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198212 [2019/02/14 02:25]
tyreless
198212 [2019/02/15 01:38] (current)
tyreless
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 Felt the nearness of the solemn twisted trees?\\ Felt the nearness of the solemn twisted trees?\\
 Have you lived those precious silences - your best friend at your side,\\ Have you lived those precious silences - your best friend at your side,\\
-ke you drowsed away the evening at your ease?+As you drowsed away the evening at your ease?
  
 If you've done these things, you'll realise there'​s so much more in living,\\ If you've done these things, you'll realise there'​s so much more in living,\\
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 by Alex Colley. by Alex Colley.
  
-Bluegum, Garrawarra, Bouddi, Morella Karong, Era and Coolana. These are the conservation highlights of the S.B.W. The names live on in the memory of members because four of these campaigns, Bluegum, Morella Karong, Era and Coolana were solo effdrts ​by the S.B.W. while the Club took a leading part in the others. It also worked steadily for larger projects such as the Kosciusko National Park, Myall Lakes, Deua and the Greater Blue Mountains. Support for these became much more widely based. In the days of Bluegum the word conservation was seldom heard outside three societies then existing - the Mountain Trails Club, the S.B.W. and the Wild Life Preservation Society. Today there are more members of conservation bodies than there are of all political parties combined.+Bluegum, Garrawarra, Bouddi, Morella Karong, Era and Coolana. These are the conservation highlights of the S.B.W. The names live on in the memory of members because four of these campaigns, Bluegum, Morella Karong, Era and Coolana were solo efforts ​by the S.B.W. while the Club took a leading part in the others. It also worked steadily for larger projects such as the Kosciusko National Park, Myall Lakes, Deua and the Greater Blue Mountains. Support for these became much more widely based. In the days of Bluegum the word conservation was seldom heard outside three societies then existing - the Mountain Trails Club, the S.B.W. and the Wild Life Preservation Society. Today there are more members of conservation bodies than there are of all political parties combined.
  
 Era was a favourite camping place from the earliest days of the Club. In the hot summer months a group of S.B.W.s could be found there nearly every weekend. At first they camped at South Era. One windy weekend two well known members invited some of the other campers to their camp fire - a nice sheltered spot - and the next weekend the guests arrived early enough to "​bag"​ it for themselves. Shacks appeared in increasing numbers, and the bushwalkers moved on to Stockyard Creek. This too became crowded. Then they moved on to the gully at North Era, situated on Lot 7, which belonged to a relative of a member. The possibility of buying it was mooted, but as we had become used to camping there without hindrance, nothing eventuated. Then a gent started to appear after dark, flashing his torch into tents, and demanding a camping fee of 1/- a tent. Not until some years later, in 19439 was it ascertained from the owner that he had no right to collect. By this time we had made him a gift of a tidy sum. Era was a favourite camping place from the earliest days of the Club. In the hot summer months a group of S.B.W.s could be found there nearly every weekend. At first they camped at South Era. One windy weekend two well known members invited some of the other campers to their camp fire - a nice sheltered spot - and the next weekend the guests arrived early enough to "​bag"​ it for themselves. Shacks appeared in increasing numbers, and the bushwalkers moved on to Stockyard Creek. This too became crowded. Then they moved on to the gully at North Era, situated on Lot 7, which belonged to a relative of a member. The possibility of buying it was mooted, but as we had become used to camping there without hindrance, nothing eventuated. Then a gent started to appear after dark, flashing his torch into tents, and demanding a camping fee of 1/- a tent. Not until some years later, in 19439 was it ascertained from the owner that he had no right to collect. By this time we had made him a gift of a tidy sum.
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 Early in 1943 we learned that Byrnes'​ Estate, which included most of the land round South Era, was to be sold. Fears were aroused that it might be sold to a land development company, because an attempt to form an "Era Development Company"​ had been made in 1927. The proposed company was to erect a large boarding house or hotel and instal all the usual holiday facilities. The probability of another such scheme was the stimulus for a prolonged and obstacle-strewn campaign for preservation of North Era as a camping area. Early in 1943 we learned that Byrnes'​ Estate, which included most of the land round South Era, was to be sold. Fears were aroused that it might be sold to a land development company, because an attempt to form an "Era Development Company"​ had been made in 1927. The proposed company was to erect a large boarding house or hotel and instal all the usual holiday facilities. The probability of another such scheme was the stimulus for a prolonged and obstacle-strewn campaign for preservation of North Era as a camping area.
  
-The first move was to ask the Government, through the Federation, to resume the whole of the privately owned lands between Garrawarra and National Park. The Government refused to resume, so attention was turned to the possibility of purchasing Lot 7. As this lot included all the flat land at North Era, it was thought that its acquisition would prevent development. Federation was asked to organise the purchase, but it wouldn'​t,​ so the Club decided to attempt it alone. It would be necessary to raise some 400 pounds ($800), which was a large sum to raise when average annual wages were some 200 pounds. No special effort was made to raise the funds because it was a lot to ask from a small club, but in a very short time nearly 200 pounds had been promised, and this evidence of substantial and unsolicited support was placed before the half yearly meeting in September, 1943. The meeting resolved "That the Club devote 100 pounds from its Savings Bank Account towards the purchase of the whole or half of Lot 7, North Eta, provided the balance of the money be raised by loan or gift".+The first move was to ask the Government, through the Federation, to resume the whole of the privately owned lands between Garrawarra and National Park. The Government refused to resume, so attention was turned to the possibility of purchasing Lot 7. As this lot included all the flat land at North Era, it was thought that its acquisition would prevent development. Federation was asked to organise the purchase, but it wouldn'​t,​ so the Club decided to attempt it alone. It would be necessary to raise some 400 pounds ($800), which was a large sum to raise when average annual wages were some 200 pounds. No special effort was made to raise the funds because it was a lot to ask from a small club, but in a very short time nearly 200 pounds had been promised, and this evidence of substantial and unsolicited support was placed before the half yearly meeting in September, 1943. The meeting resolved "That the Club devote 100 pounds from its Savings Bank Account towards the purchase of the whole or half of Lot 7, North Era, provided the balance of the money be raised by loan or gift".
  
 The next move was to send our ace negotiators,​ Tom Herbert and Mouldy Harrison, down to the owner, Mr. Ziems of Wollongong, to arrange the purchase. It was known he was not keen to sell, but after hearing our reasons for wanting to buy, he consented to sell for 350 pounds. By June a total of 435 pounds had been contributed,​ all in the form of outright gifts. Then we found that money was not enough, because land prices were pegged in those days and the Federal Treasurer wouldn'​t allow us to buy for more than 210 pounds. However we were able to lease the camping rights for 18 rounds a year. The next move was to send our ace negotiators,​ Tom Herbert and Mouldy Harrison, down to the owner, Mr. Ziems of Wollongong, to arrange the purchase. It was known he was not keen to sell, but after hearing our reasons for wanting to buy, he consented to sell for 350 pounds. By June a total of 435 pounds had been contributed,​ all in the form of outright gifts. Then we found that money was not enough, because land prices were pegged in those days and the Federal Treasurer wouldn'​t allow us to buy for more than 210 pounds. However we were able to lease the camping rights for 18 rounds a year.
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-===== "​Five ​Reutrns ​Dulbolla, Please."​ =====+===== "​Five ​Returns ​Dulbolla, Please."​ =====
  
  
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 (In the Obituary for the late Ray Kirkby published in the September magazine, Alex Colley said of Ray - "it is probably for his very original humour he will be remembered."​ Alex has now unearthed a copy of an article written by Ray and first published in the "​Kweensland Speshul Edition"​ of the magazine in September 1946. It is a good example of the "very original humour"​ which friends of Ray so greatly appreciated,​ and is republished as originally given in the 1946 magazine.) (In the Obituary for the late Ray Kirkby published in the September magazine, Alex Colley said of Ray - "it is probably for his very original humour he will be remembered."​ Alex has now unearthed a copy of an article written by Ray and first published in the "​Kweensland Speshul Edition"​ of the magazine in September 1946. It is a good example of the "very original humour"​ which friends of Ray so greatly appreciated,​ and is republished as originally given in the 1946 magazine.)
  
-My deah, do you wish to be booked together with your parrot to Kilimanjaro via King's Cross? Or do you wish to know how to do the cheapest submarine trip up the Yangtze Kiang? If so, I am your man. I am wonderful and I admit it myself. Of course I had to learn by hard experience but I may as well cash in on it and, in years to come, as I drive past in my magnificent limousine from the palatial offices of "​Dulbolla Travellers'​ Aids" to my princely mansion, "​Dulbolla",​ set in the broad acres of "​Dulbolla Park", I see you cowering in the gutter with your dirty ruckeack ​and saying, "He made his money out of us".+My deah, do you wish to be booked together with your parrot to Kilimanjaro via King's Cross? Or do you wish to know how to do the cheapest submarine trip up the Yangtze Kiang? If so, I am your man. I am wonderful and I admit it myself. Of course I had to learn by hard experience but I may as well cash in on it and, in years to come, as I drive past in my magnificent limousine from the palatial offices of "​Dulbolla Travellers'​ Aids" to my princely mansion, "​Dulbolla",​ set in the broad acres of "​Dulbolla Park", I see you cowering in the gutter with your dirty rucksack ​and saying, "He made his money out of us".
  
 Any simpleton can go to the Railway and ask, "Is there or is there not a certain train running?"​ We have so much practice at that kind of question that we all are quite proficient. But how many are able, when required, to tell the Railways where to get off - at least, that is, of course where __you__ want to get off - or rather where to get off if they will not let you off where you want to get off. Any simpleton can go to the Railway and ask, "Is there or is there not a certain train running?"​ We have so much practice at that kind of question that we all are quite proficient. But how many are able, when required, to tell the Railways where to get off - at least, that is, of course where __you__ want to get off - or rather where to get off if they will not let you off where you want to get off.
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 However, actions speak louder than words, let us to a concrete example. However, actions speak louder than words, let us to a concrete example.
  
-To commence our Queensland trip I considered it advisable to alight from the Brisbane Express at Dulbolla. Dulbolla is a siding about 60 miles from Brisbane having quite three houses and no platform but only about a mile from the township of Rathdowney. The N.S.W. Railway Guide does not mention the place so resort had to be made to "​Enquiries"​. Here came my first triumph. You know how the clerk, if asked the time of the train to Sulphanilamide,​ mostly rattles it off without reference to index or page? This time he had to make a few enquiries from me before he could proceed! Then he seized a Queensland Guide and, like a huntsman getting the fox, his eyes gleamed as he actually saw the name "​Dulbolla"​ in print for the first time. Like the Sun surrounded by its planets, like a lovely princess with lesser ladies clustered to her, like flies around a piece of bread and jam, Dulbolla was hemmed in by a symbolism which would have inspired Pitman. They were all represented - K, f, p, see page 68, %, ::, @, and ¤ which means "​Don'​t spit where the platform ought to be" and ¤¤¤ which means "When you get two different answers to the one question, ​donrt believe either"​ and, yes, there it is, !!!, which means "Stops on Tues. Thurs. and Sat. if required"​. And we should be there on Sat.+To commence our Queensland trip I considered it advisable to alight from the Brisbane Express at Dulbolla. Dulbolla is a siding about 60 miles from Brisbane having quite three houses and no platform but only about a mile from the township of Rathdowney. The N.S.W. Railway Guide does not mention the place so resort had to be made to "​Enquiries"​. Here came my first triumph. You know how the clerk, if asked the time of the train to Sulphanilamide,​ mostly rattles it off without reference to index or page? This time he had to make a few enquiries from me before he could proceed! Then he seized a Queensland Guide and, like a huntsman getting the fox, his eyes gleamed as he actually saw the name "​Dulbolla"​ in print for the first time. Like the Sun surrounded by its planets, like a lovely princess with lesser ladies clustered to her, like flies around a piece of bread and jam, Dulbolla was hemmed in by a symbolism which would have inspired Pitman. They were all represented - K, f, p, see page 68, %, ::, @, and ¤ which means "​Don'​t spit where the platform ought to be" and ¤¤¤ which means "When you get two different answers to the one question, ​don'​t ​believe either"​ and, yes, there it is, !!!, which means "Stops on Tues. Thurs. and Sat. if required"​. And we should be there on Sat.
  
-Of course, I am not blaming Alex for what happened. Perhaps I should have had my party in for tutorial classes twice a week. However, Alex offered to buy the tickets - just "Five returns Dulbolla, please"​. Apparently, after making discreet enquiries, the man endeavoured to hide his ignorance by saying that he could not issue return tickets there and that Alex would have to accept tickets to Bisbane ​"which is about the same". Not having sufficient data in his possession Alex acquiesced. After sifting all the evidence I gathered that N.S.W. is unable to issue return tickets to Queensland stations other than BriSbane but what riled me was that, on a distance calculation,​ the overcharge was about £l per ticket and we did not want to use a considerable proportion of the return ticket at all. Why could we not buy return tickets to the Border and then get single extensions to Dulbolla?+Of course, I am not blaming Alex for what happened. Perhaps I should have had my party in for tutorial classes twice a week. However, Alex offered to buy the tickets - just "Five returns Dulbolla, please"​. Apparently, after making discreet enquiries, the man endeavoured to hide his ignorance by saying that he could not issue return tickets there and that Alex would have to accept tickets to Brisbane ​"which is about the same". Not having sufficient data in his possession Alex acquiesced. After sifting all the evidence I gathered that N.S.W. is unable to issue return tickets to Queensland stations other than BriSbane but what riled me was that, on a distance calculation,​ the overcharge was about £1 per ticket and we did not want to use a considerable proportion of the return ticket at all. Why could we not buy return tickets to the Border and then get single extensions to Dulbolla?
  
 The official reluctantly agreed that this could be done but said it would make little difference in cost so I had to make a lot of calculations to prove otherwise and then, only then, did he abandon his defences and surrender, knowing that I had an atom bomb up each sleeve. With good grace (and, I felt, with some respect and a tinge of admiration for me) he handed me back lots of five pound notes and told me how to proceed. The official reluctantly agreed that this could be done but said it would make little difference in cost so I had to make a lot of calculations to prove otherwise and then, only then, did he abandon his defences and surrender, knowing that I had an atom bomb up each sleeve. With good grace (and, I felt, with some respect and a tinge of admiration for me) he handed me back lots of five pound notes and told me how to proceed.
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 The impact of a ticket to Border Tunnel onto the brain of the train officials had varying effects. Some expressed great astonishment. Others looked at it as people probably looked at the first aeroplane and yet showed not the least curiosity. In the early hours of the morning, when it was still dark, a ticket examiner came through the train and happened to catch Jean away from her home base. Unfortunately,​ when he asked Jean where she was going, she could not remember beyond the fact that "It starts with '​D'"​. He suggested "​Deepwater. Perhaps Dapto. Not Dungog? Doonside, Dorrigo, Dubbo?"​ He conducted Jean back to the compartment to satisfy himself that it wasn't Gladesville. Then he became quite keen to know where we "​Flannel Flowers"​ were walking - apparently he had dealt with peculiar people before. The impact of a ticket to Border Tunnel onto the brain of the train officials had varying effects. Some expressed great astonishment. Others looked at it as people probably looked at the first aeroplane and yet showed not the least curiosity. In the early hours of the morning, when it was still dark, a ticket examiner came through the train and happened to catch Jean away from her home base. Unfortunately,​ when he asked Jean where she was going, she could not remember beyond the fact that "It starts with '​D'"​. He suggested "​Deepwater. Perhaps Dapto. Not Dungog? Doonside, Dorrigo, Dubbo?"​ He conducted Jean back to the compartment to satisfy himself that it wasn't Gladesville. Then he became quite keen to know where we "​Flannel Flowers"​ were walking - apparently he had dealt with peculiar people before.
  
-Within a hundred miles of our destination we got quite "​jumpy"​ as to whether the train might forget or not be advised to stop at our destination. So I planned to ask the engine driver at Casino whether he intended to stop. However, just as I arrived at the engine, a station official handed him a form on which, a carbon copy, I cauld see the word "​Dulbolla"​ written.+Within a hundred miles of our destination we got quite "​jumpy"​ as to whether the train might forget or not be advised to stop at our destination. So I planned to ask the engine driver at Casino whether he intended to stop. However, just as I arrived at the engine, a station official handed him a form on which, a carbon copy, I could see the word "​Dulbolla"​ written.
  
 "Only one stop today,"​ he said cheerily, "​Dulboola"​. "Only one stop today,"​ he said cheerily, "​Dulboola"​.
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-===== the Uncanny Story Of The S.B.W. Magazine. =====+===== The Uncanny Story Of The S.B.W. Magazine. =====
    
 by Evelyn Walker. by Evelyn Walker.
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-TEE NOVEKBER GENERAL MEETMG+===== The November General Meeting===== 
 by Barry Wallace. by Barry Wallace.
 +
 The meeting began at around 2016 with some 30 or so members present and the President in the chair. The meeting began at around 2016 with some 30 or so members present and the President in the chair.
-There were no apologies so we proceeded to welcome no less than 9 new + 
-members. Of these, Michelle De Vries Robbe, Sue Tonkin, Paul Rodgers, Neil +There were no apologies so we proceeded to welcome no less than 9 new members. Of these, Michelle De Vries Robbe, Sue Tonkin, Paul Rodgers, Neil Thomas ​and Matthew Walton were there when summoned, Debbie Van der Sluys arrived later and Elisabeth Ratcliff, David Butler and Sharon Kinsella did not show. 
-Thbmas ​and Matthew Walton were there when summoned, Debbie Van der Sluys arrived later and Elisabeth Ratcliff, David Butler and Sharon Kinsella did not show.+
 The Minutes were read and received. The Minutes were read and received.
-Correspondence brought letters ​frbm Rudy Dezelin advising change of + 
-address, from Newcastle Bush Walkers seeking advice on sharing of vehicle ​-usage costs, return thanks from Jean Kirkby; to Malcolm McGregor and Mike Short, to Morag Ryder and Barbara Elliot advising readmission to membership, +Correspondence brought letters ​from Rudy Dezelin advising change of address, from Newcastle Bush Walkers seeking advice on sharing of vehicle usage costs, return thanks from Jean Kirkby; to Malcolm McGregor and Mike Short, to Morag Ryder and Barbara Elliot advising readmission to membership, to the N.S.W. Premier expressing our opposition to changes in the Kosciusko ​National ​Park Plan of Management, to Mr. Les Brand ref the use of his property as a base for recent bushwalks, to Joe Turner and Maurie Berry thanking them for substantial donations, to Mr. Ted Kelly asking that he appear before the Committee, and last but not least, to the Prime Minister ​expressing our opposition to proposed dams in South West Tasmania. 
-to the N.S.W. Premier expressing our opposition to changes in the Kosciusko ​Nation ​Park Plan of Management, to Mr. Les Brand ref the use of his property + 
-as a base for recent bushwalks, to Joe Turner and Maurie Berry thanking them for substantial donations, to Mr. Ted Kelly asking that he appear before the +The Treasurer'​s Report indicated that we began the month with a balance of $1,405.16, had an income of $775.56, spent $383.99 and closed the month with a balance of $1,796.73. The Coolana Account has now been merged with other Club funds and shows a last balance of zero. 
-Committee, and 1Pst but not least, to the Prime Ministee ​expressing our opposition to proposed dams in South West Tasmania. + 
-The.Treasurer'​s Report indicated that we began the month with a balance +The Walks Report opened with Bill Capon'​s Cox River walk of the 15,16,17 October which was reported as uneventful with an unbalance of the sexes (?) in the 13 attendees. Ian Debert'​s Tomat Creek walk the same weekend had 9 starters and as is becoming traditional it rained, and they met Neville Laing. The third weekend walk saw Bob Younger and his 6 members meeting up with people on donkeys, in the rain, somewhere near Yalwal. I guess you can't win 'em all. On Sunday, 17th October, Meryl Watman led a wet and somewhat shortened walk from Waterfall to Waterfall with starters who were legion. Ralph Penglis'​ Syd. Arb. walk was cancelled. 
-of $1,405.16, had an income of $775.56, spent $383.99 and closed the month with a balance of $1,796.73. The Coolana Account has now been merged with other Club funds and shows a last balance of zero. + 
-The Walks Report opened with Bill Capon'​s Cox River walk of the +The following weekend, 22,23,24 October, saw Jim Laing leading four members and 6 visitors on his Barrington Tops walk, and Peter Miller cancelling his Kowmung walk. Peter Hislop led two people on his Mt. Solitary walk and reported a good trip with waratahs in profusion. Of the day walks David Ingram reported 28 starters ​on his Bell to Lithgow-along-the-tracks walk. There were waratahs and it seems not everyone listened to the lecture ​on local history provided on the walk. I gain the impression David was somewhat ​disappointed. Hans Stichter'​s Bluegum walk was led by Gordon Lee who reported that the two starters believe they sighted a native cat. 
-15,16,17 October which was reported as uneventful with an unbalance of the + 
-sexes (?) in the 13 attendees. Ian Debert'​s Tomat Creek walk the same weekend had 9 starters and as is becoming traditional it rained, and they met +Over the weekend of 29,30,31 October Bob Younger reported 8 members, 2 prospectives,​ and one visitor on a good trip on the Kowmung River. John Redfern'​s semi-exploratory walk from St. Albans did not go to programme so its 13 members, one prospective and one visitor ​ended up in St. Albans pub. Of the two Sunday walks John Newman had 4 prospectives and 6 members who enjoyed surfing at Burning Palms and caught the early train from Lilyvale despite the fact that someone has removed the overhead bridge; and Kath Brown had 15 starters on her Benowie Track walk enjoying the wildflowers in fine weather. 
-Neville Laing. The third weekend walk saw Bob Younger and his 6 members meeting up with people on donkeys, in the rain, somewhere near Yalwal. I + 
-guess you can't win 'era all. On Sunday, 17th October, Meryl Watman led awet and somewhat shortened walk from Waterfall to Waterfall with starters who were legion. Ralph Penglis'​ Syd. Arb. walk was cancelled. +Over the weekend of November 5,6,7 Don and Jenny Cornell led 9 members and one visitor, from Brisbane Bushwalkers,​ on an enjoyable trip on the Cox River in hot and rather dry conditions. Of Scott Crawford'​s Budawangs walk there was no report and Peter Christian'​s Mt. Solitary walk was cancelled. On Ken Gould'​s Mountain Lagoon walk the 12 starters somehow ended up as 11, with No. 12 being retrieved on the Tuesday morning. Brian Bolton'​s Waterfall to Waterfall walk attracted ​10 members, 9 prospectives and 3 visitors and was reported with almost evangelical fervour by the leader. Joan Cooper, on the other hand, was definitely soft-sell in her report of the 16 starters on her Machin'​s Crater trip with its hot weather, total fire ban and lots of swims. All of which ended the Walks Report. 
-The following weekend, 22,23,24 October, saw Jim Laing leading four +
-members and 6 visitors on his Barrington Tops walk, and Peter Miller cancelling his Kowmung walk. Peter Hislop led two people on his Mt.Solitary walk and reported a good trip with waratahs in profusion. Of the day walks David Ingram reported 28 starters ​an his Bell to Lithgow-along-the-tracks walk. +
-There were waratahs and it seems not everyone listened to the lecture ​an local history provided on the walk. I gain the impression David was some- +
-what disappointed. Hans Stichter'​s Bluegum walk was led by Gordon Lee who reported that the two starters believe they sighted a native cat. +
-Over the weekend of 29,30,31 October Bob Younger reported 8 members, +
-2 prospectives,​ and one visitor on a good trip on the Kowmung River. John Redfern'​s semi-exploratory walk from St. Albans did not go to programme so its 13 meMbers, one prospective and one visitor ​endsd up in St. Albans pub. Of the two Sunday walks John Newman had 4 prospectives and 6 members who enjoyed surfing at Burning Palms and caught the early train from Lilyvale +
-Page 16 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER DeceMber,​ 1982. +
-despite the fact that someone has removed the overhead bridge; and Kath Brown had 15 starters on her Benowie Track walk enjoying the wildflowers in fine weather. +
-Over the weekend of November 5,697 Don and Jenny Cornell led 9 members and one visitor, from Brisbane Bushwalkers,​ on an enjoyable trip on the Cox River in hot and rather dry conditions. Of Scott Crawford'​s Budawangs walk there was no report and Peter Christian'​s Mt. Solitary walk was cancelled. On Ken Gould'​s Mountain Lagoon walk the 12 starters somehow ended up as 11, with No.12 being retrieved on the Tuesday morning. Brian Bolton'​s Waterfall to Waterfall walk atrracted ​10 members, 9 prospectives and 3 visitors and was reported with almost evangelical fervour by the leader. Joan Cooper, on the +
-other hand, was definitely soft-sell in her report of the 16 starters on her +
-Machin'​s Crater trip with its hot weather, total fire ban and lots of swims. All of which ended the Walks Report.+
 Arising from the Walks Report a decision was made to write thanking a member of the Bush Fire Brigade at Mountain Lagoon for her assistance in the search conducted in the area. Arising from the Walks Report a decision was made to write thanking a member of the Bush Fire Brigade at Mountain Lagoon for her assistance in the search conducted in the area.
-Federation Report brought news of a S.& R. exercise planned for 30th Aloril/lst May 1983 to search for the missing plane at Barrington Tops. Federation have received a letter from the N.P.W.S. at Nowra complaining that S. & R. conducted an exercise in Horton National Park. They will contact 
-N.P.W.S. and explain the situation. The F.B.W. Ball this year produced a profit of $1,700 and at conclusion of the report the meeting passed a vote, of thanks to Gordon Lee for his efforts in producing this most pleasing result. Federation are writing to C.S.I.R.O. seeking information on the possible spreading of forest dieback by bushwalking activities. 
-Of General Business there was none, so announcements complete, the 
-meeting closed at 2101. 
-THE CLUB AUCTION 1982. by Jim Brown. 
-Any stranger visiting.the'​S.B.W. Clubroom on the evening of November 17th might well have been forgiven for disbelieving the daily plaints in the madia over the economic recession. For S.B.W. had gathered in great number - about 75 present - and were to be seen and heard vying to out-spend one another. 
-There was a notable collection of saleable - well, mainly saleable - wares and bric-a-brac,​ including a sextant (minus instruction,​ manual) and we trust the buyer has a yachting friend, and is not trying to make the instrument 
-forecast the sex of unborn pedigree cats. There were two sleeping bags, which went off at bargain prices in these days; and a couple of tents which also went pretty cheaply; a two-burner Portagas stove; and amongst the items of less obvious worth, a fur-lined cap of the type worn by the late Genghis Than 
-and not quite so late Leonid Brezhnev. Some bottles of wine sold at prices higher than those currently asked by cut-rate liquor stores. At the end 
-of the night Coolana funds had increased by $400. 
-The key to the situation was, of course, the auctioneer. Charlie Brown 
-excelled himself - his performance was even better than last year's - and he kept up the flow of banter, persuasion, invective and coercion for over an hour. Now that's quite a battering to endure - but, after all, $40011 
-XXXXXXXXX 
  
 +Federation Report brought news of a S. & R. exercise planned for 30th April / 1st May 1983 to search for the missing plane at Barrington Tops. Federation have received a letter from the N.P.W.S. at Nowra complaining that S. & R. conducted an exercise in Morton National Park. They will contact N.P.W.S. and explain the situation. The F.B.W. Ball this year produced a profit of $1,700 and at conclusion of the report the meeting passed a vote of thanks to Gordon Lee for his efforts in producing this most pleasing result. Federation are writing to C.S.I.R.O. seeking information on the possible spreading of forest dieback by bushwalking activities.
 +
 +Of General Business there was none, so announcements complete, the meeting closed at 2101.
 +
 +----
 +
 +===== The Club Auction 1982. =====
 +
 +by Jim Brown.
 +
 +Any stranger visiting the S.B.W. Clubroom on the evening of November 17th might well have been forgiven for disbelieving the daily plaints in the media over the economic recession. For S.B.W. had gathered in great number - about 75 present - and were to be seen and heard vying to out-spend one another.
 +
 +There was a notable collection of saleable - well, mainly saleable - wares and bric-a-brac,​ including a sextant (minus instruction manual) and we trust the buyer has a yachting friend, and is not trying to make the instrument forecast the sex of unborn pedigree cats. There were two sleeping bags, which went off at bargain prices in these days; and a couple of tents which also went pretty cheaply; a two-burner Portagas stove; and amongst the items of less obvious worth, a fur-lined cap of the type worn by the late Genghis Khan and not quite so late Leonid Brezhnev. Some bottles of wine sold at prices higher than those currently asked by cut-rate liquor stores. At the end of the night Coolana funds had increased by $400.
 +
 +The key to the situation was, of course, the auctioneer. Charlie Brown excelled himself - his performance was even better than last year's - and he kept up the flow of banter, persuasion, invective and coercion for over an hour. Now that's quite a battering to endure - but, after all, $400!!
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198212.1550111123.txt.gz · Last modified: 2019/02/14 02:25 by tyreless