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198602 [2015/08/06 02:59]
sbw
198602 [2017/05/24 03:17] (current)
kennettj
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 by Ainslie Morris. by Ainslie Morris.
  
-The Second Colo River Trip led by Don Finch 15,16,17 November1985.  +The Second Colo River Trip led by Don Finch 15,16,17 November 1985. 
-The gathering in the pub at Windsor near the bridge over the Nepean consisted of a few innocents and several wise men - and women. Or were we any the wiser after the first Colo River trip classified by Don as "​medium"?​ +
-I'd have called that 50 km upstream from Pass 6 to Glen Davis "​hard"​. This +
-weekend going downstream was to show me why those bludgers coming down from Glen Davis called it only "​medium"​. +
-The bushwalker'​s maxim - down is easier than up - definitely applies to the Colo River, that is, once you actually get down into it. Having descended precipitately down Pass 5, I was interested to see what Pass 6 really +
-had to offer. But first we had to get to it.+
  
-Friday night saw our group of cars move on to the Six Brothers 1:25000 map and pull off the Putty Road to park at map reference 808191 in order the better to savour the comfort of warmth and dryness as the rain storm dropped the lot outside. As the torrential downpour eased a fraction, our leader +The gathering in the pub at Windsor near the bridge over the Nepean consisted of a few innocents and several wise men and women. Or were we any the wiser after the first Colo River trip classified by Don as "​medium"?​ I'd have called that 50 km upstream from Pass 6 to Glen Davis "​hard"​. This weekend going downstream was to show me why those bludgers coming down from Glen Davis called it only "​medium"​. 
-had us out in order to demonstrate the ephemeral nature of dryness. While some took the vehicles round onto the Grassy Hill firetrail ​for our return to +The bushwalker'​s maxim - down is easier than up - definitely applies to the Colo River, that is, once you actually get down into it. Having descended precipitately down Pass 5, I was interested to see what Pass 6 really had to offer. But first we had to get to it. 
-Sydney, Carol Bruce led us off along the Culoul Range firetrail. It was dark+ 
 +Friday night saw our group of cars move on to the Six Brothers 1:25000 map and pull off the Putty Road to park at map reference 808191 in order the better to savour the comfort of warmth and dryness as the rain storm dropped the lot outside. As the torrential downpour eased a fraction, our leader had us out in order to demonstrate the ephemeral nature of dryness. While some took the vehicles round onto the Grassy Hill fire trail for our return to Sydney, Carol Bruce led us off along the Culoul Range fire trail. It was dark
 and wet, so we just shut our eyes and walked on, dreaming of the insides of cars. and wet, so we just shut our eyes and walked on, dreaming of the insides of cars.
-Soon the leader and drivers caught us up, and a few kilometres were covered until we, and what was left of our leader, decided to camp. As tents + 
-and flies were put up the mossies took shelter from the rain, and we snatched a few hours sleep. Saturday morning dawned absolutely beautiful and the sun shone all day and on Sunday, only letting up on Saturday night, which was mossie-free on the Colo. +Soon the leader and drivers caught us up, and a few kilometres were covered until we, and what was left of our leader, decided to camp. As tents and flies were put up the mossies took shelter from the rain, and we snatched a few hours sleep. Saturday morning dawned absolutely beautiful and the sun shone all day and on Sunday, only letting up on Saturday night, which was mossie-free on the Colo. 
-To get on to Pass 6, turn off to the left just before Hollow Rock where the firetrail takes a sharp dogleg turn at 724229. Push straight into dense scrub; do not be deterred at the lack of track. You will pick up a clear + 
-ridge to the southwest; follow this for 1 km. At the end is a low cliff- +To get on to Pass 6, turn off to the left just before Hollow Rock where the firetrail takes a sharp dogleg turn at 724229. Push straight into dense scrub; do not be deterred at the lack of track. You will pick up a clear ridge to the southwest; follow this for 1 km. At the end is a low cliff-line and good view of the two valleys both left and right which lead to the Colo River at 708219. We took the right tributary after an easy scramble down and morning tea by a small pool. The last descent is steep, and can involve going left along the ledge above the river, back right and over a log, then a short chimney down. We then waterproofed our packs and took our first plunge in to cross a pool below an attractive cascade. We were down. 
-line and good view of the two valleys both left and right which lead to the Colo River at 708219. We took the right tributary after an easy scramble + 
-down and morning tea by a small pool. The last descent is steep, and can involve going left along the ledge above the river, back right and over a log, then a short chimney down. We then waterproofed our packs and took our first plunge in to cross a pool below an attractive cascade. We were down. +The river this year had plenty of water in it, so the cascades were roaring and tumbling and foamy white, and the pools were full and deep. Last year at the same time the river was low and we waded ankle deep, only to suddenly sink thigh deep in quicksand at the ends of firm sand spits. This year several of us soon found that the way to really see the Colo is to let the river carry you. Carol, Wendy Aliano and I were the stayers often joined by Rick King and Barrie Murdoch whose packs had no waist straps and so made it harder to rest back on them in the water. 
-The river this year had plenty of water in it, so the cascades were roaring and tumbling and foamy white, and the pools were full and deep. Last year at the same time the river was low and we waded ankle deep, only to suddenly sink thigh deep in quicksand at the ends of firm sand spits. This + 
-year several of us soon found that the way to really see the Colo is to let +So we drifted down, not at all cold, and keeping direction by using our legs like paddle wheels ​and hand-sculling steadily. At the cascades we checked the rocks and force of the water, and it was either a walkaround or a "Here she goes!" It was great. Then another long drift in a pool, either ​chatting or quietly contemplating the fantastic cliffs above. Sculpted into half-caves like seashells, overhangs twisted out in curlicues, the cliffs rose in apricot and peach creams and pinks and orange hues all the way up their two hundred metre heights. Oh, glorious wilderness! 
-the river carryyou. Carol, Wendy Aliano and I were the stayers often joined +
-by Rick King and Barrie Murdoch whose packs had no waist straps and so made it harder to rest back on them in the water. +
-So we drifted down, not at all cold, and keeping direction by using our legs like paddlewheels ​and hand-sculling steadily. At the cascades we checked the rocks and force of the water, and it was either a walkaround or +
-a "Here she goes!" It was great. Then another long drift in a pool, eithel-'​ +
-chatting or quietly contemplating the fantastic cliffs above. Sculpted into half-caves like seashells, overhangs twisted out in curlicues, the cliffs rose in apricot and peach creams and pinks and orange hues all the way up their +
-two hundred metre heights. Oh, glorious wilderness! +
-February, 1986. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER Page 5+
 Boorai Creek offered clean fresh water and a wide sandy bwil opposite for a campsite. We swam, sunbathed, and dried off wet sleeping bags. Silly me did not tie up my canyon bag properly. A campfire and yarning under the stars, and a good rest for a fairly hard day on the morrow. Boorai Creek offered clean fresh water and a wide sandy bwil opposite for a campsite. We swam, sunbathed, and dried off wet sleeping bags. Silly me did not tie up my canyon bag properly. A campfire and yarning under the stars, and a good rest for a fairly hard day on the morrow.
-Again we cascaded down, while most of the party boulder-scrambled along the sides, some frequently recrossing the river to gain easier going. We did a total of 12 km of river from Pass 6, and took the Canoe Creek exit at + 
-741138 on the Colo Heights 1:25000 map. I had spent seven hours in the water;+Again we cascaded down, while most of the party boulder-scrambled along the sides, some frequently recrossing the river to gain easier going. We did a total of 12 km of river from Pass 6, and took the Canoe Creek exit at 741138 on the Colo Heights 1:25000 map. I had spent seven hours in the water;
 and to think on Friday night I didn't like water! Horizontal water, however, has its charms, and the Colo is most spectacular in this section, rewarding the effort of getting in and out of it. and to think on Friday night I didn't like water! Horizontal water, however, has its charms, and the Colo is most spectacular in this section, rewarding the effort of getting in and out of it.
  
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 by Geoff Grace. by Geoff Grace.
  
-Following the November Sydney Bushwalker in which a walk incorporating Yerranderie was reported, it seems timely to offer the following information describing the early years of mining at Yerranderie Field. It comes from a very old journal about mining in N S  W +Following the November Sydney Bushwalker in which a walk incorporating Yerranderie was reported, it seems timely to offer the following information describing the early years of mining at Yerranderie Field. It comes from a very old journal about mining in NSW. 
 + 
 YERRANDERIE FIELD Known twenty years ago, it was not till the late nineties that the Yerranderie field was first practically exploited. The field is only 42 miles by rail and 41 miles by road from Sydney, but it is that 41 miles of road that has so long stood in the way of advancement. Waggon and railway freights in getting the ore to the smelters total some four pounds per ton of ore, and how great a handicap that has been need not be insisted upon. The country is one of small lodes, but if small, they are rich, and there is no reason to suppose that they are not permanent. The yield of the mines of the field for the past six years is as follows :- YERRANDERIE FIELD Known twenty years ago, it was not till the late nineties that the Yerranderie field was first practically exploited. The field is only 42 miles by rail and 41 miles by road from Sydney, but it is that 41 miles of road that has so long stood in the way of advancement. Waggon and railway freights in getting the ore to the smelters total some four pounds per ton of ore, and how great a handicap that has been need not be insisted upon. The country is one of small lodes, but if small, they are rich, and there is no reason to suppose that they are not permanent. The yield of the mines of the field for the past six years is as follows :-
 Year Ore raised Gold ' Silver Lead Nett Value Year Ore raised Gold ' Silver Lead Nett Value
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 Yerranderie ​ Yerranderie ​
  
-The Yerranderie is not only the principal mine on +The Yerranderie is not only the principal mine on the field, but one of the most profitable little mining properties in the State. The story of the event that led up to its idevelopment is an extraordinary one, and is thus told:-- Mr.T.J.Hilder was keeping an hotel in Picton in 1899, and hearing of Mr.Bartlett'​s luck, arranged with his brother-in-law,​ Mr.C.S.Dobson,​ a dairy farmer, to go to the field and prospect it. Mr.Hilder started off in a cart, and after an adventurous trip reached Yerranderie in three days. The community was then a small one. The new-comer - be has told the story often himself - approached one of the few, and told him he had taken up a piece of ground while in Picton, and wanted to know how to go about prospecting it. "You have to find an outcrop first,- the older hand replied. "Can you show me one?" said Mr.Hilder. "No, but theres Chiddy over thelc; if you give him ten bob I think he'll be able to do it." A bargain was struck with Chiddy on thoseterms, and the green prospector was taken to a gully some distance North-Eastof Bartlett'​s shaft, and there shown a reef projecting just above the surface. From that load six hundred thousand pounds worth of ore has been taken in six years,​andMr.Hilder is the manager of the mine in which it occurs. In 1901 the Yerranderie Silver Mining No Liability was formed with a nominal capital of ten thousand pounds in one pound shares, five thousand of which were issued as paid up to the vendors. The remainder paid up to ten shillings were taken up principally by the vendors themselves and a call of two and sixpence was made on them. That six hundred and twenty five pounds was all the capital put into the company; and up to date 21 dividends for an aggregate sum of six thousand seven hundred and fifty pounds have been paid, additions to the plant to the extent of fully three thousand pounds have been made, and a reserve of two thousand pounds at fixed deposit has been accumulated.
-the field, but one of the most profitable little mining properties in the State. The story of the event that led up to its idevelopment is an extraordinary one, and is thus told:-- Mr.T.J.Hilder was keeping an hotel in Picton in 1899, and hearing of Mr.Bartlett'​s luck, arranged with his brother-in-law,​ Mr.C.S.Dobson,​ a dairy farmer, to go to the field and prospect it. Mr.Hilder started off in a cart, and after an adventurous trip reached Yerranderie in three days. The community was then a small one. The new-comer - be has told the story often himself - approached one of the few, and told him he had taken up a piece of ground while in Picton, and wanted to know how to go about prospecting it. "You have to find an outcrop first,- the older hand replied. "Can you show me one?" said Mr.Hilder. "No, but theres Chiddy over thelc; if you give him ten bob I think he'll be able to do it." A bargain was struck with Chiddy on thoseterms, and the green prospector was taken to a gully some distance North-Eastof Bartlett'​s shaft, and there shown a reef projecting just above the surface. From that load six hundred thousand pounds worth of ore has been taken in six years,​andMr.Hilder is the manager of the mine in which it occurs. In 1901 the Yerranderie Silver Mining No Liability was formed with a nominal capital of ten thousand pounds in one pound shares, five thousand of which were issued as paid up to the vendors. The remainder paid up to ten shillings were taken up principally by the vendors themselves and a call of two and sixpence was made on them. That six hundred and twenty five pounds was all the capital put into the company; and up to date 21 dividends for an aggregate sum of six thousand seven hundred and fifty pounds have been paid, additions to the plant to the extent of fully three thousand pounds have been made, and a reserve of two thousand pounds at fixed deposit has been accumulated.+
 All this has been done out of a lode not more than three feet through in its thickest part, and varying to a few inches. The average width may be about a foot/. Today the shaft is down 630 feet, following the course of theunderlay at an angle of about 29 degrees, From the 100 feet level to the bottom there are levels at every 50 feet, and the longest drive along the course of the lode is 1050 feet. Where there is a change in the ore at the extremeties of the shaft or the levels it is generally for the better. Last year the ore despatched to Cockle Creek for treatment - it was picked first grade stuff - yielded a nett return All this has been done out of a lode not more than three feet through in its thickest part, and varying to a few inches. The average width may be about a foot/. Today the shaft is down 630 feet, following the course of theunderlay at an angle of about 29 degrees, From the 100 feet level to the bottom there are levels at every 50 feet, and the longest drive along the course of the lode is 1050 feet. Where there is a change in the ore at the extremeties of the shaft or the levels it is generally for the better. Last year the ore despatched to Cockle Creek for treatment - it was picked first grade stuff - yielded a nett return
 of ten pounds one shilling and six pence per ton, and the average metal contents for the mine have been 100 ozs silver, 17 % lead, and from 4 dwt to 5 dwt gold. In 1904 about 1700 tons of second grade ore from the mine were sent to Cockle Creek, and averaged 40 or 50 ounces of silver per ton, returning a profit of over one pound per ton. A new contract has been made with the Sulphide Corporation. of ten pounds one shilling and six pence per ton, and the average metal contents for the mine have been 100 ozs silver, 17 % lead, and from 4 dwt to 5 dwt gold. In 1904 about 1700 tons of second grade ore from the mine were sent to Cockle Creek, and averaged 40 or 50 ounces of silver per ton, returning a profit of over one pound per ton. A new contract has been made with the Sulphide Corporation.
198602.txt · Last modified: 2017/05/24 03:17 by kennettj