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 Resort was then had to the river, where bathing, liloing and canoeing were as popular as ever. Here the conversation turned naturally to health food (can anyone remember __any__ bushwalk or other S.B.W. function in which the main topic isn't food?). Marcia Shappert suggested that recipes for favourite bushwalking foods should be published in the magazine, one of which could be her bran bread, an offer which she followed up with a large sample chunk, which drew much appreciation from all taste-testers. The idea seems a good one, and other recipes are sought of foods which are suitable in one way or another for bushwalking. What about toasted muesli, marinaded steaks and the like? Please send them in - we'd love to try them. And it isn't necessary in every instance to send a sample. Resort was then had to the river, where bathing, liloing and canoeing were as popular as ever. Here the conversation turned naturally to health food (can anyone remember __any__ bushwalk or other S.B.W. function in which the main topic isn't food?). Marcia Shappert suggested that recipes for favourite bushwalking foods should be published in the magazine, one of which could be her bran bread, an offer which she followed up with a large sample chunk, which drew much appreciation from all taste-testers. The idea seems a good one, and other recipes are sought of foods which are suitable in one way or another for bushwalking. What about toasted muesli, marinaded steaks and the like? Please send them in - we'd love to try them. And it isn't necessary in every instance to send a sample.
  
-Another ​suggestton ​for the magazine was made - that articles on Coolana and the Kangaroo Valley should be prepared. It seems that this is a series just waiting to be written, as the Coolana Committee discussed it some two years ago. We hope therefore to have articles on the purchase of the land, the building of the hut and floor, the local fauna and flora and the history of the area in subsequent issues. Good for you, Dot, George and Helen, John Redfern and anyone else who can contribute!+Another ​suggestion ​for the magazine was made - that articles on Coolana and the Kangaroo Valley should be prepared. It seems that this is a series just waiting to be written, as the Coolana Committee discussed it some two years ago. We hope therefore to have articles on the purchase of the land, the building of the hut and floor, the local fauna and flora and the history of the area in subsequent issues. Good for you, Dot, George and Helen, John Redfern and anyone else who can contribute!
  
 On the way up from the river we paused to admire the new tank which collects rain from the roof. Prepared by Wayne Steele and friends with an impressive array of bolts, the tank was recently brought in and installed by George Gray and Gordon Lee. Given a few heavy showers the tank should be able to supply enough water for any number of people camping in the area even if the creek dries up. A most useful acquisition. On the way up from the river we paused to admire the new tank which collects rain from the roof. Prepared by Wayne Steele and friends with an impressive array of bolts, the tank was recently brought in and installed by George Gray and Gordon Lee. Given a few heavy showers the tank should be able to supply enough water for any number of people camping in the area even if the creek dries up. A most useful acquisition.
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 The Colong Committee commissioned Michael Bell to draw up a Washpool National Park proposal, and Roger Lembit, Federation Conservation Secretary, to draw up plans for extension of Barrington Tops National Park. The FBW has been asked to contribute towards the cost of the Barrington proposal. The cabinet rainforest sub-committee will now have before it specific proposals for the reservation of the four largest rainforest areas - the Border Ranges, Washpool, Hastings and Barrington. The Colong Committee commissioned Michael Bell to draw up a Washpool National Park proposal, and Roger Lembit, Federation Conservation Secretary, to draw up plans for extension of Barrington Tops National Park. The FBW has been asked to contribute towards the cost of the Barrington proposal. The cabinet rainforest sub-committee will now have before it specific proposals for the reservation of the four largest rainforest areas - the Border Ranges, Washpool, Hastings and Barrington.
  
-In October last year the World Heritage Council listed 11 new World Heritage sites. Three of these are in Australia. Kakadu was chosen because it possesses ​outstanaing ​Aboriginal art, in addition to the best example of a range of ecosystems unique to northern Australia, the Great Barrier Reef because it possesses the world'​s longest stretch of Coral reef, as well as the world'​s most diverse faunal collection, and Willandra Lakes Region, the richest fossil site in Australia, which includes both the arrival of homo sapiens and the extinction of the giant marsupials in its time span.+In October last year the World Heritage Council listed 11 new World Heritage sites. Three of these are in Australia. Kakadu was chosen because it possesses ​outstanding ​Aboriginal art, in addition to the best example of a range of ecosystems unique to northern Australia, the Great Barrier Reef because it possesses the world'​s longest stretch of Coral reef, as well as the world'​s most diverse faunal collection, and Willandra Lakes Region, the richest fossil site in Australia, which includes both the arrival of homo sapiens and the extinction of the giant marsupials in its time span.
  
 In the U.S. the Sierra Club presented a petition carrying more than a million signatures to the U.S. Senate, calling on Congress to replace Interior Secretary James Watt and resist the anti-environmental legislation of the Reagan Government. The campaign appears to have inspired Watt's surprise statement on February 21st in which he announced that the Reagan administration will seek legislation to ban energy and mineral development in the Nation'​s 80 million acres of wilderness areas to the end of the century. There is no such provision in this State. In the U.S. the Sierra Club presented a petition carrying more than a million signatures to the U.S. Senate, calling on Congress to replace Interior Secretary James Watt and resist the anti-environmental legislation of the Reagan Government. The campaign appears to have inspired Watt's surprise statement on February 21st in which he announced that the Reagan administration will seek legislation to ban energy and mineral development in the Nation'​s 80 million acres of wilderness areas to the end of the century. There is no such provision in this State.
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 by Patrick McBride. by Patrick McBride.
  
-The calm evening air was filled with flying insects of all types, ranging from swarms of tiny gnats to fluttering half-size grey buttetflies. Seated by a hot fire in woollen clothing I was led to reflect that, despite my impression of the ambient temperature,​ to the local fauna it was a balmy evening in peak summer conditions. Aspiring Flat must be a bleak place in winter when snow reaches to the valley floor and the brief days are shadowed by encircling walls. For us in January 1982 the days blazed long and golden, before easing to a slow twilight that left enough brightness in the sky to read fine print at 10 pm.+The calm evening air was filled with flying insects of all types, ranging from swarms of tiny gnats to fluttering half-size grey butterflies. Seated by a hot fire in woollen clothing I was led to reflect that, despite my impression of the ambient temperature,​ to the local fauna it was a balmy evening in peak summer conditions. Aspiring Flat must be a bleak place in winter when snow reaches to the valley floor and the brief days are shadowed by encircling walls. For us in January 1982 the days blazed long and golden, before easing to a slow twilight that left enough brightness in the sky to read fine print at 10 pm.
  
 I was sitting alone now, drinking in the spectacular beauty of this glen in its evening garb and waiting to see if the soft silver of moonlight would reveal a new aspect. Spiro had finally given up the strain of focussing on his current paperback fiction and followed the other members of the party (Wendy Lippiat, Wayne Steele and Bill Capon) to tents and sleeping bags. The air was quite still and Turnbull Thomson Falls, one kilometre upstream, provided a background murmur. Nearer to hand Kitchener Creek, deflected by the grassy promontory on which we were camped, whispered its tale of tussock and glacier. I was sitting alone now, drinking in the spectacular beauty of this glen in its evening garb and waiting to see if the soft silver of moonlight would reveal a new aspect. Spiro had finally given up the strain of focussing on his current paperback fiction and followed the other members of the party (Wendy Lippiat, Wayne Steele and Bill Capon) to tents and sleeping bags. The air was quite still and Turnbull Thomson Falls, one kilometre upstream, provided a background murmur. Nearer to hand Kitchener Creek, deflected by the grassy promontory on which we were camped, whispered its tale of tussock and glacier.
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 Abruptly we reached the treeline and after winding through a few scrubby outliers found ourselves in open country. Crossing the ecotone between forest and alpine grassland was always a landmark of practical if rather prosaic import since only the former is habitat for sandflies. High country brought the party relief from sandflies and the leader relief from complaints about sandflies. Several trip members were a bit paranoid about these insects even though it was only once, at the last camp in Fiordland, that sandflies were numerous enough to constitute a nuisance. Abruptly we reached the treeline and after winding through a few scrubby outliers found ourselves in open country. Crossing the ecotone between forest and alpine grassland was always a landmark of practical if rather prosaic import since only the former is habitat for sandflies. High country brought the party relief from sandflies and the leader relief from complaints about sandflies. Several trip members were a bit paranoid about these insects even though it was only once, at the last camp in Fiordland, that sandflies were numerous enough to constitute a nuisance.
  
-Long easy ridges now led upwards in graceful undulations,​ the warm scent of mountain meadows replaced the odours of moss and humus, and at our feet alpine flowers lifted their bright heads in greeting. A giant daisy (Celmisia sp.) with white petals around a yellow centre was particularly striking. At about 1100 metres the rarefied air induced more laboured breathing but no change of pace as instead of going directly to Albert Burn Saddle we diverged to the unnamed mountain to the north opposite Dragonfly Peak. This peak was composed of loose plates of slate (the renowled ​New Zealand "​Weetbix"​ rock) bedded at a steep angle, and readily sliding over each other. Thoughtfully we pressed on. After all, how could the landscape collapse around us on such a magnificent day?+Long easy ridges now led upwards in graceful undulations,​ the warm scent of mountain meadows replaced the odours of moss and humus, and at our feet alpine flowers lifted their bright heads in greeting. A giant daisy (Celmisia sp.) with white petals around a yellow centre was particularly striking. At about 1100 metres the rarefied air induced more laboured breathing but no change of pace as instead of going directly to Albert Burn Saddle we diverged to the unnamed mountain to the north opposite Dragonfly Peak. This peak was composed of loose plates of slate (the renowned ​New Zealand "​Weetbix"​ rock) bedded at a steep angle, and readily sliding over each other. Thoughtfully we pressed on. After all, how could the landscape collapse around us on such a magnificent day?
  
 From near the top the view was breathtaking. Far below was our home at Junction Flat, a green triangle held by ribbons of translucent turquoise. Two lone beech trees growing near the centre of the flat proclaimed their enterprise and character. I thought of the relief map used as a display at Aspiring National Park Headquarters - if only the leaden-souled tourists shambling around that clay image could see the scintillating colours and Olympian scale of the real country they would cast off their coats of lethargy and dance to the hills. From near the top the view was breathtaking. Far below was our home at Junction Flat, a green triangle held by ribbons of translucent turquoise. Two lone beech trees growing near the centre of the flat proclaimed their enterprise and character. I thought of the relief map used as a display at Aspiring National Park Headquarters - if only the leaden-souled tourists shambling around that clay image could see the scintillating colours and Olympian scale of the real country they would cast off their coats of lethargy and dance to the hills.
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 Over the weekend of 5,6,7 March Tony Marshall reported low river conditions for the five people who attended his Kangaroo River trip, whilst Bob Hodgson cancelled his second attempt on the Cess Pit Canyon. Gordon Lee had four people on his rock climbing day on the Saturday and 12 people on the Sunday abseiling instructional. Meryl Watman reported 7 people on her Heathcote to Waterfall walk, finishing the walk at 1405; and the Walks Report. Over the weekend of 5,6,7 March Tony Marshall reported low river conditions for the five people who attended his Kangaroo River trip, whilst Bob Hodgson cancelled his second attempt on the Cess Pit Canyon. Gordon Lee had four people on his rock climbing day on the Saturday and 12 people on the Sunday abseiling instructional. Meryl Watman reported 7 people on her Heathcote to Waterfall walk, finishing the walk at 1405; and the Walks Report.
  
-Meanwhile, back at the ranch; the elctions ​were over and the discussion of Annual Subs raged to and fro, and back again. At one stage the meeting passed a motion which was subsequently ruled invalid under the Constitution. I guess we got it right, in the end.+Meanwhile, back at the ranch; the elections ​were over and the discussion of Annual Subs raged to and fro, and back again. At one stage the meeting passed a motion which was subsequently ruled invalid under the Constitution. I guess we got it right, in the end.
  
 Then there was a motion of thanks to the retiring committee, carried by acclamation,​ the announcements,​ and the President'​s cry of "Let us Re-une";​ and then the meeting closed at 2200. Then there was a motion of thanks to the retiring committee, carried by acclamation,​ the announcements,​ and the President'​s cry of "Let us Re-une";​ and then the meeting closed at 2200.
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 In 1980 Ian had about fourteen people on this walk, and of the eight who turned up in 1981, five had come the previous year. For the record, the 1981 party comprised Ian Debert, Joy Hynes, Sue and Bill Capon, Keith Docherty, Derek and Lyn Wilson, and the writer. In 1980 Ian had about fourteen people on this walk, and of the eight who turned up in 1981, five had come the previous year. For the record, the 1981 party comprised Ian Debert, Joy Hynes, Sue and Bill Capon, Keith Docherty, Derek and Lyn Wilson, and the writer.
  
-The walk proper starts from the gate and proceeds for about fifty minutes along the dirt road which passes through the cliffs to the buttress below Kedumba Walls. There the route turns off the road (rather subtly I might add, about five minutes along a flat section of the road running generally south and parallel to Kedumba Walls) on to a little-used route down to Kedumba Creek. The road walk is not without interest, as one cannot but be impressed by the eneineering ​work involvd ​in breaching the cliff-face, and the fine views from the road.+The walk proper starts from the gate and proceeds for about fifty minutes along the dirt road which passes through the cliffs to the buttress below Kedumba Walls. There the route turns off the road (rather subtly I might add, about five minutes along a flat section of the road running generally south and parallel to Kedumba Walls) on to a little-used route down to Kedumba Creek. The road walk is not without interest, as one cannot but be impressed by the engineering ​work involved ​in breaching the cliff-face, and the fine views from the road.
  
 The route from the road down to Kedumba Creek is probably best understood by walking it in company with someone who knows the way, rather than trying to understand my description. Briefly, though, one starts down a sort of disused fire trail, becoming a track on an ever-steepening route which bears left around the back of a gully and sidles down its farther side, ending up in the bottom of the gully alongside the near dry wash of a seasonal creek bed. Eventually, one emerges on to Kedumba Creek and then heads upstream for about five minutes to a reasonable campsite adjacent to cliffs on the opposite bank. The route from the road down to Kedumba Creek is probably best understood by walking it in company with someone who knows the way, rather than trying to understand my description. Briefly, though, one starts down a sort of disused fire trail, becoming a track on an ever-steepening route which bears left around the back of a gully and sidles down its farther side, ending up in the bottom of the gully alongside the near dry wash of a seasonal creek bed. Eventually, one emerges on to Kedumba Creek and then heads upstream for about five minutes to a reasonable campsite adjacent to cliffs on the opposite bank.
  
-The campsite of 1980 had taken a bit of a battering in between visits and the fire in 1981 was lighted on a much reduced bench of packed sand above the creek. Considering the drought conditions ​throughoat ​the period one can but speculate on the force of the flash flood which ripped through the original campsite. There is still the choice of a tent pitched on the hard sand or a few yards away among the tall trees which dominate this part of the creek flats.+The campsite of 1980 had taken a bit of a battering in between visits and the fire in 1981 was lighted on a much reduced bench of packed sand above the creek. Considering the drought conditions ​throughout ​the period one can but speculate on the force of the flash flood which ripped through the original campsite. There is still the choice of a tent pitched on the hard sand or a few yards away among the tall trees which dominate this part of the creek flats.
  
 The need to boil water is an excuse for a generous campfire and plentiful brews of tea. Overnight cold and damp tend to fall heavily on the campsite and a warmer alternative may be to camp about one hundred feet above the creek on the opposite side - it just means a little more effort to draw water and find wood. An advantage could be to place one at the beginning of the ridge walk up to The Col on Mount Solitary, without having to cross the creek first up. The need to boil water is an excuse for a generous campfire and plentiful brews of tea. Overnight cold and damp tend to fall heavily on the campsite and a warmer alternative may be to camp about one hundred feet above the creek on the opposite side - it just means a little more effort to draw water and find wood. An advantage could be to place one at the beginning of the ridge walk up to The Col on Mount Solitary, without having to cross the creek first up.
  
-Last year, on the Sunday morning, we walked up through thick mist to a beautiful, cloudless day atop Mount Solitary - at one stage we seemed to be adrift on a sea of mist - whereas in 1980 it had been clear thoaughout.+Last year, on the Sunday morning, we walked up through thick mist to a beautiful, cloudless day atop Mount Solitary - at one stage we seemed to be adrift on a sea of mist - whereas in 1980 it had been clear throughout.
  
 Probably, the most satisfying part of the walk - and this is what is missed by those who only day walk from the other end - is the climb from Kedumba Creek to The Col, and the walk along the top of Mount Solitary to Chinaman'​s Cave. It is a walk in open forest up a spur ridge to The Col, steady at first but increasing in steepness towards the cliff line until hands and feet are necessary. At the top of the buttress a dead-end track sidles around the cliff line to the north, while the track to The Col forks and continues steeply. About two-thirds of the way up, there is an abundance of bellbirds and the air is filled with their sounds - it is like walking through an aviary. At The Col are fine views to east and south-east and to Lake Burragorang. The track between there and Chinaman'​s Cave, across the top of Mount Solitary, is generally clear and keeps to the Katoomba side until shortly before descending to the cave, when it swings to the opposite side giving the opportunity for good views south beyond Cox's River. Probably, the most satisfying part of the walk - and this is what is missed by those who only day walk from the other end - is the climb from Kedumba Creek to The Col, and the walk along the top of Mount Solitary to Chinaman'​s Cave. It is a walk in open forest up a spur ridge to The Col, steady at first but increasing in steepness towards the cliff line until hands and feet are necessary. At the top of the buttress a dead-end track sidles around the cliff line to the north, while the track to The Col forks and continues steeply. About two-thirds of the way up, there is an abundance of bellbirds and the air is filled with their sounds - it is like walking through an aviary. At The Col are fine views to east and south-east and to Lake Burragorang. The track between there and Chinaman'​s Cave, across the top of Mount Solitary, is generally clear and keeps to the Katoomba side until shortly before descending to the cave, when it swings to the opposite side giving the opportunity for good views south beyond Cox's River.
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 ---- ----
  
-CANCEING THE SHOALHAVEN RIVER+===== Canoeing The Shoalhaven River===== 
 by Geoff Davidson. by Geoff Davidson.
-(Over the past year or so, several S.B.W. parties have carried out trips by canoe on the waters of Tallowa Dam, at the junction of the Shoalhaven and Kangaroo Rivers. The following ​,account of a trip by + 
- canoe. from Sewells Point (near Nerriga) to Tallowa Dam, covers six +(Over the past year or so, several S.B.W. parties have carried out trips by canoe on the waters of Tallowa Dam, at the junction of the Shoalhaven and Kangaroo Rivers. The following account of a trip by canoe. from Sewells Point (near Nerriga) to Tallowa Dam, covers six days in January, 1982, and was written by Geoff Davidson, a member of both the River Canoe Club of N.S.W. and S.B.W., and was originally published in the March issue of "​Splash",​ the monthly magazine of the R.C.C. It is reprinted here with permission of the Editor of "​Splash"​. Days 4,5 and 6 of the trip also relate to parts of the river often visited by walking parties. Ed.) 
- days in January, 1982, and was written by Geoff Davidson, a member ​+ 
-of boththe River Canoe Club of N.S.W. and S.B.W., and was originally +=== Day 1=== 
-published in the March issue of "​Splash",​ the monthly magazine of the R.C.C. It is reprinted here with permission of the Editor of "​Splash"​. + 
-Days 4,5 and 6 of the trip also relate to parts of the river often visited by walking parties. Ed.) +On Saturday morning 11 canoeists, 8 assorted canoes and a few hanger-ons were seen clambering down and up the steep side of the Shoalhaven River at Sewells Point. For the benefit of future trippers, the best way to tackle ​it is not by putting the full canoes on your heads but by carrying the gear in rucksacks, and the canoes empty, and if anything is put down hold onto it or it will continue on its way without you. 
-pay 1  + 
-.On Saturday morning 11 canoeists, 8 assorted canoes and a few hanger- +Lunch was had after the first trip, and after the cars had left for Tallowa Dam the remainder made their second trip. Each downward trip took an hour and the upward trip half as long, but generous ​rest periods ​were needed ​at the end of each trip. The evening was fine and the water level low but excellent for swimming and all slept well, after prayers for rain. 
-ans 7m:23 seen clambering down and up the steep side of the Shoalhaven River + 
-at Sewells Point. For the benefit of future trippers, the best way to tackle ​fLt; is not by putting the full canoes on your heads but by carrying +=== Day 2. === 
-the gea-n in rucksacks, and the canoes empty, and if anything is put down hold onto it or it will continue on its way without you. + 
-Lnnch was had after the first trip,and after the cars had left for Tallowa Dam the remainder made their second trip. Each downward trip took an hour and the upward trip half as long, but gemerous ​rest periods ​wee needed ​-5 the end of each trip. The evening was fine and the water level +Day two dawned fine and we were all eager to begin the trip. Due partly ​to the low water level the first few kilometres were very slow and the canadians, especially, took a beating. The performance of the poly-propylne B-Line hire canoe was watched with interest, since it could not be repaired. 
-low but excellent for swimming and all slept well, after prayers for rain. Day 2  + 
-two dawned fine and we were all eager to begin the trip. Due +At morning tea much discussion over maps ensued but despite having ​a map attached ​to one of the leading canoes, we were having trouble monitoring our progress. After morning tea the trip proceeded more smoothly, although with much scraping. That evening we camped surprisingly close to where the leader ​had intended, near Trail Race Creek, high up on a sandy bank. 
-partly ​:53 the low uater level the first feu kilometres were very slow and the cannaians, especially, took a beating. The performance of the polypropylne B-Line hire canoe was watched with interest, since it could not + 
-be repaed+The day's casualties had included one paddle and one canadian, but the best was yet to come, in the form of rain. As we sat around the fire cooking ​dinner ​and drinking tea, we could hear and see some thunderstorm ​activity. ​As it approached, we retired to our tents and flys, but its fury surprised ​us, and after 10 minutes huddled up in tents and flys holding up the poles, a sea of mud washed through the camp and we all had to evacuate our campsite ​for higher, rocky ground. One tent was eventually dug up from 80mm of sand, while the site of another was quickly becoming a 1.2 m washaway. Soon the worst of the storm passed hut we were all cold and lay awake for hours at night listening nervously to landslides, wandering how much had been washed away and how much the river would come up. 
-At morning tea much discussion over maps ensued but despite having ​amap atn.ahed ​to one of the leading canoes, we were having trouble monitoring + 
-our pror,-cess. Aftermorning tea the trip proceeded more smoothly, although with mu. ::12 scraping. That evening we camped surprisingly close to where +=== Day 3. === 
-the leaC.r ​had intended, near Trail Race Creek, high up on a sandy bank. + 
-TL'​D ​day's casualties had included one paddle and one canadian, but the bast v yet to cane, in the form of rain. As we sat around the fire +Fortunately ​it was fine, if a little cloudy, and we all took it rather leisurely, trying to sort out the previous evening'​s chaos, dry our gear and repair ​the canadians. By midday spirits had lifted considerably since very litt1e ​gear of any importance had been lost and the river had come up only 60 cm. We paddled on that afternoon through glorious scenery and excellent, ​if reasonably easy, rapids. We camped at the end of the Great Horseshoe ​Bend and out came all the wet gear again. Luckily it only rained ​occasionally ​during the night, and that was fairly light. 
-cooking ​C.Lnner ​and drinking tea, we could hear and see some thunderstorm + 
-activityz ​As it approached, we retired to our tents and flys, but its +=== Day 4. === 
-fnry su=rised ​us, and after 10 minutes huddled up in tents and flys holding + 
-up the poles, a sea of mud washed through the camp and we all had to evacuate our ciam];:​ite ​for higher, rocky ground. One tent was eventually dug up from 80 7m of sand, while the site of another was quickly becoming a 1.2 m washawa:. Soon the worst of the storm passed hut we were all cold and lay alWake fc.. hours at night listening nervously to landslides, wandering how much had been washed away and how much the river would come up. +Surprisingly ​enough the river was still up and we were all rather eager again, if a little apprehensive,​ at the thought of the "​washing machine"​. ​One of our members had done the trip a couple of years before and we all made the mistake of relying on his memory to tell us where this rapid was. Once we came across it we couldn'​t miss it and after a quick look some of us decided definitely to give it a go, and others, to bypass it. Lengthy ​precautions ​were made, including tying life jackets to a rope and the perching ​of photographers on rock pinnacles. Our illustrious leader donned crash hat and proceeded to show us how to do it. Yours truly also donned crash hat and surfaced right side up. Then the more experienced of the three canadians ​shot it successfully. After that came fun and games for all, with one young lady managing to capsize three times, while the other canadian went in for good "​wash"​ with one occupant and one keen rescuer hanging on. All were safely rescued eventually and after a leisurely morning tea we proceeded ​on to the Block Up Gorge. 
-Day 3  + 
- ...Fc-n.,​unately ​it was fine, if a little cloudy, and we all took it rather +In a number of places there were spectacular,​ whispy waterfalls and we stopped for a long lunch at Fordham Canyon. Our intended campsite that evening ​was opposite the old Tallang chimneys near where the food dump had been planted a week and a half before. 
-Page 17 THE SYDNEY.BUSHWALIORR April,​ 1982. + 
-leisurely, trying to sort out the previous evening'​s chaos, dry our gear and epair the canadians. By midday spirits had lifted considerably since very l5tt1e ​gear of any importance had been lost and the river had come up only 60 cm. We paddled on that afternoon through glorious scenery and excellent, ​4:r reasonably easy, rapids. We camped at the end of the Great Horseshoe ​Band and out came all the wet gear again. Luckily it only rained ​..occasion 411y during the night, and that was fairly light. +It was towards the end of our lunch stop that the river seemed to rise at least 15 cm in about half an hour, and one canoe took off on its own down two rapids. That afternoon while two canadians again made use of their repair kits - for the continuing after effects of that first day - most of us took a look at the old chimneys and marvelled at what must have been for some few years a very active copper mining and smelting operation. That evening we had a communal dinner consisting of mixed Vesta curries and baked potatoes, washed down with wine and followed by prunes, blackberries and custard. 
-40Z-+ 
-_Surprisingly ​enough the river was still up and we were all rather eager 40ain, if a little apprehensive,​ at the thought of the "​washing machine"​. +=== Day 5. === 
-Okhe of our members had done the trip a couple of years before and we all made tie mistake of relying on his memory to tell us where this rapid was. Aonce we came across it we couldn'​t miss it and after a quick look some of us decided definitely to give it a go, and others, to bypass it. Lengthy ​pre4utions ​were made, including tying life jackets to a rope and the perching+ 
-9f photographers on rock pinnacles. Our illustrious leader donned crash hat and proceeded to show us how to do it. Yours truly also donned crash hat' ​and surfaced right side up. Then the more experienced of the three canadians +This day was not notable for anything in particular, just an enjoyable, ​relaxing, leisurely day, paddling an excellent river with interesting but not difficult rapids. Louise Reach was paddled with ease due to the current ​but the main rapid on the right hand side was considered a little too hazardous, so we all proceeded down the left hand side, which was in itself quite interesting. That afternoon we stopped early at Tryers Gorge where we were promised a nice, deep, clear pool for swimming, by our leader. This was not to be, but it was a very pleasant campsite, with clean water. 
-Shot it successfully. After that came fan and games for all, with one young lady managing to capsize three tithes, while the other canadian went in for good "​wash"​ with one occupant and one keen rescuer hanging on. All -ware safely rescued eventually and after a leisurely morning tea we proceeded ​an tP the Block Up Gorge. + 
-In a number of places there were spectacular,​ whispy waterfalls and we +=== Day 6. === 
-stopped for a long lunch at Fordham Canyon. Our intended campsite that + 
-qVening ​was opposite the old Tallang chimneys near where the food dump had +Began warm and sunny and we all donned suntan lotion and neck protectors. We had lunch at Billy Bulloo'​s Canyon after a most interesting submarine effort by the orange B-Line canadian. Below Canoe Flat was a nice Grade 3 rapid with plenty of pressure waves and haystacks, and our leader, who was not wearing his bash hat, managed to capsize where most of us had little trouble. Later at Fossicker'​s Flat our illustrious leader again capsized and Molly'​s canadian, which had previously not capsized, got into a rather tricky back eddy after successfully negotiating the rapid, and managed to capsize. 
-been planted a week and a half before. + 
-It was towards the end of our lunch stop that the river seemed to riseat least.15 cm in about half an hour, and one canoe took off on its.oun down two rapids. That afternoon while two canadians again made use of their repair kits - for the continuing after effects of that first day - most of us tooka look at the old chimneys and marvelled at what must have been for some few +There remained ​only three more gravel races before we were on the dam water and paddling became rather difficult. After much discussion ​democracy ​decreed that we all paddle on to the dam wall, arriving about 7 pm. Unfortunately ​we didn't make it to the pub in time for dinner, so we decided to go on to Nowra for an excellent Chinese meal, where we all agreed that it had been an epic trip that none of us would have missed. 
-Years a very active copper mining and smelting operation. That evening we + 
-had a communal dinner consisting of mixed Vesta curries and baked potatoes, ​washed down with wine and followed by prunes, blackberries and custard. +---- 
-Day 5  + 
-This day was not notable for anything in particular, just an enjqyablel. +===== Safe Canoeing. ===== 
-relaxing, leisurely day, paddling an excellent river with interesting but npt difficult rapids. Louise Reach was paddled with ease due to the currant ​but the main rapid on the right hand side was considered a little too hazardous, + 
-so we all proceeded down the lefthand side, which was in itself quite interest- +=== Some suggestions from the R.C.C. ​=== 
-ing. That afternoon we stopped early at Tryers Gorge -where We were promised + 
-anice, deep, clear pool for swimming, by our leader. This was not to be,+The individual should equip himself with safety gear such as buoyancy vest, crash hat, sandshoes ​or wet-boots, spray-deck and a properly maintained and fitted canoe (with buoyancy, decklines or slalom loops, and no leaks). 
-but it was a very pleasant campsite, with clean water. + 
-Dpy 6-- began warm and sunny and we all donned suntan lotion and neck pro- +A basic first aid kit and repair kit should be carried, and any necessary spare clothing. Gear should be tied in in such a way that it cannot entangle the feet in a capsize in rough water. If capsized don't try to turn the canoe back upright in the water. Guide it to the bank upside ​down and full of air, then right it. Don't change places in canoes. 
-tectors. We had lunch at Billy Bulloo'​s Canyon after a most interesting submarine effort by the orange B-Line canadian. Below Canoe Flat was a nice +
-Grade 3 rapid with plenty of pressure waves and haystacks, and our leaaer, who was not wearing his bash hat, managed to capsize where most of us had little trouble. Later at Fossicker'​s Flat our illustrious leader again capsized +
-Page 18 1E6 SYDNEY. BUSHWALKER April,​ 1982: +
-and Molly'​s canadian, which had previously not capsized, got into a rather tricky back eddy after successfully negotiating the rapid, and managed to capsize. +
-There remainod ​only three more gravel races before we were on the dam Water and paddling became rather difficult. After much discussion ​democraq ​decreed that we all paddle on to the dam wall, arriving about 7 pm. ' Unfor,,'​ +
-tunately ​we didn't make it to the pub in time for dinner, so we decided to +
-go on to Nora for an excellent Chinese meal, where we all agreed that it had been an epic trip that none of us would have missed. +
-* * * * * * * * * * * * * * +
-SAFE CANOEING ​- Some suggestions from the R.C.C. +
- The individual should equip himself with safety gear such as buoyancy +
-vest, crash hat, Sanddhoes ​or wet-boots, spray-deck and a properly maintained and fitted canoe (with buoyancy, decklines or slalom loops, and no leaks). +
-A basic first aid kit and repair kit should be carried, and any necessary ​spare clothing. Gear should be tied in in such a way that it cannot entangle the feet in a capsize in rough water. If capsized don't try to turn the +
-canoe back upright in the water. Guide it to the bank upside ​dawn and full +
-of air, then right it. Don't change places in canoes.+
 Never less than three canoes in a group. Never less than three canoes in a group.
-When a rapid is encountered,​ stop, inspect and if shootable, proceed, one canoe in the rapid at any one time then wait in the'​slack water below Until all have arrived. 
-XXXXXX,WAXX 
-SOCIAL NOTES FOR MAY. by Jo Van Sommers. 
-Wednesday, May 19th. - Films from the National Film Board of Canada. 
-" "​ToMbrrOw-Uiritei. Cones. A group of downhill skiers decide to desert the.crowded_slopes.and.learn to ski cross-country. 
-Ice Birds. Winter climbing of the Crystal Pillar icefall. 
-How to .Build. an Igloo. A block by block description of how it is done, 
  
-DINNER-befbre the -meeting will be held at Chdhades Lebanese Restaurant270 Pacific HighwayCrow's Nest at 6.30 pm. +When a rapid is encounteredstopinspect ​and if shootableproceed, one canoe in the rapid at any one time then wait in the slack water below until all have arrived.
-Wednesday, May 26th. - Ski .Touring. Slides ​and commentary by David aostran and-Craig Austin. +
-ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS. by Basr-JeMurdock. Treasurer. +
-The Annual Subscriptions are now due. Please see Barrie Murdoch who +
-will be pleased to receive your cash or cheque. Or post to Box 4476 G.P.O. +
-2001. +
-Rates;​ Single active member $ 9 +
-Married couple $12 +
-Full-time student $ 7 +
-Non-active member $ 2 +
-Prospective member $ 3 - (See New Members Sec.) +
-Magazine rates for non-active members or others - $5 posted.+
  
 +----
 +
 +===== Social Notes For May. =====
 +
 +by Jo Van Sommers.
 +
 +=== Wednesday, May 19th. ===
 +
 +Films from the National Film Board of Canada.
 +
 +__Tomorrow Winter Comes__. A group of downhill skiers decide to desert the crowded slopes and learn to ski cross-country.
 +
 +__Ice Birds__. Winter climbing of the Crystal Pillar icefall.
 +
 +__How to Build an Igloo__. A block by block description of how it is done.
 +
 +Dinner before the meeting will be held at Chehades Lebanese Restaurant, 270 Pacific Highway, Crow's Nest at 6.30 pm.
 +
 +=== Wednesday, May 26th. ===
 +
 +Ski Touring. Slides and commentary by David Rostran and Craig Austin.
 +
 +----
 +
 +===== Annual Subscriptions. =====
 +
 +by Barrie Murdock. Treasurer.
 +
 +The Annual Subscriptions are now due. Please see Barrie Murdoch who will be pleased to receive your cash or cheque. Or post to Box 4476 G.P.O. 2001.
 +
 +Rates:
 +
 +|Single active member|$ 9|
 +|Married couple|$12|
 +|Full-time student|$ 7|
 +|Non-active member|$ 2|
 +|Prospective member|$ 3 - (See New Members Sec.)|
 +|Magazine rates for non-active members or others|$5 posted|
 +
 +----
198204.1548731509.txt.gz · Last modified: 2019/01/29 03:11 by tyreless