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198402 [2016/03/17 04:18]
kclacher [Established June 1931]
198402 [2016/03/17 04:30] (current)
kclacher [SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU, TASMANIA - 26/12/83 TO 9/1/84]
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 |Apprentice Dup. Op.:  |Barbara Evans  | |Apprentice Dup. Op.:  |Barbara Evans  |
  
-==== FEBRUARY 1984====+==== FEBRUARY 1984 ====
 | | |Page  | | | |Page  |
 |Kosciusko National Park   |by Peter Miller ​  ​| ​ 2| |Kosciusko National Park   |by Peter Miller ​  ​| ​ 2|
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 |The Annual General Meeting & The Annual Reunion ​  |Kath Brown  |  16| |The Annual General Meeting & The Annual Reunion ​  |Kath Brown  |  16|
  
-===== KOSCIUSKO NATIONAL PARK=====+===== KOSCIUSKO NATIONAL PARK =====
  
-by Peter Miller.\\ +by Peter Miller\\ ​
  
 |Maps: ​ |Khancoban 1:​50,​000 ​ | |Maps: ​ |Khancoban 1:​50,​000 ​ |
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 I have included the times in this walk report as an aid to someone else planning a similar trip. We were an average walking party and not setting out to break records. I have included the times in this walk report as an aid to someone else planning a similar trip. We were an average walking party and not setting out to break records.
  
-__Monday 26.12.83.__\\ +__Monday 26.12.83__\\ 
 Boxing Day, and who really wants to get out of bed at 04.45 and drive down to the Snowy? I know I didn'​t,​ but Colin Barnes was coming to pick up my son Robert and me so we had to stir ourselves and be ready by 05.50. The packs at this stage were bone-crushing and I couldn'​t see how I would ever carry mine up Disappointment Ridge. We picked up Jeff and set off for Guthega Power Station where we were all to meet at 13.00. Bill, Margaret, Helen and Brian were already there when we arrived and John, Adrienne and Evelyn arrived late as they had been indulging heavily at Macdonalds on the way. Boxing Day, and who really wants to get out of bed at 04.45 and drive down to the Snowy? I know I didn'​t,​ but Colin Barnes was coming to pick up my son Robert and me so we had to stir ourselves and be ready by 05.50. The packs at this stage were bone-crushing and I couldn'​t see how I would ever carry mine up Disappointment Ridge. We picked up Jeff and set off for Guthega Power Station where we were all to meet at 13.00. Bill, Margaret, Helen and Brian were already there when we arrived and John, Adrienne and Evelyn arrived late as they had been indulging heavily at Macdonalds on the way.
  
 The drivers took the three cars to Thredbo and returned in John'​s. It takes about two hours to drive to Thredbo and back and it was a little tedious waiting around the power station. The weather was overcast and it did not look like a very auspicious start to the trip. The drivers took the three cars to Thredbo and returned in John'​s. It takes about two hours to drive to Thredbo and back and it was a little tedious waiting around the power station. The weather was overcast and it did not look like a very auspicious start to the trip.
  
-__Map: Mount Kosciusko.__\\ +__Map: Mount Kosciusko__\\ 
 We finally left at 16.30 and headed slowly up the four-wheel-drive track up Disappointment Ridge. By now the clouds had blown away and we had some good views across the valley to the Main Range, and caught our first glimpse of snow in the distance. We walked up the track until we came to the gauging station, 273787, and after a rest we headed up the creek looking for a camp spot. We finally left at 16.30 and headed slowly up the four-wheel-drive track up Disappointment Ridge. By now the clouds had blown away and we had some good views across the valley to the Main Range, and caught our first glimpse of snow in the distance. We walked up the track until we came to the gauging station, 273787, and after a rest we headed up the creek looking for a camp spot.
  
 We found a reasonable place to camp a few hundred metres below the brow of the ridge (18.00) and settled down quite early. We were treated to our first evening of listening to the cackle of Colin, Adrienne and Evelyn as they argued over how and where to pitch their tent. They were quickly labelled the "​Rosellas"​ and they kept up their noisy settling down procedure every night as they roosted on their perches. It was a fine clear night and we were all soon asleep. We found a reasonable place to camp a few hundred metres below the brow of the ridge (18.00) and settled down quite early. We were treated to our first evening of listening to the cackle of Colin, Adrienne and Evelyn as they argued over how and where to pitch their tent. They were quickly labelled the "​Rosellas"​ and they kept up their noisy settling down procedure every night as they roosted on their perches. It was a fine clear night and we were all soon asleep.
  
-__Tuesday 27.12.83.__\\ +__Tuesday 27.12.83__\\ 
 After a cold night we woke up to find the ice nearly a centimetre thick on the billies. This was quite a shock to the system as two days before in Sydney the temperature had been 37 degrees C.  We got away at 08.00 and headed up Disappointment Ridge. Although our packs were heavy it was a delightful walk up the ridge. The low scrub thins out to become snow grass which makes for easier walking. Eventually we left the clumps of snow gums behind and reached the top of Gungartan at 11.00 after a three hundred metre climb. We were all puffing by the time we reached the top as the thinner air makes climbing quite an exertion. After a cold night we woke up to find the ice nearly a centimetre thick on the billies. This was quite a shock to the system as two days before in Sydney the temperature had been 37 degrees C.  We got away at 08.00 and headed up Disappointment Ridge. Although our packs were heavy it was a delightful walk up the ridge. The low scrub thins out to become snow grass which makes for easier walking. Eventually we left the clumps of snow gums behind and reached the top of Gungartan at 11.00 after a three hundred metre climb. We were all puffing by the time we reached the top as the thinner air makes climbing quite an exertion.
  
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 By now it was quite hot and we still had a long way to go so we reluctantly hoisted up our heavy packs and set off along the Brassy Mountains. It was soft walking over snow grass or low gorse and fairly level going. By now it was quite hot and we still had a long way to go so we reluctantly hoisted up our heavy packs and set off along the Brassy Mountains. It was soft walking over snow grass or low gorse and fairly level going.
  
-__Map: ​Khancoban.__\\ +__Map: ​Khancoban__\\ 
 We passed Big Brassy Peak and Brassy Peak and steered for the saddle between Cup and Saucer Hill and Mailbox Hill. This was my first attempt at leading a walk in this area and I wasn't sure of the camp spots but we found one just to the west of the saddle with a splendid view of Jagungal to the north - 273921. We passed Big Brassy Peak and Brassy Peak and steered for the saddle between Cup and Saucer Hill and Mailbox Hill. This was my first attempt at leading a walk in this area and I wasn't sure of the camp spots but we found one just to the west of the saddle with a splendid view of Jagungal to the north - 273921.
  
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 It was quite windy during the night and some ominous, dark clouds ​ blew up from the south-east. It was quite windy during the night and some ominous, dark clouds ​ blew up from the south-east.
  
-__Wednesday 28.12.83.__\\ +__Wednesday 28.12.83__\\ 
 We woke to a misty morning with no sun and no Jagungal. As We had a relatively easy day there was no great hurry to be off. Helen opted to stay back at camp and make the "​blanc-mange"​ and the rest of us set out at 09.20 heading north for the Jagungal saddle. It was delightful to be walking with light packs across the open grassland with our mountain now in full view. We climbed an open grassy ridge (262973) and followed the sky-line to the summit which we reached by 11.50. We woke to a misty morning with no sun and no Jagungal. As We had a relatively easy day there was no great hurry to be off. Helen opted to stay back at camp and make the "​blanc-mange"​ and the rest of us set out at 09.20 heading north for the Jagungal saddle. It was delightful to be walking with light packs across the open grassland with our mountain now in full view. We climbed an open grassy ridge (262973) and followed the sky-line to the summit which we reached by 11.50.
  
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 When we were gathered again at the camp Helen produced a birthday cake with one candle for Brian so we all helped him to celebrate - um - delicious. When we were gathered again at the camp Helen produced a birthday cake with one candle for Brian so we all helped him to celebrate - um - delicious.
  
-__Thursday 29.12.8.__\\ +__Thursday 29.12.8__\\ 
 It was a clear sunny morning and we got away by 08.30 and set off to climb Cup and Saucer Hill. The view from the top was excellent, looking across Valentines Creek to the Kerries, back to Jagungal which we could now add to our "been there, done that" list, and along the Brassies. By now the packs were noticeably lighter and it was good to be walking. It was a clear sunny morning and we got away by 08.30 and set off to climb Cup and Saucer Hill. The view from the top was excellent, looking across Valentines Creek to the Kerries, back to Jagungal which we could now add to our "been there, done that" list, and along the Brassies. By now the packs were noticeably lighter and it was good to be walking.
  
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 We rigged up a foot bath made from a large (75 cm x 100 cm) garbage bag laid across a square made from logs and filled with hot soapy water. From here on this foot bath became very popular and we rigged it up again at the next camp. It is recommended for soothing tired feet. We rigged up a foot bath made from a large (75 cm x 100 cm) garbage bag laid across a square made from logs and filled with hot soapy water. From here on this foot bath became very popular and we rigged it up again at the next camp. It is recommended for soothing tired feet.
  
-__Friday 30.12.83.__\\ +__Friday 30.12.83__\\ 
 Reluctant to leave such a charming spot we finally dragged ourselves away at 09.00 and set off for the Granite Peaks, the Rolling Grounds and Consett Stephens Pass. The weather remained clear and we had no problems navigating. At the pass the wind was extremely cold so we put on extra clothing which soon became too-warm as we climbed up to Mount Tate. On top of Tate we met Gordon Lee and his party. Gordon pointed out a possible camp site below Mount Anderson and-that became our objective after lunch. Reluctant to leave such a charming spot we finally dragged ourselves away at 09.00 and set off for the Granite Peaks, the Rolling Grounds and Consett Stephens Pass. The weather remained clear and we had no problems navigating. At the pass the wind was extremely cold so we put on extra clothing which soon became too-warm as we climbed up to Mount Tate. On top of Tate we met Gordon Lee and his party. Gordon pointed out a possible camp site below Mount Anderson and-that became our objective after lunch.
  
 We found another grassy knoll surrounded by snow gums - 206732 - and made an early camp at 14.00. This campsite too was surrounded by mountains and we could see Mount Tate, Mann Bluff, Mounts Anderson, ​ Anton, Twynam (with a large patch of snow), Little Twynam, The Paralyser, Mount Perisher, Blue Cow and Gills Knob.  In the valley below us across the Snomy River we could see Illawong Lodge. I wanted to camp in a position with an easy escape route in case the weather turned nasty and this was an ideal spot. We found another grassy knoll surrounded by snow gums - 206732 - and made an early camp at 14.00. This campsite too was surrounded by mountains and we could see Mount Tate, Mann Bluff, Mounts Anderson, ​ Anton, Twynam (with a large patch of snow), Little Twynam, The Paralyser, Mount Perisher, Blue Cow and Gills Knob.  In the valley below us across the Snomy River we could see Illawong Lodge. I wanted to camp in a position with an easy escape route in case the weather turned nasty and this was an ideal spot.
  
-__Saturday 31.12.83.__\\  ​+__Saturday 31.12.83__\\  ​
 This was another day off from carrying full packs, so we left the tents pitched and set out (09.30) for Watsons Crags. Helen'​s knee had been hurting so she and Brian decided to camp at Lake Albina for the night. This would save them climbing Mount Twynam twice and make the last day easier.- (We had intended walking to Thredbo on the last day from Pounds Creek.) This was another day off from carrying full packs, so we left the tents pitched and set out (09.30) for Watsons Crags. Helen'​s knee had been hurting so she and Brian decided to camp at Lake Albina for the night. This would save them climbing Mount Twynam twice and make the last day easier.- (We had intended walking to Thredbo on the last day from Pounds Creek.)
  
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 As we turned in for the night the rain started and did not stop all night. The wind was very strong, blowing from the north-east and we wondered how Helen and Brian were getting on in their exposed position at Lake Albina. As we turned in for the night the rain started and did not stop all night. The wind was very strong, blowing from the north-east and we wondered how Helen and Brian were getting on in their exposed position at Lake Albina.
  
-__Sunday 1.1.84.__\\ +__Sunday 1.1.84__\\ 
 After raining all night and blowing great guns the weather relented a little and we were able to have breakfast in the dry. Colin and Bill got a fire going and when we were ready to go I asked each person ​ whether they wanted to go over the top to Thredbo or down to Guthega. The general consensus was that there would be little joy in going higher, so we set off down Pounds Creek. As we did so the rain started After raining all night and blowing great guns the weather relented a little and we were able to have breakfast in the dry. Colin and Bill got a fire going and when we were ready to go I asked each person ​ whether they wanted to go over the top to Thredbo or down to Guthega. The general consensus was that there would be little joy in going higher, so we set off down Pounds Creek. As we did so the rain started
 again and became quite heavy. The scrub along Pounds Creek was thick for the last kilometre before reaching the Snowy River and we made slow progress until we crossed the river and picked up the track leading into Guthega. We did the six kilometres from Guthega to the Power Station in about an hour as we wanted to get out of the rain as soon as we could. again and became quite heavy. The scrub along Pounds Creek was thick for the last kilometre before reaching the Snowy River and we made slow progress until we crossed the river and picked up the track leading into Guthega. We did the six kilometres from Guthega to the Power Station in about an hour as we wanted to get out of the rain as soon as we could.
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 We spared a thought for our fellow walkers at Dead Horse Gap. We spared a thought for our fellow walkers at Dead Horse Gap.
  
-__Monday 2.1,84.__\\  ​+__Monday 2.1,84__\\  ​
 And so the drive home again. And so the drive home again.
  
-===== BUSHWALKER RECIPES===== +===== BUSHWALKER RECIPES ===== 
  
 |**From Judith Rostron** ​ |  |  |**From Christine Austin** ​ | |**From Judith Rostron** ​ |  |  |**From Christine Austin** ​ |
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 ===== MEETING NOTES ===== ===== MEETING NOTES =====
-===== DECEMBER 1983 GENERAL MEETING.===== +===== DECEMBER 1983 GENERAL MEETING===== 
-by Barry Wallace.+by Barry Wallace
  
 The meeting began at 2018 with around 35 members present and Vice- President Ainslie Morris in the chair. The meeting began at 2018 with around 35 members present and Vice- President Ainslie Morris in the chair.
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 Of General Business there was none, so the meeting closed at 2107 hours. Of General Business there was none, so the meeting closed at 2107 hours.
  
-===== JANUARY 1984 GENERAL MEETING===== +===== JANUARY 1984 GENERAL MEETING ===== 
-by Jim Brown.+by Jim Brown
  
 This should be sub-titled "Where have all the office-bearers gone?" You see, President Tony Marshall was on holidays; so was V.P. Ainslie Morris. The other "​Vice",​ Barry Wallace, was in Brisbane on business. After almost as much "​racing and chasing"​ as mentioned in Walter Scott'​s "​Lochinvar"​. Treasurer Barrie Murdoch occupied the chair for the General Meeting, which started with the bare quorum of 15 members, escalating to a little over 20 by the end. This should be sub-titled "Where have all the office-bearers gone?" You see, President Tony Marshall was on holidays; so was V.P. Ainslie Morris. The other "​Vice",​ Barry Wallace, was in Brisbane on business. After almost as much "​racing and chasing"​ as mentioned in Walter Scott'​s "​Lochinvar"​. Treasurer Barrie Murdoch occupied the chair for the General Meeting, which started with the bare quorum of 15 members, escalating to a little over 20 by the end.
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 With almost exactly 14 minutes of the meeting time fled, Barrie, who had conducted the meeting with the aplomb one might expect of a legal practitioner,​ called for General Business and when there was none, decreed the gathering at an end. With almost exactly 14 minutes of the meeting time fled, Barrie, who had conducted the meeting with the aplomb one might expect of a legal practitioner,​ called for General Business and when there was none, decreed the gathering at an end.
  
-===== ANOTHER BUSHWALKER RECIPE===== +===== ANOTHER BUSHWALKER RECIPE ===== 
-Judith Rostron.+Judith Rostron
  
 __PESTO__\\ ​ __PESTO__\\ ​
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 ===== SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU, TASMANIA - 26/12/83 TO 9/1/84 ===== ===== SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU, TASMANIA - 26/12/83 TO 9/1/84 =====
-by Spiro Hajinakitas.+by Spiro Hajinakitas
  
 ROUTE: Higg's Track - Lake Nameless - Walls of Jerusalem - Lake Meston - Mountains of Jupiter - Orion Lakes - Du Cane Gap - Overland Track -  Narcissus Bay - Byron Gap - Cuvier Valley - Cynthia Bay. ROUTE: Higg's Track - Lake Nameless - Walls of Jerusalem - Lake Meston - Mountains of Jupiter - Orion Lakes - Du Cane Gap - Overland Track -  Narcissus Bay - Byron Gap - Cuvier Valley - Cynthia Bay.
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 The success of a two-week Tassie walk depends on a combination of factors. The compatibility of the party members, sound leadership, the weather, an interesting and scenic route, good campsites, good food and shorter walking days than on an ordinary weekend walk in NSW. Peter, whilst maintaining a hectic pace at his work place, did a great deal of hard work in the planning of the route, arranging transport, selecting the party members and delegating chores. All credit goes to him for the success of this trip and we are forever in his debt. The success of a two-week Tassie walk depends on a combination of factors. The compatibility of the party members, sound leadership, the weather, an interesting and scenic route, good campsites, good food and shorter walking days than on an ordinary weekend walk in NSW. Peter, whilst maintaining a hectic pace at his work place, did a great deal of hard work in the planning of the route, arranging transport, selecting the party members and delegating chores. All credit goes to him for the success of this trip and we are forever in his debt.
  
-__DAY 1.__\\ +__DAY 1__\\ 
 Our driver, Spike, arrived on time at Devonport Airport and we loaded - our packs onto the Land Rover. They seemed to weigh a tonne, but I think the average weight was 27 kilos. After an hour's drive in the hot midday sun we arrived at the bottom of Higg's Track, changed into our walking clothes and put our street clothes back into the vehicle. Spike assured us he would deposit them at the Ranger'​s hut at Cynthia Bay ready for our return. We bid him farewell, boiled the billy, had lunch and started off up the steep but well-graded track through thick forest. We were thankful of the tree shade cover, saw our first Tasmanian Waratahs and eventually reached the top of The Great Western Tiers to be greeted by a most strong north-westerly breeze. After the hot climb up Higg's Track the change in temperature came as a shock. We donned jumpers and set up camp in a sheltered spot alongside the ruins of a logger'​s hat. It was very pleasant out of the wind. Our driver, Spike, arrived on time at Devonport Airport and we loaded - our packs onto the Land Rover. They seemed to weigh a tonne, but I think the average weight was 27 kilos. After an hour's drive in the hot midday sun we arrived at the bottom of Higg's Track, changed into our walking clothes and put our street clothes back into the vehicle. Spike assured us he would deposit them at the Ranger'​s hut at Cynthia Bay ready for our return. We bid him farewell, boiled the billy, had lunch and started off up the steep but well-graded track through thick forest. We were thankful of the tree shade cover, saw our first Tasmanian Waratahs and eventually reached the top of The Great Western Tiers to be greeted by a most strong north-westerly breeze. After the hot climb up Higg's Track the change in temperature came as a shock. We donned jumpers and set up camp in a sheltered spot alongside the ruins of a logger'​s hat. It was very pleasant out of the wind.
  
-__DAY 2.__\\ +__DAY 2__\\ 
 We awoke to a sunny but cool day, and moved off at 9.20 am to cover the 6 km to Lake Nameless. A severe bushfire many years ago had burnt of a lot of the trees and shrubs, the going through numerous vivid green cushion plants, snow grass and alpine flowers in bloom was very easy. Quite soon afterwards Peter was feeling very ill; he suspected the bacon he had for breakfast. We stopped for morning tea at the northern and of Lake Nameless and spotted a small group of day trippers coming towards us. We invited them to share our fire, chatted with them for a while, and moved off to make camp near the south-west tip of Lake Nameless in another sheltered spot above another ruined hut site which was to be our camp for two nights. As he was still feeling ill, Peter declined lunch and whilst we ate our lunch.of cheese, ham speck, bread and butter, spreads, carob nuts and dried fruit, he went through our comprehensive medicine chest for the right medicine and retired to his tent to sleep. We awoke to a sunny but cool day, and moved off at 9.20 am to cover the 6 km to Lake Nameless. A severe bushfire many years ago had burnt of a lot of the trees and shrubs, the going through numerous vivid green cushion plants, snow grass and alpine flowers in bloom was very easy. Quite soon afterwards Peter was feeling very ill; he suspected the bacon he had for breakfast. We stopped for morning tea at the northern and of Lake Nameless and spotted a small group of day trippers coming towards us. We invited them to share our fire, chatted with them for a while, and moved off to make camp near the south-west tip of Lake Nameless in another sheltered spot above another ruined hut site which was to be our camp for two nights. As he was still feeling ill, Peter declined lunch and whilst we ate our lunch.of cheese, ham speck, bread and butter, spreads, carob nuts and dried fruit, he went through our comprehensive medicine chest for the right medicine and retired to his tent to sleep.
  
 Dick, George and Joan headed off to Lake Ironstone, 3 km to the north,east, followed half an hour later by Jo, Jim and me. On the way we disturbed a colony of fat-looking light-tan wallabies. We Were not sure if they were fat or if their long hair gave them their plump -appearance. We saw so many wallabies on the Central Plateau that after the first day we just took their presence for granted. Liter a short time viewing and photographing the lake we returned to camp, With.Jim, Jo and Jowl going for a swim. As the night was still young, we decided on an afternoon-drink. During our absence Peter had had the same idea. He had got up and had a couple of stiff scotches and a cigarette or two and back to bed. Any thought of Peter having dinner with us that evening was quashed when he heard Joan exclaim that we had weevils in the figs. Unperturbed,​ our quartermaster Bill stated we should wash and eat them first. Dick, George and Joan headed off to Lake Ironstone, 3 km to the north,east, followed half an hour later by Jo, Jim and me. On the way we disturbed a colony of fat-looking light-tan wallabies. We Were not sure if they were fat or if their long hair gave them their plump -appearance. We saw so many wallabies on the Central Plateau that after the first day we just took their presence for granted. Liter a short time viewing and photographing the lake we returned to camp, With.Jim, Jo and Jowl going for a swim. As the night was still young, we decided on an afternoon-drink. During our absence Peter had had the same idea. He had got up and had a couple of stiff scotches and a cigarette or two and back to bed. Any thought of Peter having dinner with us that evening was quashed when he heard Joan exclaim that we had weevils in the figs. Unperturbed,​ our quartermaster Bill stated we should wash and eat them first.
  
-__DAY 3.__\\ +__DAY 3__\\ 
 The morning'​s "day trip" was a circular route taking in Lakes Johnny, Chambers, Douglass, Forty Lakes Peak and back. At first Peter thought he would opt out as he had not recovered, but we persuaded him to change his mind, as we thought the exercise would do him good. So we set off, and as George said, we kept up with Peter in the lead only because he was feeling ill and not walking at his usual strong pace. Again Peter declined lunch, George draped a chequered table cloth over his legs, like a sarong, to protect his legs from  the sun. Just as we were moving off we heard gunfire and sure enough, near Lake Chambers we spotted two shooters. The morning'​s "day trip" was a circular route taking in Lakes Johnny, Chambers, Douglass, Forty Lakes Peak and back. At first Peter thought he would opt out as he had not recovered, but we persuaded him to change his mind, as we thought the exercise would do him good. So we set off, and as George said, we kept up with Peter in the lead only because he was feeling ill and not walking at his usual strong pace. Again Peter declined lunch, George draped a chequered table cloth over his legs, like a sarong, to protect his legs from  the sun. Just as we were moving off we heard gunfire and sure enough, near Lake Chambers we spotted two shooters.
  
 The view from Forty Lakes Peak was indeed magnificent. Dozens of small lakes and tarns dotted the landscape and the distant spectacular mountain ranges wore starkly silhouetted against the blue sky. Back at camp we all set about various chores and managed to get some ash in the soup. Bill said it would act as a salt substitute. The view from Forty Lakes Peak was indeed magnificent. Dozens of small lakes and tarns dotted the landscape and the distant spectacular mountain ranges wore starkly silhouetted against the blue sky. Back at camp we all set about various chores and managed to get some ash in the soup. Bill said it would act as a salt substitute.
  
-__DAY 4.__\\ +__DAY 4__\\ 
 Our next camp was to be at Pencil Pine Tarn some 9 km along the obscure and shadeless Ritter'​s Track, named after a cattleman. It was another hot sunny day, so Peter draped a bright yellow cloth around his waist: two converted to "​drag",​ six to go? The route through countless lakes and tarns was indeed tricky but Peter expertly led us through the maze of waterways assisted by the occasional cairn. After a long hot walk we eventually stopped for lunch at the only available shade, a small tree-lined lake. Quite surprisingly,​ after a short tine in the shade we all felt a little cool, so we edged our way back into the sunshine and as we only had a few km to go to Pencil Pine Tarn most of us enjoyed a cat-nap. Our next camp was to be at Pencil Pine Tarn some 9 km along the obscure and shadeless Ritter'​s Track, named after a cattleman. It was another hot sunny day, so Peter draped a bright yellow cloth around his waist: two converted to "​drag",​ six to go? The route through countless lakes and tarns was indeed tricky but Peter expertly led us through the maze of waterways assisted by the occasional cairn. After a long hot walk we eventually stopped for lunch at the only available shade, a small tree-lined lake. Quite surprisingly,​ after a short tine in the shade we all felt a little cool, so we edged our way back into the sunshine and as we only had a few km to go to Pencil Pine Tarn most of us enjoyed a cat-nap.
  
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 Pencil Pine Tarn was reached after a short walk and some scouting had to be done to find a suitable camp site amongst the pencil pines which Joan said were very old, some were 1000 years old. After dinner we went off to an unnamed hill to view the sunset and got back in time for a cup of tea and a lesson in star watching from Dick. Pencil Pine Tarn was reached after a short walk and some scouting had to be done to find a suitable camp site amongst the pencil pines which Joan said were very old, some were 1000 years old. After dinner we went off to an unnamed hill to view the sunset and got back in time for a cup of tea and a lesson in star watching from Dick.
  
-__DAY 5.__\\ +__DAY 5__\\ 
 Off again with day packs at 9.00 am, an easy 3 km north to Turrana Heights, then west another 3 km to Turrana Bluff and more splendid views in all directions. To the south-west in the middle distance Mt. Jerusalem, and beyond, the massive outline of the main range including Mt. Geryon, Mt. Ossa and Pelion East. On the way back to Pencil Pine Tarn some light rain tell for a few minutes. We got back at 2.30 pm and all had a few drinks before afternoon tea. We were in a merry mood as we waited for the billy to boil. Jo couldn'​t pour Off again with day packs at 9.00 am, an easy 3 km north to Turrana Heights, then west another 3 km to Turrana Bluff and more splendid views in all directions. To the south-west in the middle distance Mt. Jerusalem, and beyond, the massive outline of the main range including Mt. Geryon, Mt. Ossa and Pelion East. On the way back to Pencil Pine Tarn some light rain tell for a few minutes. We got back at 2.30 pm and all had a few drinks before afternoon tea. We were in a merry mood as we waited for the billy to boil. Jo couldn'​t pour
 the tea properly, she said she couldn'​t get it out quick enough. Peter announced he was going to break wind and light up a cancer stick and proceeded to do both. Then continuing, as he examined his washing, "What will I wear tomorrow? My tennis whites or my leprechaun greens?"​ Dick responded for all of us, "​You'​d better wear your leprechaun greens. If you wear your whites and someone sees you with us seven trailing behind you, we could be mistaken for Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs."​ the tea properly, she said she couldn'​t get it out quick enough. Peter announced he was going to break wind and light up a cancer stick and proceeded to do both. Then continuing, as he examined his washing, "What will I wear tomorrow? My tennis whites or my leprechaun greens?"​ Dick responded for all of us, "​You'​d better wear your leprechaun greens. If you wear your whites and someone sees you with us seven trailing behind you, we could be mistaken for Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs."​
  
-__DAY 6.__\\ +__DAY 6__\\ 
 Another hot sunny day. After a good breakfast of porridge and fantastic scrambled eggs-(Joan had finally mastered the secrets of egg powder), we left Pencil Pine Tarn and followed Peter, splendid in his leprechaun greens, back onto the Ritter'​s Track, our destination being The Walls of Jerusalem some 12 km away. After an hour or so we realised that George was not with us. He had missed seeing Peter take a short cut around a hill and had continued up the hill alone. By this time the rest of the party was way ahead and out of sight. But George, who was not carrying the cheese this time (reference S.W. Tassie trip 1974) realised something was amiss, when still on the track, walked into an unbroken spider'​s web. Another hot sunny day. After a good breakfast of porridge and fantastic scrambled eggs-(Joan had finally mastered the secrets of egg powder), we left Pencil Pine Tarn and followed Peter, splendid in his leprechaun greens, back onto the Ritter'​s Track, our destination being The Walls of Jerusalem some 12 km away. After an hour or so we realised that George was not with us. He had missed seeing Peter take a short cut around a hill and had continued up the hill alone. By this time the rest of the party was way ahead and out of sight. But George, who was not carrying the cheese this time (reference S.W. Tassie trip 1974) realised something was amiss, when still on the track, walked into an unbroken spider'​s web.
  
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 As it was New Year's Eve we had a special dinner with drinks,. Joan supplied us with chocolate, dried fruit and nuts and George produced cabanossi and crackers, and we cooked our first dampers. After dinner we sang Auld Lang Syne. When Jim and Jo retired to their tent they disturbed a possum who had stolen their bread. It climbed up the nearest tree to eat the bread quite unconc6rned at our protests. As it was New Year's Eve we had a special dinner with drinks,. Joan supplied us with chocolate, dried fruit and nuts and George produced cabanossi and crackers, and we cooked our first dampers. After dinner we sang Auld Lang Syne. When Jim and Jo retired to their tent they disturbed a possum who had stolen their bread. It climbed up the nearest tree to eat the bread quite unconc6rned at our protests.
  
-__DAY 7.__\\ +__DAY 7__\\ 
 DISASTER! ​ During the night an animal entered Peter and Dick's tent apse, bit a large hole in the bottom of Peter'​s canvas pack and ate all of our remaining ham speck, 24 kilos of it, and also one packet of rolled oats.  Another or the same beast (who knows) had entered George'​s pack and into a gar bag and George heard him rustling outside the tent. George grabbed it in the gar bag by the neck and then released it. It had drunk all of George'​s brandy, eaten his salami and had eaten through the straps on George'​s brand new pack. Not a good start to the New Year, still we had enough food and the packs were repairable. Peter handed out Minties to everyone as it was certainly time for a Mintie. For the marauding animals he prepared a bait of pethidine sandwiches. DISASTER! ​ During the night an animal entered Peter and Dick's tent apse, bit a large hole in the bottom of Peter'​s canvas pack and ate all of our remaining ham speck, 24 kilos of it, and also one packet of rolled oats.  Another or the same beast (who knows) had entered George'​s pack and into a gar bag and George heard him rustling outside the tent. George grabbed it in the gar bag by the neck and then released it. It had drunk all of George'​s brandy, eaten his salami and had eaten through the straps on George'​s brand new pack. Not a good start to the New Year, still we had enough food and the packs were repairable. Peter handed out Minties to everyone as it was certainly time for a Mintie. For the marauding animals he prepared a bait of pethidine sandwiches.
  
 That morning we climbed up to the top of the Western Wall via a very steep scree slope in a narrow gully. The climb was made very interesting by a very strong wind that literally blew our parkas up over our heads and played havoc with our balance. Of course we were rewarded with another splendid view from the top. That afternoon it started to rain very heavily. Half the party retreated to the dry comfort of their tents whilst the other half chose to stand around the fire keeping it going and watching Bill struggling to cook the evening meal. Eventually everyone was fed either in their tents or by the fire. I retired to bed at 9 pm when not long afterwards Peter came around in the pouring rain with a cup of tea which Joan and I thankfully accepted. A little while later Jo came around with an offer of Milo. We politely declined through fear of having to get up early in the morning in the rain. Apparently George and Bill did not have this problem in their tent. George had devised a plastic tube under the ground sheet. What a scientific mind he has. Well it proved to be quite effective, too much so, for in the morning there was a fast flowing river through the camp that most decidedly was not there the night before. That morning we climbed up to the top of the Western Wall via a very steep scree slope in a narrow gully. The climb was made very interesting by a very strong wind that literally blew our parkas up over our heads and played havoc with our balance. Of course we were rewarded with another splendid view from the top. That afternoon it started to rain very heavily. Half the party retreated to the dry comfort of their tents whilst the other half chose to stand around the fire keeping it going and watching Bill struggling to cook the evening meal. Eventually everyone was fed either in their tents or by the fire. I retired to bed at 9 pm when not long afterwards Peter came around in the pouring rain with a cup of tea which Joan and I thankfully accepted. A little while later Jo came around with an offer of Milo. We politely declined through fear of having to get up early in the morning in the rain. Apparently George and Bill did not have this problem in their tent. George had devised a plastic tube under the ground sheet. What a scientific mind he has. Well it proved to be quite effective, too much so, for in the morning there was a fast flowing river through the camp that most decidedly was not there the night before.
  
-__DAY 8.__\\ +__DAY 8__\\ 
 We left the Walls of Jerusalem through the Damascus Gate and down the picturesque Damascus Vale. We walked through some beautiful heath country with numerous grevillea and wild flowers in bloom. The rain had now ceased and we stopped at the eastern side of Lake Adelaide and had lunch on a nice sandy beach. After lunch we moved off to the south-eastern corner of Lake Adelaide and came upon a delightful camp site, flat grassy ground and a sandy beach and good views across the lake, but as it was not considered sheltered we continued on to site amongst the trees, a scruffy site but sheltered. A young Tasmanian Devil came towards us and started to scratch away in the dirt of the base of a tree only two metres from our campfire. We watched it for about thirty minutes and when it moved off in the direction of the tents we feared for our food and set up a guard. We left the Walls of Jerusalem through the Damascus Gate and down the picturesque Damascus Vale. We walked through some beautiful heath country with numerous grevillea and wild flowers in bloom. The rain had now ceased and we stopped at the eastern side of Lake Adelaide and had lunch on a nice sandy beach. After lunch we moved off to the south-eastern corner of Lake Adelaide and came upon a delightful camp site, flat grassy ground and a sandy beach and good views across the lake, but as it was not considered sheltered we continued on to site amongst the trees, a scruffy site but sheltered. A young Tasmanian Devil came towards us and started to scratch away in the dirt of the base of a tree only two metres from our campfire. We watched it for about thirty minutes and when it moved off in the direction of the tents we feared for our food and set up a guard.
  
-__DAY 9.__\\ +__DAY 9__\\ 
 Light rain was falling as we headed for Lake Meston. Peter had predicted heavy rain for the rest of the day: his predictions were always correct, so as Peter disbanded the original plan to camp at the Ling Roth Lakes area, our destination that day was now the hut at Junction Lake, built by A.H. Read, who now at the age of 93 still ventures out into the bush. Anyway, back to our story, we reached another Read hut three quarters of the way down the northern side of Lake Meston. This hut called RRR Hut after the three men starting with R's that built it. A most delightful rustic hut with thick horizontal logs, sealed with moss, a shingle roof, four bunks, stone floor and fire place and a tin chimney. Half way through lunch a group of young bushwalkers arrived from Junction Hut. So we hurried our lunch to make room for them. The damper I had cooked the night before tasted good and Jo wondered why I had not been snapped up yet. Jan replied, "He pedals too fast!" Light rain was falling as we headed for Lake Meston. Peter had predicted heavy rain for the rest of the day: his predictions were always correct, so as Peter disbanded the original plan to camp at the Ling Roth Lakes area, our destination that day was now the hut at Junction Lake, built by A.H. Read, who now at the age of 93 still ventures out into the bush. Anyway, back to our story, we reached another Read hut three quarters of the way down the northern side of Lake Meston. This hut called RRR Hut after the three men starting with R's that built it. A most delightful rustic hut with thick horizontal logs, sealed with moss, a shingle roof, four bunks, stone floor and fire place and a tin chimney. Half way through lunch a group of young bushwalkers arrived from Junction Hut. So we hurried our lunch to make room for them. The damper I had cooked the night before tasted good and Jo wondered why I had not been snapped up yet. Jan replied, "He pedals too fast!"
  
 We got to Junction Hut in time to collect and saw firewood and draw water from the adjacent Mersey River before the rain started. And rain it Jo and Jim chose to pitch their tent. Even with the fire going, the hut at first was quite cold and whilst playing cards we engaged in musical chairs in order-to have a turn to be near the fire. The rain pelted down and the hut warmed up and we were most thankful for the use of the hut. We got to Junction Hut in time to collect and saw firewood and draw water from the adjacent Mersey River before the rain started. And rain it Jo and Jim chose to pitch their tent. Even with the fire going, the hut at first was quite cold and whilst playing cards we engaged in musical chairs in order-to have a turn to be near the fire. The rain pelted down and the hut warmed up and we were most thankful for the use of the hut.
  
-__DAY 10.__\\ +__DAY 10__\\ 
 At 6 am we were awakened by a cheeky currawong tapping loudly on the window. Peter decided to reserve his opinion on the weather until after lunch. Most of us decided to walk to Clarke Falls, about half an hour's walk to the ,west of Junction Lake. Upon our return Peter greeted us with the news that we would be moving off after lunch. Twice previously Peter was prevented by bad weather in climbing up to the Mountains of Jupiter, but after studying the clouds he felt confident that this year he would make it. Some thick scrub was encountered on the way up and a little difficulty in finding a break in the cliff face. Finding a flat campsite for four tents took a little time. Peter and George who found the site gave it a rating bf 8, in fact we all agreed that it was the best camp site to date. Bill thought that David Rostron would have liked it also. Bill also confessed, seeing that David was not in earshot, that he too was getting to like high camps. At 6 am we were awakened by a cheeky currawong tapping loudly on the window. Peter decided to reserve his opinion on the weather until after lunch. Most of us decided to walk to Clarke Falls, about half an hour's walk to the ,west of Junction Lake. Upon our return Peter greeted us with the news that we would be moving off after lunch. Twice previously Peter was prevented by bad weather in climbing up to the Mountains of Jupiter, but after studying the clouds he felt confident that this year he would make it. Some thick scrub was encountered on the way up and a little difficulty in finding a break in the cliff face. Finding a flat campsite for four tents took a little time. Peter and George who found the site gave it a rating bf 8, in fact we all agreed that it was the best camp site to date. Bill thought that David Rostron would have liked it also. Bill also confessed, seeing that David was not in earshot, that he too was getting to like high camps.
  
-__DAY 11.__ +__DAY 11__ 
 We moved off at 10 am, it was windy and misty, but Peter predicted it would clear up, and it did. After a couple of hours of very pleasant walking we stopped for lunch in a glen out of the wind, overlooking the south-eastern tip of Lake Payanna, which afforded a spectacular view of Mt. Ida to the south complimented by the diamond-shaped Lake Riengeeng in the foreground. After lunch we- walked around the southern end of Lake Payanna, then headed north past Lake Pallas and Orion Lakes on our left, and after a couple of hours of scrub bashing we were quite pleased to get to Lake Zeus where we made the best of a poor campsite, and put an some water to make Turkish coffee. I distributed the coffee in the now familiar mugs, (Joan called my big one "The Gozunda",​ which means 'goes under the bed"), and made sure that everyone received a little of the froth called "​kaymaki"​. This enhances the taste of the coffee. George got hooked an the word "​kaymaki"​ and kept a score on the number of times it was used. 1, 2, 3, 4 etc. I supposed he had been away from civilisation too long. We moved off at 10 am, it was windy and misty, but Peter predicted it would clear up, and it did. After a couple of hours of very pleasant walking we stopped for lunch in a glen out of the wind, overlooking the south-eastern tip of Lake Payanna, which afforded a spectacular view of Mt. Ida to the south complimented by the diamond-shaped Lake Riengeeng in the foreground. After lunch we- walked around the southern end of Lake Payanna, then headed north past Lake Pallas and Orion Lakes on our left, and after a couple of hours of scrub bashing we were quite pleased to get to Lake Zeus where we made the best of a poor campsite, and put an some water to make Turkish coffee. I distributed the coffee in the now familiar mugs, (Joan called my big one "The Gozunda",​ which means 'goes under the bed"), and made sure that everyone received a little of the froth called "​kaymaki"​. This enhances the taste of the coffee. George got hooked an the word "​kaymaki"​ and kept a score on the number of times it was used. 1, 2, 3, 4 etc. I supposed he had been away from civilisation too long.
  
 We explored the shores of the lake and discovered a little island a few metres offshore, a chance for possession of our own little tropical island - but how to get to it without getting wet? George offered to whittle a log canoe but that would have taken too long, so we discussed the merits of getting Peter, who was the tallest, to stretch out from the bank so that we could walk over him, but he was not quite long enough. We explored the shores of the lake and discovered a little island a few metres offshore, a chance for possession of our own little tropical island - but how to get to it without getting wet? George offered to whittle a log canoe but that would have taken too long, so we discussed the merits of getting Peter, who was the tallest, to stretch out from the bank so that we could walk over him, but he was not quite long enough.
  
-__DAY 12.__ +__DAY 12__ 
 As we had only 5 km to walk that day we set off after lunch with the midday sun overhead and set up camp on the northern end of the Traveller Range, a kilometre or so from Du Cane Gap. A splendid high camp, the best view being of Cathedral Mountain to the north. Peter warned us that a rain storm was approaching and sure enough it hit us just as we were cooking our curry and vegetables, and Dick was half way through cooking his first damper. Whilst most of the party sheltered in their tents two or three of us stood by the fire, and despite the pouring rain managed to complete the cooking. The storm blew over and we ate our dinner, and as we were now out of Turkish coffee we made some, instant coffee. Joan said we had not had any for a while. "For a while,"​ answered Peter, "I only get it on birthdays, Christmas and when the Labor Party wins." As we had only 5 km to walk that day we set off after lunch with the midday sun overhead and set up camp on the northern end of the Traveller Range, a kilometre or so from Du Cane Gap. A splendid high camp, the best view being of Cathedral Mountain to the north. Peter warned us that a rain storm was approaching and sure enough it hit us just as we were cooking our curry and vegetables, and Dick was half way through cooking his first damper. Whilst most of the party sheltered in their tents two or three of us stood by the fire, and despite the pouring rain managed to complete the cooking. The storm blew over and we ate our dinner, and as we were now out of Turkish coffee we made some, instant coffee. Joan said we had not had any for a while. "For a while,"​ answered Peter, "I only get it on birthdays, Christmas and when the Labor Party wins."
  
-__DAY 13.__ +__DAY 13__ 
 After a cool night, we awoke to a beautiful, clear morning. We had our last view of the Central Plateau and dropped down through a small section of eucalyptus and beech forest to the Overland Track. The change came as quite a shock. The Overland Track is like a walker'​s highway with hundreds of duckboards over the muddy sections and a tourists'​ atmosphere. At Windy Ridge Hut we stopped for a while then continued on and stopped for lunch at a creek crossing 2km before Narcissus Bay. Over lunch, in between disturbances of day trippers walking through, Peter outlined a plan to storm Narcissus Bay, raping and pillaging. "Hands up those who wish to join the raping party and hands up those who wish to join the pillaging party."​ Jo answered, "I think I'll be in the burning party, I always wanted to be an arsonist."​ Jim and I thought a beer would be nice but Peter didn't entertain the thought of a drink. I said, "No, you'll be too busy raping and pillaging to stop for a drink."​ After a cool night, we awoke to a beautiful, clear morning. We had our last view of the Central Plateau and dropped down through a small section of eucalyptus and beech forest to the Overland Track. The change came as quite a shock. The Overland Track is like a walker'​s highway with hundreds of duckboards over the muddy sections and a tourists'​ atmosphere. At Windy Ridge Hut we stopped for a while then continued on and stopped for lunch at a creek crossing 2km before Narcissus Bay. Over lunch, in between disturbances of day trippers walking through, Peter outlined a plan to storm Narcissus Bay, raping and pillaging. "Hands up those who wish to join the raping party and hands up those who wish to join the pillaging party."​ Jo answered, "I think I'll be in the burning party, I always wanted to be an arsonist."​ Jim and I thought a beer would be nice but Peter didn't entertain the thought of a drink. I said, "No, you'll be too busy raping and pillaging to stop for a drink."​
  
 At Narcissus Bay the party split up: as Bill and George had not done the Lake St. Clair section of the Overland Track an previous trips they decided to do it now, whilst the remaining six of us headed up over Byron Gap on the Cuvier Valley Track which promised better views. We had our last camp at a creek crossing 2 kilometres before Lake Petrarch. Bill and George camped at the first beach camp site and George had another wild animal incident. A native cat, intent on ransacking his pack, awoke him during the night. George was in no mood for fun and games and smartly got rid of him. At Narcissus Bay the party split up: as Bill and George had not done the Lake St. Clair section of the Overland Track an previous trips they decided to do it now, whilst the remaining six of us headed up over Byron Gap on the Cuvier Valley Track which promised better views. We had our last camp at a creek crossing 2 kilometres before Lake Petrarch. Bill and George camped at the first beach camp site and George had another wild animal incident. A native cat, intent on ransacking his pack, awoke him during the night. George was in no mood for fun and games and smartly got rid of him.
    
-__DAY 14.__\\ +__DAY 14__\\ 
 We got back to civilisation,​ if that is what Cynthia Bay is, at about 2pm. Pitched our tents for the last time in the camping area, spent hours in the bathrooms cleaning ourselves and that night:had a good big meal at the Derwent Bridge Hotel with masses of wine and an assortment of the strangest liqueurs imaginable. We got back to civilisation,​ if that is what Cynthia Bay is, at about 2pm. Pitched our tents for the last time in the camping area, spent hours in the bathrooms cleaning ourselves and that night:had a good big meal at the Derwent Bridge Hotel with masses of wine and an assortment of the strangest liqueurs imaginable.
  
-__DAY 15.__\\ +__DAY 15__\\ 
 Our driver picked us up at 9.30 am, drove us to the airport to drop our luggage, then into Devonport itself for another meal at the hotel. Bill, who was staying on in Tasmania, drove us back to the airport in his hired car (Jim and Jo were also staying on, but were on their way to Hobart), thus ending a pleasant two weeks' holiday. Our driver picked us up at 9.30 am, drove us to the airport to drop our luggage, then into Devonport itself for another meal at the hotel. Bill, who was staying on in Tasmania, drove us back to the airport in his hired car (Jim and Jo were also staying on, but were on their way to Hobart), thus ending a pleasant two weeks' holiday.
  
-===== THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING & THE ANNUAL REUNION===== +===== THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING & THE ANNUAL REUNION ===== 
-by Kath Brown.+by Kath Brown
  
 According to the S.B.U. Constitution the Annual General Meeting "shall be held in March" and among the business of that meeting shall be "​election of Office-bearers and Committee"​. Each year all official positions become vacant and although the previous holders often stand for re-election for a second year and sometimes for a third or more, usually the President does not seek re-election after two years. Any member may be nominated for any office. Only. Club full members may vote. This year the A.G.M. will be on Wednesday, 14th March. According to the S.B.U. Constitution the Annual General Meeting "shall be held in March" and among the business of that meeting shall be "​election of Office-bearers and Committee"​. Each year all official positions become vacant and although the previous holders often stand for re-election for a second year and sometimes for a third or more, usually the President does not seek re-election after two years. Any member may be nominated for any office. Only. Club full members may vote. This year the A.G.M. will be on Wednesday, 14th March.
198402.1458188293.txt.gz · Last modified: 2016/03/17 04:18 by kclacher