Page 14 fhe Whey Bus-Kwalker January 1989 
-.0 
-4 
-FOOTNOTES. 
-0 This month looks like a thin month for 
-articles and notes. We cannot have a 
-bumper issue every issue, and think of the %rees we save! 
- WHAT YOU MISSED: 1. The Club Christmas Party on Wednesday 21 December was excellent. For some reason attendance was very high, 
-about 70 to BO members. All, as suggested last month, scrubbed, polished and dressed- up and filled with cheer and best wishes. Plenty of food, sufficient drink and enough 
-time. The Preside managed to restrict his 
-speech to simply "Happy Christmas"​. A well organised finale of the Social 
-Secretary'​s activities for 1988. 
-o WHAT YOU MISSED: 2. The December General Meeting voted to stay at the 
-present Clubrooms. So now there'​s every reason to visit the rooms. That's 
-the reason we've included public transport details in this issue. At the 
-meeting there was discussion on some system of organising car lifts. More 
-of this next month. 
-* The MEMBERSHIP LIST will be published soon. Now is the time to send in corrections and/or alterations,​ spelling errors, that new surname or change of telephone number. Send the details to the Membership Secretary, at GPO Box 4476, Sydney, 2001. 
-o And talking of membership apparently the National Parks Association is looking for 
-new blood. 
- aft TASMANIAN BRANCH (?) is now centred 
-around Wynyard (in Tasmania 7325). Barbara Evans has moved caw from Hobart to Wynyerd and is now close t) Heather and John White 
-at Bridport (Tasmalia 7254). The three 
-SEM have found eacczther again. We are expecting a half page report on the meeting for th next issue. 
-WHAT YOU MISSED: 3. Or if we're 
-lucky you're in time. On 2FC at 1.30 pm on Saturday 14 January a report on 
-bushwalking in the 1930s. The report 
-will feature some of our well known oldies. 
  
 +"That SBW Incorporated continue to use the Ella Community Centre at Haberfield as their Clubroom and efforts be made to improve access to the hall for members."​
 +
 +Carol Bruce, Hon. Secretary.
 +
 +----
 +
 +=== Belvedere Taxis Blackheath. ===
 +
 +10 seater mini bus taxi. 047-87 8366.
 +
 +Kanangra Boyd. Upper Blue Mountains. Six Foot Track.
 +
 +Pick up anywhere for start or finish of your walk - by prior arrangement.
 +
 +Share the fare - competitive rates.
 +
 +----
 +
 +===== Footnotes. =====
 +
 +This month looks like a thin month for articles and notes. We cannot have a bumper issue every issue, and think of the trees we save!
 +
 +What you missed: 1. The Club Christmas Party on Wednesday 21 December was excellent. For some reason attendance was very high, about 70 to 80 members. All, as suggested last month, scrubbed, polished and dressed-up and filled with cheer and best wishes. Plenty of food, sufficient drink and enough time. The President managed to restrict his speech to simply "Happy Christmas"​. A well organised finale of the Social Secretary'​s activities for 1988.
 +What you missed: 2. The December General Meeting voted to stay at the present Clubrooms. So now there'​s every reason to visit the rooms. That's the reason we've included public transport details in this issue. At the meeting there was discussion on some system of organising car lifts. More of this next month.
 +
 +The Membership List will be published soon. Now is the time to send in corrections and/or alterations,​ spelling errors, that new surname or change of telephone number. Send the details to the Membership Secretary, at GPO Box 4476, Sydney, 2001.
 +
 +And talking of membership apparently the National Parks Association is looking for new blood.
 +
 +SBW Tasmanian Branch (?) is now centred around Wynyard (in Tasmania 7325). Barbara Evans has moved camp from Hobart to Wynyard and is now close to Heather and John White at Bridport (Tasmania 7254). The three SBW have found each other again. We are expecting a half page report on the meeting for the next issue.
 +
 +What you missed: 3. Or if we're lucky you're in time. On 2FC at 1.30 pm on Saturday 14 January a report on bushwalking in the 1930s. The report will feature some of our well known oldies.
 +
 +----
198901.txt · Last modified: 2019/05/02 02:28 by tyreless