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198307 [2016/03/24 04:12]
kclacher
198307 [2016/03/24 04:39] (current)
kclacher
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 by Peter Christian by Peter Christian
  
-| Lonely voices moan over windswept Curra Moors, |  +| Lonely voices moan over windswept Curra Moors, ​   |  
-|  Flower buds lie dormant under spiky stem and leaf. | +|  Flower buds lie dormant under spiky stem and leaf.    
-| Honeyeaters vie for insects with fruity nectar yet to come, | +| Honeyeaters vie for insects with fruity nectar yet to come,    
-|  State of slumber and storage as winter brings relief. |  +|  State of slumber and storage as winter brings relief. ​   |  
-| Full-throated chorus of multitudes not yet reborn, |  +| Full-throated chorus of multitudes not yet reborn, ​   |  
-|  However this lack of nature'​s symphony shall be brief. |+|  However this lack of nature'​s symphony shall be brief. ​   |
 | |  | | 
-| Murmuring Curra Brook matures as surging stream |  +| Murmuring Curra Brook matures as surging stream ​   |  
-|  Falling freely into ocean'​s arms, as the fishes it delights. | +|  Falling freely into ocean'​s arms, as the fishes it delights. ​   
-| Eagle Rock's baleful eye, misses not a beat of nature'​s moods, |  +| Eagle Rock's baleful eye, misses not a beat of nature'​s moods, ​   |  
-|  Whilst craggy sandstone cliffs can test our nerve for heights. | +|  Whilst craggy sandstone cliffs can test our nerve for heights. ​   
-| Our minds drift over coastline, heathlands and ocean vista |  +| Our minds drift over coastline, heathlands and ocean vista    |  
-|  Joining soaring gannet and sooty tern on migratory flights. |+|  Joining soaring gannet and sooty tern on migratory flights. ​   |
 | |  | | 
-| Corracorang waterhole relieves many a parched throat, |  +| Corracorang waterhole relieves many a parched throat, ​   |  
-|  Crystal clear waters soothe and revive tired, aching hides. | +|  Crystal clear waters soothe and revive tired, aching hides. ​  ​
-| The quietude of its bay belies its closeness to the city, |  +| The quietude of its bay belies its closeness to the city,    |  
-|  A perfect place to let our life flow rythmically with the tides. | +|  A perfect place to let our life flow rythmically with the tides. ​   
-| Soon the drab heath will dazzle the eye with a myriad of blooms, |  +| Soon the drab heath will dazzle the eye with a myriad of blooms, ​   |  
-|  Colouring our memories of dormant heathlands, whatever fate decides. |+|  Colouring our memories of dormant heathlands, whatever fate decides. ​   |
  
 ===== Vale - Kath McKay ===== ===== Vale - Kath McKay =====
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 |* August 17 | Talented Persons Concert | |* August 17 | Talented Persons Concert |
-| | Anyone who would like to join the line-up of singers and players and declaimers please contact +| | Anyone who would like to join the line-up of singers and players and |  
-Owen Marks - Phone 30-187. | +| |declaimers please contact Owen Marks - Phone 30-187. | 
-| August 24 | Peter Christian will show a series of slides with natural sound effects titled - +| August 24 | Peter Christian will show a series of slides with natural sound 
-"​Kosciusko to New England"​. |+| | effects titled - "​Kosciusko to New England"​. |
 | August 31 | Bush Dancing, with caller. ​ 8 - 10 pm. Nothing complicated,​ just good fun. | | August 31 | Bush Dancing, with caller. ​ 8 - 10 pm. Nothing complicated,​ just good fun. |
 * Everyone is invited to meet beforehand at the Phuong Vietnamese Restaurant, 6:30 pm. B.Y.0; * Everyone is invited to meet beforehand at the Phuong Vietnamese Restaurant, 6:30 pm. B.Y.0;
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 Shortly afterwards we set off on the well-defined graded Border Track. In a few minutes the temperature had dropped considerably because of the tall trees and dense canopy overhead that blocked out the rays of the sun. Shortly afterwards we set off on the well-defined graded Border Track. In a few minutes the temperature had dropped considerably because of the tall trees and dense canopy overhead that blocked out the rays of the sun.
  
-Mark said that all of the trees in this section of the plateau were rainforest species and that eucalypts did not grow here. He pointed out some of the species as we proceeded along the path - Red Carabeens 100 to 140 feet high, Rose Mahoganys, White Walnuts, the Silver Quandang, the Mock Orange tree, down to the smallest, a Finger Lime only 50 mm in diameter with tiny '​bananas'​ that a persoh ​can eat. At each bend in the track the forest opened up new vistas for the walkers. The light that filtered through the trees accentuated the different colours and textures of the vegetation.+Mark said that all of the trees in this section of the plateau were rainforest species and that eucalypts did not grow here. He pointed out some of the species as we proceeded along the path - Red Carabeens 100 to 140 feet high, Rose Mahoganys, White Walnuts, the Silver Quandang, the Mock Orange tree, down to the smallest, a Finger Lime only 50 mm in diameter with tiny '​bananas'​ that a person ​can eat. At each bend in the track the forest opened up new vistas for the walkers. The light that filtered through the trees accentuated the different colours and textures of the vegetation.
  
 Suddenly a sharp sound like a rifle shot rang out. This call repeated at intervals came from a Rifle Bird. The bird was black in colour with a white cheek. Suddenly a sharp sound like a rifle shot rang out. This call repeated at intervals came from a Rifle Bird. The bird was black in colour with a white cheek.
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 As the walkers came over a rise in the track a strange sight met our eyes - two tall trees were growing together, one over the other. The outer one was the notorious Strangler Fig which was actually choking to death the Mahogany tree underneath. The Fig starts its life via a seed which is dropped by a bird or possum at the top of the host tree. The seed germinates and spreads its leaves to the sun whilst its roots drop to the ground below. Soon a curtain of slender roots enclose the trunk of the host tree, thickening and fusing together in an ever tightening lacework until eventually the host tree dies and rots away. The Fig then stands unaided as a huge hollow column. As the walkers came over a rise in the track a strange sight met our eyes - two tall trees were growing together, one over the other. The outer one was the notorious Strangler Fig which was actually choking to death the Mahogany tree underneath. The Fig starts its life via a seed which is dropped by a bird or possum at the top of the host tree. The seed germinates and spreads its leaves to the sun whilst its roots drop to the ground below. Soon a curtain of slender roots enclose the trunk of the host tree, thickening and fusing together in an ever tightening lacework until eventually the host tree dies and rots away. The Fig then stands unaided as a huge hollow column.
 +
 The bushwalkers broke out of the cool of the forest into bright sunlight at 10 am near the Joalah Lookout. The lookout commands an awe-inspiring breathtaking view of the lush Tweed Valley below. The valley, extends for The bushwalkers broke out of the cool of the forest into bright sunlight at 10 am near the Joalah Lookout. The lookout commands an awe-inspiring breathtaking view of the lush Tweed Valley below. The valley, extends for
-30 miles. In the far distance'​ a bright orange/red flame tree stood out from the dark green of the surrounding trees. Our view was partly ​obsuured ​by fog over _the distant mountains but Mt. Warning could be seen some ten miles away at the western side of the valley. Mt. Warning was originally the plug of +30 miles. In the far distance'​ a bright orange/red flame tree stood out from the dark green of the surrounding trees. Our view was partly ​obscured ​by fog over the distant mountains but Mt. Warning could be seen some ten miles away at the western side of the valley. Mt. Warning was originally the plug of a great volcano that  erupted some 20 million years ago pouring forth lava. Over the years some of this lava eroded ​away to form the Tweed Valley. Pat the leader explained that we would be walking south for the rest of the journey not far from the rim of the escarpment and we would eventually traverse the whole length of the valley. 
-Page 16 THE SYDNEY BUSHWAIKER July,​ 1983. + 
-a great-volcano-thaterupted some 20-million-years-ago pouring-forthlava.-- Over the years some of this lava eroded ​aWay to form the Tweed Valley. Pat the leader explained that we would be walking south for the rest of the journey not far from the rim of the escarpment and we would eventually traverse the whole length of the valley. +After a short rest the party again plunged into the cool of the forest. Not far along the track a native ​Raspberry was growing. The members of the party that tested the berries ​said that they were bland in flavour. Mark Pointed to a Duboise tree stating that the Aborigines had used the bark of the tree to catch fish. The bark when placed in water has a stunning effect. 
-After a short rest the party again plunged into the cool of the forest. Not far along the track a Native ​Raspberry was growing. The members of the party that tested the berries ​saia that they were bland in flavour. Mark Pointed to a Duboise tree stating that the Aborigines had used the bark of the tree to catch fish. The bark when placed in water has a stunning effect. + 
-At a bend in the track we witnessed a dance by the Rufous Fantail. This small bird about the size of a robin is generally brown in colour with a patch of white under the beak. A splash of orange is featured ​the head and this colour also extends down the back and halfway up the tail. The bird flitted along the track in front of us seeming to say "Catch me if you can"​. +At a bend in the track we witnessed a dance by the Rufous Fantail. This small bird about the size of a robin is generally brown in colour with a patch of white under the beak. A splash of orange is featured ​on the head and this colour also extends down the back and halfway up the tail. The bird flitted along the track in front of us seeming to say "Catch me if you can"​. 
-- -+
 The path then turned inland through pristine green gullies and at 11.00 am the party reached Dragon Bird Creek which was flowing with water from the Coomera River. The path then turned inland through pristine green gullies and at 11.00 am the party reached Dragon Bird Creek which was flowing with water from the Coomera River.
-At 12 noon we reached MtMerino Lookout overlooking the Tweed Valley. Our view was of cleared farmland interspersed with trees. Dense bush grew on the mountain ​tOp. MtWarning again appeared on our left but with a changed perspective because we were viewing it from a different angle. + 
-A large grey .bird, the Top Knot Pigeon, so named because of the shape of the feathers on its head, flew above the valley. Purple flowered bushes and yellow clumps of daisies grew at the edge of the lookout. At 2.30 the walkers reached Moon Joorara Lookout from where could be seen the township of Murwillumbah and in the distance Byron Bay. +At 12 noon we reached Mt Merino Lookout overlooking the Tweed Valley. Our view was of cleared farmland interspersed with trees. Dense bush grew on the mountain ​top. Mt Warning again appeared on our left but with a changed perspective because we were viewing it from a different angle. 
-Not far from.the lookout, the group saw a number of King Parrots feeding in the tree tops. These large birds were coloured orange/red on the head and lower parts with soft green feathers to the rest of the body. They have a tail which is almost as long as the wing.+ 
 +A large grey bird, the Top Knot Pigeon, so named because of the shape of the feathers on its head, flew above the valley. Purple flowered bushes and yellow clumps of daisies grew at the edge of the lookout. At 2:30 the walkers reached Moon Joorara Lookout from where could be seen the township of Murwillumbah and in the distance Byron Bay. 
 + 
 +Not far from the lookout, the group saw a number of King Parrots feeding in the tree tops. These large birds were coloured orange/red on the head and lower parts with soft green feathers to the rest of the body. They have a tail which is almost as long as the wing. 
 Dingo droppings were observed on ton of a rock near the junction of a dry creek bed. These droppings marked the boundary of that particular dingo'​s territory and served as a warning to other animals. Dingo droppings were observed on ton of a rock near the junction of a dry creek bed. These droppings marked the boundary of that particular dingo'​s territory and served as a warning to other animals.
-At 5.30 we broke out of the dense forest to a large cleared area on top of a mountain. A large timber arch over the track proclaimed that we had reached the boundary of-that section of the park. We had come to O'​Reillys,​ an area consisting of a large guest house/motel complete with a camping and caravaning area Our tents had been pitched, for us alongside the minibus, in a clearing comnanding an extensive view of mountains and valleys that receded in the 
-distance. . 
-The evening meal was partaken with a picturesque red sunset in the background,​. the sun taking half-an-hOur to sink below the horizon. . We shared some of our food with two blue and black satin bowerbirds and a yellow and black regent bowerbird. The satid bowerbirds are,so named because of the sheen of their feathers. After-the meal the party adjourned to the guest house .ware a film evening was in iprogreSs consisting of coloured slides and a commentary by an ornithologist. The room was packed with birdwatchers,​ including some people from America and Japan. End of PART 1.  
  
-===== FREE FOR THE DAY ===== +At 5:30 we broke out of the dense forest to a large cleared area on top of a mountain. A large timber arch over the track proclaimed that we had reached the boundary of-that section of the park. We had come to O'​Reillys,​ an area consisting of a large guest house/motel complete with a camping and caravaning area Our tents had been pitched, for us alongside the minibus, in a clearing commanding an extensive view of mountains and valleys that receded in the distance. 
-by Spiro Hajinakitas. + 
-Date& Saturday, 26th March, 1983. +The evening meal was partaken with a picturesque red sunset in the background, the sun taking half an hour to sink below the horizon. We shared some of our food with two blue and black Satin Bowerbirds and a yellow and black Regent Bowerbird. The Satin Bowerbirds are so named because of the sheen of their feathers. After the meal the party adjourned to the guest house where a film evening was in progress consisting of coloured slides and a commentary by an ornithologist. The room was packed with birdwatchers,​ including some people from America and Japan.  
-Route:​ Carlon'​s Farm, Tin Pot Mountain, Goolara Peak, Jenolan River, + 
-+**__End of Part I__** 
-Mount O'​Reilly,​ Cox's River, Breakfast Creek, Carlon'​s Creek, Carlon'​s ​Fame + 
-Starters ​& Craig and Christine Austin, Ian Olsen, Alan and Dorothy Pike, _John Redfern, Richard Winthorpe, Spiro Hajinakitas.+===== Free for the Day ===== 
 +by Spiro Hajinakitas 
 + 
 +DateSaturday, 26th March, 1983 | 
 +Route: ​Carlon'​s Farm, Tin Pot Mountain, Goolara Peak, Jenolan River, Mount O'​Reilly,​ Cox's River, Breakfast Creek, Carlon'​s Creek, Carlon'​s ​Farm | 
 +Starters ​Craig and Christine Austin, Ian Olsen, Alan and Dorothy Pike, John Redfern, Richard Winthorpe, Spiro Hajinakitas. ​
 Energetic young offsprings can really wear out good-hearted grandparent babysitters,​ consequently it's much easier to arrange to leave the youngsters in the loving care and attention of their grandparents,​ or whoever, for one day as opposed to two days. Understandably,​ bushwalkers bringing up a family do have their walking activities somewhat restricted, but with a little organisation it is possible for them to go walking now and then. Energetic young offsprings can really wear out good-hearted grandparent babysitters,​ consequently it's much easier to arrange to leave the youngsters in the loving care and attention of their grandparents,​ or whoever, for one day as opposed to two days. Understandably,​ bushwalkers bringing up a family do have their walking activities somewhat restricted, but with a little organisation it is possible for them to go walking now and then.
 +
 So with the babysitters organised, John Redfern and I were pleased to accept Chris' invitation to go on a long day walk in the Blue Mountains. So with the babysitters organised, John Redfern and I were pleased to accept Chris' invitation to go on a long day walk in the Blue Mountains.
-We left Sydney at some ungodly hour and arrived at Carlon'​s Farm at 
-8.15 am. On the way up John remarked how strange it was for him to-pack for a day walk as he usually goes on overnight walks, as I do. He fdlt sure he had brought along .too much gear and food. Thus whilst we waited for Craig, Christine, Richard and Ian to arrive we sorted out our gear, got our ect together and walked up to Bert Carlon'​s newly located shop to pay our parking fee, than we merry eight were off. 
-Along the road to Ironpot Mountain we could see that the bush had 
-benefited from the recent rain and looking back towards Narrow Neck we envied 
-the view that the people at "​Galong"​ had. Christine wished she had a view like that from her backyard. We made OUT way out along _the.. ridge to Ironpot Mountain and Goolara Peak, occasionally catching a glimpse of the Cox's River 600 metres or so below. A little difficulty was experienced finding a negotiable route down off Goolara Peak and at one stage a loose stone, as large as a kettle drum, was sent rolling and crashing down the mountain. I hope there was no one in the way! 
-Once past the steep section, the ridge flattened_out and 17...e.stopped to admire a most handsome stand of iron Barks and our botanists Ian and Christine, with lots of help from Dorothy, answered all Tuestions. Craig pointed out a couple of red _cedars. We reluctantly dropped off the ridge on to the Cox's, and stopped for a short break. The Cox's was flowing strongly and high, its water glistering in the midday sunshine. . What a difference a good bit of rain can do, it was indeed heartening to see tho Cox's again running 
-, freely and clean after months of severe drought. 
-We started off up the Jenolan River and after a short walk stopped for lunch on a nice grassy bank. As we had all had a very early breakfast we did feel rather hungry and we ate a hearty Dinah Washed down with tea and coffee. Then we were off again and soon we were admiring the spectacular 
-2age 18 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER July,​ 1983. 
-steep-sides'​of the-Lower'​Jenolan Canyon, I had-not ever walked up or down the Jenolan River and I was impressed with the scenery it offered. Many years ago, Craig told us he did walk right up to Caves House, the upper reacheS of the river being much slower to manoeuver. 
-At last the time came for some uphill going. Shlowly up and up, with Richard setting the pace, we pl3dded on until we reached the top of.MoUnt. - O'​Reilly at about 900 metres. We stopped to rest and regroup, measured our pulse rates, why I can't imagine, listened with interest to John about his "​nutrition"​ course, and as Alan was dying for a cup of tea, we marched .off down the north-eastern ridge to the Cox's. In no time at all Alan had a fire going and we finished off the carrot cake and other goodies. 
- ​Richard raced off up the river and up Breakfast Creek to get back to the cars before dark, whilst we followed at a slower pace. At the junction of the Cox's and Breakfast Creek we came upon a large party of school children and their teachers cooking their evening meal. We walked through their camp, exchanged greetings and started off up Breakfast Creek. 
-By the time we reached Carlon'​s Creek the sun had set and as we walked on in the dark, occasionally we would feel the slight stinging sensation of the stinging nettles hiding in the dark shadows. Sometimes the full moon managed to penetrate the tree cover and we finally got back to our cars at about 7.30 pm. 
-John and I remarked how nice it would have been if we had stayed out and camped on the Cox'​s'​as is our usual Saturday night habit. . We changed into our 'clean "​street"​ clothes and thought back on the day's walk. We all agreed it was a great trip and made plans for a follow-up day walk in the not too distant future. 
-*XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX 
-.NOTICE OF CHANGE OF WALK. LEADER - IAN DEBERT, 
-Ian advises that due to unforeseen circumstances he is unableto lead the walk set down for July 23,24 - Hartley Vale Historical Walk, Base Camp at Hartley Vale. The walk will now be on the 30,31st of July, details as programmed for the earlier date. 
  
-===== ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION ​1983 - UNFINANCIAL MEKBERS PLEASE NOTE ===== +We left Sydney at some ungodly hour and arrived at Carlon'​s Farm at 8:15 am. On the way up John remarked how strange it was for him to pack for a day walk as he usually goes on overnight walks, as I do. He felt sure he had brought along too much gear and food. Thus whilst we waited for Craig, Christine, Richard and Ian to arrive we sorted out our gear, got our act together and walked up to Bert Carlon'​s newly located shop to pay our parking fee, than we merry eight were off. 
-Single member $10 + 
-Married couple $13 +Along the road to Ironpot Mountain we could see that the bush had benefited from the recent rain and looking back towards Narrow Neck we envied the view that the people at "​Galong"​ had. Christine wished she had a view like that from her backyard. We made our way out along the ridge to Ironpot Mountain and Goolara Peak, occasionally catching a glimpse of the Cox's River 600 metres or so below. A little difficulty was experienced finding a negotiable route down off Goolara Peak and at one stage a loose stone, as large as a kettle drum, was sent rolling and crashing down the mountain. I hope there was no one in the way! 
-Full-time student $ ​a + 
-Non-active member $ 3 +Once past the steep section, the ridge flattened out and we.stopped to admire a most handsome stand of Ironbarks and our botanists Ian and Christine, with lots of help from Dorothy, answered all questions. Craig pointed out a couple of red cedars. We reluctantly dropped off the ridge on to the Coxs, and stopped for a short break. The Coxs was flowing strongly and high, its water glistering in the midday sunshine. What a difference a good bit of rain can do, it was indeed heartening to see tho Coxs again running freely and clean after months of severe drought. 
-Non-active member with magazine posted $ 8+ 
 +We started off up the Jenolan River and after a short walk stopped for lunch on a nice grassy bank. As we had all had a very early breakfast we did feel rather hungry and we ate a hearty lunch washed down with tea and coffee. Then we were off again and soon we were admiring the spectacular steep sides of the Lower Jenolan Canyon, I had not ever walked up or down the Jenolan River and I was impressed with the scenery it offered. Many years ago, Craig told us he did walk right up to Caves House, the upper reaches of the river being much slower to maneuver 
 + 
 +At last the time came for some uphill going. Slowly up and up, with Richard setting the pace, we plodded on until we reached the top of Mount O'​Reilly at about 900 metres. We stopped to rest and regroup, measured our pulse rates, why I can't imagine, listened with interest to John about his "​nutrition"​ course, and as Alan was dying for a cup of tea, we marched off down the north-eastern ridge to the Coxs. In no time at all Alan had a fire going and we finished off the carrot cake and other goodies. 
 + 
 +Richard raced off up the river and up Breakfast Creek to get back to the cars before dark, whilst we followed at a slower pace. At the junction of the Coxs and Breakfast Creek we came upon a large party of school children and their teachers cooking their evening meal. We walked through their camp, exchanged greetings and started off up Breakfast Creek. 
 + 
 +By the time we reached Carlons Creek the sun had set and as we walked on in the dark, occasionally we would feel the slight stinging sensation of the stinging nettles hiding in the dark shadows. Sometimes the full moon managed to penetrate the tree cover and we finally got back to our cars at about 7:30 pm. 
 + 
 +John and I remarked how nice it would have been if we had stayed out and camped on the Coxs as is our usual Saturday night habit. ​ We changed into our clean "​street"​ clothes and thought back on the day's walk. We all agreed it was a great trip and made plans for a follow-up day walk in the not too distant future. 
 + 
 +===== Notice of Change of Walk ===== 
 +Leader - Ian Debert 
 + 
 +Ian advises that due to unforeseen circumstances he is unable to lead the walk set down for July 23,24 - Hartley Vale Historical Walk, Base Camp at Hartley Vale. The walk will now be on the 30,31st of July, details as programmed for the earlier date. 
 + 
 +===== Annual Subscription ​1983 - Unfinancial Members Please Note ===== 
 + 
 +Single member $10 | 
 +Married couple ​$13 | 
 +Full-time student ​$8 | 
 +Non-active member ​$3 | 
 +Non-active member with magazine posted$8 
 These subscriptions were due and payable as at the Annual General Meeting, 9th March. These subscriptions were due and payable as at the Annual General Meeting, 9th March.
-The Treasurer is at present on holidays overseas, but the President, +The Treasurer is at present on holidays overseas, but the President, Tony Marshall or John Holly will accept subscriptions in the Clubroom, or **__unfinancial__** ​members may send their cheques to the Sydney Bushwalkers,​ Box 4476 G.P.O., Sydney, 2001.
-TonyMarshall or John Holly will accept subscriptions in the ClUbroom, or UNFINANGIAL ​members may send their cheques to the Sydney Bushwalkers,​ Box 4476 G.P.O., Sydney, 2001.+
  
198307.txt · Last modified: 2016/03/24 04:39 by kclacher