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198510 [2014/03/09 06:38]
simon [1986 WILDERNESS CALENDAR.]
198510 [2014/03/13 09:58] (current)
simon
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 Established June 1931 Established June 1931
  
-A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to The Sydney Bush Walkers, Box 4476 G.P.O., Sydney, 2001. Club meetingsare ​held every Wednesday evening from 7.45 pm at the Cahill Community Centre (Upper Hall) 34 Falcon Street, Crow's Nest.+A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to The Sydney Bush Walkers, Box 4476 G.P.O., Sydney, 2001. Club meetings are held every Wednesday evening from 7:45 pm at the Cahill Community Centre (Upper Hall) 34 Falcon Street, Crow's Nest.
  
 | EDITOR: | Ainslie Morris, 45 Austin Street, Lane Cove, 2066. Telephone 428-3178. | | EDITOR: | Ainslie Morris, 45 Austin Street, Lane Cove, 2066. Telephone 428-3178. |
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 | Assistant Printers Needed! |  | 12 | | Assistant Printers Needed! |  | 12 |
 | The One That Got Away | Peter Dyce | 13 | | The One That Got Away | Peter Dyce | 13 |
-| Committee Meeting Report 2/10/85 | Bill Holland ​| 14 | +| Committee Meeting Report 2/10/85 |  | 14 | 
-| Social Notes |  | 14 |+| Social Notes | Bill Holland ​| 14 |
  
 ===== BUNGONIA GORGE ON "​P"​ PLATES. 2/3/4 Aug. 1985. ===== ===== BUNGONIA GORGE ON "​P"​ PLATES. 2/3/4 Aug. 1985. =====
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 The blue sapphire, with the red ruby, diamond, emerald and opal, are the most desired gemstones. Sapphire, which means blue, is a variety of the mineral corundum coloured by the presence of some titanium. This area produces 80% of the world'​s sapphires. The blue sapphire, with the red ruby, diamond, emerald and opal, are the most desired gemstones. Sapphire, which means blue, is a variety of the mineral corundum coloured by the presence of some titanium. This area produces 80% of the world'​s sapphires.
  
-A bonus for cyclists visiting Inverell in early September is to see the Grafton to inverell ​Cycling Classic, of international standard. There is also a fun run on the day for you keen joggers.+A bonus for cyclists visiting Inverell in early September is to see the Grafton to Inverell ​Cycling Classic, of international standard. There is also a fun run on the day for you keen joggers.
  
-__The scenic gems are two little national parks__ on the Mt. Lindesay Highway 30 km out of Tenterfield. First is Boonoo Boonoo (pronounced +__The scenic gems are two little national parks__ on the Mt. Lindesay Highway 30 km out of Tenterfield. First is Boonoo Boonoo (pronounced Bunny B'​noo),​ which has a good 14 km track in to it, clearly signposted on the right. We had the campsite to ourselves; water can be collected on the way in from one of several creeks as you cross them, or from the swimming hole on the river 100 metres from camp. This river descends in cascades and falls for 210 metres into a gorge. The gorge may be viewed from the top, but to see the falls you'll need to go to the bottom. It looks far, but only takes 1 1/4 hours return for fit and experienced walkers. Near the bottom the track disappears into a steep rock scramble in rainforest, then you clamber over huge boulders for a view of the falls. For a day walk you'd need to negotiate these, then it looks a bit easier to follow the river down on flat rock ledges.
-Bunny B'​noo),​ which has a good 14 km track in to it, clearly signposted on the right. We had the campsite to ourselves; water can be collected on the way in from one of several creeks as you cross them, or froth- ​the swimming hole on the river 100 metres from camp. This river descends in cascades and falls for 210 metres into a gorge. The gorge may be viewed from the top, but to see the falls you'll need to go to the bottom. It looks far, but only takes lf hours return for fit and experienced walkers. Near the bottom the track disappears into a steep rock scramble in rainforest, then you clamber over huge boulders for a view of the falls. For a day walk you'd need to negotiate these, then it looks a bit easier to follow the river down on flat rock ledges.+
  
 Bald Rock (Boonoo Boonoo to the aborigines) is also off the unsealed Mt. Lindesay Highway to Brisbane, a few kilometres further on but on the left. A good 6 km track takes you to a picnic area where you may camp overnight. An easy walk takes 1 hour return, and raises you 200 metres above the surrounding wet sclerophyll forest. The beauty of the rock is in its coloured streaks, shown in the 1985 N.S.W. wilderness Calendar for August. We read that there are views out to the peaks of the - Scenic Rim and the Tweed coast, but we could hardly see the rock itself for mist and rain. Now we'll have to go back - oh dear! Bald Rock (Boonoo Boonoo to the aborigines) is also off the unsealed Mt. Lindesay Highway to Brisbane, a few kilometres further on but on the left. A good 6 km track takes you to a picnic area where you may camp overnight. An easy walk takes 1 hour return, and raises you 200 metres above the surrounding wet sclerophyll forest. The beauty of the rock is in its coloured streaks, shown in the 1985 N.S.W. wilderness Calendar for August. We read that there are views out to the peaks of the - Scenic Rim and the Tweed coast, but we could hardly see the rock itself for mist and rain. Now we'll have to go back - oh dear!
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 Notwithstanding this, a few walking parties, taking train to Nowra and hire cars beyond, managed to make the first dint in the protective armour of the Budawangs. The late Ray Kirkby led some trips into the area between Sassafras and Wog Wog about 1947/8, and about the same time Grace and John Noble trudged along the southern part of the range from near Mount Budawang itself to Currockbilly and Wog Wog. A little later Alex Colley who, in company with the late Maurie Berry, had ascended Currockbilly from the east (somewhere along Belowra Creek), also led some parties in from Sassafras towards The Castle: these met with mixed success owing to the abominable weather often encountered in the area. Notwithstanding this, a few walking parties, taking train to Nowra and hire cars beyond, managed to make the first dint in the protective armour of the Budawangs. The late Ray Kirkby led some trips into the area between Sassafras and Wog Wog about 1947/8, and about the same time Grace and John Noble trudged along the southern part of the range from near Mount Budawang itself to Currockbilly and Wog Wog. A little later Alex Colley who, in company with the late Maurie Berry, had ascended Currockbilly from the east (somewhere along Belowra Creek), also led some parties in from Sassafras towards The Castle: these met with mixed success owing to the abominable weather often encountered in the area.
  
-Others, including Ken Angel and some of his friends who produced a map of the region, and Ron Knightley and colleagues also tried conclusions with portions of the Budawangs and gradually there was a spread of bushwalker awareness of a relatively unspoiled and spectacular country. In the mid1950s Frank Leyden and some friends made a fresh try from the Sassafras side, with a measure of success, and it was about this time that the increasing ownership of private cars brought the area within the reach of a wider circle of walkers.+Others, including Ken Angel and some of his friends who produced a map of the region, and Ron Knightley and colleagues also tried conclusions with portions of the Budawangs and gradually there was a spread of bushwalker awareness of a relatively unspoiled and spectacular country. In the mid 1950s Frank Leyden and some friends made a fresh try from the Sassafras side, with a measure of success, and it was about this time that the increasing ownership of private cars brought the area within the reach of a wider circle of walkers.
  
 At Easter, 1957, Alex Colley and party came in from Wog Wog and reached Mt. Renwick/​Owen. Over the June holiday week-end that same year a party camped at Yadboro Flat: one group climbed The Castle and the others scaled Talaterang from the Clyde River - a reprint of The Castle party'​s story was published in the magazine in April 1983. Simultaneously members of the Coast and Mountain Walkers, in particular Colin Watson, were undertaking exploration in the region. At Easter, 1957, Alex Colley and party came in from Wog Wog and reached Mt. Renwick/​Owen. Over the June holiday week-end that same year a party camped at Yadboro Flat: one group climbed The Castle and the others scaled Talaterang from the Clyde River - a reprint of The Castle party'​s story was published in the magazine in April 1983. Simultaneously members of the Coast and Mountain Walkers, in particular Colin Watson, were undertaking exploration in the region.
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 I had first been in the Budawangs with a party which went from Wog Wog down Yadboro River to the Clyde and out to the coast over the Pigeon House ridges at Easter, 1952, and later had joined in a couple of the trips following the Leyden explorations from Sassafras. Like all the others, I was impressed by the promise of this new walking ground. However, most of these trips were private ventures, and did not get into printed walks programmes. I had first been in the Budawangs with a party which went from Wog Wog down Yadboro River to the Clyde and out to the coast over the Pigeon House ridges at Easter, 1952, and later had joined in a couple of the trips following the Leyden explorations from Sassafras. Like all the others, I was impressed by the promise of this new walking ground. However, most of these trips were private ventures, and did not get into printed walks programmes.
  
-Which brings us, finally, to the Colin Putt exploratory of October, 1957. I think this may have been the first official programmed walk for nine years that entered the Budawangs from Sassafras - the previous one being Alex Colley'​s in June, 1948, which had been plaguedcby ​deplorable weather. Colin'​s averred intention was to get from Sassafras to Mount Renwick/​Owen (and who knows time permitting, The Castle).+Which brings us, finally, to the Colin Putt exploratory of October, 1957. I think this may have been the first official programmed walk for nine years that entered the Budawangs from Sassafras - the previous one being Alex Colley'​s in June, 1948, which had been plagued by deplorable weather. Colin'​s averred intention was to get from Sassafras to Mount Renwick/​Owen (and who knows time permitting, The Castle).
  
 Transport was by Putt-mobile,​ a fairly large truck furnished with a canopy in which up to 16 or 18 walkers could be conveyed with a minimum of comfort, but a high level of satisfaction. This time there were 14 - some I can still recall are Colin (driver/​leader),​ Heather Joyce (White), George Gray, John Manning and Eric Pegram. Friday night was spent at Tianjara Falls, and in the morning, turning south at Sassafras, our vehicle got us most of the way to the site of the ruined sawmill at The Vines. Transport was by Putt-mobile,​ a fairly large truck furnished with a canopy in which up to 16 or 18 walkers could be conveyed with a minimum of comfort, but a high level of satisfaction. This time there were 14 - some I can still recall are Colin (driver/​leader),​ Heather Joyce (White), George Gray, John Manning and Eric Pegram. Friday night was spent at Tianjara Falls, and in the morning, turning south at Sassafras, our vehicle got us most of the way to the site of the ruined sawmill at The Vines.
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 At that stage the easy way south, passing east of Quilty'​s Mountain and through the level swampland of Styles/​Sallee/​Haddles Creeks was not known, so we dived straight down from the old sawmill into Kilpatrick Creek and up the other side on to the northern end of Sturgiss Mountain (needless to say we did not know those names, nor did we have any map worth a pinch of salt). There was a small cliff to surmount to reach Sturgiss Mountain, but it couldn'​t have been formidable because I cannot remember any butterflies invading my inside as they do on even modestly steep places. At that stage the easy way south, passing east of Quilty'​s Mountain and through the level swampland of Styles/​Sallee/​Haddles Creeks was not known, so we dived straight down from the old sawmill into Kilpatrick Creek and up the other side on to the northern end of Sturgiss Mountain (needless to say we did not know those names, nor did we have any map worth a pinch of salt). There was a small cliff to surmount to reach Sturgiss Mountain, but it couldn'​t have been formidable because I cannot remember any butterflies invading my inside as they do on even modestly steep places.
  
-However, the party did get rather widely dispersed and selected a variety of different ways of scrambling down into the top end of Hidden Valley (then called "​Hopalong Valley"​ because of a fancied resemblance to the gullies where Wild West character Hopalong Cassidy used to pursue the rustlers in the T.V. series). When finally the scattered party assembled on the scrubby but reasonably level floor of Hidden Valley, Colin Putt announced sternly, "​We ​willnow ​rope up". Thereafter the party kept fairly coherent shape.+However, the party did get rather widely dispersed and selected a variety of different ways of scrambling down into the top end of Hidden Valley (then called "​Hopalong Valley"​ because of a fancied resemblance to the gullies where Wild West character Hopalong Cassidy used to pursue the rustlers in the T.V. series). When finally the scattered party assembled on the scrubby but reasonably level floor of Hidden Valley, Colin Putt announced sternly, "​We ​will now rope up". Thereafter the party kept fairly coherent shape.
  
 We were now on ground already known to George Gray and myself, and we made good time along Hidden Valley and out to the big grassy/​reedy saddle between Pagoda Rocks and Mount Houghton, where we took lunch. In fact, I think the early afternoon stage, along a wombat parade below the cliffs on the eastern side of Mount Houghton and then up a gap on to Mount Tarn was suggested jointly by George and myself. Along the way we found the burnt sticks of a campfire in an overhang, and someone said, "​Probably C.M.W. - they'​re prowling through this place too." We were now on ground already known to George Gray and myself, and we made good time along Hidden Valley and out to the big grassy/​reedy saddle between Pagoda Rocks and Mount Houghton, where we took lunch. In fact, I think the early afternoon stage, along a wombat parade below the cliffs on the eastern side of Mount Houghton and then up a gap on to Mount Tarn was suggested jointly by George and myself. Along the way we found the burnt sticks of a campfire in an overhang, and someone said, "​Probably C.M.W. - they'​re prowling through this place too."
  
-On Tarn Mountain, however, we were all at a loss, but Colin and John Manning went "​looking"​ with a vague snippet of information about a way down "in the second slot". While we waited they explored and confirmed that the "​second slot" would get us down below the cliff and on to the long reedy spur that runs down to the very beginnings of the Corang River. ​BUt it was too late in the day, so we camped on top of Tarn in the shelter of a big rocky mound, shaped rather like a rising moon. That was the night we. saw Sputnik One.+On Tarn Mountain, however, we were all at a loss, but Colin and John Manning went "​looking"​ with a vague snippet of information about a way down "in the second slot". While we waited they explored and confirmed that the "​second slot" would get us down below the cliff and on to the long reedy spur that runs down to the very beginnings of the Corang River. ​But it was too late in the day, so we camped on top of Tarn in the shelter of a big rocky mound, shaped rather like a rising moon. That was the night we. saw Sputnik One.
  
-We had used up so much of the week-end that The Castle was no longer an option, but we could still hope to discover the link between Tarn, Bibbenluke Mountain and the western face of MOunts ​Renwick/​Roswaine (Owen/​Cole). Colin accordingly decreed a 5.00 am departure, without packs, on Sunday to look at the way down from Tarn and to find the saddle connecting Bibbenluke with the Mount Renwick massif.+We had used up so much of the week-end that The Castle was no longer an option, but we could still hope to discover the link between Tarn, Bibbenluke Mountain and the western face of Mounts ​Renwick/​Roswaine (Owen/​Cole). Colin accordingly decreed a 5.00 am departure, without packs, on Sunday to look at the way down from Tarn and to find the saddle connecting Bibbenluke with the Mount Renwick massif.
  
-So, obedient to the last, as walkers always are (Ha, Ha, Ha) nine out of the 14 got out of their sleeping bags about 4.15 am and moved off in picaninny daylight at 5.10 am. They did pass the Corang headwaters, skirt Bibbenluke Walls and find the saddle leading to Renwick before the enemy, time, forced a retreat. But another couple of links in the chain of discovery had been forged.+So, obedient to the last, as walkers always are (Ha, Ha, Ha) nine out of the 14 got out of their sleeping bags about 4.15 am and moved off in picaninny daylight at 5.10 am. They __did__ ​pass the Corang headwaters, skirt Bibbenluke Walls and find the saddle leading to Renwick before the enemy, time, forced a retreat. But another couple of links in the chain of discovery had been forged.
  
-Here I confess I went only to Bibbenluke Walls, where I discovered I had lost my watch. It was an old one, and used only on walks, but it had been a gift from my parents in 1934 and had been with me all through the War +Here I confess I went only to Bibbenluke Walls, where I discovered I had lost my watch. It was an old one, and used only on walks, but it had been a gift from my parents in 1934 and had been with me all through the War years: I left the party and turned back looking for it and didn't find it.
-years: I left the party and turned back looking for it and didn't find it.+
  
-About 10.30 the reconnaissance party returned and we all packed and+About 10:30 the reconnaissance party returned and we all packed and
 left Mount Tarn, retreating by the same route. As the Putt-mobile approached Sassafras we met an incoming Army convoy whose commander was shocked to learn he would be loosing off mortar bombs in an area where civilians went bush walking. left Mount Tarn, retreating by the same route. As the Putt-mobile approached Sassafras we met an incoming Army convoy whose commander was shocked to learn he would be loosing off mortar bombs in an area where civilians went bush walking.
  
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 * R - __Response__ - quickly assess the state of consciousness of the casualty. If fainting from pain and shock, lie him/her down with feet raised. Lift leg well above burn. __Immediately pour on WATER__ and remove hot shoe and sock.  * R - __Response__ - quickly assess the state of consciousness of the casualty. If fainting from pain and shock, lie him/her down with feet raised. Lift leg well above burn. __Immediately pour on WATER__ and remove hot shoe and sock. 
  
-__WATER__ - Tell someone or get a canvas bucket full of cold water, or use a large billy, or plastic bag ih a hat. Use a creek only if very close by - remember, it is dark. Leave foot immersed in water for 10 minutes. Do NOT break blisters.+__WATER__ - Tell someone or get a canvas bucket full of cold water, or use a large billy, or plastic bag in a hat. Use a creek only if very close by - remember, it is dark. Leave foot immersed in water for 10 minutes. Do NOT break blisters.
  
 __(2) ASSESSMENT OF BURN.__ __(2) ASSESSMENT OF BURN.__
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 Here is an account of a recently completed tour of parts of Europe during this year's northern summer. Members planning an overseas trip to Europe may find my experiences and advice helpful in planning their itineraries. Here is an account of a recently completed tour of parts of Europe during this year's northern summer. Members planning an overseas trip to Europe may find my experiences and advice helpful in planning their itineraries.
  
-Flying Thai Airlines to Bangkok I joined a Polish "​LOT"​ Airlines flight to Warsaw and then on to Stockholm. Polish Airlines is one of the cheapest airlines available on the S.E. Asia - Europe sector. The return +Flying Thai Airlines to Bangkok I joined a Polish "​LOT"​ Airlines flight to Warsaw and then on to Stockholm. Polish Airlines is one of the cheapest airlines available on the S.E. Asia - Europe sector. The return fare from Sydney to Europe was approx. $1450. This is some $300 or $400 less than the big, established western airlines charge.
-fare from Sydney to Europe was approx. $1450. This is some $300 or $400 less than the big, established western airlines charge.+
  
 __Sweden__. Arriving at Stockholm'​s modern ARLANDA Airport, I was met by a Swedish friend whom I knew from a previous (1978) holiday in Europe. My friend showed me the sights of Stockholm, the beautiful, clean and tidy Swedish capital. Stockholm is known as the "​Venice of the North" due to its waterways and the lakes surrounding the city. __Sweden__. Arriving at Stockholm'​s modern ARLANDA Airport, I was met by a Swedish friend whom I knew from a previous (1978) holiday in Europe. My friend showed me the sights of Stockholm, the beautiful, clean and tidy Swedish capital. Stockholm is known as the "​Venice of the North" due to its waterways and the lakes surrounding the city.
  
-Sweden is about the most expensive country in the whole of Europe, about the same as Switzerland. However, I found I could get delicious, healthy and inexpensive meals at a good self-service restaurant with smorgasbord dishes, a Swedish ​speciality ​now internationally known.+Sweden is about the most expensive country in the whole of Europe, about the same as Switzerland. However, I found I could get delicious, healthy and inexpensive meals at a good self-service restaurant with smorgasbord dishes, a Swedish ​specialty ​now internationally known.
  
 Owing to Sweden'​s very high latitudes, it has very long hours of daylight. The sun was up by 4 am in the morning and it was still light at 10 o'​clock at night. Hence the name sometimes used to describe Sweden - "The Land of the Midnight Sun". Owing to Sweden'​s very high latitudes, it has very long hours of daylight. The sun was up by 4 am in the morning and it was still light at 10 o'​clock at night. Hence the name sometimes used to describe Sweden - "The Land of the Midnight Sun".
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 On the last Sunday of my visit we went on a lovely bushwalk to a lakeside national park, just outside Stockholm. It was a warm and sunny May day and the flowering tulips, daffodils and silver beech trees were a beautiful sight. Swedish people appear to be very nature-loving and fitness conscious. There were thousands of people to be seen cycling and walking in the park on this glorious spring day. On the last Sunday of my visit we went on a lovely bushwalk to a lakeside national park, just outside Stockholm. It was a warm and sunny May day and the flowering tulips, daffodils and silver beech trees were a beautiful sight. Swedish people appear to be very nature-loving and fitness conscious. There were thousands of people to be seen cycling and walking in the park on this glorious spring day.
  
-__West Germany__. On the following Monday it was with sadness that I boarded a train for Germany, as the Swedish people impressed very wK1 with their cleanliness,​ friendliness and their helpfulness to foreign visitors. That night I arrived in Hamburg in West Germany quite late after a very long and tiring train trip through southern Sweden and Denmark. I stayed only one night in Hamburg catching a train for Munich in Bavaria the following morning.+__West Germany__. On the following Monday it was with sadness that I boarded a train for Germany, as the Swedish people impressed very well with their cleanliness,​ friendliness and their helpfulness to foreign visitors. That night I arrived in Hamburg in West Germany quite late after a very long and tiring train trip through southern Sweden and Denmark. I stayed only one night in Hamburg catching a train for Munich in Bavaria the following morning.
  
-My next stop was the mountain town of Berchtesgaden,​ near the Austrian border. It was very interesting to travel up the steep mountain road to inspect the famous "​Eagles Nest" mountain retreat. The views from the top +My next stop was the mountain town of Berchtesgaden,​ near the Austrian border. It was very interesting to travel up the steep mountain road to inspect the famous "​Eagles Nest" mountain retreat. The views from the top were unbelievably beautiful. At present there is a restaurant and coffee shop on the site where a former German leader used to have his vacation house. The place is very popular with international tourists, especially Americans.
-were unbelievably beautiful. At present there is a restaurant and coffee shop on the site where a former German leader used to have his vacation house. The place is very popular with international tourists, especially Americans.+
  
-__Yugoslavia__. Leaving Germany, I continued south to Yugoslavia. This is a poor and backward communist (non-aligned) country that is at present experiencing very serious economic problems. Be that as it may, it is +__Yugoslavia__. Leaving Germany, I continued south to Yugoslavia. This is a poor and backward communist (non-aligned) country that is at present experiencing very serious economic problems. Be that as it may, it is relatively cheap to travel through compared to the northern and western European countries. This is mainly due to its very weak local currency, the "​Dinar",​ and the consequently very favorable ​exchange rates for "​hard"​ (western) currencies.
-relatively cheap to travel through compared to the northern and western European countries. This is mainly due to its very weak local currency, the "​Dinar",​ and the consequently very favourable ​exchange rates for "​hard"​ (western) currencies.+
  
 I found the Dalmatian coastline to be the most scenically interesting part of Yugoslavia. I spent a week on the island RAB off the coast of N.W. Yugoslavia. It is a very scenic little island with beautiful beaches but tends to be overrun by hordes of German tourists during "the season"​ (July and August). I found the Dalmatian coastline to be the most scenically interesting part of Yugoslavia. I spent a week on the island RAB off the coast of N.W. Yugoslavia. It is a very scenic little island with beautiful beaches but tends to be overrun by hordes of German tourists during "the season"​ (July and August).
  
-__Hungary__. Leaving Yugoslavia, I crossed the Hungarian border to visit this other small Eastern Bloc country. Its capital, Budapest, was a pleasant surprise. The city straddles the long Danube River and has very many fine old buildings dating back several centuries when Hungary was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Hungary has very good and cheap food, especially paprika-flavoured ​dishes and its world-famous "​goulash"​ is especially good. There are many restaurants in Budapest where one can dine and be entertained by live Gipsy bands! After Budapest, I briefly visited Lake Balaton, a rather large lake about 100 km south of the capital. The lake is rather "​touristy"​ and is used for yachting and swimming by locals and tourists.+__Hungary__. Leaving Yugoslavia, I crossed the Hungarian border to visit this other small Eastern Bloc country. Its capital, Budapest, was a pleasant surprise. The city straddles the long Danube River and has very many fine old buildings dating back several centuries when Hungary was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Hungary has very good and cheap food, especially paprika-flavored ​dishes and its world-famous "​goulash"​ is especially good. There are many restaurants in Budapest where one can dine and be entertained by live Gipsy bands! After Budapest, I briefly visited Lake Balaton, a rather large lake about 100 km south of the capital. The lake is rather "​touristy"​ and is used for yachting and swimming by locals and tourists.
  
 __Czechoslovakia__. The next country, Czechoslovakia,​ is another Eastern Bloc country. I found it quite unfriendly and uninteresting,​ except for the capital Prague, which has some fine buildings and old churches along the river. Its shops were very poorly stocked and it is normal practice for people having to queue up when doing their shopping. __Czechoslovakia__. The next country, Czechoslovakia,​ is another Eastern Bloc country. I found it quite unfriendly and uninteresting,​ except for the capital Prague, which has some fine buildings and old churches along the river. Its shops were very poorly stocked and it is normal practice for people having to queue up when doing their shopping.
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 __Austria__. It was with great pleasure that I crossed the Czech border to get into beautiful Austria! (Parochial prejudice, I call it! Ed.) The difference between Austria and the drab and boring Eastern Bloc countries is unbelievable! I was stunned by the wealth and prosperity so obvious in Austria: there are well stocked shops and the inhabitants are well dressed and prosperous looking. Austria is a "​neutral"​ country though very "​western"​ in its outlook and way of life. __Austria__. It was with great pleasure that I crossed the Czech border to get into beautiful Austria! (Parochial prejudice, I call it! Ed.) The difference between Austria and the drab and boring Eastern Bloc countries is unbelievable! I was stunned by the wealth and prosperity so obvious in Austria: there are well stocked shops and the inhabitants are well dressed and prosperous looking. Austria is a "​neutral"​ country though very "​western"​ in its outlook and way of life.
  
-I spent a most enjoyable five weeks here. Having bought a bicycle, I toured lots of quaint mountain villages by bike and "​bushwalked"​ in some beautiful mountain country. There are still wild mountain ​gOats ("​chamois"​) to be seen grazing on the mountain peaks, and the alpine flowers one sees are spectacular.+I spent a most enjoyable five weeks here. Having bought a bicycle, I toured lots of quaint mountain villages by bike and "​bushwalked"​ in some beautiful mountain country. There are still wild mountain ​goats ("​chamois"​) to be seen grazing on the mountain peaks, and the alpine flowers one sees are spectacular.
  
 The country in general is a real pleasure to travel through. Public transport is clean, very efficient and always on time. Austria, compared to the Eastern Bloc and southern European countries, is not cheap, but in my opinion, it was the most beautiful and enjoyable country of all. The country in general is a real pleasure to travel through. Public transport is clean, very efficient and always on time. Austria, compared to the Eastern Bloc and southern European countries, is not cheap, but in my opinion, it was the most beautiful and enjoyable country of all.
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 All work done for the S.B.W. is done by volunteers (and there are a lot of different jobs), so new members are invited to offer if they feel there is any work they can take part in. This applies to the many other jobs that need to be done in the Club as well as the magazine printing. All work done for the S.B.W. is done by volunteers (and there are a lot of different jobs), so new members are invited to offer if they feel there is any work they can take part in. This applies to the many other jobs that need to be done in the Club as well as the magazine printing.
  
-However, at the moment, ASSISTANT PRINTERS are wanted, so please consider whether you can help, and if so ring Phil Butt 94-6333 (H) or 339-7179 (B), or Barbara Bruce 546-6570 (H), or speak to Barbara or +However, at the moment, ASSISTANT PRINTERS are wanted, so please consider whether you can help, and if so ring Phil Butt 94-6333 (H) or 339-7179 (B), or Barbara Bruce 546-6570 (H), or speak to Barbara or Ainslie Morris in the clubroom. The off-set printer is at present located at Seaforth but in future will probably be located at Turramurra.
-Ainslie Morris in the clubroom. The off-set printer is at present located +
-at Seaforth but in future will probably be located at Turramurra.+
  
 ===== THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY: ===== ===== THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY: =====
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 ===== ALTERATION TO WALKS PROGRAMME. ===== ===== ALTERATION TO WALKS PROGRAMME. =====
  
-8.9.10 Nov. FAMILY WALK - Megalong - Six Foot Track - Cox R. - Canons ​20 km Easy. Leader: DAVID ROSTRON 451 7943.+8.9.10 Nov. FAMILY WALK - Megalong - Six Foot Track - Cox R. - Carlons ​20 km Easy. Leader: DAVID ROSTRON 451 7943.
  
 This walk will now be led on the following weekend, 15.16.17 November. This walk will now be led on the following weekend, 15.16.17 November.
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 Don't forget, the CLUB AUCTION is on October 30th (next Wednesday?​). If the mails are on time there is still the opportunity to put your old or unwanted gear to good use. Charlie Brown is the auctioneer. Don't forget, the CLUB AUCTION is on October 30th (next Wednesday?​). If the mails are on time there is still the opportunity to put your old or unwanted gear to good use. Charlie Brown is the auctioneer.
  
-In November, Greta Davis will show slides on Nepal on the lath. Magazine wrapping follows the dinner on the 20th, and there is an important announcement about the 27th.+In November, Greta Davis will show slides on Nepal on the 13th. Magazine wrapping follows the dinner on the 20th, and there is an important announcement about the 27th.
  
 The Minister for Planning and Environment,​ Mr. Bob Carr, has had to defer his address to the Club until 22nd January '86 (to be shown on the next programme). Unfortunately,​ the House was meeting on the night originally scheduled. The Minister for Planning and Environment,​ Mr. Bob Carr, has had to defer his address to the Club until 22nd January '86 (to be shown on the next programme). Unfortunately,​ the House was meeting on the night originally scheduled.
198510.txt · Last modified: 2014/03/13 09:58 by simon