User Tools

Site Tools


198803

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
198803 [2019/03/27 02:42]
tyreless
198803 [2019/03/27 21:58] (current)
tyreless
Line 104: Line 104:
 __Wednesday,​ 30th December__. Left early under grey skies and dressed in raincoats. We marched in formation through the Wilderness Society camp hoping to frighten them or something. We cheated a couple of loops in the river by doing a couple of "up and overs" to arrive at Bullshead Creek at about 3.30 pm. The camp area was inhabited by all kinds of creatures - ants, flies and also leeches in the creek bed. My fly was on sloping ground next to a bull-ant nest. Our food drop was intact up the creek except for George'​s port which had undergone some kind of underground self-destruction. I enjoyed a fantastic wash, an act copied by Barry a little later much to the delight of another passing group of liloists we'd met earlier. We had a premature New Year's Eve with all the goodies in the drop and had a lot of fun with George'​s stories, Lynne'​s song sheets and Mother drying things. She is going to be a Hill's Hoist in her next existence. __Wednesday,​ 30th December__. Left early under grey skies and dressed in raincoats. We marched in formation through the Wilderness Society camp hoping to frighten them or something. We cheated a couple of loops in the river by doing a couple of "up and overs" to arrive at Bullshead Creek at about 3.30 pm. The camp area was inhabited by all kinds of creatures - ants, flies and also leeches in the creek bed. My fly was on sloping ground next to a bull-ant nest. Our food drop was intact up the creek except for George'​s port which had undergone some kind of underground self-destruction. I enjoyed a fantastic wash, an act copied by Barry a little later much to the delight of another passing group of liloists we'd met earlier. We had a premature New Year's Eve with all the goodies in the drop and had a lot of fun with George'​s stories, Lynne'​s song sheets and Mother drying things. She is going to be a Hill's Hoist in her next existence.
  
-__Thursday, 31st December__. This day was renamed Yom F.S. (Zero Day in Hebrew). We had a nice quick shower in the early hours to get the dry tents and flies a bit damp. Actually when we finally crawled out of bed there were a few blue patches in the sky and we set off after 9 slighly ​hung over. Actually had lunch in sunshine!! Don and George took out their fancy mosquito nets. Just after ambling off the Yerranderie map we met a fisherman who had just come down Hughes'​ Ridge. Realizing that we had not been in civilisation for a while he told us all some exciting things that had happened in the world, as in who had won the cricket test! The weather having cleared we made the acquaintance of several snakes and goannas. It was not until after 5 that we found a suitable camp spot although we had to dislodge the resident landlord - a nice black snake. Wendy said I couldn'​t camp where I'd pitched my fly - it was too flat!+__Thursday, 31st December__. This day was renamed Yom F.S. (Zero Day in Hebrew). We had a nice quick shower in the early hours to get the dry tents and flies a bit damp. Actually when we finally crawled out of bed there were a few blue patches in the sky and we set off after 9 slightly ​hung over. Actually had lunch in sunshine!! Don and George took out their fancy mosquito nets. Just after ambling off the Yerranderie map we met a fisherman who had just come down Hughes'​ Ridge. Realizing that we had not been in civilisation for a while he told us all some exciting things that had happened in the world, as in who had won the cricket test! The weather having cleared we made the acquaintance of several snakes and goannas. It was not until after 5 that we found a suitable camp spot although we had to dislodge the resident landlord - a nice black snake. Wendy said I couldn'​t camp where I'd pitched my fly - it was too flat!
  
 __Friday, 1st January__. Woke up to clear blue skies. Set off at a fast trot and walked until 10.30 - 11.00 when we had arrived at a beautiful pool. We farewelled Joe who had a wedding to get to and we finally had the promised holiday, swimming, loafing, making damper and fly swotting. We left at 3 and the skies turned black, the thunder clapped, the lightning struck and we just managed to pull out our raincoats before the deluge. Made camp at New Yards Bend and pitched tents and flies in between downpours. __Friday, 1st January__. Woke up to clear blue skies. Set off at a fast trot and walked until 10.30 - 11.00 when we had arrived at a beautiful pool. We farewelled Joe who had a wedding to get to and we finally had the promised holiday, swimming, loafing, making damper and fly swotting. We left at 3 and the skies turned black, the thunder clapped, the lightning struck and we just managed to pull out our raincoats before the deluge. Made camp at New Yards Bend and pitched tents and flies in between downpours.
Line 176: Line 176:
  
 I wish to be considered For the SBW S & R contact list, on the following basis: I wish to be considered For the SBW S & R contact list, on the following basis:
 +
 A - available same day\\ A - available same day\\
 B - require one (1) day's notice\\ B - require one (1) day's notice\\
Line 231: Line 232:
 __December 26__: __December 26__:
  
-The party of fifteen assembled at Guthega Power Station at 2 pm and set off northwards. The stretch from the power station to White'​s River Hut was an easy, but hot, walk of 8 km, with an ascent of 400 m gained by following the Aqueduct Road up the valley of the Munyang or White'​s River. About ten minutes before reaching our first camp the road passed, on the uphill side, an extensive jumble of granite boulders which I believe constituted a "large terminal moraine.... This bouldery barrier was dumped by the glacier as it retreated up the valley... (l)". We briefly ​imspected ​the White'​s River Hut which had some bunks, a wood stove and table. It would doubtless look very attractive to snow-blown souls in the winter, but on our sunny afternoon the campsite nearby among the snowgums was George'​s obvious choice.+The party of fifteen assembled at Guthega Power Station at 2 pm and set off northwards. The stretch from the power station to White'​s River Hut was an easy, but hot, walk of 8 km, with an ascent of 400 m gained by following the Aqueduct Road up the valley of the Munyang or White'​s River. About ten minutes before reaching our first camp the road passed, on the uphill side, an extensive jumble of granite boulders which I believe constituted a "large terminal moraine.... This bouldery barrier was dumped by the glacier as it retreated up the valley... (l)". We briefly ​inspected ​the White'​s River Hut which had some bunks, a wood stove and table. It would doubtless look very attractive to snow-blown souls in the winter, but on our sunny afternoon the campsite nearby among the snowgums was George'​s obvious choice.
  
 __December 27__: __December 27__:
Line 241: Line 242:
 We continued towards the N.E. to Tin Hut, at the headwaters of Finn's River, where we had lunch. Bill said the huts in this region took their rise from the days when leaseholders were required by regulation to provide shelter for employees shepherding flocks and tending cattle. Tin Hut was built in 1925-26 at the instigation of Dr. Schlink who had been contemplating a ski trip from Kiandra to Kosciusko (Bett'​s Camp) - or the reverse, but had been deterred by lack of shelter on the way. However, one summer "Dr. Schlink noticed a tumble-down shepherd'​s hut at the head of Finn's River and realized its significance to the expedition. Mr. Litchfield, lessee of the snow leases at that time, was approached for permission to rehabilitate the hut and he proved both interested and generous and, with his help, a small weatherproof hut, the present Tin Hut, was built in 1925-26 a few hundred metres from the old site."​(3) We continued towards the N.E. to Tin Hut, at the headwaters of Finn's River, where we had lunch. Bill said the huts in this region took their rise from the days when leaseholders were required by regulation to provide shelter for employees shepherding flocks and tending cattle. Tin Hut was built in 1925-26 at the instigation of Dr. Schlink who had been contemplating a ski trip from Kiandra to Kosciusko (Bett'​s Camp) - or the reverse, but had been deterred by lack of shelter on the way. However, one summer "Dr. Schlink noticed a tumble-down shepherd'​s hut at the head of Finn's River and realized its significance to the expedition. Mr. Litchfield, lessee of the snow leases at that time, was approached for permission to rehabilitate the hut and he proved both interested and generous and, with his help, a small weatherproof hut, the present Tin Hut, was built in 1925-26 a few hundred metres from the old site."​(3)
  
-From Tin Hut it was an easy walk up into the hills of the Brassy Mountains which extend for about five kilometres northwards. Actually, they are more like a rocky ridge than mountains, the gain in height from Tin Hut being only about 100 m. The lack in relative altitude was more than compensated for by the rock formations ​wuch as the one where we had afternoon tea among the alpine flowers in a grassy bay with a backdrop of elongated granite boulders stabbing at the aky like the fingers of a hand.+From Tin Hut it was an easy walk up into the hills of the Brassy Mountains which extend for about five kilometres northwards. Actually, they are more like a rocky ridge than mountains, the gain in height from Tin Hut being only about 100 m. The lack in relative altitude was more than compensated for by the rock formations ​such as the one where we had afternoon tea among the alpine flowers in a grassy bay with a backdrop of elongated granite boulders stabbing at the sky like the fingers of a hand.
  
-We made an early camp on an arm of Road Horse Creek on the eastern side of The Brassy Peak. "The Brassy ​Muuntains ​are the definite eastern ​topogr +We made an early camp on an arm of Road Horse Creek on the eastern side of The Brassy Peak. "The Brassy ​Mountains ​are the definite eastern ​topographic ​boundary to the Main Range, as well as being part of the Great Divide."​ (4)
-aphic boundary to the Main Range, as well as being part of the Great Divide."​ (4)+
  
 Some brave souls immersed themselves in the creek, downstream from camp, while the less hardy of us filled waterbags, and even contemplated performing less heroic ablutions. The hills in this area constantly leak quite cold water. Tiny creeklets do not seem to need rain to cause them to flow. It is as if whole mountainsides are so waterlogged from melted snows that the subterranean waters are continually seeking the comfort of appropriate points of egress. (Having said that, it does also seem to rain here a fair bit!) As George had said, there is really no need to carry water in these parts. Some brave souls immersed themselves in the creek, downstream from camp, while the less hardy of us filled waterbags, and even contemplated performing less heroic ablutions. The hills in this area constantly leak quite cold water. Tiny creeklets do not seem to need rain to cause them to flow. It is as if whole mountainsides are so waterlogged from melted snows that the subterranean waters are continually seeking the comfort of appropriate points of egress. (Having said that, it does also seem to rain here a fair bit!) As George had said, there is really no need to carry water in these parts.
Line 252: Line 252:
 It was raining when we awoke, and though the rain on the tent sounded worse than it was, it was still rather unpleasant outside, and breakfasting and packing up were less fun than usual. It was raining when we awoke, and though the rain on the tent sounded worse than it was, it was still rather unpleasant outside, and breakfasting and packing up were less fun than usual.
  
-We headed back towards the ridge of the Brassy HIlls, and shortly afterwards met George'​s son Matthew and his friend Sue who had just walked up via Gungartan. At this point the weather looked positively foul and although the rain was easing off, the low cloud was fogging the high points, and it was getting colder. A conference was held as to the best course to follow. The result was that Bill, Fran, John, Derek and I decided to return to Tin Hut to await an improvement in the weatherr, while the twelve others elected to push on north towards Mawson'​s Hut. That was the last time we saw the rest of the party until we were reunited at White'​s River camp on the last afternoon of the trip.+We headed back towards the ridge of the Brassy HIlls, and shortly afterwards met George'​s son Matthew and his friend Sue who had just walked up via Gungartan. At this point the weather looked positively foul and although the rain was easing off, the low cloud was fogging the high points, and it was getting colder. A conference was held as to the best course to follow. The result was that Bill, Fran, John, Derek and I decided to return to Tin Hut to await an improvement in the weather, while the twelve others elected to push on north towards Mawson'​s Hut. That was the last time we saw the rest of the party until we were reunited at White'​s River camp on the last afternoon of the trip.
  
-Retracing our steps in the poor conditions was no problem, especially with Bill leading, and we soon found ourselves back at Tin Hut where five other people were in residence. They, however, decided during the afternoon, when the weather improved, to press on north, and thus apart from two latecomers who tented outside and cooked on the hut fire, we had the place to ourselved ​for the night. The afternoon at the hut had enabled us to stop still and enjoy the atmosphere of granite boulders and alpine plants in fog, and to photograph such delights as green and yellow patterns on the wet trunks of gnarled snow gums where the rainwater had darkened and highlighted the colours'of the smooth bark.+Retracing our steps in the poor conditions was no problem, especially with Bill leading, and we soon found ourselves back at Tin Hut where five other people were in residence. They, however, decided during the afternoon, when the weather improved, to press on north, and thus apart from two latecomers who tented outside and cooked on the hut fire, we had the place to ourselves ​for the night. The afternoon at the hut had enabled us to stop still and enjoy the atmosphere of granite boulders and alpine plants in fog, and to photograph such delights as green and yellow patterns on the wet trunks of gnarled snow gums where the rainwater had darkened and highlighted the colours of the smooth bark.
  
 __December 29__: __December 29__:
Line 262: Line 262:
 As we left Tin Hut the fog began to clear and we wended our way past Valentine Creek towards Gungartan Pass, with Kerrie'​s Ridge providing a rocky backdrop to the west. After morning tea just north of Gungartan we set off for Schlink Pass, and when we looked downhill towards the road we saw what seemed to be an easy way down via a small valley so, not bothering to follow the ridge of the actual Pass, down we went. It would have been quite a good way down had it not been for the granite boulders (another terminal moraine, I think). Where these stood above the bed of the creek their rounded surfaces presented a chance to do some easy rock hopping, but further downstream prostrate shrubs grew over the rock in thin matting offering a deceptive surface which was secure as long as we stood on the rock beneath. In many places, however, the sparse foliage covered the holes between the rocks and it became a difficult matter to keep from stepping into the interminable interstices. This problem was compounded by the spongy boggy vegetation which made walking tiring in the wetter places near the creek. Eventually we descended to the road and arrived at the conclusion that in this area it is advisable to keep to the ridges, and stay out of the creeks however easy they may look from a distance. As we left Tin Hut the fog began to clear and we wended our way past Valentine Creek towards Gungartan Pass, with Kerrie'​s Ridge providing a rocky backdrop to the west. After morning tea just north of Gungartan we set off for Schlink Pass, and when we looked downhill towards the road we saw what seemed to be an easy way down via a small valley so, not bothering to follow the ridge of the actual Pass, down we went. It would have been quite a good way down had it not been for the granite boulders (another terminal moraine, I think). Where these stood above the bed of the creek their rounded surfaces presented a chance to do some easy rock hopping, but further downstream prostrate shrubs grew over the rock in thin matting offering a deceptive surface which was secure as long as we stood on the rock beneath. In many places, however, the sparse foliage covered the holes between the rocks and it became a difficult matter to keep from stepping into the interminable interstices. This problem was compounded by the spongy boggy vegetation which made walking tiring in the wetter places near the creek. Eventually we descended to the road and arrived at the conclusion that in this area it is advisable to keep to the ridges, and stay out of the creeks however easy they may look from a distance.
  
-Before I left home I should have studied my copy of "Snowy Mountains Walks" where the admonition says, in relation to Schlink Pass, "avoid the cirque depression a little to the north"​(6). We migh have added, "else you'll __get__ depressed!"​ In retrospect it was a more demanding, more adventurous descent than Schlink Pass. I do not think I would care to repeat the performance.+Before I left home I should have studied my copy of "Snowy Mountains Walks" where the admonition says, in relation to Schlink Pass, "avoid the cirque depression a little to the north"​(6). We might have added, "else you'll __get__ depressed!"​ In retrospect it was a more demanding, more adventurous descent than Schlink Pass. I do not think I would care to repeat the performance.
  
 The road walking, north, was a pleasant change after our stumbles and slips down from Gungartan, but it grew hot and when we eventually reached Valentine'​s Hut (complete with a row of red hearts on the awning over the window) at 3.30 pm I was quite ready to stop. We found a good campsite nearby on the side of a hill overlooking Valentine River where we enjoyed a leisurely campfire. Just on dark, as clouds passed overhead, a blood-red sunset illuminated the closing of the day. The road walking, north, was a pleasant change after our stumbles and slips down from Gungartan, but it grew hot and when we eventually reached Valentine'​s Hut (complete with a row of red hearts on the awning over the window) at 3.30 pm I was quite ready to stop. We found a good campsite nearby on the side of a hill overlooking Valentine River where we enjoyed a leisurely campfire. Just on dark, as clouds passed overhead, a blood-red sunset illuminated the closing of the day.
Line 306: Line 306:
 The scenery of the area is not quite so impressive as the central and southern Blue Mountains, but it is both attractive and appealing. In the Nattai catchment the entire rock sequence of the Sydney Basin is represented,​ giving rise to the typical sandstone cliff escarpments. Further west the basement slates and granites give rise to a less rugged terrain. There are numerous igneous intrusions. The soils formed from these varied rock formations support a wide variety of flora and fauna. By reason of the protection afforded by the Water Board, the area between the Nattai and the Kowmung may well be the best wild life refuge in the State. The scenery of the area is not quite so impressive as the central and southern Blue Mountains, but it is both attractive and appealing. In the Nattai catchment the entire rock sequence of the Sydney Basin is represented,​ giving rise to the typical sandstone cliff escarpments. Further west the basement slates and granites give rise to a less rugged terrain. There are numerous igneous intrusions. The soils formed from these varied rock formations support a wide variety of flora and fauna. By reason of the protection afforded by the Water Board, the area between the Nattai and the Kowmung may well be the best wild life refuge in the State.
  
-Like most Crown lands outside national parks the area has suffered considerable abuse. This includes sewerage discharge from Mittagong, overstocking and burning by graziers with consequent erosion, the annual burning of fire breaks, and penetration,​ mostly illegal, by off-road vehicles. Threats include quarrying, a rifle range, the Mittagong by-pass and development of Yerranderie as a tourist resort. Coal mining has usually proved uneconomic. That these abuses and threats should continue in an important Warragamba catchment and a prime recreational area is a reflection on the effectivemess ​of land use planning. But they are preventable and with prevention recovery is likely. Even the bluegums of the Couridjah Corridor may regenerate in time.+Like most Crown lands outside national parks the area has suffered considerable abuse. This includes sewerage discharge from Mittagong, overstocking and burning by graziers with consequent erosion, the annual burning of fire breaks, and penetration,​ mostly illegal, by off-road vehicles. Threats include quarrying, a rifle range, the Mittagong by-pass and development of Yerranderie as a tourist resort. Coal mining has usually proved uneconomic. That these abuses and threats should continue in an important Warragamba catchment and a prime recreational area is a reflection on the effectiveness ​of land use planning. But they are preventable and with prevention recovery is likely. Even the bluegums of the Couridjah Corridor may regenerate in time.
  
 By reason of its accessibility to the population of the central coast, its natural endowment and catchment significance,​ the Nattai area is ideally suited to become park land. Its economic potential has been thoroughly tested since early in the last century and found wanting. It would be an appropriate addition to the "green belt" of parklands north, west and south of Sydney. By reason of its accessibility to the population of the central coast, its natural endowment and catchment significance,​ the Nattai area is ideally suited to become park land. Its economic potential has been thoroughly tested since early in the last century and found wanting. It would be an appropriate addition to the "green belt" of parklands north, west and south of Sydney.
Line 344: Line 344:
 The ridge top turned out to be a lacerating experience. The first section was the hardest - low, thick vine scrub, tree ferns, fallen logs, with occasional raspberry vine and spear grass thrown in; Ric said it seemed more like a steeple chase than a bush walk. The six kilometres, including some reasonable stretches of open country, took us six hours to traverse. Rain fell constantly. The elevation was 1150 to 1300 metres and Rik estimated the temperature at below 10 degrees Celsius, with a wind chill factor in the open parts. It we all a bit much for the middle of summer. The ridge top turned out to be a lacerating experience. The first section was the hardest - low, thick vine scrub, tree ferns, fallen logs, with occasional raspberry vine and spear grass thrown in; Ric said it seemed more like a steeple chase than a bush walk. The six kilometres, including some reasonable stretches of open country, took us six hours to traverse. Rain fell constantly. The elevation was 1150 to 1300 metres and Rik estimated the temperature at below 10 degrees Celsius, with a wind chill factor in the open parts. It we all a bit much for the middle of summer.
  
-On the way down the last long, steep ridge, I became careless and we found ourselves in an unexpected position, with a creek forming up in a wrong location. As it was gatting ​late - 5.30 pm - I decided to abandon map reading finesse and strike directly north and across any intervening obstacles to the Gloucester River, a course of action recommended only with stoic walking companions. The unsophisticated ploy worked and we soon found ourselves looking down on the Gloucester, still quite a fair distance below. We could hear the rumble of the river and it seemed to contain long stretches of white. As it was still raining, Rik thought this could be low-lying cloud - but the river looked to me to be in flood. Not wishing to disturb the ambience of the occasion, I said nothing.+On the way down the last long, steep ridge, I became careless and we found ourselves in an unexpected position, with a creek forming up in a wrong location. As it was getting ​late - 5.30 pm - I decided to abandon map reading finesse and strike directly north and across any intervening obstacles to the Gloucester River, a course of action recommended only with stoic walking companions. The unsophisticated ploy worked and we soon found ourselves looking down on the Gloucester, still quite a fair distance below. We could hear the rumble of the river and it seemed to contain long stretches of white. As it was still raining, Rik thought this could be low-lying cloud - but the river looked to me to be in flood. Not wishing to disturb the ambience of the occasion, I said nothing.
  
 Forcing our way down the ridge proved hard work - lots of vines, raspberry and undergrowth,​ and it was 7.40 pm by the time we arrived at the top of a line of semi-cliff fringing the river. There was no time to spend on further reconnaissance,​ so we used our rope line to lower packs and scramble down. Forcing our way down the ridge proved hard work - lots of vines, raspberry and undergrowth,​ and it was 7.40 pm by the time we arrived at the top of a line of semi-cliff fringing the river. There was no time to spend on further reconnaissance,​ so we used our rope line to lower packs and scramble down.
Line 352: Line 352:
 So we made the crossing; fortunately,​ there was still a lot of late light and we were able to choose a spot where the water was only waist deep or less. Rik's experience stood us in good stead and we were miraculously across in a matter of minutes. So we made the crossing; fortunately,​ there was still a lot of late light and we were able to choose a spot where the water was only waist deep or less. Rik's experience stood us in good stead and we were miraculously across in a matter of minutes.
  
-By now it was 8.30 pm. With driver Nev's warning about the police rescue squad in mind, we had been pushing steadily on for 12 hours - no lunch stop, but occasional 10-minute food and rest breaks. I thought the party would be happpy ​to call a halt at the river, but to my surprise Rik and Fazeley were more than ready to go on. Fazeley, with her adrenalin level boosted by the river crossing, declared she could walk for hours. The imperturbable Rik felt it would be desirable to march on until we reached a good camp site.+By now it was 8.30 pm. With driver Nev's warning about the police rescue squad in mind, we had been pushing steadily on for 12 hours - no lunch stop, but occasional 10-minute food and rest breaks. I thought the party would be happy to call a halt at the river, but to my surprise Rik and Fazeley were more than ready to go on. Fazeley, with her adrenalin level boosted by the river crossing, declared she could walk for hours. The imperturbable Rik felt it would be desirable to march on until we reached a good camp site.
  
 So off we went through the darkening scrub, coming out on the Gloucester River tourist track about 9 pm. Rain was still pouring down and it took an hour or so to get the tents up and a decent blaze going. After a late meal, we climbed into our sleeping bags about 11.30 pm; we felt we had had our money'​s worth from that particular day's walking. So off we went through the darkening scrub, coming out on the Gloucester River tourist track about 9 pm. Rain was still pouring down and it took an hour or so to get the tents up and a decent blaze going. After a late meal, we climbed into our sleeping bags about 11.30 pm; we felt we had had our money'​s worth from that particular day's walking.
Line 496: Line 496:
 I felt something tangible should be done in remembrance of them and all fallen walkers and conceived the idea of a suitable bronze plaque to be installed at some prominent and well loved site, and immediately thought of Splendour Rock. I recall moving a resolution at a monthly meeting at our old clubroom at Ingersoll Hall to that effect with the rider that Federation be acquainted with our intentions, the site being Crown Land and not National Park at that time. I felt something tangible should be done in remembrance of them and all fallen walkers and conceived the idea of a suitable bronze plaque to be installed at some prominent and well loved site, and immediately thought of Splendour Rock. I recall moving a resolution at a monthly meeting at our old clubroom at Ingersoll Hall to that effect with the rider that Federation be acquainted with our intentions, the site being Crown Land and not National Park at that time.
  
-Federation greeted the idea with enthusiasm and a small committee of four was elected with myself as Convenor. I put the proposition to the committee, which it adopted, that the inscription be "Their Splendour Shall Never Fade". The full text on the plaque reads: "In memory of bdshwalkers ​who fell in World War II. Their splendour shall never fade." Subscriptions to a fund raised some 27 pounds whilst the cost of the plaque was, I think, 23 pounds, and this was cast by a firm of brass founders in City Road.+Federation greeted the idea with enthusiasm and a small committee of four was elected with myself as Convenor. I put the proposition to the committee, which it adopted, that the inscription be "Their Splendour Shall Never Fade". The full text on the plaque reads: "In memory of bushwalkers ​who fell in World War II. Their splendour shall never fade." Subscriptions to a fund raised some 27 pounds whilst the cost of the plaque was, I think, 23 pounds, and this was cast by a firm of brass founders in City Road.
  
 It was affixed on site on 22nd February 1948 by a party consisting of Paul Barnes, Ken Compagnoni, Stan Cottier and Len Hall who had a fairly hefty load to carry out there with the necessary cement and rock cutting tools. It was affixed on site on 22nd February 1948 by a party consisting of Paul Barnes, Ken Compagnoni, Stan Cottier and Len Hall who had a fairly hefty load to carry out there with the necessary cement and rock cutting tools.
Line 504: Line 504:
 Further commemorative gatherings were held on 26th April 1958 (10 years), 25th April 1965 and 6th May 1973 (25 years) whilst one or two wreaths have been laid on unofficial occasions as Anzac Day is celebrated on the actual date and not the nearest Monday, when a three day weekend would be created. Further commemorative gatherings were held on 26th April 1958 (10 years), 25th April 1965 and 6th May 1973 (25 years) whilst one or two wreaths have been laid on unofficial occasions as Anzac Day is celebrated on the actual date and not the nearest Monday, when a three day weekend would be created.
  
-And now, 40 years on, Anzac Day conveniently does occur on a Monday when, at my suggestion, Federation has again organised a service to be conducted at dawn on Monday, 25th April, details of which are being ciiculated ​to all clubs.+And now, 40 years on, Anzac Day conveniently does occur on a Monday when, at my suggestion, Federation has again organised a service to be conducted at dawn on Monday, 25th April, details of which are being circulated ​to all clubs.
  
 I would ask as many walkers as possible to attend the ceremony. I shall be there in spirit. I would ask as many walkers as possible to attend the ceremony. I shall be there in spirit.
Line 510: Line 510:
 ---- ----
  
-THE FEBRUARY GENERAL MEETING ​by Barry Wallace+===== The February General Meeting. ===== 
 + 
 +by Barry Wallace 
 The meeting was called to order at around 2031 after a short film about Blue Gum Forest which gave latecomers an even chance. There were 30 or so members present as we called Richard Brading (present) and Dawn Greentree (no show) for welcome to membership with badge and applause. Apologies were called next, and lo and behold, there were apologies from Stan Madden and Dawn Greentree. The meeting was called to order at around 2031 after a short film about Blue Gum Forest which gave latecomers an even chance. There were 30 or so members present as we called Richard Brading (present) and Dawn Greentree (no show) for welcome to membership with badge and applause. Apologies were called next, and lo and behold, there were apologies from Stan Madden and Dawn Greentree.
-The Minutes of the previous meeting were read and received with the only matter arising being advice that the transfer of ownership of Conlana ​to the incorporated body is proceeding and has been accepted as exempt ​1r-0ms-stamp duty on the transferi + 
-Correspondence brought a letter from the Wilderness Society advising of a walk planned +The Minutes of the previous meeting were read and received with the only matter arising being advice that the transfer of ownership of Coolana ​to the incorporated body is proceeding and has been accepted as exempt ​from stamp duty on the transfer. 
-for 7th-8th May to celebrate the first recorded walk to Blue Gum Forest; a copy of the minutes of the FBW January meeting; a letter from the Colong Foundation forwarding a copy of the Nattai National Park proposal which was recently submitted to the State Government for consideration;​ together with the usual letters of notice to new members.+ 
 +Correspondence brought a letter from the Wilderness Society advising of a walk planned for 7th-8th May to celebrate the first recorded walk to Blue Gum Forest; a copy of the minutes of the FBW January meeting; a letter from the Colong Foundation forwarding a copy of the Nattai National Park proposal which was recently submitted to the State Government for consideration;​ together with the usual letters of notice to new members. 
 The Treasurer'​s Report indicated that we began the month with $5617, received $844, spent $5201 and closed with $1982. Around $4000 has been placed in a high interest savings account. The Treasurer'​s Report indicated that we began the month with $5617, received $844, spent $5201 and closed with $1982. Around $4000 has been placed in a high interest savings account.
-March, 1988 The Sydney Bushwalker Page 19+
 The Treasurer also reviewed the final accounts of the 60th Anniversary Committee. The Treasurer also reviewed the final accounts of the 60th Anniversary Committee.
-Next came the sheer frenzy of the Walks Reports. Over the first weekend covered, 15/16/17 January, Oliver Crawford led a party of 6 on his Wollongambe walk. They experienced wet weather on the Sunday. Bill Holland with a party of 9 on his Grose River, Grand Canyon trip encountered the same very wet conditions on the Saturday night/all day Sunday. Of Frank Woodgate'​s overnight walk near Springwood there was no report.- + 
-The following extended weekend, 22 to 26 January, Carol Bruce and her party of 10 experienced a wide range of alpine weathers on her Guthega to Jagungal and return walk. David McIntosh was more forthright and described the weather as awful on his Surefire (6 bods) and Heart-attack (8 brads) Canyon trips over the 22,23,24 January weekend. Ian Woolfe went as far +Next came the sheer frenzy of the Walks Reports. Over the first weekend covered, 15/16/17 January, Oliver Crawford led a party of 6 on his Wollongambe walk. They experienced wet weather on the Sunday. Bill Holland with a party of 9 on his Grose River, Grand Canyon trip encountered the same very wet conditions on the Saturday night/all day Sunday. Of Frank Woodgate'​s overnight walk near Springwood there was no report. 
-as Tasmania to guarantee bad weather for his party of 7 but all to no avail; they had good, fine weather. + 
-Over the weekend 29,30,31 Jan Oliver Crawford'​s trip to watch the sun rise from The Castle attracted 7 starters and cloudy weather. The only other walk that weekend (was there a reunion +The following extended weekend, 22 to 26 January, Carol Bruce and her party of 10 experienced a wide range of alpine weathers on her Guthega to Jagungal and return walk. David McIntosh was more forthright and described the weather as awful on his Surefire (6 bods) and Heart-attack (8 bods) Canyon trips over the 22,23,24 January weekend. Ian Woolfe went as far as Tasmania to guarantee bad weather for his party of 7 but all to no avail; they had good, fine weather. 
-on somewhere?) was a day walk from Waterfall to Heathcote with Jim Percy at the helm and some + 
-26 people enjoying a warm sunny day with swims and an hour-and-a-half lunch stop. The rains +Over the weekend 29,30,31 Jan Oliver Crawford'​s trip to watch the sun rise from The Castle attracted 7 starters and cloudy weather. The only other walk that weekend (was there a reunion on somewhere?) was a day walk from Waterfall to Heathcote with Jim Percy at the helm and some 26 people enjoying a warm sunny day with swims and an hour-and-a-half lunch stop. The rains came as they reached the train and shelter. 
-came as they reached the train and shelter. + 
-The following weekend Ian Debert had 10 starters, not sure how many members, on his retreat to River Island Nature. Anyway, it rained on the parade on the Sunday. Don Finch'​s Saturday +The following weekend Ian Debert had 10 starters, not sure how many members, on his retreat to River Island Nature. Anyway, it rained on the parade on the Sunday. Don Finch'​s Saturday Wollongambe Gorge trip had 17 people with 16 li-los; the water started out cold and became cooler as they progressed. A group of fellow travellers experienced a problem when one of their number broke a leg. Fortunately he was made of stern stuff and managed to hop out of the gorge, up onto one of the ridges from where he was evacuated by Polair. 
-Wollongambe Gorge trip had 17 people with 16 li-los; the water started out cold and became cooler as they progressed. A group of fellow travellers experienced a problem when one of their number broke a leg. Fortunately he was made of stern stuff and managed to hop out of the gorge, up onto one of the ridges from where he was evacuated by Polair.+
 Greta Davis had 10 starters on her Glenbrook walk enjoying rain, rain, rain and thick scrub. Jan Mohandas'​ walk from Audley to Marley reported good weather for the 17 people who attended. Greta Davis had 10 starters on her Glenbrook walk enjoying rain, rain, rain and thick scrub. Jan Mohandas'​ walk from Audley to Marley reported good weather for the 17 people who attended.
-The FBW Report indicated that the S & R radio fund had reached $17,096 and 8 radios have been purchased. Two pager units are also to be purchased to modernise the facilities for contact with S & R officers. The FBW passed a vote of thanks to Peter Tressider for his work + 
-at the climbathon. There will be another S & R First Aid Course over the weekend of 21/22 May. +The FBW Report indicated that the S & R radio fund had reached $17,096 and 8 radios have been purchased. Two pager units are also to be purchased to modernise the facilities for contact with S & R officers. The FBW passed a vote of thanks to Peter Tressider for his work at the climbathon. There will be another S & R First Aid Course over the weekend of 21/22 May. There was one call-out over the weekend, the new radios were used and appeared to work well. There are rumours that the ski-resort areas may be excised from Kosciusko National Park. 
-There was one call-out over the weekend, the new radios were used and appeared to work well. There are rumours that the ski-resort areas may be excised from Kosciusko National Park.+
 The Conservation Report brought news that the Nattai National Park submission has been lodged and that draft Plans of Management for Blue Mountains N.P. and Wollomi N.P. are out for comment. The meeting moved that we recommend that Committee make a donation of an appropriate amount to the Colong Foundation. The Conservation Report brought news that the Nattai National Park submission has been lodged and that draft Plans of Management for Blue Mountains N.P. and Wollomi N.P. are out for comment. The meeting moved that we recommend that Committee make a donation of an appropriate amount to the Colong Foundation.
-General Business saw passage of a motion that we include Envirovote pamphlets for the NSW Upper House with the club magazine. The meeting carried a vote of thanks to all those who helped ​DA, the preparation and printing of the new Constitution. And then it was just a matter of the announcements and the meeting closed at 2145. + 
-ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION +General Business saw passage of a motion that we include Envirovote pamphlets for the NSW Upper House with the club magazine. The meeting carried a vote of thanks to all those who helped ​in the preparation and printing of the new Constitution. And then it was just a matter of the announcements and the meeting closed at 2145. 
-1988 + 
-For application form +---- 
-see + 
-Reverse ​of this notice +=== Annual Subscription ​1988. === 
-Page 20 The Sydney Bushwalker March, 1988 + 
-Federation of Bushwalking Clubs NSW - ReeaLL2LE21ERALymeetiag.+For application form see reverse ​of this notice. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== Federation of Bushwalking Clubs NSW - Report of February Meeting===== 
 by Spiro Hajinakitas by Spiro Hajinakitas
-Kowmung ​Committee ​Report: Photographs of the Kowmung still needed, also volunteers to ease the committee'​s work load. Main concerns at present are to ensure that damming of major tributaries such as Christie'​s Creek does not occur and that the general public be educated in usage of water. The Warragamba issue has become a most urgent battle. + 
-Search ​& Rescue ​Report: New pagers have been purchased. Next practice at Newnes Plateau 19/20 March. Ref Cullen Bullen 435104. Bring abseiling gear and maps Rock Hill & Mt. MUrgan+__Kowmung ​Committee ​Report__: Photographs of the Kowmung still needed, also volunteers to ease the committee'​s work load. Main concerns at present are to ensure that damming of major tributaries such as Christie'​s Creek does not occur and that the general public be educated in usage of water. The Warragamba issue has become a most urgent battle. 
-Anzac Day Service at Splendour ​Rock: Gate at Medley ​Gap will be opened Sunday 24th at 11 am. + 
-Treasurer'​s ​Report: Concern at drain on FBW reserves, loss over the year could be $1643.00. Consideration should be given to having advertisements in the Bushwalker and Clubs should be persuaded to an increase in fees. +__Search ​& Rescue ​Report__: New pagers have been purchased. Next practice at Newnes Plateau 19/20 March. Ref Cullen Bullen 435104. Bring abseiling gear and maps Rock Hill & Mt. Morgan
-Tracks ​Access: No camping allowed at the head-waters of glacial lakes in Kosciusko N.Park. Letter to NPWS re additional spike on Taro's Ladder, exit sign at Wollangambie Canyon, urging that the road from Newhaven Gap to Quilty'​s Clearing be closed to traffic. + 
-Bush Dance: Will be held on Friday 13th May - 8 pm till midnight - tickets $8. (See also SBW party to be arranged by Denise Shaw. Ed.) +__Anzac ​Day Service at Splendour ​Rock__: Gate at Medlow ​Gap will be opened Sunday 24th at 11 am. 
-The OUtdoor ​Club has donated $100 for S & R Radio appeal. + 
-Please set aside 26/27 March for the Three Sisters ​Climathon ​(bucket brigade). Proceeds for S & R. Peter Treseder will attempt to set new records for climbing Three Sisters. +__Treasurer'​s ​Report__: Concern at drain on FBW reserves, loss over the year could be $1643.00. Consideration should be given to having advertisements in the Bushwalker and Clubs should be persuaded to an increase in fees. 
-* * * * * * * * * * + 
-NEW MEMBERS  ​Please add the following names to your Membership List:- +__Tracks ​Access__: No camping allowed at the head-waters of glacial lakes in Kosciusko N.Park. Letter to NPWS re additional spike on Taro's Ladder, exit sign at Wollangambie Canyon, urging that the road from Newhaven Gap to Quilty'​s Clearing be closed to traffic. 
-Brading, Richard - 15/8 Lachlan Avenue, North Ryde, 2113 Phone- - - + 
-Chapman, John - 48 Quinton Road, Manly, 2095 977 4326 (H) 977 7277 (B) +__Bush Dance__: Will be held on Friday 13th May - 8 pm till midnight - tickets $8. (See also SBW party to be arranged by Denise Shaw. Ed.) 
-Greentree, Dawn - 8 Florence Avenue, Gosford, 2250 (043) 25 7203 + 
-********** +The Outdoor ​Club has donated $100 for S & R Radio appeal. 
-FBW BUSH DANCE - Friday 13th May - BYO Food & Drink - pay at door. The SBW party will be arranged by Denise Shaw - phone 922 6093. + 
-Cut out: THE SYDNEY BUSH WALKERS ​ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION ​1988+Please set aside __26/27 March__ ​for the __Three ​Sisters ​Climathon__ ​(bucket brigade). Proceeds for S & R. Peter Treseder will attempt to set new records for climbing Three Sisters. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=== New Members. === 
 + 
 +Please add the following names to your Membership List:- 
 + 
 +  * Brading, Richard - 15/8 Lachlan Avenue, North Ryde, 2113. 
 +  ​* ​Chapman, John - 48 Quinton Road, Manly, 2095977 4326 (H)977 7277 (B). 
 +  ​* ​Greentree, Dawn - 8 Florence Avenue, Gosford, 2250(043) 25 7203. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=== FBW Bush Dance. === 
 + 
 +Friday 13th May - BYO Food & Drink - $8 pay at door. The SBW party will be arranged by Denise Shaw - phone 922 6093. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +Cut out: 
 + 
 +=== The Sydney Bush Walkers ​Annual Subscription ​1988. === 
 Please send this notice with your cheque/​money order to:- Please send this notice with your cheque/​money order to:-
 +
 The Hon. Treasurer, The Sydney Bush Walkers, Box 4476 GPO, Sydney, 2001. The Hon. Treasurer, The Sydney Bush Walkers, Box 4476 GPO, Sydney, 2001.
-NAME/(For ALL members in household) + 
-ADDRESS ​+Name/(For ALL members in household): ....\\ 
 +Address: .... 
 + 
 If a receipt is required please send a stamped self-addressed envelope. If a receipt is required please send a stamped self-addressed envelope.
-TYPE: (Cross out any not applicadle) - Single Household ​AMOUNT ​ ENCLOSED: $    + 
 +Type: (Cross out any not applicable) - Single ​Household 
 + 
 +__Amount enclosed__: $.... 
 (Single -$25, Household -$25 plus $15 for each extra person. Non-active, Non-active with magazine, magazine subscription only - these will be decided by Committee and advised in next issue) (Single -$25, Household -$25 plus $15 for each extra person. Non-active, Non-active with magazine, magazine subscription only - these will be decided by Committee and advised in next issue)
  
 +----
198803.txt · Last modified: 2019/03/27 21:58 by tyreless