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198203 [2019/01/24 23:35]
tyreless
198203 [2019/01/25 01:54] (current)
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 |Office Bearers & Committee Members 1982| | 2| |Office Bearers & Committee Members 1982| | 2|
-|Consevation ​Notes|Alex Colley| 3|+|Conservation ​Notes|Alex Colley| 3|
 |Between the Lines|Barbara Bruce| 4| |Between the Lines|Barbara Bruce| 4|
 |The February General Meeting|Barry Wallace| 5| |The February General Meeting|Barry Wallace| 5|
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 |Snowy Mountains - Feb. 12th/​18th|Meryl Watman|11| |Snowy Mountains - Feb. 12th/​18th|Meryl Watman|11|
 |Social Notes for April| |12| |Social Notes for April| |12|
-|Annual ​Sabscriptions ​1982| |12|+|Annual ​Subscriptions ​1982| |12|
 |Snowy Mountains Summer|Helen Gray|13| |Snowy Mountains Summer|Helen Gray|13|
  
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 |Committee Members|Joan Cooper*, Barry Wallace*, Wendy Hodgman*, Steve Hodgman*| |Committee Members|Joan Cooper*, Barry Wallace*, Wendy Hodgman*, Steve Hodgman*|
 |Federation Delegates|Gordon Lee*, Wendy Hodgman, Spiro Hajinakitas| |Federation Delegates|Gordon Lee*, Wendy Hodgman, Spiro Hajinakitas|
-|Substituee ​Federation Delegate|Alex Colley|+|Substitute ​Federation Delegate|Alex Colley|
 |Conservation Secretary|Alex Colley| |Conservation Secretary|Alex Colley|
 |Magazine Editor|Evelyn Walker| |Magazine Editor|Evelyn Walker|
Line 58: Line 58:
 |Duplicator Operator|Phil Butt| |Duplicator Operator|Phil Butt|
 |Keeper of Maps & Timetables|John Holly| |Keeper of Maps & Timetables|John Holly|
-|Search & Rescue Contacts|Don Finch, Ray Hookway, Marcia Shappert|+|Search & Rescue Contacts|Don Finch, Ray Hookway, Marcia Shappert|
 |Archivist|Phil Butt| |Archivist|Phil Butt|
 |Auditor|Gordon Redmond| |Auditor|Gordon Redmond|
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 Correspondence brought a letter from the Australian Himalayan Expedition announcing a slide show, a press release from the Paddy Pallin Foundation and advice of applications for the 1982 awards, the letter to our new member, a letter from the Conservation Secretary to the Budawangs Committee requesting maps and further information,​ a letter from Lawrie McCane advising change of address, a letter from the N.S.W. Department of Services requesting copies of our annual reports, and a letter to the Yellow Pages publishers requesting a change in our listing. With that wealth of letters it is surprising that there was no business arising. Correspondence brought a letter from the Australian Himalayan Expedition announcing a slide show, a press release from the Paddy Pallin Foundation and advice of applications for the 1982 awards, the letter to our new member, a letter from the Conservation Secretary to the Budawangs Committee requesting maps and further information,​ a letter from Lawrie McCane advising change of address, a letter from the N.S.W. Department of Services requesting copies of our annual reports, and a letter to the Yellow Pages publishers requesting a change in our listing. With that wealth of letters it is surprising that there was no business arising.
  
-The Treasurer'​s Report indicated that we started the month with $866.40, received $29.74, spent $64.00 to close the month with a balanoe ​of $832.14. The Coolana account had a closing balance of $104.82.+The Treasurer'​s Report indicated that we started the month with $866.40, received $29.74, spent $64.00 to close the month with a balance ​of $832.14. The Coolana account had a closing balance of $104.82.
  
 Federation dealt only with general business, with few delegates present, and a very short report. Federation dealt only with general business, with few delegates present, and a very short report.
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 Yet, with this said, it is the text that has left the stronger impression with me. I do not think that John Rundle writes as well as he photographs:​ but, oh my goodness, what a wealth of experience from which to draw his tramping tales. There is the simple recounting of a day walk alone on a brilliantly clear winter'​s Sunday, taking him from a crisp dawn at home in the Hutt Valley to the top of snow-covered Mt. Marchant on the south wall where he sat, primus purring away for a brew, while he surveyed hundreds of kilometres of the lower North Island in peace and quiet. And then in a steep plunge, descended a ridge to a familiar stream before returning to his car for the drive home at dusk. Yet, with this said, it is the text that has left the stronger impression with me. I do not think that John Rundle writes as well as he photographs:​ but, oh my goodness, what a wealth of experience from which to draw his tramping tales. There is the simple recounting of a day walk alone on a brilliantly clear winter'​s Sunday, taking him from a crisp dawn at home in the Hutt Valley to the top of snow-covered Mt. Marchant on the south wall where he sat, primus purring away for a brew, while he surveyed hundreds of kilometres of the lower North Island in peace and quiet. And then in a steep plunge, descended a ridge to a familiar stream before returning to his car for the drive home at dusk.
  
-In contrast stand exciting accounts of his party traversing Dress Circle Ridge and Mt Alpha in a full gale in winter, needing every bit of experience and phystcal ​strength to survive (and later learning that only a short distance away two other trampers were dying of exposure in the snow); and of his being called out on a search and rescue for a tramper with serious back injuries in the days before ​helicoptors ​- four days in freezing conditions, most of the daylight hours soaked in icy river water. The rescue party started out from Otaki Forks thus: "... then we were off, down the track from the road to the river which we found was running fairly high. We entered it in a line, holding on to each other'​s pack-straps,​ our torches revealing a small area of rolling brown water ahead of us. A lot of effort was needed to keep the line straight, so presenting the least area to the current. After one stumbling, anxious moment we were across, well and truly wet..."​ I felt that they were the ones who might have needed rescuing!+In contrast stand exciting accounts of his party traversing Dress Circle Ridge and Mt Alpha in a full gale in winter, needing every bit of experience and physical ​strength to survive (and later learning that only a short distance away two other trampers were dying of exposure in the snow); and of his being called out on a search and rescue for a tramper with serious back injuries in the days before ​helicopters ​- four days in freezing conditions, most of the daylight hours soaked in icy river water. The rescue party started out from Otaki Forks thus: "... then we were off, down the track from the road to the river which we found was running fairly high. We entered it in a line, holding on to each other'​s pack-straps,​ our torches revealing a small area of rolling brown water ahead of us. A lot of effort was needed to keep the line straight, so presenting the least area to the current. After one stumbling, anxious moment we were across, well and truly wet..."​ I felt that they were the ones who might have needed rescuing!
  
 Throughout all his accounts runs a strong thread of good information,​ a generous sharing of experiences,​ and the reasons why tramping has been such an important part of his life. John Rundle has strong opinions on many matters of interest to bushwalkers - preservation of wilderness, tracks, huts, gear etc. His advice hits home time and again, woven into good tramping stories. Throughout all his accounts runs a strong thread of good information,​ a generous sharing of experiences,​ and the reasons why tramping has been such an important part of his life. John Rundle has strong opinions on many matters of interest to bushwalkers - preservation of wilderness, tracks, huts, gear etc. His advice hits home time and again, woven into good tramping stories.
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 What peace and tranquility there exists in Wilderness! What a joy to refresh the soul in the tranquil bliss of this created natural masterpiece! In Wilderness there is a destiny still to be fulfilled. What peace and tranquility there exists in Wilderness! What a joy to refresh the soul in the tranquil bliss of this created natural masterpiece! In Wilderness there is a destiny still to be fulfilled.
  
-In Wilderness is a rekindling of the humas soul.+In Wilderness is a rekindling of the human soul.
  
 Why then do I hesitate to break the unyielding bondage of a salaried slave, tied to his master with an unbroken umbilical cord? Why then do I hesitate to break the unyielding bondage of a salaried slave, tied to his master with an unbroken umbilical cord?
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 Why cast an aura of gloom over breaking the cord? That is there to prevent a body from seeking solace in the raw beauty of Wilderness? Why cast an aura of gloom over breaking the cord? That is there to prevent a body from seeking solace in the raw beauty of Wilderness?
  
-The answer is menopause. To be precise - bushwalkers'​ menopause! Arising from too many trips, too many routes. Being too familiar with wilderness. Having '​done'​ it all! Having '​had'​ it all! Seeing everything, yet seeing nothing. Exploration urges sated, looking for somewhere '​different'​ to go - some new challeng, some new excitement to lift the soul. There is too little wilderness left, yet so much time to fill.+The answer is menopause. To be precise - bushwalkers'​ menopause! Arising from too many trips, too many routes. Being too familiar with wilderness. Having '​done'​ it all! Having '​had'​ it all! Seeing everything, yet seeing nothing. Exploration urges sated, looking for somewhere '​different'​ to go - some new challenge, some new excitement to lift the soul. There is too little wilderness left, yet so much time to fill.
  
-We've crossed the Arthurs thrice, once in winter, twice in summer. Done Federation. Done Precipitous Bluff. Been down the Gordan ​River and up the Gordon River. Traversed the Denison Range, Ring William Range, crossed to The Spire and Diamond Peak, walked the South Coast and the West Coast, climbed Mt. Picton and Mt. Jerusalem, crossed the Central Plateau and walked the Cradle Mountain track five times. Done the Du Cane Range, Maria Island, Freycinet, Ben Lomond, Harz Mountains and climbed Mt. Field East and West. Climbed Frenchman'​s Cap and been partly down the Franklin. Done Mt. Anne and Mt. Wellington. Been over to Window Pane Bay twice.+We've crossed the Arthurs thrice, once in winter, twice in summer. Done Federation. Done Precipitous Bluff. Been down the Gordon ​River and up the Gordon River. Traversed the Denison Range, Ring William Range, crossed to The Spire and Diamond Peak, walked the South Coast and the West Coast, climbed Mt. Picton and Mt. Jerusalem, crossed the Central Plateau and walked the Cradle Mountain track five times. Done the Du Cane Range, Maria Island, Freycinet, Ben Lomond, Harz Mountains and climbed Mt. Field East and West. Climbed Frenchman'​s Cap and been partly down the Franklin. Done Mt. Anne and Mt. Wellington. Been over to Window Pane Bay twice.
  
 Wot's left? An urge that says see it all before the bastards destroy it for dams or wood pulp or whatever. Why is our Tasmanian Wilderness receding when it is already too small? Wot's left? An urge that says see it all before the bastards destroy it for dams or wood pulp or whatever. Why is our Tasmanian Wilderness receding when it is already too small?
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 ---- ----
  
 +===== Snowy Mountains Summer. =====
  
-SNOWY MOUNTAINS SUMMER ​ 
 Helen Gray Helen Gray
-It was last September, after a week's ski touring near Uagungal, that we arranged with our friends to re-line at Christmas in the same area. We pfomised ourselves an easy trip - easy enough for those children who had been too young to join their parents'​ skiing holiday. The summer party was: George and Helen Gray, with Kathleen (16) and Susan (14) who had already skied in the area the past three winters, Kamerukas Stan and Janette McDonald with daughters Fiona (8) and Alison (6), Jenny Finlayson from Canberra with sons Malcolm (12) and Gordon (10), and Mike and Joy Gallagher, non-walkers from Sydney. It promised to be a leisurely holiday. 
-"... and if George can get the 4 wheel drive Toyota going, you can 
-use that You will find that one door doesn'​t open and the other doesn'​t 
-close...."​ so ran the note from friend Bryan Haig, who owns the lodge "​Bogong"​ where we stay in minter. What a treat; we could load all our 
-gear and the younger children on it, and the walk-in to the High Country would be easy. 
-We found the vehicle easily enough. It was .t where we'd seen Bryan park it, facing downhill, months ago. The truck'​s back tray still had his 
-boots and parka in it, now floating in water after the rain of months. And there was Bryan'​s sock, still replacing a lost petrol cap. I tried the driver'​s 
-door. Crash! It fell right off onto my feet. That must be the door that 
-didn't close. Oh well At least George'​s job of opening and closing gates 
-would be easier. While George worked on the engine, we drained and loaded the truck, filled the tank and wrung out the sock, bundled the 4 youngest into the passangers seat, and without even the usual roll-start, the engine ticked over and we were off. 
-Having crossed the shaky old bridge on the Gungarlan, with its badly-eroded approaches, the vehicle and passangers parted company. We on foot walked up the long grassy valley, through the lush summer grass and the wild flowers which make summer walking in the highlands such a delight. The low clouds rushed past. Sometimes we were in mist, sometimes in light rain, and once or twide a patch of sunlight raced along the valley to add brilliance to the field of 
-flowers. We even found mushrooms, huge ones. (They didn't look quite right 
-to me, but Mike stated with authority that field mushrooms didn't look like cultivated ones. Anyway, they were edible, as the evening meal proved.) - 
-The truck, 1;-1- meanwhile, was on a higher route. We could hear the engine_ 
-in the distance as George coped with steep hills, creek crossings and the endless stopping to open gates, drive through and close them again. 
-March, 1932 The Sydney Eushwalker Page 14. 
-At dusk we were at the end of the road at "​Bogong",​ which is on the main range on a small piece of freehold.. (Who says huts are an eye-sore? In winter "​Bogong"​ and its neighbour Cesjack'​s But are virtually covered in snow and impossible to see. In summer time their khaki-brown paint hides them just as effec tively.) It was no,...7 raining steadily, so again on Bryan'​s written invitation, we decided to use the lodge and its much- needed drying room. Around the cosy fire that night, we drank coffee and planned the week ahead. 
-  
-Whatever we planned for the next day, it didn't eventuate. The rain continued; lovely cold mountain rain, strong winds, occasional breaks 
-in the clouds with views of Jagungal or the distant plains of Coama in 
-sunlight. It was beautiful. Even the cosiness of the hut didn't tempt us to stay indoors. 
-You may think that 6 children with 7 adults is not your idea of a holiday. 
-But when the children like walking, are fit, interested, and don't complain, it is a delight. A six year old can (and did) take just as much pleasure in the flowers and scenery as the adults. Age meant little; we were 13 frien4s. 
-The rain was already clearing by the late afternoon, so we transferred:​ our base-camp to Cesjack'​s. We spent two days at this base. Our day walks, attempting to follow our ski routes, proved slow going, for the beautiful smooth-surfaced valleys of winter were full of head-high scrub. 
-The route from Cesjack'​s to O'​Keefe'​s hut on the 3rd day was particularly slow, for those ridges of snow-gum sapplings leading down to O'​Keefe'​s - which provide such a test of turning skills on skis - are thicker and closer together at ground level, on foot. It was here that Joy caught her foot and with loaded pack fell heavily, to rise in great pain and unable to put any Weight on her foot. 
-Joy is 5'​10'​ or more, a big and beautiful lady. Even Stan, at 6'​5'​ couldn'​t carry her. (If only it had been Janette at 5'​2",​ or Jenny so thin and light, or ....) Poor Joy had a painful walk of about .5 km before reaching O'​Keefe'​s and its cool stream into which she plunged her now fast- swelling ankle. The rest of us settled into the hut or erected tents outside, while occasionally Joy's plaintive voice would tell us that she was bored or hungry or the leeches were nibbling. Apart from that she compl4ned not a jot, and when we tucked her into the most comfy bed that night, we all agreed that by tomornmshe'​d be all right. 
-Joy wasn't right next day; in fact, she could not walk at all and George and Stan volunteered to go for help. Trying not to look at Jagungal above4nd so close, enticing all to visit on such a magnificently sunny day, they pa4ed and left for the 8 km.dah to the truck at Bogong, thel7 km drive to our c#s at Nimmo Bill and the further 40 km to Jindabyne for help. 
-Page 15 The Sydney Bushwalker March,​ 1982 
-Leaving all our spare food with Joy and Mike, Janette, Jenny and I and 
-our children slowly headed back to Bogong. The going got hotter and hotter, and once back in the open valleys we found ourselves dashing from one shady tree to another. Under one such tree, literally "in the middle of nowhere"​ 
-a man suddenly appeared. Said Janette (always playing games) "​Hello,​ we're 
-on a Sunday School picnic"​. Our visitor started to smile, then decided it was probably true! He was walking with a map with a tiny scale and had only a vague idea of his whereabouts. We showed him, with the aid of our maps, just where he was and which way to go to reach his ultimate 
-destination,​ Guthega. He thanked us, and walked off--in the opposite direction! A Games player, too? 
-George and Stan arrived hot and already tired at Bogong, had a hasty 
-snack, and headed off again in the Toyota. Stan lay back and relaxed, knowing that his door didn't open so George would have to open the gates as well as drive. Once back at Nimmo Hill and into Stan's vehicle, George (now the passnger) still had the job of opening gates. When he finally 
-returned to Bogong late that night, George had opened and closed 40 gates). They arrived at Jindabyne at 5.30 p.m, just as the policeman and ambulance 
-driver were closing-up and heading off for a New Year's Eve party. Their spirits fell, but rose again when Stan and George assured them that Joy would 
-be comfortable that night in a hut and that they could still enjoy the 
-festivities. 
  
-The women and children were settling into their tents when our Heroes +It was last September, after a week's ski touring near Jagungal, that we arranged with our friends to re-une at Christmas in the same area. We promised ourselves an easy trip - easy enough for those children who had been too young to join their parents'​ skiing holiday. The summer party was: George and Helen Gray, with Kathleen (16) and Susan (14) who had already skied in the area the past three winters, Kamerukas Stan and Janette McDonald with daughters Fiona (8) and Alison (6), Jenny Finlayson from Canberra with sons Malcolm (12) and Gordon (10), and Mike and Joy Gallagher, non-walkers from Sydney. It promised to be a leisurely holiday. 
-returned, but they soon lowered themselves in our esteem by refusing to stay + 
-awake 'till midnight to see the New Year in. Thy proved to be just as useless next day by being too exhausted to climb Jagungal. A great pity, for those +"... and if George can get the 4 wheel drive Toyota going, you can use that. You will find that one door doesn'​t open and the other doesn'​t close...."​ so ran the note from friend Bryan Haig, who owns the lodge "​Bogong"​ where we stay in winter. What a treat; we could load all our gear and the younger children on it, and the walk-in to the High Country would be easy. 
-of us who did had the most perfect of days. The scenery and flowers were truly magnificent. (Those back at base-camp that day counted 48 different species in full flower within a kilometre radius of the tents. They declined ​t000unt ​those in 'bud or past their prime).+ 
 +We found the vehicle easily enough. It was just where we'd seen Bryan park it, facing downhill, months ago. The truck'​s back tray still had his boots and parka in it, now floating in water after the rain of months. And there was Bryan'​s sock, still replacing a lost petrol cap. I tried the driver'​s door. Crash! It fell right off onto my feet. That must be the door that didn't close. Oh well! At least George'​s job of opening and closing gates would be easier. While George worked on the engine, we drained and loaded the truck, filled the tank and wrung out the sock, bundled the 4 youngest into the passengers seat, and without even the usual roll-start, the engine ticked over and we were off. 
 + 
 +Having crossed the shaky old bridge on the Gungarlan, with its badly-eroded approaches, the vehicle and passengers parted company. We on foot walked up the long grassy valley, through the lush summer grass and the wild flowers which make summer walking in the highlands such a delight. The low clouds rushed past. Sometimes we were in mist, sometimes in light rain, and once or twice a patch of sunlight raced along the valley to add brilliance to the field of flowers. We even found mushrooms, huge ones. (They didn't look quite right to me, but Mike stated with authority that field mushrooms didn't look like cultivated ones. Anyway, they were edible, as the evening meal proved.) ​ The truck, meanwhile, was on a higher route. We could hear the engine in the distance as George coped with steep hills, creek crossings and the endless stopping to open gates, drive through and close them again. 
 + 
 +At dusk we were at the end of the road at "​Bogong",​ which is on the main range on a small piece of freehold. (Who says huts are an eye-sore? In winter "​Bogong"​ and its neighbour Cesjack'​s Hut are virtually covered in snow and impossible to see. In summer time their khaki-brown paint hides them just as effectively.) It was now raining steadily, so again on Bryan'​s written invitation, we decided to use the lodge and its much-needed drying room. Around the cosy fire that night, we drank coffee and planned the week ahead. 
 + 
 +Whatever we planned for the next day, it didn't eventuate. The rain continued; lovely cold mountain rain, strong winds, occasional breaks in the clouds with views of Jagungal or the distant plains of Cooma in sunlight. It was beautiful. Even the cosiness of the hut didn't tempt us to stay indoors. 
 + 
 +You may think that 6 children with 7 adults is not your idea of a holiday. But when the children like walking, are fit, interested, and don't complain, it is a delight. A six year old can (and did) take just as much pleasure in the flowers and scenery as the adults. Age meant little; we were 13 friends. 
 + 
 +The rain was already clearing by the late afternoon, so we transferred our base-camp to Cesjack'​s. We spent two days at this base. Our day walks, attempting to follow our ski routes, proved slow going, for the beautiful smooth-surfaced valleys of winter were full of head-high scrub. The route from Cesjack'​s to O'​Keefe'​s hut on the 3rd day was particularly slow, for those ridges of snow-gum sapplings leading down to O'​Keefe'​s - which provide such a test of turning skills on skis - are thicker and closer together at ground level, on foot. It was here that Joy caught her foot and with loaded pack fell heavily, to rise in great pain and unable to put any weight on her foot. 
 + 
 +Joy is 5'​10"​ or more, a big and beautiful lady. Even Stan, at 6'​5"​ couldn'​t carry her. (If only it had been Janette at 5'​2",​ or Jenny so thin and light, or ....) Poor Joy had a painful walk of about .5 km before reaching O'​Keefe'​s and its cool stream into which she plunged her now fast-swelling ankle. The rest of us settled into the hut or erected tents outside, while occasionally Joy's plaintive voice would tell us that she was bored or hungry or the leeches were nibbling. Apart from that she complained not a jot, and when we tucked her into the most comfy bed that night, we all agreed that by tomorrow she'd be all right. 
 + 
 +Joy wasn't right next day; in fact, she could not walk at all and George and Stan volunteered to go for help. Trying not to look at Jagungal above and so close, enticing all to visit on such a magnificently sunny day, they packed and left for the 8 km. dash to the truck at Bogong, the l7 km drive to our cars at Nimmo Hill and the further 40 km to Jindabyne for help. 
 + 
 +Leaving all our spare food with Joy and Mike, Janette, Jenny and I and our children slowly headed back to Bogong. The going got hotter and hotter, and once back in the open valleys we found ourselves dashing from one shady tree to another. Under one such tree, literally "in the middle of nowhere"​ a man suddenly appeared. Said Janette (always playing games) "​Hello,​ we're on a Sunday School picnic"​. Our visitor started to smile, then decided it was probably true! He was walking with a map with a tiny scale and had only a vague idea of his whereabouts. We showed him, with the aid of our maps, just where he was and which way to go to reach his ultimate destination,​ Guthega. He thanked us, and walked off - in the opposite direction! A Games player, too? 
 + 
 +George and Stan arrived hot and already tired at Bogong, had a hasty snack, and headed off again in the Toyota. Stan lay back and relaxed, knowing that his door didn't open so George would have to open the gates as well as drive. Once back at Nimmo Hill and into Stan's vehicle, George (now the passenger) still had the job of opening gates. (When he finally returned to Bogong late that night, George had opened and closed 40 gates). They arrived at Jindabyne at 5.30 p.m, just as the policeman and ambulance driver were closing-up and heading off for a New Year's Eve party. Their spirits fell, but rose again when Stan and George assured them that Joy would be comfortable that night in a hut and that they could still enjoy the festivities. 
 + 
 +The women and children were settling into their tents when our Heroes returned, but they soon lowered themselves in our esteem by refusing to stay awake 'till midnight to see the New Year in. They proved to be just as useless next day by being too exhausted to climb Jagungal. A great pity, for those of us who did had the most perfect of days. The scenery and flowers were truly magnificent. (Those back at base-camp that day counted 48 different species in full flower within a kilometre radius of the tents. They declined ​to count those in bud or past their prime)
 + 
 +Meanwhile, Joy and Mike were sitting outside O'​Keefe'​s enjoying the sun when no less than three vehicles appeared over the hill - the policeman in his vehicle, the 4-wheel drive ambulance, and a park ranger in his jeep. They had arrived via White'​s River Hut, Valentine'​s and around the back of Jagungal, clearing fallen trees and other obstacles en route and thoroughly enjoying the adventure. On finding Joy comparatively well, they elected to drive on and return via Happy Jack's Plain. Joy, in the front seat of the ambulance, had a long and scenic drive to Jindabyne. The x-ray showed she had broken a bone as well as a torn tendon. 
 + 
 +Our return to Nimmo Hill in the Toyota was uneventful except for a light incident - George'​s bursting into tears. Once again George was the driver and gate opener. As we unloaded the truck, Jenny mused "I wonder ... what if the driver'​s door was the one that wasn't meant to open?" So saying, she turned the handle of the passenger'​s door. It opened.
  
-Meanwhile, Joy and Mike were sitting outside O'​Keefe'​s enjoying the sun 
-When no less than three vehicles appeared over the hill - the policeman in 
-his vehicle, the 4-wheel drive ambulance, and a park ranger in his jeep. 
-They had arrived via White'​s River Hut, Valentine'​s and around the back of Jagungal, clearing fallen trees and other obstacles en route and thoroughly 
-enjoying the adventure. On finding Joy comparatively well, they elected to drive on and return via Happy Jack's Plain. Joy, in the front seat of the gmbulance, had a long and scenic drive to Jindabyne. The x-ray showed she had broken a bone as well as a torn tendon. 
- -  
-Our return to Nimmo Hill in the Toyota was uneventful except for a light incident - George'​s bursting into tears. Once again George was the driver and 
-March, 1982 The Sydney Bushwalker Page 1:6 
-gate opener. As we unloaded the truck, Jenny mused "I wonder ... what if the driver'​s door was the one that wasn't meant to open?" So saylmg, she turned the handle of the passenge7'​s door. It opened. 
- a V 
-16 
 The next few days I spent with Bill Burke'​s mob at Kandahahat Perisher. But that's another story. The next few days I spent with Bill Burke'​s mob at Kandahahat Perisher. But that's another story.
-NIP DAMS 
-RaHcj +c) 5."​\ALTosmanion 
-Scdu rcio ti 1iahch .27 
-Assenqbe i0-30a.rn Town 14ofl Scluot-e 
-; Cowl rr;cf+ee 04 N., S. -\AT) 
-07L -71A e7ouyer'​ .S7:e71- 04" Z \Ai/ 
-c' 714 ADri/m 7Lhe fu,b k-ookn. 
-Please oil Co IA/17th idea cold, trIcv:),s, Lie / ie 01 .7b 
-pia Ido -fot -1/2 e /tie I- e 
-BLTIHDAY. RAY. 1-for.)0r.iar Ilery-dper Pce a-ilrber.00 
-cje. 914.1.. T6 rie 
-Busb.. Waike/r,$ Ws1i Rtj Q 17)Qp_pir 1511-41-1(.3013 
-Es 80 
  
 +----
 +
 +=== No Dams. ===
 +
 +Rally to save the S.W. Tasmanian Wilderness.
 +
 +Saturday March 27. Assemble 10.30 a.m., Town Hall Square.
 +
 +(Organised by the South-West Tasmania Committee of N.S.W.)
 +
 +----
 +
 +A meeting of the Younger Set (16 - 25 years) will be on Wednesday 7th April in the club room. Please all come with ideas and maps. We intend to plan walks for the winter programme.
 +
 +----
 +
 +=== Happy Birthday Ray! ===
 +
 +Honorary Member Ray Page of Jamberoo is 80 years of age on March 29th. The Sydney Bush Walkers with Ray a happy birthday.
 +
 +----
198203.txt · Last modified: 2019/01/25 01:54 by tyreless