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198201 [2019/01/16 01:40]
tyreless
198201 [2019/01/17 00:53]
tyreless
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 Led by Jim Percy and Barrie Murdoch. Led by Jim Percy and Barrie Murdoch.
  
-On Christmas Day 1981, Two Triple Jay, aamittedly ​not a particularly reliable source, announced the prospect of a White Christmas at Perisher Valley. This gave me some pause. The following day was to be the start of seven days walking on the Main Range and out to Jagungal and back. Every other time I had been to the Snowy Mountains, summer or winter, there had been the comfort of a lodge to return to. Obviously I needed some advice. I knew that Bill Burke had a private party of seasoned members at his Perisher Valley Lodge at the same time as I was going to be bravely exposing myself to the elements. Besides, the food list I'd dug out ftom the last long walk I'd done (ssh, it was 1957!) was full of strange items like dehydrated vegetable stew, hanks of bacon and Ry Vita biscuits. Surely something good must have happened to lightweight food in the interval. Sure enough, Bill provided me with a terrific list which I followed faithfully to the last gram. He also regaled me with tales of previous disasters. Had I heard of the time he was rung up at Perisher from Charlotte'​s Pass by a bedraggled party who asked him to come and get them before they froze? What about the time he was marooned in Mawson'​s Hut for nearly three days in a Christmastime blizzard? Did the leaders know to head for a hut and stay there if the weather turned nasty? Had I remembered to pack my beanie, gloves, long trousers, heavy rainjacket and stormproof tent?+On Christmas Day 1981, Two Triple Jay, admittedly ​not a particularly reliable source, announced the prospect of a White Christmas at Perisher Valley. This gave me some pause. The following day was to be the start of seven days walking on the Main Range and out to Jagungal and back. Every other time I had been to the Snowy Mountains, summer or winter, there had been the comfort of a lodge to return to. Obviously I needed some advice. I knew that Bill Burke had a private party of seasoned members at his Perisher Valley Lodge at the same time as I was going to be bravely exposing myself to the elements. Besides, the food list I'd dug out from the last long walk I'd done (ssh, it was 1957!) was full of strange items like dehydrated vegetable stew, hanks of bacon and Ry Vita biscuits. Surely something good must have happened to lightweight food in the interval. Sure enough, Bill provided me with a terrific list which I followed faithfully to the last gram. He also regaled me with tales of previous disasters. Had I heard of the time he was rung up at Perisher from Charlotte'​s Pass by a bedraggled party who asked him to come and get them before they froze? What about the time he was marooned in Mawson'​s Hut for nearly three days in a Christmastime blizzard? Did the leaders know to head for a hut and stay there if the weather turned nasty? Had I remembered to pack my beanie, gloves, long trousers, heavy rainjacket and stormproof tent?
  
 By this time I was starting to think I was preparing for a trip to Antarctica. However, I was glad I took all those items. We drove up on boxing Day and made a cold camp at Sawpit Creek. Next day we rendezvoused at Charlotte'​s Pass in a freezing wind. Our party was preceded by a group of giant Atlases with incredible legs, who moved off smartly into the bleakness, slapping their goitres and ignoring the gale. I felt suddenly frail and puny. We were supposed to climb Kosci from Merritt'​s Creek, but by the time we got to the creek the rain and mist forced us into Seaman'​s Hut for a soggy lunch. We zipped across the fields of alpine flowers to Albina Hut, which is being nicely maintained by a group of volunteers and was not full before our party of eleven got there. However it was cold even inside, and there is no way of cooking unless you have brought a stove or carried firewood. We had a somewhat subdued cold dinner. Laurie endeared himself to everyone by making us all cups of tea on his backpacked stove. Despite the rain, the aroma from downstairs drove several of the party to the dubious shelter of their tents. Barbara and John almost got washed away and decided that wet sleeping bags, swirling mists and very cold weather made it advisable to return to Charlotte'​s Pass. Keith and Kathy and Laurie went with them, so the party was almost halved at one blow. The rump set off through the mist; those who had been there before described to those who hadn't the splendours of the scenery. At this stage my thoughts turned to the crowd at Kandahar. Perhaps they were sitting around at this moment, having a second cup of coffee and planning gourmet meals! By this time I was starting to think I was preparing for a trip to Antarctica. However, I was glad I took all those items. We drove up on boxing Day and made a cold camp at Sawpit Creek. Next day we rendezvoused at Charlotte'​s Pass in a freezing wind. Our party was preceded by a group of giant Atlases with incredible legs, who moved off smartly into the bleakness, slapping their goitres and ignoring the gale. I felt suddenly frail and puny. We were supposed to climb Kosci from Merritt'​s Creek, but by the time we got to the creek the rain and mist forced us into Seaman'​s Hut for a soggy lunch. We zipped across the fields of alpine flowers to Albina Hut, which is being nicely maintained by a group of volunteers and was not full before our party of eleven got there. However it was cold even inside, and there is no way of cooking unless you have brought a stove or carried firewood. We had a somewhat subdued cold dinner. Laurie endeared himself to everyone by making us all cups of tea on his backpacked stove. Despite the rain, the aroma from downstairs drove several of the party to the dubious shelter of their tents. Barbara and John almost got washed away and decided that wet sleeping bags, swirling mists and very cold weather made it advisable to return to Charlotte'​s Pass. Keith and Kathy and Laurie went with them, so the party was almost halved at one blow. The rump set off through the mist; those who had been there before described to those who hadn't the splendours of the scenery. At this stage my thoughts turned to the crowd at Kandahar. Perhaps they were sitting around at this moment, having a second cup of coffee and planning gourmet meals!
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 As one who has been going to "​Coolana"​ for quite a few years, I would like to thank you and Dot Butler for the use of the mattresses in the building. I am sure I speak for many other people. As one who has been going to "​Coolana"​ for quite a few years, I would like to thank you and Dot Butler for the use of the mattresses in the building. I am sure I speak for many other people.
  
-The destruction of these items is regretable ​and contrary to the usual spirit of co-operation.+The destruction of these items is regrettable ​and contrary to the usual spirit of co-operation.
  
 Let's hope the Coolana Committee is consulted in the future. Let's hope the Coolana Committee is consulted in the future.
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 ---- ----
  
-Page 16 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALiER January,​ 1982+===== Nature Notes - Uloola Track===== 
-NATURE NOTES ULOOLA TRACK. ​+
 by Kath Brown. by Kath Brown.
-"​Look,"​ said Jim. -"​Bloodroot."​+ 
 +"​Look,"​ said Jim. "​Bloodroot."​ 
 He was looking at a straight stem bearing a cluster of blackened seed pods, or so I thought. He was looking at a straight stem bearing a cluster of blackened seed pods, or so I thought.
-"Oh, what colour is the flower?"​ I asked"Black - that's it." said Jim.+ 
 +"Oh, what colour is the flower?"​ I asked
 + 
 +"Black - that's it." said Jim. 
 "​Black,"​ said I, "a BLACK flower?"​ "​Black,"​ said I, "a BLACK flower?"​
-"Well, as you see. And the flower books say '​blackish or dark red . flowers"​. Botanical name '​Haemodoruml."​ 
-I looked closely at this '​black'​ flower. Not dead seed pods, black but slightly shiny, most with inch, slightly brownish, round swellings (developing seed pods?) in the middle, but the black twisting small petals? sepals? stamens? had some miniscule yellow pollen pads. So, yes, a functioning flower - and BLACK. 
-During the rest of the easy day walk I noticed many of these black flower clusters on the top of the two to three foot stems, with reed-like leaves at the base. I suppose '​bloodroot'​ comes from the root which we did not see. Mat strange flowers (as well as beautiful ones) we have in our bushland. 
-The walk was along the Uloola Track, near Waterfall, and passes along the Uloola Swamp which was burnt out completely during the bushfires of November 1980. I'm pleased-to r4ot-thatI-the-rsvirami) is making a good 
-recovery, looking nice and green again, mainly from new grasses. But also the blackboys are recovering, and bear many tall spikes-which had flowered in the spring and now, in early summer, had many small brown seed pods on them. 
-The swamp banksia was also growing well, its new growth covered with 
-golden-brown hairs, like velvet. We also saw some new flower spikes, mostly 
-still tight and brown, but one or two getting the typical bright emerald . 
-green colour that the swamp banksia flowers have. The banksia asplenifolia,​ which grows on the edge of the swamp, Ta',S also getting its new foliage - 
-this is covered with rust-brown velvet. There wero other small flowers 
-in the swamp - white heaths, yellow-eyes (xyris) and also native parsley - with its charming sprays of creamy flowers. 
-But the thing that was -most striking and. delightful were the many 
-Christmas Bells in flower. The whole swamp was spotted with them. 
-Further along the track we saw pink trigger flowers, bright blue lobelia, mauve scaevola and mauve fringed iiiy and also more native parsley. Near 
-tfloola Falls tall shrubs of Christthastush.were.turning'​red and.there were - =mmer wattles in flower. 
-The easy day walks not too far from Sydney have a different interest 
-every time you do them,as the changing seasons bring the many different flowers, both beautiful or strange. 
-*'* * * * * ** * 
  
 +"Well, as you see. And the flower books say '​blackish or dark red flowers"​. Botanical name '​Haemodorum'​."​
 +
 +I looked closely at this '​black'​ flower. Not dead seed pods, black but slightly shiny, most with 1/2 inch, slightly brownish, round swellings (developing seed pods?) in the middle, but the black twisting small petals? sepals? stamens? had some miniscule yellow pollen pads. So, yes, a functioning flower - and BLACK.
 +
 +During the rest of the easy day walk I noticed many of these black flower clusters on the top of the two to three foot stems, with reed-like leaves at the base. I suppose '​bloodroot'​ comes from the root which we did not see. What strange flowers (as well as beautiful ones) we have in our bushland.
 +
 +The walk was along the Uloola Track, near Waterfall, and passes along the Uloola Swamp which was burnt out completely during the bushfires of November 1980. I'm pleased to report that the swamp is making a good recovery, looking nice and green again, mainly from new grasses. But also the blackboys are recovering, and bear many tall spikes which had flowered in the spring and now, in early summer, had many small brown seed pods on them.
 +
 +The swamp banksia was also growing well, its new growth covered with golden-brown hairs, like velvet. We also saw some new flower spikes, mostly still tight and brown, but one or two getting the typical bright emerald green colour that the swamp banksia flowers have. The banksia asplenifolia,​ which grows on the edge of the swamp, was also getting its new foliage - this is covered with rust-brown velvet. There were other small flowers in the swamp - white heaths, yellow-eyes (xyris) and also native parsley with its charming sprays of creamy flowers.
 +
 +But the thing that was most striking and delightful were the many Christmas Bells in flower. The whole swamp was spotted with them.
 +
 +Further along the track we saw pink trigger flowers, bright blue lobelia, mauve scaevola and mauve fringed lily, and also more native parsley. Near Uloola Falls tall shrubs of Christmas bush were turning red and there were summer wattles in flower.
 +
 +The easy day walks not too far from Sydney have a different interest every time you do them, as the changing seasons bring the many different flowers, both beautiful or strange.
 +
 +----
198201.txt · Last modified: 2019/01/17 00:53 by tyreless