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198308 [2016/03/24 00:34]
kclacher [The Sydney Bushwalker]
198308 [2016/03/25 04:22] (current)
kclacher y the leader (who had arrived ten days earlier to do some walking on his own account). They were quickly transferred from the airport to their overnight accommodation at the Melville Private Hotel in Gloucester Street, close to the city centre, with instr
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 Arthur'​s Pass is to the Christchurch tramper what the Blue Mountains are to the Sydney bushwalker, a rugged area within easy reach for weekend trips leaving Friday evening after work: but, otherwise, quite different. These differences - the nature of Arthur'​s Pass National Park - are perhaps best summarised with an extract or two from the park handbook. Arthur'​s Pass is to the Christchurch tramper what the Blue Mountains are to the Sydney bushwalker, a rugged area within easy reach for weekend trips leaving Friday evening after work: but, otherwise, quite different. These differences - the nature of Arthur'​s Pass National Park - are perhaps best summarised with an extract or two from the park handbook.
  
-"The park is a rugged and mountainous area of about 100,000 hectares situated in the centre of the South Island (about 150 km west of Christchurch). It is a land of jagged skylines, tall snowy peaks and snowgrass-clad ridges, deep gorges, steep, bush-covered hillsides, sheer cliffs of angular black rock, high.waterfalls,​ wide shingle riverbeds and rushing torrents. The park is traversed by large rivers - on the east the Waimakariri and Poulter and their tributaries,​the Taramakau and Otira and their tribularies on the west.+"The park is a rugged and mountainous area of about 100,000 hectares situated in the centre of the South Island (about 150 km west of Christchurch). It is a land of jagged skylines, tall snowy peaks and snowgrass-clad ridges, deep gorges, steep, bush-covered hillsides, sheer cliffs of angular black rock, high.waterfalls,​ wide shingle riverbeds and rushing torrents. The park is traversed by large rivers - on the east the Waimakariri and Poulter and their tributaries,​ the Taramakau and Otira and their tribularies on the west.
  
 "... the area of mountain ridges above bushline approximately equals the forested area. From valley floors at about 700m on the east the peaks rise to 1800m or more, but the western valley floors lie at only about 300m or slightly more. From any of the high peaks there are views over ridge upon ridge of broken rock, with snowfields lying beneath them and deep-cut valleys below. Ten named peaks over 2100m in height and twenty-one over 1800m lie within the park. "... the area of mountain ridges above bushline approximately equals the forested area. From valley floors at about 700m on the east the peaks rise to 1800m or more, but the western valley floors lie at only about 300m or slightly more. From any of the high peaks there are views over ridge upon ridge of broken rock, with snowfields lying beneath them and deep-cut valleys below. Ten named peaks over 2100m in height and twenty-one over 1800m lie within the park.
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 "The main divide of the Southern Alps bisects the park and from it branch intricate ranges of mountains between the courses of the rivers.... Between the peaks are many passes, high and low, but nearly all of them difficult to cross. The western and eastern separation has a dominating influence on the character of the park; but the rugged terrain, the wide range of altitudes, the relatively severe mountain climate, the swift rivers and the passes all affect the nature of the park in various ways." "The main divide of the Southern Alps bisects the park and from it branch intricate ranges of mountains between the courses of the rivers.... Between the peaks are many passes, high and low, but nearly all of them difficult to cross. The western and eastern separation has a dominating influence on the character of the park; but the rugged terrain, the wide range of altitudes, the relatively severe mountain climate, the swift rivers and the passes all affect the nature of the park in various ways."
  
-Instead of going straight into the walk as programmed, our introduction to the park, as a party, was two days spent above Arthurs Pass itself, firstly on the east side in the Temple Basin and in the upper Mingha Valley, and then an the west side on the slopes of MtRolleston, 2271m. The leader had spent two days in the park on the previous weekend and proposed this change as a way of widening the scope of the walking to be done by the party. It proved to be an excellent beginning, in brilliantly fine weather immediately after snowfalls. The change was also partly due to recent alterations in the timetable for trains to and from the park, which had made impractical the use of public transport if full use was to be made of the days allotted for walking. The use of the leader'​s rental car to move the party from Christchurch to the park and back again kept the walking days to schedule and provided the sort of flexibilitY ​which members usually enjoy in their weekend walks out of Sydney.+Instead of going straight into the walk as programmed, our introduction to the park, as a party, was two days spent above Arthurs Pass itself, firstly on the east side in the Temple Basin and in the upper Mingha Valley, and then an the west side on the slopes of Mt Rolleston, 2271m. The leader had spent two days in the park on the previous weekend and proposed this change as a way of widening the scope of the walking to be done by the party. It proved to be an excellent beginning, in brilliantly fine weather immediately after snowfalls. The change was also partly due to recent alterations in the timetable for trains to and from the park, which had made impractical the use of public transport if full use was to be made of the days allotted for walking. The use of the leader'​s rental car to move the party from Christchurch to the park and back again kept the walking days to schedule and provided the sort of flexibility ​which members usually enjoy in their weekend walks out of Sydney.
  
-Anyway, three of the party members arrived in Christchurch late on Wednesday afternoon, 16 March, on a cold, wet day (maximum 7<​sup>​0</​sup>​ C) and were met by the leader (who had arrived ten days earlier to do some walking on his own account). They were quickly transferred from the airport to their overnight accommodation at the Melville Private Hotel in Gloucester Street, close to the city centre, with instructions to be ready to be picked up at noon the following day. It was a frantic morning for Brian, Bronwyn and Steve of making onward travel arrangements to reach Abel Tasman National Park, their destination after the walking in Arthurs Pass, and of buying food/fuel for the immediate walking. And we did get away on time. +Anyway, three of the party members arrived in Christchurch late on Wednesday afternoon, 16 March, on a cold, wet day (maximum 7<​sup>​0</​sup>​ C) and were met b3 pm the storm had nearly reached the ridge and most of us stopped to don our rain gear. Shortly after the storm burst upon us with all its fury. First there came heavy torrential rain and lightning accompanied by a strong wind. Although I was protected by a parka my sleeping bag was in the haversack without a waterproof cover. Joyce came to the rescue with a large orange ground sheet which I held over my head and the haversack.
- +
-All the way from Christchurch the Southern Alps were a line of white against blue sky, looming larger all the time. The storm of the previous day had dumped an impressive covering of snow. However, over the foothills +
-at Porters Pass. we found that the warmth of the day was melting the snow rapidly and, much the same as a rainbow, it seemed to recede the closer we got to it. It was the following day before we indulged in sliding around on steep slopes of compacted snow with its fresh cover. +
- +
-About 4:00 pm we walked away from the parking area on Arthur'​s Pass, at the start of the steeply rising Temple Basin Track, glad to leave behind the hardy sandflies in this chilly place which had hastened our change into walking gear. Earlier, we had made a brief stop at the Park Visitor Centre in Arthur'​s Pass township to record our intentions. Mt. Rolleston overhung the west view, with its upper slopes liberally slabbed with snowfields and the remnants of glaciers. Withing an hour the party had itself ascended 400m higher, above the bushline in the main park shelter in Temple Basin. +
- +
-In the gathering chill of the early evening the pot belly stove in the centre of the room was soon alight. It provided a little warmth, but was really quite inadequate to heat a room of hall-like proportions designed +
-to shelter many day-use skiers. Piped water and flush toilets seemed luxuries, but were really necessities to cope with numbers in winter if the place was not to become a health hazard. Party members slept either on the floor or on the wide benches built in around the walls; and were awoken the following morning to the cacophony of Keas sliding down the metal roof of the shelter. Steve was soon outside trying to make contact with the locals, but without a great deal of success. +
- +
-Away on a day walk, we traipsed through the debris and scattered ski-tow equipment on what is essentially a downhill ski area, to the upper part of the Temple Basin; and, after a brief inspection of the other park shelter, we scrambled up the steep scree alongside the last ski-tow to the Col itself. In a few steps we were out of a chill breeze. and into the sun on the lee slope looking down into the upper Mingha Valley. Packed snow slopes offered glissading opportunities as we slowly made our way down. The way was fairly clear and there were probably a number of routes which we could have taken. Tn fine weather, all very easy. A waterfall of about 20m falling on rocks and then tumbling on through a large snowcave enticed us to inspect before we settled down to lunch in the snowgrass alongside a small side stream. +
- +
-Our route back was to follow the rocky watercourse of the side stream which brought us out on a ridge spur about 500m above. For the next hour or so we walked and scrambled our way along the ridge and confirmed the description in the park handbook of ".... ridge upon ridge of broken rock.... deep-cut valleys below",​ eventually deciding to traverse back to Temple Col and a quick descent into the Temple Basin via a scree slope. The shadows were well drawn across the mountains by the time we reached the shelter. +
- +
-Early on Saturday morning we went back to the car to move it down the highway about 500m and start another day walk, this time up on to Rome Ridge leading to Mt. Rolleston. By late morning we were back on a level with the shelter which we had left in Temple Basin opposite; that is, after a short taste of scrub-bashing to reach a ridge spur clear of the bushline - it gave us a healthy respect for the sort of foliage one can encounter by moving away from acknowledged routes. An ascent of Mt. Rolleston was not contemplated - although one could say that Sreve had higher expectations than the rest of us - and after a generous break in the sun, reasonably sheltered from a chill breeze and with sweeping views into the Bealey Valley, we took the plunge down a scree slope which dropped us about 400m to the head of the Bealey Valley. The upper slope of the scree in fine shingle enabled giant steps, although lower down the size of the rocks slowed the pace - we still descended though in about 10-15 minutes. +
- +
-After lunch, it was a pleasant half-hour walk out alongside the fledgling Bealey River to the highway, after which we repaired to Arthur'​s Pass township for all sorts of junk food at the tearooms before making a brief call at the Park Visitor Centre and moving down to the start of our main walk, i.e. at Hawdon Shelter, about a half-hour drive away from the township. The chilly and increasingly cloudy conditions close to the main divide resolved into a fine and relatively mild afternoon in the more easterly part of the park. The sandflies kept on keeping on though - damn them. +
- +
-(Map reference: Arthur'​s Pass National Park, NZMS 273, 1:80000, 1st edition; Otira, NS 1, S59, inch to the mile series) +
- +
-===== Advertisement =====  +
-==== For Sale ==== +
- +
-__One only__ "​Norrona"​ two-man tunnel __tent__, "​Skarstint"​ model, weight 2.8 kg, colour dark green, suitable for all conditions, as new - $300. (Refer 1st issue of "​Wild"​ magazine for review - cost over $600 new.) +
- +
-__Two only__ "​Mountain Design"​ sleeping bags, "Ski Tourer"​ model, tulip shape; full zip, Goretex foot, rated to minus 15<​sup>​0</​sup>​ approximate weight 1.9 kg, as new - $200 each. +
- +
-Phone Bronwyn Stow - 81 1257 (H) 789 9242 (B) after 4 pm. +
- +
-===== For the Love of the South-West ===== +
-by Peter Harris +
- +
-I am not alone with my thoughts. I used to be, but all of the unanswered questions have been answered. There is another voice inside me which calls for freedom, and weeps for my love of the South-West won. +
- +
-Mine is a burning life-force borne in peaceful lofty crags, and in the silent heathlands with their carpets of button grass and cushion plant. Mine is a satisfied want surpassing spiritual rebirth. +
- +
-I hear my name being beckoned in the high-pitched squeal of a cold wind, and creation beckons me from meaningless blank photograph, denuded of natural colour. +
- +
-Talk to me no more about joyful experiences of the South-West. Praise instead the many hearts that are looking for the light, to see God in creation itself. And many are the hearts that are dying in the night, to see God in creation itself. Come back with me to the South-West to see my God of peace on the campground of life amongst those rocky mountains; stalwart pillars of solemn fortitude, and in the tranquil enduring bliss of silent lake and quiet stream. +
- +
-Lift your voices. Can you hear the call of the wild? Can you feel its burning caress of tender love - the driving force of life? +
- +
-There are times when I am alone that I can communicate with nature itself, when I sit upon a rock and see the place of which I've dreamed, and know without a single doubt it is exactly as it seemed. The cold bitter wind speaks to me in whispers of intimate love, enveloping and caressing my body. My eyes reflect the awesome power of creation. I am not dying in the night. I am not looking for the light. I have found the light in the South-West. It is the tie that binds me to my Maker. +
- +
-===== Notes of the June and July General Meetings ===== +
-by Barry Wallace +
- +
-==== June ==== +
-There were about 30 members present by 2018, so the President, in the chair, gonged the gong (this time with a wooden spoon, you will all be relieved. to know) and called the meeting to order. +
- +
-As is sometimes the way of things there were no apologies and no new members, so we went straight to the reading of the Minutes. This was accomplished with no business arising, so we passed to Correspondence. +
- +
-It seems our membership is becoming mobile for there was a spate of change of address notices. Apart from these there was a letter from the Wildlife Preservation Society advising of a three week bus tour to South Australia and environs planned for later this year; and a copy of a letter which Ray Hookway has sent to the N.S.W. Minister for Sport and Recreation supporting the provision of facilities for cross-country skiing in the areas around Kosciusko National Park. The only business arising was deferred to General Business. +
- +
-The Treasurer'​s Report indicated that we began the month with $2005.76, spent $1161.11, earned or otherwise acquired $856.50 and ended up with $1701.15. All of which brought us to the heady stuff of which Walks Reports are wrought. +
- +
-We began with Tony Marshall'​s Kanangra trip over the weekend of 13,14,15 May. It was reported as a good trip, with 12 plus one starters. Gem Gagne'​s Coolana gourmet weekend was a case of biting off more than one could chew. It did not go. Jim Brown, on the other hand, reported 27 people on his Springwood day walk, which he described as a very nice trip. Geoff Bridge'​s Bobbin Head to Berowra trip had who knows how many starters, but 25 people finished, apparently in jig time, at 1430. Pulse and respiration rates were not disclosed, and final casualty figures are not available at time of writing. +
- +
-The following weekend, 20,21,22 saw Barry Wallace and a team of 10 dedicated experimenters conducting rainwear tests in the drizzle and swirling mists of Bonnum Pic. Steve and Wendy Hodgman had 11 people on their Goulburn River National Park trip that same weekend. The remark that the trip "has potential as a summer walk" is to be taken at face value only. Of the day walks, Roy Braithwaite reported 7 starters on a very wet and cold coastal walk which was slightly re-arranged to go from Bundeena to Audley rather than Otford. Sandy Johnston had 10 people on his Hawkesbury River walk, reported as "​satisfactory,​ with good views from Berowra trig"​. +
- +
-The weekend of 27,28,29 May saw various parties struggling with the aftermath of the wet weather. Don Finch and his party of 6 found the Capertee in flood, so they walked over to the Wolgan and back. Bob Hodgson (just call me Dad!) had an interesting but different experience coping with excess waters on his Krungle-without-Bungle walk. The report of Peter Christian'​s day walk in Royal National Park brought forth a veritable spate of mixed - - um - -well anyway, one of the more memorable was that under the prevailing wet conditions "​anti-leech repellents were soon in fall spate"​. The party of 28 seems to have ended up at various places at various times. Talk to John Newman if you want more Of the same. David Ingram'​s Wahroonga to North Turramurra walk attracted 18 starters and was described somewhat more succinctly as "​nice"​. +
- +
-Bill Capon'​s walk from Yalwal over the weekend of 3,4,5 June had damper for lunch, a fine sunny Sunday afternoon, and 11 starters. Don and Jenny Cornell had 8 people on their Kowmung trip that same weekend and of the day walks Brian Bolton'​s Waterfall to Bundeena via Forest Island attracted 20 people who were rained on for their trouble, and Peter Christian had 12 people on an uneventful ramble in the Maroota State Forest. +
- +
-Federation Report concerned a proliferation of Helipads in the Kanangra area. It seems that once you have a chopper you then have to produce uses for it. +
- +
-General Business brought a motion that we write to the N.S.W. Minister for Sport and Recreation urging that he support the provision of facilities for cross-country skiers in areas adjacent to Kosciusko National Park. After an extensive but rather confused debate the motion was carried. +
- +
-So then it was just a matter of the announcements,​ and it was all over for another month at 2116. +
- +
-==== July ==== +
-The meeting began at around 2013 hours with 20 or so members present andthe President in the chair. There were apologies from Bob Sames and John Newman. New members Bronny Niemeyer, Jan McLean, Edith Townsend and Daksh Baweja were present to receive badge, constitution and applause, but Wendy Allan was not there to answer the call. +
- +
-The Minutes of the previous meeting were read and received, with the only business arising being a follow-up on the proposal to levy member clubs of the South West Tasmania Coalition. It seems Federation plans to offer support for the Coalition as well. +
- +
-Correspondence brought letters out to new members and to the N.S.W. Minister for Sport and Recreation urging support for the provision of facilities for cross-country skiing in the Kosciusko area. There were also letters in from Sutherland Bushwalkers regarding a planned trip to Barrington Tops and from the Beswick family fund donating $200.00 toward the Coolana property costs. +
- +
-The Treasurer'​s Report brought news that we began the month with $1701.15 earned $524.80, spent $105.89 and ended the month with $2120.06. +
- +
-David Rostron began the Walks Report with his Axe Head Range high camps extravaganza. They began with 11 starters on a snow-swept Kanangra Walls and picked up an extra bod along the way. That same weekend 10,11,12,13 June saw Ian Debert and 8 others on a base camp at Yerranderie. They reported a very snowy Friday night, but were able to climb Yerranderie Peak and Chiddys Obelisk over the weekend to retain their license. Bill Burke had 16 people on his Sofala to Hill End walk. They reported beautiful, but cold, weather. There were no day walks programmed for that weekend. +
- +
-The following weekend 17,18,19 June saw Gordon Lee with 20 people on his Ski Touring Instructional,​ reporting a rainy Sunday, and Peter Harris and his two starters diverting to 100 Man Cave to escape the snow on Kanangra Tops and environs. Steve and Wendy Hodgman had 6 cyclists on their Moss Vale to Nowra by bike --- er --- walk(?), and of the day Walks Jim Brown had 8 people and a soggy day in the hills behind Coal Cliff, and Jo Van Sommers reported rainy conditions and 19 starters an her Waterfall to Engadine ramble. +
- +
-Over the weekend of 24,25,26th June Tony Marshall led his party of 7 through Jenolan Canyon - - twice, just to make sure. George Walton'​s Coxs River walk had 11 people covering similar ground, but only once. Ralph Pengliss reported 35 people on his Sydney Harbour day walk, and Roy Braithwaite reported 20 starters on his Cowan to Brooklyn trip.  +
- +
-Ainslie Morris'​ Bundanoon Y.H.A. base camp walk had 9 starters spending part of their time riding bikes over the weekend of 2,3rd July, and Gordon Lee's rock scrambling and abseiling instructional attracted two takers for the rock scrambling and 10 for abseiling. Errol Sheedy'​s Bundeena to Waterfall day walk did not go, but Peter Christian reported 27 people, and a rough but truncated walk for his Canoelands Ridge to Duck Ponds Ridge and return trip. +
- +
-The following weekend, 8,9,10 July Bill Capon had 3 starters on a Somewhat modified Yalwal-Leighton Creek-Corroboree Flat-Yalwal walk, and Bill Holland reported 16 people, beaut weather and lots of water on his Shoalhaven River walk. Roy Braithwaite'​s Lilyvale to Burning Palms day walk did not go (due to the train strike), but Kath Brown had 8 starters on an easy trip from Glenbrook to Glenbrook via Red Hands Cave. All of which brought the Walks Report to a close. +
- +
-Federation Report brought news that the Barrier Ranges Bushwalkers have been accepted as members of Federation, that there are conservation concern over stock routes in the Kosciusko National Park, and that information is sought regarding the establishment of a Nattai National Park. There will be S. & R. exercises on 22,23 October 1983, 24,25 March 1984 and 23,24 June 1984. +
- +
-There was no General Business and the meeting closed at 2106 hours. +
- +
-===== Letter to the Editor ===== +
-Dorothy Lawry +
- +
-1332 Pacific Highway, Turramurra. 2074.  +
-Dear Evelyn, +
- +
-We haven'​t met because I am now an Honorary Member of the S.B.W. confined to a wheelchair in a nursing home. Back in the 1930s for a couple of years I had the job you are now doing so well.  I always look forward to my copies of our magazine and have just received the June issue, which I particularly enjoyed. +
- +
-Bill Gamble'​s article on Page 9 "My Favourite Garbage Dump" I feel should be answered. When I was the editor the Club exchanged magazines in various countries and from one copy of that of the British Ramblers Club I copied a poem which travelled round the world in those of the Appalachian Club of U.S.A., of The Tararua Tramping Club of Wellington N.Z. and probably many others as well as The Sydney Bushwalker. It is called "A Fable" and I suggest you republish it and also send a copy to the N.P.W.S. so they can have it put up on noticeboards near Karloo Pool and along the track to Uloola Falls, etc. +
- +
-I remember one S.B.W. one-day walk from Heathcote via Karloo Pool and Uloola Falls to Waterfall. As it was such an easy walk of course we had a large party that was well strung out. When we at the head reached the flat above the Fails it was evident picnickers had been there. It was filthy with sheets of newspapers blowing across it etc. etc. By the time the tail of our party reached us we had it all cleared away and the place looking as it should again. +
- +
-Best wishes to you and all the present active members of the Sydney Bush Walkers. +
-From Dorothy Lawry. +
- +
-Reprinted from The Ramblers Handbook, Southern Federation, 1938 Edition, official year book of The Southern and the West of England Federation of the Ramblers Association. +
- +
-=====A Fable ===== +
-by F. W. Thomas +
- +
-| Frederick Foljambe Fotheringai | +
-| Went for a picnic one fine day. | +
-| Under the trees he ate his meal | +
-| Leaving a lot of banana peel, | +
-| Empty tins and a paper bag, | +
-| Tidying up was too much fag. | +
-| | In course of time he went and died, | +
-| | Crossed the Styx to the other side, | +
-| |Heard the Devil politely say, | +
-| | "​Welcome,​ Mister Fotheringai! | +
-| | Here's a job that will suit you fine, | +
-| |Tidying up this place of mine." | +
-| Frederick Foljambe Fotheringai | +
-| For ever and ever and aye, | +
-| Spends his time and pays for his sins | +
-| Pursuing elusive banana skins, | +
-| Armed with a stick without a nail, | +
-| He chases litter in half a  gale, | +
-| Shoving the pieces when he's got 'em | +
-| Into a basket without any bottom. | +
- +
-===== Trekking Through The McPherson Ranges, November 1982   Part II ===== +
-by Wal Liddle +
- +
-__At O'​Reillys__  +
-The many birds that raided our larder made our breakfast the next morning a sheer delight. Our light blue ground sheet was covered with red and blue rosellas, black and white magpies, and a couple of scrub turkeys feeding on scraps of bread. The cheekier birds would eat the cereal from our bowls if not shooed away. +
- +
-The walkers then packed for a 3-day hike without the benefits of a support vehicle. Pat and Mark shared the main load, consisting of food and tents, for the whole group. I estimated that they were carrying 40 lbs each. Mark was advised to leave his leggings and hard hat behind but he would not part with the briefcase. His excuse was that he might have time to finish his thesis for the New England University. Before leaving we visited the Botanical Gardens which consisted of terraced gardens behind the Guest House, laid out with native and exotic plants. +
- +
-The party left O'​Reillys "Green Mountains"​ at 9:30 to the call of a lyrebird echoing in the bush. Not long after departure a huge fat lizard lumbered across the track in front of us. It was black with a grey underbelly. This creature was the Australian Land Mullet which is the largest land lizard in the continent and can grow to 18 inches long. +
- +
-A short distance along the track the group split up. Bill and I took the track to Mt. Echo via Lightning Falls whilst the main party took a longer but less steep route to the lunchtime rendezvous spot. Bill and I had morning tea at Jimbolongerri Falls where we obtained clear pure drinking water. The next resting place on our journey was Bithongabel Falls. The falls were joined to a series of mirror-like pools. The sun that filtered through the trees played with the Shadows on the ground, making ever-changing patterns of light and shade. +
- +
-At 1:30 Bill and I joined the rest of the group at Echo Lookout for lunch before trekking on to Mt. Wupawn and Mt. Durigan. +
- +
-Late that afternoon a distinct recurring mee-ow sound was heard by our party. The call was not that of a feral cat but came from a Cathird in the forest on our left. A number of us tried to get a glimpse of the bird by tracing the sound but it was too elusive. Mark said that the plumage is bright, almost iridescent green, spotted with white. +
- +
-We arrived at Rat-a-Tat Hut at 5:00 pm and divested ourselves of our packs. The hut is a 3-sided roofed shelter sheeted with corrugated iron located in a clearing surrounded by tall trees. +
- +
-Graham was delegated to fetch our water from a nearby rivulet. As he was filling the water bags he noticed a movement under one of the rocks. Returning to camp he cadged a piece of meat which he placed on a stick and used to coax out a magnificent white yabbie with blue stripes. It was approximately 10" long with two huge claws protruding from its armoured carapace. Graham brought it back to camp and placed it in a corral of stones near the campfire. He then showed different members of the party how to carry the yabbie with safety and without injuring the creature. Eventually we released the yabbie near where it was caught. +
- +
-As the darkness descended an earthen bank at the side of the clearing came aglow with blue-purple pinpoints of light. The light came from thousands of glow worms which lived amongst the green moss and ferns, but were +
-indistinguishable by day. +
- +
-Most of the party elected to sleep on the packed earth in the hut whilst two made up their beds in the open, but in the middle of the night the two toughies came inside because of heavy showers. The showers had cleared by dawn and the morning presaged a hot day. +
- +
-The walkers left Rat-a-Tat at 8:45 and trekked towards Ukai Lookout and onwards to Mt. Throakban. Soon after leaving the mountain on an ever-narrowing path we came to the Roberts Survey Tree which had a large triangle blaze on the trunk. Mark indicated that the tree would have been blazed in approximately the year 1860 by the original Government Surveyor. +
- +
-We arrived at Kalinya Lookout overlooking the Tweed Valley at noon and partook of lunch. The afternoon proved to be very humid and oppressive with sweat pouring off all the walkers. Most of us were in shorts with some of the men stripped down to singlets or bare tops. +
- +
-As we traversed a ridge on top of the mountain storm clouds were gathering on the horizon. At 2:30 the dark clouds were moving closer accompanied by lightning flashes and thunder claps. At 3 pm the storm had nearly reached the ridge and most of us stopped to don our rain gear. Shortly after the storm burst upon us with all its fury. First there came heavy torrential rain and lightning accompanied by a strong wind. Although I was protected by a parka my sleeping bag was in the haversack without a waterproof cover. Joyce came to the rescue with a large orange ground sheet which I held over my head and the haversack.+
  
 After what seemed hours the rain gave way to a hail storm. The hail pelted down, cutting the leaves and small twigs from the trees, changing the earthen path surroundings into a dark green carpet. Fifteen minutes later the green carpet had changed to a white one with hailstones 2" deep underfoot. In a short time the temperature had dropped from 32<​sup>​0</​sup>​ C to 15<​sup>​0</​sup>​ C. After what seemed hours the rain gave way to a hail storm. The hail pelted down, cutting the leaves and small twigs from the trees, changing the earthen path surroundings into a dark green carpet. Fifteen minutes later the green carpet had changed to a white one with hailstones 2" deep underfoot. In a short time the temperature had dropped from 32<​sup>​0</​sup>​ C to 15<​sup>​0</​sup>​ C.
198308.txt · Last modified: 2016/03/25 04:22 by kclacher