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-BELFRY+===== The Heaphy===== 
 by Bill Gamble. by Bill Gamble.
-North-west Nelson Forest Park in New Zealand'​s South Island has a walking track named the Heaphy, after an explorer ​emplOyed ​by the pioneering New Zealand Company around 1840. The route was supposed to develop into a + 
-.road--'the'steady._grades ​on the mountain sections indicate the Work of a surveyor rather than a mountain goat - but it is now well established as a popular walking track from Golden Bay, in Nelson province, to the West Coast. +North-west Nelson Forest Park in New Zealand'​s South Island has a walking track named the Heaphy, after an explorer ​employed ​by the pioneering New Zealand Company around 1840. The route was supposed to develop into a road - the steady ​grades ​on the mountain sections indicate the work of a surveyor rather than a mountain goat - but it is now well established as a popular walking track from Golden Bay, in Nelson province, to the West Coast. ​As an aside: for those who have walked from the Nelson end of the track and are still keen, the nearby Tangapeka Track starting just south of Karamea (for the most part still within the Forest ​Park, but including some State Forest) will take them back into Nelson province by another route across the mountains. 
-an.aside: for those who have walked from the Nelson end of the track and are still keen, the nearby Tangapeka Track starting just south of Karamea (for the most part still within the '​brest ​Park, but including some State Forest) will take then back into Nelson province by another route across the mountains. + 
-The interest of the Heaphy Track, among other things, is its bringing +The interest of the Heaphy Track, among other things, is its bringing together of disparate scenery - the coastal strip is reminiscent of, say, the coastline around Palm Jungle and Werong in Royal National Park, the sub-tropical rain forest on the rugged mountain slopes of a jungle setting, perhaps more in keeping with rain forest on the hills near Cairns; and the rolling, open country of the Gouland Downs a little like the land around Cooma - all traversed in a space of 70-odd kilometres. 
-together of disparate scenery - the coastal strip is reminiscent of, say, + 
-the coastline around Palm Jungle and Werong in Royal National Park, the +The Heaplly Track is well defined, huts and shelters strategically placed, signs located where they are needed to dispel ​doubts, and sturdy footbridges across most of the streams and rivers. In fact, a map is not needed for route-finding,​ but a copy of NSMS 245 (Heaphy Track, 2nd or later edition ​which includes a commentary on the track and surrounding area) is worth carrying ​in one's pack and is a couple of dollars well spent. For the Wangapeka Track take NZMS 233 (3rd or later edition which includes a commentary etc.). 
-sub-tropical rain forest on the rugged mountain slopes of a jungle setting,+ 
-perhaps more in keeping with rain forest on the hills near Cairns; and the rolling, open country of the Gouland Downs a little like the land around Cooma - all traversed in a space of 70-odd kilometres. +The track crosses an area of intrinsic, if not unique, beauty, but that is not to say that the scenery is always apparent. A walker'​s reaction must be measured against the weather encountered. This is a part of New Zealand ​where the weather is notoriously unreliable. An undisputed fact is one of the heaviest rainfalls in the country - at nearby Baimham about 5 metres a year. Strong winds, big seas and sand as abrasive as carborundum can turn the 16 km coastal strip north from Kohaihai into a tough walk where lives have been lostCome back and amble along the same strip on a fine day and the beauty is apparent and the colours intense: of mountain slopes covered ​in dense primeval forest plunging to the shoreline, rocky headlands that are seemingly ​impassable, and sweeping surf beaches of fine sand (undertows and dangerous currents to boot) backed by groves of lush Nikau palms. On a warm summer'​s day, it all looks rather tropical. 
-' The Heaplly Track is well defined, huts and shelters strategically placed, + 
-signs located ​'where they are needed to dispel ​daubts, and sturdy footbridges +At the mouth of the Heaphy River, where the track moves inland a few kilometres before climbing up to the Gouland Downs wildlife refuge and scenic reserve, there is enough flat ground for the Nikau palms to widen into a plantation-sized spread. The Forest Service provides a hut adjacent to the lagoon and this is supplemented by a shelter down among the palms at the back of nearby Heaphy Beach. Hopefully, there will be a fine evening to watch the sun set on the Tasman Sea in a blaze of red not seen in the tropics, yet with the silhouettes of the palms that could be a South Pacific island. But make sure the sunset is watched in comfort by covering up with long pants and shirt with sleeves. The sandflies are legend. 
-across most of the streams and rivers. In fact, a map is not needed for route-finding,​ but a copy of NS 245 (Heaphy Track, 2nd or lateredition + 
-7hich includes a commentary on the track and surrounding area) is worth carry- +The condition of the track in the next stage of 20 km up to McKay Hut, on the mountain rim of the Downs, depends on the rainfall. In fine weather the mud may be ankle deep. If it has been raining, knee deep could be closer to the mark. One can speculate on walking the track before streams and rivers were bridged. Formidable barriers requiring river crossing experience. From the outset it is worthwhile to be on the lookout for a fallen branch ​which will make a good walking staff - it gives stability when edging past mud patches ​in tight places and in finding out how firm and/or deep the mud may be. 
-ng in one's pack and is a couple of dollars well spent. For the Wangapeka +
-Track take MIS 233 (3rd or later edition which includes a commentary etc.).. +
-The track crosses an area of intrinsic, if not unique, beauty, but that is not to say that the scenery is always apparent. A walker'​s reaction must be measured against the weather encountered. This is a part of New Zealand ​Where the weather is notoriously unreliable. An undisputed fact is one of the heaviest rainfalls in the country - at nearby Baimham'about 5 metres a year. Strong winds, big seas and sand as abrasive as carborundum can turnthe 16 km coastal strip north from Kohaihai into a tough walk where lives have beenlostCame back and amble along the same strip on -a fine day and the beauty is apparent and the colours intense: of mountain slopes covered ​tn dense primeval forest plunging to the shoreline, rocky headlands that are Seemingly ​impassable, and sweeping surf beaches of fine sand (undertows and dangerous currents to boot) backed by groves of lushNikau palms. On a warm summer'​s day, it all looks rather tropical. +
-At the mouth of the Heaphy River, where the track moves inland a few kilometres before climbing up to the Gouland Downs wildlife refuge and scenic reserve, there is enough flat ground for the Nikau palms to widen into a plantation-sized spread. The Forest Service provides a hut adjacent to the lagoon and this is supplemented by a shelter down among the palms at the bapk of nearby Heaphy Beach. Hopefully, there will be a fine evening to watch the sun set on the Tasman Sea in a blaze of red not seen in the tropics, yet with the silhouettes of the palms that could be a South Pacific island. But make sure the sunset is watched in comfort by covering up with long pants and +
-Page 12 THE SYDNEY BUbAWALKER January,​ 1982. +
-shirt with sleeves. The sandflies are legend. +
-The condition of the track in the next stage of 20 km up to McKay Hut, on the mountain rim of the Downs, depends on the rainfall. In fine weather.: the mud may be ankle deep. If it has been raining, knee deep could be closer to the mayk. One can speculate on walking the track before streams and rivers were bridged. Formidable barriers requiring river crossing experience. From the outset it is worthwhile to be on the lookout for a fallen branch ​whichywill ​make a good walking staff- it gives stability when edging past mud patcheO. ​in tight places and in finding out how firm and/or deep the mud pay be.+
 Before the track heads up the ridge, there is another well-built hut called Lewis - about 12 km upriver from the Heaphy Hut. It is on high ground well above the flood banks of the Heaphy River. In the early morning and evening a quiet walk along the river flats could be rewarded with deer at the water'​s edge. I interrupted the late afternoon ablutions of a fine stag in the autumn of 1977. Before the track heads up the ridge, there is another well-built hut called Lewis - about 12 km upriver from the Heaphy Hut. It is on high ground well above the flood banks of the Heaphy River. In the early morning and evening a quiet walk along the river flats could be rewarded with deer at the water'​s edge. I interrupted the late afternoon ablutions of a fine stag in the autumn of 1977.
-On a clear day, McKay Hut is the place to see at once where one has been and is going. Down and to the south-west can be seen the sand strip at the mouth of the Heaphy River. Away to the north-east, beyond the rim of mountains On the other side of the Downs, can be seen the jagged outline of the Anatoki Range - right in line with Perry Saddle, with its hut, 24 km away. Beyond'​ the hut, and out of sight, is the route down to the head of the track at Brown Hut, and out to the small town of Collingwood on the edge of Golden Bay. 'Under a dense forest canopy 760 m have been gained and the temperature is much cooler, often bitterly cold, even in summer. Expect strong winds. The - McKay Hut has gas cookers - cylinders are brought in by helicoptor to replenish the supply. There is no excuse for dying of exposure at McKay Hut, nor at Perry Saddle Hut which has similar facilities. 
-The Gouland Downs are deceptive. Out of McKay Hut it takes a couple - 
-of hours of steady walking to reach the rolling tussock country, although the impression is that the Downs are much closer and just around the next corner. 
-Also, the Downs appear rolling at a distance, but close-up are deeply ruttOd 
-by gullies with swiftly flowing streams. In pasts, the track is as wide ap a road, the result of walkers moving out to avoid mud patches and in turn - creating bigger mud patches. At the time I walked the track, the Forest Service was re-building much of the route using drainage channels and gravel for a cambered path. Where done, it brings the track back to a proper width. 
-There is a shelter part way across called Blue Duck and/or Saxon (take- 
-YoUr pick), located on dry ground Maybe a couple of metres higher than the swamp nearby crossed by the track. The main hut in the area, the Downs, 4: a few kilometres farther on - it is a galvanised iron shelter in the oldest, 
-traditions of New Zealand tramping and still going strong. Like all huts 
-and shelters along the route, it is home to native field nice, and food and: packs are best slung from a rafter with a cord. Do not be surprised if some Of the mice find time to skitter across sleeping bags during the night. Wekas, 
-the New Zealand woodhen, will be found around some of the huts too. 
-At Perry Saddle the end of the walk is at hand, if not quite in sight. It is the high point of the trip if nearby Mt.Perry is scrambled - 1217 m. 
-Page 13 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALEER January,​ 1982. 
-The hut sits astride the saddle at 890 m in what seems to be a very exposed position. But it is secure, and a welcome refuge from often bitter and bleak weather. As mentioned, there is the opportunity to clidbMt. Perry a:s a side trip from the hut, but be prepared for some hard scrub-bashing as the ridge is worked. 
-The final day of walking is all downhill. With an early start and fine weather one can see the serrated edge of the Anatoki Range now but a few kilometres away to the east and silhouetted in the dawn light. A place for a leisurely lunch is Aorere shelter part way down. From this place an 
-4 clear day, Mt. Egmont, 290 km away in the North Island can sometimes be seen. The Aorere River and the farming valley are below, stretching away towards . Golden Bay. For those attracted to a toilet with an aspect, the Forest Service has placed one facing the best view - the door was missing in 1977 and there was much to contemplate while squatting in the eagles nest. 
-The walk downhill is a time to enjoy a forest of tall trees (a logger'​s dream) and a reminder that this is what most of the now cleared hillsides of Nelson farmlands must have been like when the first settlers arrived barely'​ 130 years ago. By mid-afternoon,​ a last bridge at the Brown River and the 
-choice is of staying overnight at the head of the track in Brown Hut with its communal sleeping platform for about 20 keen walkers; walking the road in the hope of hitching a ride to Collingwood and the bus; or, if you are affluent or anxious to get back to town, using the public telephone to call- or a taxi. 
-The commentaries on the track say 4 days shuuld be allowed for the arossing with food for 5 days to cover delays by weather. Seven days was too short for me, but one bloke I met midway was aiming to do it in 2 days. 
-Someday I will go again. Anyone who enjoys a good walk might do the same. I suggest that you go prepared and do not be offput by the prospect of mud, rain, rain and more rain. Go on the hunch of a favourable weather break that will make the 70-odd kilometres of the Heaphy Track a walk to be remembered. The memories will be around years after tha last sandfly and mosquito bites have stopped itching. 
-Postscript: 
- As indicated, this is about a walk in the autumn of 1977. Members will appreciate that man-made structures and some facilities change over time. However, the essence of the walk will not as long as the surrounding c6untry remains undisturbed. 
-* * * * * * * * * * * 
  
-THE DECEMBER GELMAII MEETING+On a clear day, McKay Hut is the place to see at once where one has been and is goingDown and to the south-west can be seen the sand strip at the mouth of the Heaphy River. Away to the north-east, beyond the rim of mountains on the other side of the Downs, can be seen the jagged outline of the Anatoki Range - right in line with Perry Saddle, with its hut, 24 km away. Beyond the hut, and out of sight, is the route down to the head of the track at Brown Hut, and out to the small town of Collingwood on the edge of Golden Bay. Under a dense forest canopy 760 m have been gained and the temperature is much cooler, often bitterly cold, even in summer. Expect strong winds. The McKay Hut has gas cookers - cylinders are brought in by helicoptor to replenish the supply. There is no excuse for dying of exposure at McKay Hut, nor at Perry Saddle Hut which has similar facilities. 
 + 
 +The Gouland Downs are deceptive. Out of McKay Hut it takes a couple of hours of steady walking to reach the rolling tussock country, although the impression is that the Downs are much closer and just around the next corner. Also, the Downs appear rolling at a distance, but close-up are deeply rutted by gullies with swiftly flowing streams. In parts, the track is as wide as a road, the result of walkers moving out to avoid mud patches and in turn creating bigger mud patches. At the time I walked the track, the Forest Service was re-building much of the route using drainage channels and gravel for a cambered path. Where done, it brings the track back to a proper width. 
 + 
 +There is a shelter part way across called Blue Duck and/or Saxon (take your pick), located on dry ground maybe a couple of metres higher than the swamp nearby crossed by the track. The main hut in the area, the Downs, is a few kilometres farther on - it is a galvanised iron shelter in the oldest traditions of New Zealand tramping and still going strong. Like all huts and shelters along the route, it is home to native field mice, and food and packs are best slung from a rafter with a cord. Do not be surprised if some of the mice find time to skitter across sleeping bags during the night. Wekas, the New Zealand woodhen, will be found around some of the huts too. 
 + 
 +At Perry Saddle the end of the walk is at hand, if not quite in sight. It is the high point of the trip if nearby Mt. Perry is scrambled - 1217 m. 
 + 
 +The hut sits astride the saddle at 890 m in what seems to be a very exposed position. But it is secure, and a welcome refuge from often bitter and bleak weather. As mentioned, there is the opportunity to climb Mt. Perry as a side trip from the hut, but be prepared for some hard scrub-bashing as the ridge is worked. 
 + 
 +The final day of walking is all downhill. With an early start and fine weather one can see the serrated edge of the Anatoki Range now but a few kilometres away to the east and silhouetted in the dawn light. A place for a leisurely lunch is Aorere shelter part way down. From this place on a clear day, Mt. Egmont, 290 km away in the North Island can sometimes be seen. The Aorere River and the farming valley are below, stretching away towards Golden Bay. For those attracted to a toilet with an aspect, the Forest Service has placed one facing the best view - the door was missing in 1977 and there was much to contemplate while squatting in the eagles nest. 
 + 
 +The walk downhill is a time to enjoy a forest of tall trees (a logger'​s dream) and a reminder that this is what most of the now cleared hillsides of Nelson farmlands must have been like when the first settlers arrived barely 130 years ago. By mid-afternoon,​ a last bridge at the Brown River and the choice is of staying overnight at the head of the track in Brown Hut with its communal sleeping platform for about 20 keen walkers; walking the road in the hope of hitching a ride to Collingwood and the bus; or, if you are affluent or anxious to get back to town, using the public telephone to call for a taxi. 
 + 
 +The commentaries on the track say 4 days should be allowed for the crossing with food for 5 days to cover delays by weather. Seven days was too short for me, but one bloke I met midway was aiming to do it in 2 days. 
 + 
 +Someday I will go again. Anyone who enjoys a good walk might do the same. I suggest that you go prepared and do not be offput by the prospect of mud, rain, rain and more rain. Go on the hunch of a favourable weather break that will make the 70-odd kilometres of the Heaphy Track a walk to be remembered. The memories will be around years after the last sandfly and mosquito bites have stopped itching. 
 + 
 +__Postscript__:​ 
 + 
 +As indicated, this is about a walk in the autumn of 1977. Members will appreciate that man-made structures and some facilities change over time. However, the essence of the walk will not as long as the surrounding c6untry remains undisturbed. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== The December General Meeting. ===== 
 by Barry Wallace. by Barry Wallace.
-The meeting ​gcit away to a somewhat hesitant start at about 2015 with more than 30 members present and the President in the chair. There was an apology from Fazeley Read and a precautionary apology from Barbara Bruce, who only arrived late as it turned out.+ 
 +The meeting ​got away to a somewhat hesitant start at about 2015 with more than 30 members present and the President in the chair. There was an apology from Fazeley Read and a precautionary apology from Barbara Bruce, who only arrived late as it turned out.
  
 The Minutes were read and received without business arising. The Minutes were read and received without business arising.
  
-Correspondence brought a letter from the South-West Tasmania Committee asking that letters be 'sent to the Senate Select Committee on South-West Tasmania urging the preservation of the area in its natural state, a letter from the Budawangs Committee referring to the inclusion of the Tianjarra +Correspondence brought a letter from the South-West Tasmania Committee asking that letters be sent to the Senate Select Committee on South-West Tasmania urging the preservation of the area in its natural state, a letter from the Budawangs Committee referring to the inclusion of the Tianjarra firing range in the Budawangs National Park. Each of these letters produced motions that we write to the responsible bodies and express our concern. 
-firing range in the Budawangs National Park. Each of these letters + 
-produced motions that we write to the responsible bodies and express our concern. +All of which brought us to the Treasurer'​s Report. It seems we started the month with $2,251.86, had income of $14.00, spent $1,002.10 and ended up with $1,263.76. We obviously don't want too many months like that one. The Coolana account had a closing balance of $21.32. 
-All of which brought us to the Treasurer'​s Report. It seems we started the month with $2,251.86, had income of $14.00, spent $1,002.10 + 
-and ended up with $1,263.76. We obviously don't want too many months like that one. The Coolana account had a closing balance of 21.32. +The Federation Report brought news of a query to F.B.W. from C.M.W. Club regarding Federation'​s handling of some matters, an abseiling accident (falling rock type) in Spring Creek and conservation and access matters. Federation is to register the name "​Bushsports"​ which they have been using for their bushcraft training courses. 
-The Federation Report brought news of a query to F.B.from C.M.W. Club regarding Federation'​s handling of some matters, an abseiling accident (falling rock type) in Spring Creek and conservation and access matters. Federation is to register the name "​Bushsports"​ which they have been using for their bushcraft training courses. + 
-The Walks Report began with the weekend of 13,14,15 November. It +The Walks Report began with the weekend of 13,14,15 November. It seems that a bloke named Barry Wallace led some 13 people on his Murruin Creek, Tomat Falls trip in good weather, Ralph Pengliss had 23 people on his Bundeena day walk and Neil Brown struggled through Kath's memory to lead 17 starters on his Waterfall to Heathcote walk that same day. 
-seems that a bloke named Barry Wallace led some 13 people on his Murruin + 
-Creek, Tomat Falls trip in good weather, Ralph Pengliss had 23 people on his Bundeena day walk and Neil Brown struggled through Kath's memory to +The following weekend saw Jim Laing, with a little help from his party of 14, leading his Kanangra exploratory walk appropriately enough down "Dark Angel Spur". Peter Christian'​s Saturday start Mount Solitary failed to report... perhaps they are still out there. Jo Van Sommers reported 7 members, 7 prospectives and 2 visitors on her slightly damp day walk from Currawong ​to The Basin. One can only wonder at her statement that "It (the walk) was a little longer than programmed due to the adventurous nature of the party"​. Meryl Watman had 8 members one visitor and some rain on her National Park ramble. 
-lead 17 starters on his Waterfall to Heathcote walk that same day. + 
-The following weekend saw Jim Laing, with a little help from his party of 14, leading his Kanangra exploratory walk appropriately enough down "Dark Angel Spur". Peter Christian'​s Saturday start Mount Solitary failed to report perhaps they are still out there. Jo Van Sommers reported 7 members, 7 prospectives and 2 visitors on her slightly damp +Snow Brown's Six-Foot Track extravaganza an,the Cox River attracted 47 starters, many of them children, over the weekend of 27,28,29 November. Despite that turn-out Tony Marshall was still able to manage 14 starters for a bit of rapids shooting on his canoe trip on the Tallowa dam. Ken Gauld'​s bike trip showed the strain, however, and and not go. Of the three day walks Sheila Binns had 4 members, 2 prospectives and beaut christmas bells in the Heathcote National Park, Peter Dyce had 4 people on his Faulconbridge to Glenbrook walk and Joe Marton reported 21 starters in humid conditions on his Blue Labyrinth walk. There were flannel flowers, swimming, and they caught an early train, which was running late, so there! 
-day walk from Ourrawong ​to The Basin. One can only wonder at her statement that "It (the walk) was a little longer than programmed due to the adventurous nature of the party"​. Meryl Watman had 8 members one visitor and some rain on her National Park ramble. + 
-Snow Brawn's Six-Foot Track extravaganza an,the Cox River attracted 47 starters, many of them children, over the weekend of 27,28,29 November. Despite that turn-out Tony Marshall was still able to manage 14 starters for a bit of rapids shooting on his canoe trip on the Tallowa dam. Ken Gauld'​s bike trip showed the strain, however, and aid not go. Of the three day walks Sheila Binns had 4 members, 2 prospectives and beaut christmas bells in the Heathcote National Park, Peter Dyce had 4 people on his Faulconbridge to Glenbrook walk and Joe Marton reported 21 starters in humid conditions on his Blue Labyrinth walk. There were flannel flowers, swimming, and they caught an early train, which was running late, so therel +Meryl Watman'​s ​midweek walk to Myuna Creek for a swim attracted 6 members and 2 visitors. 
-Page 15 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER January,​ 1982. + 
-Meryl Watmants ​midweek walk to :My for a swim attracted 6 members and 2 visitors. +Fiona Moyes had 6 people on her Bungonia Gorge ramble on the hot, hot weekend ​of 4,5,6 December. Gordon Lee abandoned his Saturday rock climb in scorching heat but had 10 takers for abseiling on Sunday the 6th. There was no report of Ralph Penglis' ​"​Discover Sydney Harbour"​ walk for that same Sunday. Perhaps they found it. Ann Brown'​s Stanwell Park day walk had starters but no Ann. It was led by Neil. Derek Wilson reported 11 swimming starters on his Royal National ​Park ramble. All of which ended the Walks Report. Amen
-Fiona Moyes had 6 people on her Bungonia Gorge ramble on the hot, hot + 
-Weekend ​of 4,5,6 December. Gordon Lee abandoned his Saturday rock climb in +The Coolana Report brought news of a letter of thanks to Wayne Steele for the water storage tank, a report of the barn (shed) dance, and advice that Mr. George Davison has donated a fine scale contour map of Coolana. In that same vein, John Redfern has obtained aerial photos of the Coolana area. The extent of damage of the latest bushfire was detailed and the Coolana Account details presented. The Club auction, under the hammer, so to speak, of C. Brown (Esq.) raised $216.00 plus $12 or so in after closing sales.
-scorching heat but had 10 takers for abseiling on Sunday the 6th. There was Ao report of Ralph Penglist ​"​Discover Sydney Harbour"​ walk for that same $unday. Perhaps they found it. Ann Brown'​s Stanwell Park day walk had +
-starters but no Ann. It was led by Neil. Derek Wilson reported +
-11 swimming starters on his Royal NatiOnal ​Park ramble. All of which ended the Walks Report. Amen.+
  
-The Coolana Report brought news of a letter of thanks to Wayne Steele for the water storage tank, a report of the barn (shed) dance, and advice that Mr. George Davison has donated a fine scale contour map of Coolana. In that same vein, John Redfern has obtained aerial photos of the Coolana area. The extent of damage of the latest bushfire was detailed and the Coolana Account details presented. The Club auction, under the hammer, so to speak, of C. Brown (Esq.) raised $216.00 plus $12 or so in after closing pales. 
 It was then only a matter of announcements,​ and the President closed the meeting at 2103. It was then only a matter of announcements,​ and the President closed the meeting at 2103.
  
 +----
 +
 +===== Social Notes For February. =====
 +
 +by Peter Miller.
 +
 +=== Wednesday, February 17th: ===
  
-SOCIAL NOTES FOR FEBRUARY. ​ 
-by Peter Miller.,, 
-'​Wednesday,​ February 17th: 
 Canton - Taiwan - Japan - Elwyn Morris. Canton - Taiwan - Japan - Elwyn Morris.
-Elwyn will show slides of her visit to the countries listed above. Elwyn is a regular contributer to the social programme and always shows + 
-very high quality slides. +Elwyn will show slides of her visit to the countries listed above. Elwyn is a regular contributer to the social programme and always shows very high quality slides. 
-DINNER ​before the meeting will be held at Chehades Lebanese Restaurant, 270 Pacific Highway, Crow's Nest at 6.30 pm. + 
-Wednesday, February 24th:​ Members Slide Night. +Dinner ​before the meeting will be held at Chehades Lebanese Restaurant, 270 Pacific Highway, Crow's Nest at 6.30 pm. 
-This will be the time to show the slides of those memorable Christmas + 
-trips just gone or any other slides of general interest. +=== Wednesday, February 24th: === 
-WAIEB.PROGRAMME . MARCHAPRILMAY 1982.  + 
---This-prOgramme ​Will be goingbefore-Committee on Wednesday, 3rd February. After 20th January, Jim Percy will_be ​looking after the .draft programme,so Members ​who would like to lead a walk please contact him in the Clubroom or by phone on 520,9861 (R).+Members Slide Night. 
 + 
 +This will be the time to show the slides of those memorable Christmas trips just gone or any other slides of general interest. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=== Walks Programme - MarchAprilMay 1982. === 
 + 
 +This programme ​Will be going before ​Committee on Wednesday, 3rd February. After 20th January, Jim Percy will be looking after the draft programme, so members ​who would like to lead a walk please contact him in the Clubroom or by phone on 520,9861 (H). 
 + 
 +---- 
 Page 16 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALiER January,​ 1982. Page 16 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALiER January,​ 1982.
 NATURE NOTES ULOOLA TRACK. ​ NATURE NOTES ULOOLA TRACK. ​
198201.txt · Last modified: 2019/01/17 00:53 by tyreless