User Tools

Site Tools


198811

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Last revision Both sides next revision
198811 [2019/04/16 06:27]
tyreless
198811 [2019/04/17 02:58]
tyreless
Line 140: Line 140:
 by Deborah Shapira by Deborah Shapira
  
-It was a windy morning when we set off at 7 am to take half the cars to Pike's Saddle to begin the walk. Yes, 7 am, you read it correctly - after all this walk was graded medium/​hard,​ AND this was after we'd had to travel in a stupendous traffic jam on the Mittagong Freeway along with the rest of the world'​s fun-in-the-sun holiday makers the previous evening. So we set off at a brisk trot down and up and down and up and down the 27 km fire trail that would lead us to the Deua River at Bendethera. While enjoying morning tea at Breakfast Creek (a differenct one) we watched with interest a couple of 4WDs negotiate a big puddle and then a muddy embankment. These drivers were in fact the beginning of quite a procession of various groups all heading for the large grassy banks of the Deua River at Bendethera. Some had so much gear they looked as if they were going to form a permanent settlement, while others looked as if they were heading to a hotel resort attired in dresses and stockings and carrying large fancy looking suitcases. I did not personally +It was a windy morning when we set off at 7 am to take half the cars to Pike's Saddle to begin the walk. Yes, 7 am, you read it correctly - after all this walk was graded medium/​hard,​ AND this was after we'd had to travel in a stupendous traffic jam on the Mittagong Freeway along with the rest of the world'​s fun-in-the-sun holiday makers the previous evening. So we set off at a brisk trot down and up and down and up and down the 27 km fire trail that would lead us to the Deua River at Bendethera. While enjoying morning tea at Breakfast Creek (a differenct one) we watched with interest a couple of 4WDs negotiate a big puddle and then a muddy embankment. These drivers were in fact the beginning of quite a procession of various groups all heading for the large grassy banks of the Deua River at Bendethera. Some had so much gear they looked as if they were going to form a permanent settlement, while others looked as if they were heading to a hotel resort attired in dresses and stockings and carrying large fancy looking suitcases. I did not personally find this offensive (to each their own) except that many vehicles bore stickers with slogans such as "​Vehicle Access to more Wilderness Areas"​. Not such a problem if the group is environmentally conscious and conscientious (after all we depend a lot on such access at times), except that the group with the most stickers was enjoying lots of morning tea-breaks accompanied by the throwing of beer cans and other litter about. Perhaps their idea of wilderness is to turn the whole countryside into a large tip. Naturally, a lot of discussion ensued within our group as we went all the faster in order to find our own idea of a wilderness experience. 
-find this offensive (to each their own) except that many vehicles bore stickers with slogans such as "​Vehicle Access to more Wilderness Areas"​. Not such a problem if the group is environmentally conscious and conscientious (after all we depend a lot on such access at times), except that the group with the most stickers was enjoying lots of morning tea-breaks accompanied by the throwing of beer cans and other litter about. Perhaps their idea of wilderness is to turn the whole countryside into a large tip. Naturally, a lot of discussion ensued within our group as we went all the faster in order to find our own idea of a wilderness experience.+
 Later, in the afternoon, having reached the Deua we made our way from what looked like a large encampment and finally left the remains of accessible track behind to have our own "​invasion"​ in a secluded but smallish campsite. This was at 5.30 pm. We still managed happy hour, dinner and the after dinner happy hour, the chief point of discussion being as to who was going to offload their goodies first. Later, in the afternoon, having reached the Deua we made our way from what looked like a large encampment and finally left the remains of accessible track behind to have our own "​invasion"​ in a secluded but smallish campsite. This was at 5.30 pm. We still managed happy hour, dinner and the after dinner happy hour, the chief point of discussion being as to who was going to offload their goodies first.
--F=age The Sydney Bushwalker November + 
-The next morning we started walking at 7 am. We followed the general north direction of the river but generally walked across the loops (up and over in reality). At one point, we had to do a particularly yukky sidle but we pressed on with the promiso ​of morning tea when +The next morning we started walking at 7 am. We followed the general north direction of the river but generally walked across the loops (up and over in reality). At one point, we had to do a particularly yukky sidle but we pressed on with the promise ​of morning tea when we reached the river again. "At least the leader likes to have meals, too," I thought to myself. Then after a late morning tea (everything is relative to when you start) we came to an idyllic looking property whereupon one of the party discovered he had left his camera at morning tea. Therefore we crossed the river and proceeded with lunch while he went back to retrieve it. 
-we reached the river again. "At least the leader likes to have meals, too," I thought to +
-myself. Then after a late morning tea (everything is relative to when you start) we came to +
-an idyllic looking property whereupon one of the party discovered he had left his camera at morning tea. Therefore we crossed the river and proceeded with lunch while he went back to retrieve it.+
 As we were speculating on probable vehicle access to the property some 4WDs materialised. One of the drivers came over to ask our advice about getting through closed roads, but although we were friendly we were unable to assist. Once again we on a trail until reaching Wyanbene Creek where we camped in a beautiful position. Again, there were many goodies to distribute. As we were speculating on probable vehicle access to the property some 4WDs materialised. One of the drivers came over to ask our advice about getting through closed roads, but although we were friendly we were unable to assist. Once again we on a trail until reaching Wyanbene Creek where we camped in a beautiful position. Again, there were many goodies to distribute.
-We.had a late start the next day - 7.30 am. We ambled up the creek which was very pretty, + 
-although I did not like having to be the pathfinder through a high growth of nettles. When we approached what appeared to be our climbing ridge we had morning tea whilst admiring the gradient +We had a late start the next day - 7.30 am. We ambled up the creek which was very pretty, although I did not like having to be the pathfinder through a high growth of nettles. When we approached what appeared to be our climbing ridge we had morning tea whilst admiring the gradient to be climbed. This turned out to be rather scree and steep in places. The ridge we had to walk out from appeared to have been witness to some recent horrific tempests as there were massive uprooted trees and logs all over the place. 
-to be climbed. This turned out to be rather scree and steep in places. The ridge we had to + 
-walk out from appeared to have been witness to some recent horrific tempests as there were massive uprooted trees and logs all over the place. +Then it was a 5 km trot back to the cars (50%) and the Shoalhaven River where we had a bit of a wash while waiting for the drivers. A very well organised walk, although I wish to report that I wasn't the only one hobbling about at dinner after 70 km!!! 
-Then it was a 5 km trot back to the cars (50%) and the Shoalhaven River where we had a bit of a wash while waiting for the drivers. A very well organised walk, although I wish to report +
-that I wasn't the only one hobbling about at dinner after 70 km!!!+
 The participants were:- The participants were:-
 +
 Carol Bruce, Greta Davis, George Gamble, Lynne Jones, Geoff McIntosh, Jim Oxley, John Porter (leader), Les Powell, Morag Ryder, Deborah Shapira, Barry Wallace. Carol Bruce, Greta Davis, George Gamble, Lynne Jones, Geoff McIntosh, Jim Oxley, John Porter (leader), Les Powell, Morag Ryder, Deborah Shapira, Barry Wallace.
-* * * * * * * * + 
-BELVEDERE TAXIS BLACKHEATH +---- 
-10 SEATER MINI BUS TAXI + 
-047-87 8366 +=== Belvedere Taxis Blackheath. === 
-KANANGRA BOYD + 
-UPPER BLUE MOUNTAINS +10 seater mini bus taxi. 047-87 8366. 
-SIX FOOT TRACK + 
-PICK UP ANYWHERE FOR START OR FINISH OF YOUR WALK BY PRIOR ARRANGEMENT +Kanangra BoydUpper Blue Mountains. Six Foot Track
-Share the Fare Competitive Rates + 
-November 1988 The Sydney Bushwalker Page 7 +Pick up anywhere for start or finish of your walk by prior arrangement. 
-SBW IN THE MARQUESAS ​ ISLANDS + 
-PART 3 by Frank Rigby+Share the fare - competitive rates. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== SBW In The Marquesas Islands - Part 3. ===== 
 + 
 + 
 +by Frank Rigby 
 (Part 2 ended with Helen Gray, Barbara Bruce and Joan and Frank Rigby relaxing in Taiohae after walking across the island of Nuku Hiva) (Part 2 ended with Helen Gray, Barbara Bruce and Joan and Frank Rigby relaxing in Taiohae after walking across the island of Nuku Hiva)
-"The Aranui departs Taiohae on Thursday"​ - Source 1. "The Aranui departs Taiohae on Friday"​ - Source 2.+ 
 +"The Aranui departs Taiohae on Thursday"​ - Source 1. 
 + 
 +"The Aranui departs Taiohae on Friday"​ - Source 2. 
 "The Aranui has already called at Ua Pou. It will now sail direct to Tahiti"​ - Source 1. "The Aranui has already called at Ua Pou. It will now sail direct to Tahiti"​ - Source 1.
 +
 "The Aranui will call at Ua Pou as usual" - Source 2. "The Aranui will call at Ua Pou as usual" - Source 2.
 +
 It was Tuesday afternoon. It was Tuesday afternoon.
-Two different answers to the same question! By now, though, we merely shrugged our shoulders and resurrected the familiar observation "This is Polynesia!"​ Nonetheless,​ the right answer was important since we were depending on this itinerant vessel to take us to + 
-Ua Pou. As Aranui was not then113ort ​we had no way of checking with the horse'​s mouth +Two different answers to the same question! By now, though, we merely shrugged our shoulders and resurrected the familiar observation "This is Polynesia!"​ Nonetheless,​ the right answer was important since we were depending on this itinerant vessel to take us to Ua Pou. As Aranui was not then in port we had no way of checking with the horse'​s mouth although this particular horse was quite likely to have a couple of mouths at least! 
-although this particular horse was quite likely to have a couple of mouths at least!+
 Oh well, just relax in the pension, tour the village, walk to the next bay, buy some food at the Chinese store (Californian peaches at $18 per kg, ouch, not for us thank you, apples from Darke'​s Forest NSW of all places and don't ask the price please but it's exorbitant, amazing what you find in those Marquesan stores and don't complain about the prices because the metre-long French sticks are dirt cheap and scrumptious,​ thank heavens for small mercies), talk, cook, eat, talk again, sleep, write letters, wash your clothes, practise your French on some poor victim, stroll down the road to see if Ua Pou is out or Aranui is in and the time soon passes. Oh well, just relax in the pension, tour the village, walk to the next bay, buy some food at the Chinese store (Californian peaches at $18 per kg, ouch, not for us thank you, apples from Darke'​s Forest NSW of all places and don't ask the price please but it's exorbitant, amazing what you find in those Marquesan stores and don't complain about the prices because the metre-long French sticks are dirt cheap and scrumptious,​ thank heavens for small mercies), talk, cook, eat, talk again, sleep, write letters, wash your clothes, practise your French on some poor victim, stroll down the road to see if Ua Pou is out or Aranui is in and the time soon passes.
-"​Aranui'​s in!" It was Thursday morning. Barbara and I raced down to the wharf to + 
-learn our fate. The ship was indeed departing that day, in fact in two hours' time, and +"​Aranui'​s in!" It was Thursday morning. Barbara and I raced down to the wharf to learn our fate. The ship was indeed departing that day, in fact in two hours' time, and she was NOT going to Ua Pou like the Typical Itinerary said she ought to. Source ​had been on the ball after all. We now got to work on the Captain and what with my gesticulations and Barbara'​s charm we somehow managed to change his mind for him. Aranui would make a special call at Ua Pou to let off these crazy Anglo-Saxons who were so poor that they could travel in no better style than the local Polynesians. Amazing! Perhaps he just wanted to see the last of us. 
-she was NOT going to Ua Pou like the Typical Itinerary said she ought to. Source ​had been on the ball after all. We now got to work on the Captain and what with my gesticulations and Barbara'​s charm we somehow managed to change his mind for him. Aranui would make a special call at Ua Pou to let off these crazy Anglo-Saxons who were so poor that they could travel in no better style than the local Polynesians. Amazing! Perhaps he just wanted + 
-to see the last of us. +Sailing out of the bay we naturally thought we were now on our way to the island of spires and that would be the last of Nuku Hive. How wrong we were. This is Polynesia! Aranui turned westwards along the coast and we learned that our destination was Hakatea Bay, otherwise known to the yachties as Daniel'​s Bay after Daniel, a famous English-speaking Marquesan who has entertained them for years with his stories. 
-Sailing out of the'bay we naturally thought we were now on our way to the island of spires and that would be the last of Nuku Hive. How wrong we were. This is Polynesia! + 
-Aranui turned westwards along the coast and we learned that our destination was Hakatea Bay, otherwise known to the yachties as Daniel'​s Bay after Daniel, a famous English-speaking Marquesan who has entertained them for years with his stories. +What the devil would happen next? Helen was overjoyed because she had longed to walk to this place but the uncertainty of the track and the shortage of time had discouraged me. (I'm not so sure, though, that Helen shared my caution because she can be a determined lady when she sets her mind to an adventure.) Anyway, wonder of wonders, there we were doing it in comfort, if not in style, instead; actually, Aranui took less than an hour to do what might have been a full day's walk, even for the tigers in SBW. One felt like forgiving the old tub for all her faults and her unpredictable wanderings. 
-What the devil would happen next? Helen was overjoyed because she had longed to walk to this place but the uncertainty of the track and the shortage of time had discouraged me. (I'm not so sure, though, that Helen shared my caution because she can be a determined lady when she sets her mind to an adventure.) Anyway, wonder of wonders, there we were doing it in comfort, if not in style, instead; actually, Aranui took less than an hour to do what might have been a full day's walk, even for the tigers in SBW. One felt like forgiving the + 
-old tub for all her faults and her unpredictable wanderings. +And what did we see? I really don't think I can do justice to that landscape with words, it would be better left to an expert photographer or an artist. But briefly, there arose a great escarpment some 500 metres high, rising straight from the sea and the valley beyond and stretching inland as far as the eye could penetrate. It was mostly vivid green but also rocky brown in parts and the complex folding of the steep slopes was unbelievably beautiful when the sun caught the numerous spurs and prominences;​ and when the squalls of misty rain arrived that landscape possessed a very special atmospheric mood that reminded me somehow of the vanished Lake Pedder in Tasmania'​s south-west. ​If this place were in Australia it would certainly be a National Park and might even be loved to death. Here it was safe, at least for the time being. 
-And what did we see? I really don't think I can do justice to that landscape with words, it would be better left to an expert photographer or an artist. But briefly, there arose a + 
-preat escarpment some 500 metres high, rising straight from the sea and the valley beyond +The whaleboats started to take people ashore and the three female members of the party (God bless 'em) upheld our reputation by joining a mixed bag of tourists, crew and local passengers for a five kilometre walk up the valley to glimpse the renowned Vaipo waterfall, the highest in the Marquesas. The lone male member, who was having his "​off-day",​ decided to remain on board and just be a slob. He was, however, rewarded for his slobbery by being able to absorb the scenery at infinite leisure. 
-and stretching inland as far as the eye could penetrate. It was mostly vivid green but also + 
-rocky brown in parts and the complex folding of the steep slopes was unbelievably beautiful when the sun caught the numerous spurs and prominences;​ and when the squalls of misty rain arrived that landscape possessed a very special atmospheric mood that reminded me somehow of +A rumour was circulating,​ at least among the English-speaking fraternity, that we were returning to Taiohae. It was hard to believe but it turned out to be true. Would we never get to Ua Pou? But of course we did, the very next day; thankfully the Captain had not forgotten us although I kept an eye on the course, ready to storm the Bridge if the bow pointed towards Tahiti. I couldn'​t help reflecting on our sources of information. Aranui departed Taiohae on both Thursday and Friday so both were right on that score but only Source 2 foretold that tha ship would call at Ua Pou. I concluded that Source 2 must be a clairvoyant and therefore would be invaluable amongst all the uncertainties of Polynesia. What a pity we would never see him again. 
-the vanished Lake Pedder in Tasmania'​s south-west. ​IF this place were in Australia it would + 
-certainly be a National Park and might even be loved to death. Here it was safe, at least for the time being. +They hoisted a whaleboat, with us inside it, over the ship's side. Everyone on board had come out on deck to watch and I felt momentarily important. But shortly we stepped ashore at Hakahau, Ua Pou's chief village, the conspicuous spires now soaring skywards right in our backyard. A new phase of our Marquesan adventure was surely about to begin. 
-Page 8 The Sydney Bushwalker November 1988 + 
-The whaleboats started to take people ashore and the three female members of-the party (God bless 'em) upheld our reputation by joining a mixed bag of tourists, crew and local passengers for a five kilometre walk up the valley to glimpse the renowned Vaipo waterfall, the highest in the Marquesas. The lone male member, who was having his "​off-day",​ decided to remain on board and just be a slob. He was, however, rewarded for his slobbery by being able to absorb the scenery at infinite leisure. +To be continued. 
-A rumour was circulating,​ at least among the English-speaking fraternity, that we were returning to Taiohae. It was hard to believe but it turned out to be true. Would we never get to Ua Pou? But of course we did, the very next day; thankfully the Captain had not forgotten us although I kept an eye on the course, ready to storm the Bridge if the bow pointed towards Tahiti. I couldn'​t help reflecting on our sources of information. Aranui departed + 
-Taiohae on both Thursday and Friday so both were right on that score but only Source 2 foretold +---- 
-that tha ship would call at Ua Pou. I concluded that Source 2 must be a clairvoyant and + 
-therefore would be invaluable amongst all the uncertainties of Polynesia. What a pity we would never see him again. +===== Federation Of Bushwalking Clubs NSW - Report ​Of October Meeting. ​===== 
-They hoisted a whaleboat, with us inside it, over the ship's side. Everyone on board  +
-had come out on deck to watch and I felt momentarily important. But shortly we stepped ashore at Hakahau, Ua Pou's chief village, the conspicuous spires now soaring skywards right in our +
-backyard. A new phase of our Marquesan adventure was surely about to begin. +
-* * * * * * * * TO BE CONTINUED +
-FEDERATION OF BUSHWALKING CLUBS NSW - Report ​of October Meeting.+
 by Spiro Hajinakitas by Spiro Hajinakitas
-Insurance: Gary Duncan of G.D.Duncan & Assoc.Pty.Ltri, insurance brokers, addressed the + 
-meeting, copies of the Liability Insurance Policy were distributed to all. For a cost of $1.50 per member The Commercial Union Assurance Co of Aust would insure a minimum of 4500 members of FBW for a maximum cover of $2,000,000 per claim. The proposed policy would cover person to person claims, would cover all activities of the Clubs provided these +=== Insurance: ​=== 
-activities did not involve aircraft or seacraft longer than 3 metres in length. If FBW + 
-did not attain the required 4500 members to participate,​ the Company would entertain making +Gary Duncan of G.D.Duncan & Assoc. Pty. Ltd, insurance brokers, addressed the meeting, copies of the Liability Insurance Policy were distributed to all. For a cost of $1.50 per member The Commercial Union Assurance Co of Aust would insure a minimum of 4500 members of FBW for a maximum cover of $2,000,000 per claim. The proposed policy would cover person to person claims, would cover all activities of the Clubs provided these activities did not involve aircraft or seacraft longer than 3 metres in length. If FBW did not attain the required 4500 members to participate,​ the Company would entertain making up the shortfall by increasing the $1.50 per member levy. Gary pointed out that not all claims would necessarily reach the courtroom as (1) Commercial Union may decide to settle out of court and (2) the Judge may decide that there is no case to answer. If a matter did reach the courtroom stage, the Company would pay the legal costs which in this day and age were considerable. Gary stated that Commercial Union was a highly respected Insurance company, in his opinion, one of the best. At this stage 3 or 4 councillors expressed disatisfaction with some of Gary's answers pertaining to certain definitions and a heated exchange occured... Finally Gordon thanked Gary for his attendance and he left the meeting. Denise Krus (ANC) handed ​out another Policy from the Norwich Winterthur Insurance (Aust) Ltd for Clubs to study as an alternative policy, although Denise warned, this new policy did not cover activities other than bushwalking. Councillors are again urged to confer with their Clubs and attend the November ​FBW meeting as a solicitor will be present to answer all queries. 
-up the shortfall by increasing the $1.50 per member levy. Gary pointed out that not all + 
-claims would necessarily reach the courtroom as (1) Commercial Union may decide to settle +=== Search & Rescue: ​=== 
-out of court and (2) the Judge may decide that there is no case to answer. If a matter did + 
-reach the courtroom stage, the Company would pay the legal costs which in this day and age were considerable. Gary stated that Commercial Union was a highly respected Insurance company, in his opinion, one of the best. At this stage 3 or 4 councillors expressed disatisfaction with some of Gary's answers pertaining to certain definitions and a heated exchange occured...Finally Gordon thanked Gary for his attendance and he left the meeting. Denise Krus (ANC) -anded ​out another Policy from the Norwich Winterthur Insurance (Aust) Ltd for Clubs to study as an alternative policy, although Denise warned, this new policy did not cover activities other than bushwalking. Councillors are again urged to confer with their Clubs and attend the NOvember ​FBW meeting as a solicitor will be present to answer all queries. +The search for the missing plane 8/9 October was attended by 64 people. Two helicopters assisted in the search, the plane was again not located 
-Search & Rescue: The search for the missing plane 8/9 October was attended by 64 people. +
-Two helicopters assisted in the search, the plane was again not located.+
 A meeting took place with Ambulance Paramedics to discuss roles and co-operation. A meeting took place with Ambulance Paramedics to discuss roles and co-operation.
-The "​Foolish Person"​ legislation appears to have not been scrapped. Tim Moore will have to + 
-be approached to clear the matter up. +The "​Foolish Person"​ legislation appears to have __not__ ​been scrapped. Tim Moore will have to be approached to clear the matter up. 
-National Sports Exhibition: Eye-catching stall attracted a good crowd. The meeting thanked all who helped. + 
-General: (1) SBW invite any Club representatives to attend the meeting on 30/11/88 to +=== National Sports Exhibition: ​=== 
-hear the Environment Minister, Mr Tim Moore address the meeting and answer questions.+ 
 +Eye-catching stall attracted a good crowd. The meeting thanked all who helped. 
 + 
 +=== General: ​=== 
 + 
 +(1) SBW invite any Club representatives to attend the meeting on 30/11/88 to hear the Environment Minister, Mr Tim Moore address the meeting and answer questions. 
 (2) Wedderburn Koala Park Preservation Committee. Clubs and individuals are urged to write to the Government protesting against the development of this unique reserve. (2) Wedderburn Koala Park Preservation Committee. Clubs and individuals are urged to write to the Government protesting against the development of this unique reserve.
 +
 (3) Nature Conservation Council meeting on 12/11/88 re Coastal Development Conference. (3) Nature Conservation Council meeting on 12/11/88 re Coastal Development Conference.
 +
 (4) NPWS has increased the penalties for people caught picking wild flowers. (4) NPWS has increased the penalties for people caught picking wild flowers.
-* * * * * * * * * *+ 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=== Eastwood Camping Centre. === 
 + 
 +Australian Made is great! 
 QLD QLD
- ​QBB ​j\ Butter Concentrate + 
-WA +  QBB Butter Concentrate 
- ​Wilderness Equipment Backpacks +
-Goretex Clothing Cycle Panniers+
 NT NT
- ​Beef ​Jer+ 
 +  Beef Jerkey 
 + 
 +WA 
 +  
 +  * Wilderness Equipment Backpacks 
 +  * Goretex Clothing 
 +  * Cycle Panniers 
 ACT ACT
- National Maps + 
- Outgear Backpacks Accessories +National Maps 
- ​Feathertop Wool Shirts +
- Giant Trees Dried meals +
-NSW +
- ​Sleeping Bags J & H, Mont, Romans +
- ​Rainwear +
-Mont, J & H, Superior +
- Day Packs +
-High Tops, Summit Gear +
- ​Bonwick Caving Ladders +
- ​Holeproof Undies ef Socks +
- ​Trailblazr Hats DB +
-C nyon bags +
-TAS- +
- ​Blundstone Boots+
 SA SA
- ​Rossi ​Bo ts + 
- Fl.xiersBaby ​Carriers +  Rossi Boots 
-Vic +  * Flinders Baby Carriers 
-EASTWOOD + 
-CAMPING +VIC 
-CENTRE + 
-3 Trelawney St (PO Box 131) Eastwood ​,NSW 2122 +  * Outgear Backpacks Accessories 
-Page 10 The Sydney Bushwalker November 1988 +  * Feathertop Wool Shirts 
-WALKING IN ENGLAND AND WALES +  * Giant Trees Dried meals 
-PART 2by Ainslie Morris & Mike Reynolds + 
-THE SOUTH DOWNS WAY +NSW 
-Our first walk was in warm and gentle Sussex. Other people had taken a 'fancy to it + 
-before us. The Celts found dense woodland in 4,000 BC, and took until 100 BC to chop it +  * Sleeping Bags - J & H, Mont, Romans 
-all down. They hadn't heard of clear-felling,​ but we are "​luckier";​ our southeast forests +  * Rainwear - Mont, J & H, Superior 
-of NSW will soon be like the uplands of Britain, smooth as a baby's bum. The Celts built +  * Day Packs - High Tops, Summit Gear 
-"​Duns"​ or hill forts (hence the name "​downs"​) and left 2,000 burial termuli on these hills +  * Bonwick Caving Ladders 
-of chalk. Facing the English Channel, these low hills were-the first place the Romans got +  * Holeproof Undies 4 Socks 
-to, and they left finely built villas such as Fishbourne Palace (near Chichester) which add +  * Trailblazer Hats 
-a bit of spice to a twentieth century walk. But it wasn't the Romans who wiped out the +  * DB Canyon bags 
-Celts; ​' ​it Was the Saxons. They settled in villages below on the Weald and left the deserted + 
-Downs to the sheep. And so the land use remained until recent years when cultivation of crops spread. +TAS 
-We began our walk wading through a field of high wheat and gazing over barley waving ​ in the breeze. Our morning tea consisted of soft sweet-tasting peas fresh-picked as we strolled by. + 
-The Weald to the north is a patchwork of fields, scattered with charming villages of thatched cottages. The Weald is visible always as you walk along the Way, the sea is to the south. Then came Norman influence in churches and castles. Being of stone, they are +  * Blundstone Boots 
-evident here as in other parts of Britain. They are not, however, the only ancient buildings of interest, as the villages retain many medieval houses and schools and market + 
-places, and these have been wonderfully preserved. You can drop off the Downs Way to visit +3 Trelawney St (PO Box 131) Eastwood NSW 2122. 
-them or to use them for bed-and-breakfasts;​ an excellent example is Steyning. + 
-We set out one fine but windy morning from Mike's mother'​s house in Lancing, after stocking up at the local health shop. We realise Mike's Mum would be surprised if we wanted to start there too, but we could get a train from London to Lancing (15 pounds return) and start at the station. It is about ten minutes walk from the Downs; you could get maps and the guide book "South Downs Way" by S. Jenneth at Victoria Station'​s excellent bookshop. Lancing (near Worthing) is also close to Gatwick Airport. Anyway, we decided to leave out +Phone us today & say "​G'​Day"​. 
-the eastern end of the Way from Eastbourne as it overlooks the build up Brighton area for a good half of the walk. So we headed west from Lancing for four days along the ridge of the downs to South Harting, close to the Sussex-Hampshire border. + 
-The first day took us over Steepdown towards the dip in the crest of the downs at +02-858-3833 
-Findon Gap, past places with names like Cow Bottom Hovel and Long Mile Bottom, past the ramparts of the Iron Age earthworks of Cissbury Ring to the clump of beech trees called Chandonbury Ring. This sits on the skyline like a dark blot, and is one of the best known landmarks of this part of Sussex. Sadly, the Ring now looks very ragged and worse for wear, for on the night of + 
-October 16th, 1987, Southern England was swept by a typhoon, with wind speeds higher than any +---- 
-previously recorded in Britain (well over 160 km.p.h.). Much damage was done to property, + 
-and the stately trees of the parks, gardens, and countryside were uprooted in their hundreds. The soil on the South Downs is a thin layer over the chalk, and the shallow-rooted beeches suffered particularly badly in that terrible storm. +===== Walking In Wales And England - Part 2. ===== 
-We camped that first night in a grassy hollow on Kithurst Hill, looking down on the little town of Storrington. Finding water can be a problem because there is no surface water on the Downs, as it all sinks into the porous chalk with almost no run off. However, we were able to + 
-get water from drinking troughs installed for cattle and sheep. These troughs are fed from +by Ainslie Morris & Mike Reynolds 
-the mains, with a floating ball cistern to control the flow. By pressing down on the ball, a + 
-supply of good drinking water can be obtained. Being able to get water we were able to free camp more on this walk than on any others we did. +=== The South Downs Way. === 
-On our second day we made a detour from the South Downs Way to see Parham House, an + 
-Elizabethan country mansion, and its collection of furniture and artworks. Unfortunately we +Our first walk was in warm and gentle Sussex. Other people had taken a fancy to it before us. The Celts found dense woodland in 4,000 BC, and took until 100 BC to chop it all down. They hadn't heard of clear-felling,​ but we are "​luckier";​ our southeast forests of NSW will soon be like the uplands of Britain, smooth as a baby's bum. The Celts built "​Duns"​ or hill forts (hence the name "​downs"​) and left 2,000 burial termuli on these hills of chalk. Facing the English Channel, these low hills were the first place the Romans got to, and they left finely built villas such as Fishbourne Palace (near Chichester) which add a bit of spice to a twentieth century walk. But it wasn't the Romans who wiped out the Celts; it was the Saxons. They settled in villages below on the Weald and left the deserted Downs to the sheep. And so the land use remained until recent years when cultivation of crops spread. 
-had chosen a day when the house was closed! (Be warned - check in advance for details of + 
-November 1988 The Sydney BushwaIker Page 11 +We began our walk wading through a field of high wheat and gazing over barley waving in the breeze. Our morning tea consisted of soft sweet-tasting peas fresh-picked as we strolled by. 
-+ 
-+The Weald to the north is a patchwork of fields, scattered with charming villages of thatched cottages. The Weald is visible always as you walk along the Way, the sea is to the south. Then came Norman influence in churches and castles. Being of stone, they are evident here as in other parts of Britain. They are not, however, the only ancient buildings of interest, as the villages retain many medieval houses and schools and market places, and these have been wonderfully preserved. You can drop off the Downs Way to visit them or to use them for bed-and-breakfasts;​ an excellent example is Steyning. 
- ​--L. + 
--   +We set out one fine but windy morning from Mike's mother'​s house in Lancing, after stocking up at the local health shop. We realise Mike's Mum would be surprised if we wanted to start there too, but we could get a train from London to Lancing (15 pounds return) and start at the station. It is about ten minutes walk from the Downs; you could get maps and the guide book "South Downs Way" by S. Jenneth at Victoria Station'​s excellent bookshop. Lancing (near Worthing) is also close to Gatwick Airport. Anyway, we decided to leave out the eastern end of the Way from Eastbourne as it overlooks the build up Brighton area for a good half of the walk. So we headed west from Lancing for four days along the ridge of the downs to South Harting, close to the Sussex-Hampshire border. 
-ej + 
- ​--=-...---- --=-----L---- +The first day took us over Steepdown towards the dip in the crest of the downs at Findon Gap, past places with names like Cow Bottom Hovel and Long Mile Bottom, past the ramparts of the Iron Age earthworks of Cissbury Ring to the clump of beech trees called Chandonbury Ring. This sits on the skyline like a dark blot, and is one of the best known landmarks of this part of Sussex. Sadly, the Ring now looks very ragged and worse for wear, for on the night of October 16th, 1987, Southern England was swept by a typhoon, with wind speeds higher than any previously recorded in Britain (well over 160 km.p.h.). Much damage was done to property, and the stately trees of the parks, gardens, and countryside were uprooted in their hundreds. The soil on the South Downs is a thin layer over the chalk, and the shallow-rooted beeches suffered particularly badly in that terrible storm. 
-. \\\\\\ :​.\'''​-'​. \''​Y'​s\ \\\ \ :: \ \ ' \ '​\'''​ \\ ''''​ '​\'​ \\\ \'​Z'"​ \'​-'​\ C + 
-" il k t i 1!..--  +We camped that first night in a grassy hollow on Kithurst Hill, looking down on the little town of Storrington. Finding water can be a problem because there is no surface water on the Downs, as it all sinks into the porous chalk with almost no run off. However, we were able to get water from drinking troughs installed for cattle and sheep. These troughs are fed from the mains, with a floating ball cistern to control the flow. By pressing down on the ball, a supply of good drinking water can be obtained. Being able to get water we were able to free camp more on this walk than on any others we did. 
-a,​..71777;​97(( lit i Vifi 75:'  + 
- \ ',​..",:​1 i \ \:), \,,,   '​. \''​\ V .  , y k \ +On our second day we made a detour from the South Downs Way to see Parham House, an Elizabethan country mansion, and its collection of furniture and artworks. Unfortunately we had chosen a day when the house was closed! (Be warned - check in advance for details of opening times and days if a detour is involved, especially on Mondays.) Having made the 700 ft descent from the Downs we were glad a public footpath passed through the Deer Park close to the house, so that we could at least see the outside of this lovely 400 year old house. 
-\ ,,,( \., , \,K\ 1, \ ' ', \\',.-  + 
-01\0.\te t117- 741.1:- 4  ,\-\ :, \ ' V. +[ Sketch: __South Downs Way__ - heading west up the chalky path (also a bridle and cycle way). Teh Arun River meanders between the villages of Houghton and Amberley. The track descents between the chalk pits in distance. ] 
-ri4A  /. t 0 if -6' ​ --',​e-..c7--%-:​ fi 6'1 +
- ​- ​ , --a. +
-.  , ,.... \ \  \ \.\:\ +
-,,,​e,​......7\:​ '​.\','​. \\\.\-, \  \ 'i \'-- ' ' +
-..... 9...:​04r...............1::,​ .....,​.,​e.... ik\ 1, \';'​AA.1.. +
-;-1-e -' ' +
-q.'.1 (%. t( (k6t7:c. 7-- ' '​---1-. ( .. ....,, +
-.....0 ,.. ...,,,, ,........, ....... +
-SOUTH bp v. / r4 S WAY - 6 e.a.din5 wevi 44 p 46e. c 443. tk y pa,-Fk (also a, br id le a riot +
-c lcic w41L4). 71/ e Arun River eteandcrs le4u. ten -the- 4+itages a f i-kuCiite"​ d4 A rn beriei. TiN e +rack derceAds 1,e+tatert al-he ch ttk piis 3n4k4,​ance. +
-opening times and days if a detour is involved, especially on Mondays.) Having made the 700 ft descent from the Downs we were glad a public footpath passed through the Deer Park close to the house, so that we could at least see the outside of this lovely 400 year old   ​house.+
 We returned to the route at Amberley Village (via an Inn and a half pint of warm shandy). Here you can visit the Amberley Chalkpits Industrial Museum, all open air and with active exhibits such as a working blacksmith, potter, and rides on a vintage omnibus. We returned to the route at Amberley Village (via an Inn and a half pint of warm shandy). Here you can visit the Amberley Chalkpits Industrial Museum, all open air and with active exhibits such as a working blacksmith, potter, and rides on a vintage omnibus.
 +
 We crossed the valley of the River Arun (the only river to cut through this western end of the South Downs to the sea) at Houghton, and climbed back onto the Downs to camp on Bignor Hill, close to a still visible stretch of the Roman road known as Stane Street, and not far from the remains of a Roman villa with fine mosaic floors. That evening the weather deteriorated,​ and we spent the night and following morning enveloped in a cold dank blanket of low cloud. We crossed the valley of the River Arun (the only river to cut through this western end of the South Downs to the sea) at Houghton, and climbed back onto the Downs to camp on Bignor Hill, close to a still visible stretch of the Roman road known as Stane Street, and not far from the remains of a Roman villa with fine mosaic floors. That evening the weather deteriorated,​ and we spent the night and following morning enveloped in a cold dank blanket of low cloud.
 +
 The weather cleared later that morning and as we progressed westwards towards Hampshire, the Downs became more densely wooded, and the dry chalky track and extensive views to north and south gave way to long stretches of path through green tunnels of hazel and beech, holly and yew, where in wet weather it could get very sticky underfoot. Our third and final night'​s camp on the South Downs Way was under the spreading branches of beech trees that had survived the great storm. We reasoned that if they had stood up to that, they were unlikely to fall on us that calm night! The weather cleared later that morning and as we progressed westwards towards Hampshire, the Downs became more densely wooded, and the dry chalky track and extensive views to north and south gave way to long stretches of path through green tunnels of hazel and beech, holly and yew, where in wet weather it could get very sticky underfoot. Our third and final night'​s camp on the South Downs Way was under the spreading branches of beech trees that had survived the great storm. We reasoned that if they had stood up to that, they were unlikely to fall on us that calm night!
-We finished our walk by continuing west over Beacon Hill - with more-Iron Age defence ramparts - to South Harting and an excellent pub lunch. The afternoon was spent in a National Trust "​Stately Home" - Uppark House, just outside South Harting. A fortunate lift took us to Emsworth on the coast just in time for a train back to our starting point at Lansing. We had seen quite a few day walkers during our trip, especially at points where roads came up onto the Downs, but very few pack-carrying "​overnighters",​ and for much of the time we had the broad green Downs quite to ourselves. + 
-By no means a strenuous walk, but a delightful introduction to the charms of the English +We finished our walk by continuing west over Beacon Hill - with more Iron Age defence ramparts - to South Harting and an excellent pub lunch. The afternoon was spent in a National Trust "​Stately Home" - Uppark House, just outside South Harting. A fortunate lift took us to Emsworth on the coast just in time for a train back to our starting point at Lansing. We had seen quite a few day walkers during our trip, especially at points where roads came up onto the Downs, but very few pack-carrying "​overnighters",​ and for much of the time we had the broad green Downs quite to ourselves. 
-countryside. + 
-************ +By no means a strenuous walk, but a delightful introduction to the charms of the English countryside. 
-TO BE CONTINUED+ 
 +To be continued. 
 (A map of England & Wales will be included in the next issue) (A map of England & Wales will be included in the next issue)
-Page 12 The Sydney Bushwalker NOvember 1988 + 
-WHAT'S IN NAME SCOTT'S MAIN RANGE+---- 
 + 
 +===== What's In Name Scott's Main Range. ===== 
 by Warwick Blayden. by Warwick Blayden.
-Jim.Brown'​s request for information in the September issue of the magazine raises more questions than it answers, and I hope this short note might clarify the matter slightly. + 
-InJanuary 1833 Surveyor William Govett was in the area and presumably noted a range on his map, between the Kowmung River and Butcher'​s Creek, for it was known as Govett'​s Main Range for some time. +Jim Brown'​s request for information in the September issue of the magazine raises more questions than it answers, and I hope this short note might clarify the matter slightly. 
-The name Scott does not appear listed in the early residents of the Burragorang Valley + 
-so perhaps Scott was a later surveyor. There is however a stronger case for the alternative name "KIARAMBA RIDGE/RANGE".+In January 1833 Surveyor William Govett was in the area and presumably noted a range on his map, between the Kowmung River and Butcher'​s Creek, for it was known as Govett'​s Main Range for some time. 
 + 
 +The name Scott does not appear listed in the early residents of the Burragorang Valley so perhaps Scott was a later surveyor. There is however a stronger case for the alternative name "Kiaramba Ridge/Range". 
 Probably due to a poor water supply, and the fact that the Burragorang Valley (Cox's River) was the main thoroughfare,​ Scott'​s Main Range does not appear to have been settled prior to 1900, though a bridle track of sorts existed between Byrne'​s Gap and the summit of the range opposite the western Mount Wonga Wonga. Probably due to a poor water supply, and the fact that the Burragorang Valley (Cox's River) was the main thoroughfare,​ Scott'​s Main Range does not appear to have been settled prior to 1900, though a bridle track of sorts existed between Byrne'​s Gap and the summit of the range opposite the western Mount Wonga Wonga.
-As early as the 1860's stock were driven from the Megalong Valley down the Cox to Apple Tree Flat near Cedar Creek. There, to avoid the rough section of river near Kill's Defile, + 
-a zig-zag trail ascended the eastern flanks of Mount Cookem, then along Scott'​s and down to the Cox's River opposite McMahon'​s Farm and Lookout. +As early as the 1860's stock were driven from the Megalong Valley down the Cox to Apple Tree Flat near Cedar Creek. There, to avoid the rough section of river near Kill's Defile, a zig-zag trail ascended the eastern flanks of Mount Cookem, then along Scott'​s and down to the Cox's River opposite McMahon'​s Farm and Lookout. 
-Round the turn of the century timber cutters entered the rugged Kowmung Valley and eventually resorted to cutting a trail from the Cox's River (opposite McMahon'​s Lookout) onto the main range then down to the foot of the Gingra Range. This became known as the Cedar + 
-Road. This access route apparently encouraged graziers to establish huts or outstations on top of the range with the earliest dating from about 1907. +Round the turn of the century timber cutters entered the rugged Kowmung Valley and eventually resorted to cutting a trail from the Cox's River (opposite McMahon'​s Lookout) onto the main range then down to the foot of the Gingra Range. This became known as the Cedar Road. This access route apparently encouraged graziers to establish huts or outstations on top of the range with the earliest dating from about 1907. 
-Though far from the Cedar Road, Mary Ellen Feld took up a Crown Lease at "​Kiaramba" ​'about the same time, presumably to secure one of the few watering holes along the range. + 
-When Myles Dunphy planned his early long distance trips in the Blue Mountains the only map he had available was the Tourist District of the Blue Mountains, Illawarra & Southern Highlands issued by the Immigration & Tourist Bureau in 1910. This contained a number of blank areas, showed Konangaroo as a village, and indicated a bridle route east of Konangaroo Walls (Kanangra). This route proceeded from Kanangra over to Scott'​s Main Range where it +Though far from the Cedar Road, Mary Ellen Feld took up a Crown Lease at "​Kiaramba"​ about the same time, presumably to secure one of the few watering holes along the range. 
-joined another bridle track from Yerranderie - the junction of which was called "​Kiaramba"​.+ 
 +When Myles Dunphy planned his early long distance trips in the Blue Mountains the only map he had available was the Tourist District of the Blue Mountains, Illawarra & Southern Highlands issued by the Immigration & Tourist Bureau in 1910. This contained a number of blank areas, showed Konangaroo as a village, and indicated a bridle route east of Konangaroo Walls (Kanangra). This route proceeded from Kanangra over to Scott'​s Main Range where it joined another bridle track from Yerranderie - the junction of which was called "​Kiaramba"​. 
 As one of the old residents from the Burragorang Valley reflected: As one of the old residents from the Burragorang Valley reflected:
-The water'​s over Nattai Bridge The last mail has been run, And lonely Kiaramba Ridge Glows in the setting sun. + 
-DON'T rIE DANCE AT "COOLANA" on 10th December to christen +The water'​s over Nattai Bridge\\ 
-the new dance floor. Next day you can go swimming or walking - +The last mail has been run,\\ 
-or talking. A mini-Reunion. See you there. +And lonely Kiaramba Ridge\\ 
-November 1988 The Sydney BuShwalker Page 13+Glows in the setting sun. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +Don't forget the dance at "Coolana" on 10th December to christen the new dance floor. Next day you can go swimming or walking - or talking. A mini-Reunion. See you there. 
 + 
 +---- 
 "A Mountain Trail Tale" "A Mountain Trail Tale"
 by Peter Dyce by Peter Dyce
198811.txt · Last modified: 2019/04/18 01:55 by tyreless