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198711 [2016/09/23 02:30]
tyreless
198711 [2016/09/23 02:37] (current)
tyreless
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 The Daily Telegraph printed Gary Philpott'​s press release concerning S.& R. on the letter page on 26/9/87. Other newspapers, TV and radio stations have not responded. The Daily Telegraph printed Gary Philpott'​s press release concerning S.& R. on the letter page on 26/9/87. Other newspapers, TV and radio stations have not responded.
  
-Keith Maxwell will try to persuade the Police Minister to develop for distribution a form stating trip intentions and hints on preperation ​for skiers, bushwalkers,​ fishermen etc. similar to the Victorian Dept. of Sport & Recreation'​s.+Keith Maxwell will try to persuade the Police Minister to develop for distribution a form stating trip intentions and hints on preparation ​for skiers, bushwalkers,​ fishermen etc. similar to the Victorian Dept. of Sport & Recreation'​s.
  
 Mike Doherty has written to N.P.& W.S. stating our opposition to horse riding in Kosciusko National Park. Mike Doherty has written to N.P.& W.S. stating our opposition to horse riding in Kosciusko National Park.
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 Besides nostalgia our guests also brought along a selection of dishes and a healthy appetite. The food was consumed with a minimum of fuss together with a baker'​s dozen bottles of champagne, four casks of wine and some assorted softer drinks. Besides nostalgia our guests also brought along a selection of dishes and a healthy appetite. The food was consumed with a minimum of fuss together with a baker'​s dozen bottles of champagne, four casks of wine and some assorted softer drinks.
  
-During the evening Honorary Membership Certificates were presented to those people so elected. It may have taken some 10 to 15 years to organise the certificates,​ but we got there in the end. Paddy Pallin, the doyen of the Club, our guest speaker, talked about the early days of S.B.W. and also was one of the belated ​certicate ​receivers.+During the evening Honorary Membership Certificates were presented to those people so elected. It may have taken some 10 to 15 years to organise the certificates,​ but we got there in the end. Paddy Pallin, the doyen of the Club, our guest speaker, talked about the early days of S.B.W. and also was one of the belated ​certificate ​receivers.
  
 There is no doubt the evening was a success: the large turn-up of people, their reluctance to go home, and the consumption of all the food and drink are good indicators of success. There is no doubt the evening was a success: the large turn-up of people, their reluctance to go home, and the consumption of all the food and drink are good indicators of success.
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 The paddock was full of activity; people were pushing bogged cars, the worst bogged being towed by Stan in his 4-wheel-drive monster. In the midst of this, Fazeley Read and Ray Hookway arrived. Ray told us our district had had the heaviest rain in the state and over 300 mm in a few hours at one stage. As if we hadn't guessed! Fazeley, from N.Z.s South Island and therefore never bothered by rain, had come for the walk and as there were others still interested, Stan led a party of 15 or so on a short walk to Maitland Bay. The seas were wild and the beaches were, needless to say, deserted... and, when we returned to Stan'​s,​ the sun came out! Someone-Up-There had given up! The spirit of S.B.W. __IS__ unquenchable. The paddock was full of activity; people were pushing bogged cars, the worst bogged being towed by Stan in his 4-wheel-drive monster. In the midst of this, Fazeley Read and Ray Hookway arrived. Ray told us our district had had the heaviest rain in the state and over 300 mm in a few hours at one stage. As if we hadn't guessed! Fazeley, from N.Z.s South Island and therefore never bothered by rain, had come for the walk and as there were others still interested, Stan led a party of 15 or so on a short walk to Maitland Bay. The seas were wild and the beaches were, needless to say, deserted... and, when we returned to Stan'​s,​ the sun came out! Someone-Up-There had given up! The spirit of S.B.W. __IS__ unquenchable.
  
-Writing this, over one week later, I can only recall one "​minus"​ from the weekend. Stan's once beautiful mowed paddock is now a ploughed field from the bogged cars. (Stan laughs his good-natured laugh as he shrugs "Who cares!"​) As someone said at Coolana the next weekend: "That was a great weekend at Stan'​s. We were united by the rain, a common adversity, as well as by frindship".+Writing this, over one week later, I can only recall one "​minus"​ from the weekend. Stan's once beautiful mowed paddock is now a ploughed field from the bogged cars. (Stan laughs his good-natured laugh as he shrugs "Who cares!"​) As someone said at Coolana the next weekend: "That was a great weekend at Stan'​s. We were united by the rain, a common adversity, as well as by friendship".
  
 ===2. Weekend at Coolana - 31st October/lst November, '87. === ===2. Weekend at Coolana - 31st October/lst November, '87. ===
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 It was at times hard to keep occupied, as there was not much reading matter in the hut. We put our heads together to work out puzzles in Bob's book, if desperate, reading Bill's novel, or generally chatting to others who had arrived at the hut. Luckily, Gordon had an endless supply of paper so a few of us were able to play various games like Dot-to-Dot, Battle Ships, Hand Man etc., (brought back memories) at one stage even with Bob's help, Wayne still had trouble winning. "I Spy with my Little Eye" was suggested, we hit the sack instead. That night the howling wind and rain took us off to sleep, being thankful of the warmth inside the hut. It was at times hard to keep occupied, as there was not much reading matter in the hut. We put our heads together to work out puzzles in Bob's book, if desperate, reading Bill's novel, or generally chatting to others who had arrived at the hut. Luckily, Gordon had an endless supply of paper so a few of us were able to play various games like Dot-to-Dot, Battle Ships, Hand Man etc., (brought back memories) at one stage even with Bob's help, Wayne still had trouble winning. "I Spy with my Little Eye" was suggested, we hit the sack instead. That night the howling wind and rain took us off to sleep, being thankful of the warmth inside the hut.
  
-It was 6.30 am when we set out upthe ridge to meet face to face with our objective. The ridge was hard work, very exposed, with the winds blowing at full force or even worse, dead still. There were times you could have straddled the ridge. (I don't think there'​s another ridge I've hugged quite so tight.)+It was 6.30 am when we set out up the ridge to meet face to face with our objective. The ridge was hard work, very exposed, with the winds blowing at full force or even worse, dead still. There were times you could have straddled the ridge. (I don't think there'​s another ridge I've hugged quite so tight.)
  
 The views were something that I just can't describe. To turn around and look over the valley previously trekked, across to Mount Cook and up towards the snow-covered pass where icy blue glaciers lay either side of us - spectacular. The views were something that I just can't describe. To turn around and look over the valley previously trekked, across to Mount Cook and up towards the snow-covered pass where icy blue glaciers lay either side of us - spectacular.
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 But what of the Mountain Trails Club which Myles formed in 1914 with five mates, said to be Australia'​s first true bushwalking club (Myles'​ term in those days was '​mountain trailing'​ or '​trailering'​),​ under whose aegis so many conservation battles were waged in the decades that followed. Alex raised the question in his review and perhaps some explanation can be made here. What did happen to the Mountain Trails Club? But what of the Mountain Trails Club which Myles formed in 1914 with five mates, said to be Australia'​s first true bushwalking club (Myles'​ term in those days was '​mountain trailing'​ or '​trailering'​),​ under whose aegis so many conservation battles were waged in the decades that followed. Alex raised the question in his review and perhaps some explanation can be made here. What did happen to the Mountain Trails Club?
  
-My father, Alan Rigby, who designed the cover of "The Sydney Bushwalker",​ was a long time member of the M.T.C., from 1923 until his death in 1966. He was also a foundation member of the S.B.W. and was a member of the National Parks Association in later life. It would have to be said, however, that his greatest loyalty was to the Mountain Trails Club and in particular to Myles Dunphy. This was demonstrated to me one day on Armours Range overlooking Mt. Milo when he was pointing out where he and his mates had carried Myles out of the Kowmung in 1934, some thirty years previuously, after Myles had experienced suspected heart trouble: "Yes, we loved Myles,"​ he said, and as I looked at the terrain and imagined the party, struggling with Myles on his stretcher in the January heat, it seemed to me that they must have!+My father, Alan Rigby, who designed the cover of "The Sydney Bushwalker",​ was a long time member of the M.T.C., from 1923 until his death in 1966. He was also a foundation member of the S.B.W. and was a member of the National Parks Association in later life. It would have to be said, however, that his greatest loyalty was to the Mountain Trails Club and in particular to Myles Dunphy. This was demonstrated to me one day on Armours Range overlooking Mt. Milo when he was pointing out where he and his mates had carried Myles out of the Kowmung in 1934, some thirty years previously, after Myles had experienced suspected heart trouble: "Yes, we loved Myles,"​ he said, and as I looked at the terrain and imagined the party, struggling with Myles on his stretcher in the January heat, it seemed to me that they must have!
  
-My elder brothers and I grew up in the 1950's and 60's with the remaining Mountain Trailers almost as uncles, certainly some as godfathers. We attended most of the monthly meetings and twice a year we camped at '​Miara'​ on Heathcote Creek, on a lease of some 30 acres held by the club, and now part of the National Park. We were treated to the unique spectacle of Myles arriving on Saturday morning complete with Dungal swag, and spent Saturday night under a big angophora with a roaring campfire, listening to yarns of walks, push-bike trips and canoe trips. There were the hilarious anecdotes of Albert Crandon, a locksmith by trade, and Roy Doyle'​s laconic delivery of tales of adventure in the bush. Above all we were hypnotised by Myle's ability as a story teller; his vivid, careful use of language, Irish sense of humour and the incisive quality of his voice, once heard never forgotten.+My elder brothers and I grew up in the 1950's and 60's with the remaining Mountain Trailers almost as uncles, certainly some as godfathers. We attended most of the monthly meetings and twice a year we camped at '​Miara'​ on Heathcote Creek, on a lease of some 30 acres held by the club, and now part of the National Park. We were treated to the unique spectacle of Myles arriving on Saturday morning complete with Dungal swag, and spent Saturday night under a big angophora with a roaring campfire, listening to yarns of walks, push-bike trips and canoe trips. There were the hilarious anecdotes of Albert Crandon, a locksmith by trade, and Roy Doyle'​s laconic delivery of tales of adventure in the bush. Above all we were hypnotised by Myles's ability as a story teller; his vivid, careful use of language, Irish sense of humour and the incisive quality of his voice, once heard never forgotten.
  
 Theirs was the easy, certain, relationship of men who had known each other for up to 50 years - there was a wonderful sense of cameraderie with no sense of what we call '​macho'​ behaviour (although it is just possible that this was in deference to the presence of three small boys!). There was one aspect of the club, however, which has led to some controversy over the years, in that it was an all male outfit. It would be unacceptable now and from this distance it is difficult to explain. I suppose in 1914 a girl simply could not share a tent with a man who was not her husband and was not expected to do anything so unladylike as carry a pack and climb steep ridges. At any rate one has to remember that these were men who were of a post-Victorian era, born in the late 1890's and early 1900'​s,​ and perhaps it does not serve much of a purpose to judge them by current standards. Theirs was the easy, certain, relationship of men who had known each other for up to 50 years - there was a wonderful sense of cameraderie with no sense of what we call '​macho'​ behaviour (although it is just possible that this was in deference to the presence of three small boys!). There was one aspect of the club, however, which has led to some controversy over the years, in that it was an all male outfit. It would be unacceptable now and from this distance it is difficult to explain. I suppose in 1914 a girl simply could not share a tent with a man who was not her husband and was not expected to do anything so unladylike as carry a pack and climb steep ridges. At any rate one has to remember that these were men who were of a post-Victorian era, born in the late 1890's and early 1900'​s,​ and perhaps it does not serve much of a purpose to judge them by current standards.
  
-It is a fact, however, that the men of the Mountain Trails Club held their womenfolk in very high regard. They certainly did walk with their wives and girl frinds ​(though perhaps not in the very early days during the First World War). My parents spent their honeymoon on the Cox and the Nattai and Margaret Dunphy was a veteran of many canoe trips and walks. There was, of course, the now legendary perambulator trip which Myles and Margaret made to Kanangra with the infant Milo! The Club was quick to support the formation of the S.B.W. and some of them became foundation members and office bearers of the new club.+It is a fact, however, that the men of the Mountain Trails Club held their womenfolk in very high regard. They certainly did walk with their wives and girl friends ​(though perhaps not in the very early days during the First World War). My parents spent their honeymoon on the Cox and the Nattai and Margaret Dunphy was a veteran of many canoe trips and walks. There was, of course, the now legendary perambulator trip which Myles and Margaret made to Kanangra with the infant Milo! The Club was quick to support the formation of the S.B.W. and some of them became foundation members and office bearers of the new club.
  
 In later years there were regular picnics at Audley, Royal National Park and various functions at each others'​ houses where club members and families met and kept alight their long-standing relationships. To this day, if the Mountain Trails Club survives in any sense at all, it is largely through the bond between the women, now mostly widows, as much as between the remaining men, even though the formality of club status has long gone. In later years there were regular picnics at Audley, Royal National Park and various functions at each others'​ houses where club members and families met and kept alight their long-standing relationships. To this day, if the Mountain Trails Club survives in any sense at all, it is largely through the bond between the women, now mostly widows, as much as between the remaining men, even though the formality of club status has long gone.
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 Maurie Bloom'​s Neriga walk over the weekend 18,19,20 September attracted 11 people on what was described as a good walk, apart from the absence of Maurie, who was sick. Carol Bruce did the honours. Tom Wenman had 4 people out on his Cloudmaker trip the same weekend. Maurie Bloom'​s Neriga walk over the weekend 18,19,20 September attracted 11 people on what was described as a good walk, apart from the absence of Maurie, who was sick. Carol Bruce did the honours. Tom Wenman had 4 people out on his Cloudmaker trip the same weekend.
  
-There was no report of Ainslie Morris'​ Pearl Beach day walk but Errol Sheedy had 26 people on his Waterfall to Otford walk which was described as excellent on all counts, ​includin ​wildflowers.+There was no report of Ainslie Morris'​ Pearl Beach day walk but Errol Sheedy had 26 people on his Waterfall to Otford walk which was described as excellent on all counts, ​including ​wildflowers.
  
 The following weekend 25,26,27 September saw Oliver Crawford and a party of 11 loving the exploring of the area, particularly the descent at the Yarramunmun Creek/​Bungleboori Creek junction. Of Tony Marshall'​s Colboyd Range trip there was no report, but Barry Wallace'​s Bonnum Pic walk had a party of 6 enjoying the wildflowers and witnessing a curious snake dance in fine, rather warm weather. Peter Christian'​s day walk to West Head attracted a party of 6 for a little scrub-bashing,​ Paul Mawhinney had 12 on his Kangaroo Creek walk and Bill Hall led 12 people on his Wondabyne wildflower walk. Wilf Hilder'​s walk went - no report. The following weekend 25,26,27 September saw Oliver Crawford and a party of 11 loving the exploring of the area, particularly the descent at the Yarramunmun Creek/​Bungleboori Creek junction. Of Tony Marshall'​s Colboyd Range trip there was no report, but Barry Wallace'​s Bonnum Pic walk had a party of 6 enjoying the wildflowers and witnessing a curious snake dance in fine, rather warm weather. Peter Christian'​s day walk to West Head attracted a party of 6 for a little scrub-bashing,​ Paul Mawhinney had 12 on his Kangaroo Creek walk and Bill Hall led 12 people on his Wondabyne wildflower walk. Wilf Hilder'​s walk went - no report.
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-Also you could drive or take a coach to Kings Canyon where you can camp free, then continue beyond ​th end of the Tourist Track upstream and explore the extraordinary "lost City" of dome rocks which form a maze cut by narrow deep splits. Worth at least 1 night pack walk.+Also you could drive or take a coach to Kings Canyon where you can camp free, then continue beyond ​the end of the Tourist Track upstream and explore the extraordinary "lost City" of dome rocks which form a maze cut by narrow deep splits. Worth at least 1 night pack walk.
  
 ===Olgas.=== ===Olgas.===
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 (1) __For Hugh Gorge__ - Just before the Hugh River (signposted) - 60 km west of Alice Springs there is the 4WD road to Stuart Pass clear and obvious on the right; __or__ you can try to pick a suitable gap in the Heavitree Range and head north (about 15 km to the Hugh River further upstream); or enter at Standley Chasm. (1) __For Hugh Gorge__ - Just before the Hugh River (signposted) - 60 km west of Alice Springs there is the 4WD road to Stuart Pass clear and obvious on the right; __or__ you can try to pick a suitable gap in the Heavitree Range and head north (about 15 km to the Hugh River further upstream); or enter at Standley Chasm.
  
-(ii) __For further west__, say Redbank Gorge, either Glen Helen Tourist Camp or if possible, about 20 km west of it; or you could start at Ormiston Gorge for Mt. Slander (no water), north into the Gorge (good water), east to Mt. Giles (water, allow 3 days for trip including one day to erplore); __or__ Serpentine Gorge and go west to Ormiston Gorge; or Ellery Creek Big Hole and go east to Hugh Gorge.+(ii) __For further west__, say Redbank Gorge, either Glen Helen Tourist Camp or if possible, about 20 km west of it; or you could start at Ormiston Gorge for Mt. Slander (no water), north into the Gorge (good water), east to Mt. Giles (water, allow 3 days for trip including one day to explore); __or__ Serpentine Gorge and go west to Ormiston Gorge; or Ellery Creek Big Hole and go east to Hugh Gorge.
  
 ====4. Permits To Enter Aboriginal Land.==== ====4. Permits To Enter Aboriginal Land.====
  
-Write at least 3 to 4 months before your walk if going on to aboriginal land, e.g. for Standley Chasm you are on the Iwapataka Land Trust. __Please__ do not bushwalk or camp without ​apermit ​as S.B.W. could be banned forever, or you could be charged and fined a large sum. They were happy to grant us a permit, but leave plenty of time. Write for application forms to:- Central Land Council, P.O. Box 3321, Alice Springs, 5750. Or ring the Manager/​Administration (089) 52,3800.+Write at least 3 to 4 months before your walk if going on to aboriginal land, e.g. for Standley Chasm you are on the Iwapataka Land Trust. __Please__ do not bushwalk or camp without ​a permit ​as S.B.W. could be banned forever, or you could be charged and fined a large sum. They were happy to grant us a permit, but leave plenty of time. Write for application forms to:- Central Land Council, P.O. Box 3321, Alice Springs, 5750. Or ring the Manager/​Administration (089) 52,3800.
  
 ====5. Special Gear.==== ====5. Special Gear.====
198711.txt ยท Last modified: 2016/09/23 02:37 by tyreless