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198112 [2016/03/30 22:42]
tyreless
198112 [2016/04/13 03:53] (current)
richard_pattison
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 by Spiro Hajinakitas. by Spiro Hajinakitas.
  
-__Trip Route__ - Carlon'​s Farm, Breakfast Creek, Cox's River, Mt. Jenolan, ​Guauogang, Nooroo Gable, Kanangra River, Cox's River, Carlon'​s Farm. Date: 12/13th September, 1981. Leader: Alan Pike.+__Trip Route__ - Carlon'​s Farm, Breakfast Creek, Cox's River, Mt. Jenolan, ​Guouogang, Nooroo Gable, Kanangra River, Cox's River, Carlon'​s Farm. Date: 12/13th September, 1981. Leader: Alan Pike.
  
 "​There'​s only four people coming on the trip, Spiro,"​ Alan Pike informed me on the Wednesday before the weekend of the walk. "We might as well meet at my place at 7.30; we'll go in one car". At eight o'​clock that Friday we set off in my car. Bob Milne'​s car being out of service after someone released his handbrake outside his place whilst he was unloading and it ended up against a brick wall, Alan's car would be handy for Dot to use during his absence and Brian Hart's beloved old Beetle, although much loved, cannot be trusted to venture too far from home. The temperature that day had reached 32°C but the man on the radio clearly stated that there was a cool change due to hit Sydney and the surrounding area at 9 o'​clock. "​There'​s only four people coming on the trip, Spiro,"​ Alan Pike informed me on the Wednesday before the weekend of the walk. "We might as well meet at my place at 7.30; we'll go in one car". At eight o'​clock that Friday we set off in my car. Bob Milne'​s car being out of service after someone released his handbrake outside his place whilst he was unloading and it ended up against a brick wall, Alan's car would be handy for Dot to use during his absence and Brian Hart's beloved old Beetle, although much loved, cannot be trusted to venture too far from home. The temperature that day had reached 32°C but the man on the radio clearly stated that there was a cool change due to hit Sydney and the surrounding area at 9 o'​clock.
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 We arrived at Carlon'​s Farm at about 10 o'​clock and after paying Bert our parking fee, we set off into the full moonlit night. "​It'​s still warm, chaps,"​ Alan said, "I suppose he meant that the cool change was coming at 9 o'​clock in the morning, eh?" Yes, we agreed and followed Alan as he headed off illuminating the way with his large Vulcan torch. "First thing I'll do when we reach the Cox's, is to make a cup of tea," Alan again. "​It'​s essential to relax before going to bed otherwise one doesn'​t sleep properly."​ Sure enough, whilst we busied ourselves putting up our tent flys, Alan put on the billy, got out his pipe, sat down in front of the fire and relaxed. Brian salvaged some boiling water to make a separate cup of tea, he likes it weak but not quite as weak as Fazeley, whose definition of tea is suspect - anyway, back to the story. We drank our tea and Alan passed around some biscuits and I think it was about 1.00 am when we went to bed. We arrived at Carlon'​s Farm at about 10 o'​clock and after paying Bert our parking fee, we set off into the full moonlit night. "​It'​s still warm, chaps,"​ Alan said, "I suppose he meant that the cool change was coming at 9 o'​clock in the morning, eh?" Yes, we agreed and followed Alan as he headed off illuminating the way with his large Vulcan torch. "First thing I'll do when we reach the Cox's, is to make a cup of tea," Alan again. "​It'​s essential to relax before going to bed otherwise one doesn'​t sleep properly."​ Sure enough, whilst we busied ourselves putting up our tent flys, Alan put on the billy, got out his pipe, sat down in front of the fire and relaxed. Brian salvaged some boiling water to make a separate cup of tea, he likes it weak but not quite as weak as Fazeley, whose definition of tea is suspect - anyway, back to the story. We drank our tea and Alan passed around some biscuits and I think it was about 1.00 am when we went to bed.
  
-Next morning we left camp at 7.00 am and walked down the river for three-quarters of an hour or so until we reached Gasper'​s Ridge. We took some dreaded Cox's water with us to make teas for lunch as we would not be down to water level again until late afternoon. The 3,000 ft climb up to Jenolan was indeed a pleasant one if a little hot, but we looked forward to the predicated cool change at 9 o'​clock. We didn't rush things, in fact Brian is a great believer in having a short breather every hour or so and by the time we got to Queahgong it was time for lunch. After lunch we continued along Krungle Bungle to Hawkfell Point and up to the trig point on Guauogang. Although not the highest spot in the Blue Mountains, at 4,232 feet altitude, it must rank as the highest mountain that bushwalkers climb in the area.+Next morning we left camp at 7.00 am and walked down the river for three-quarters of an hour or so until we reached Gasper'​s Ridge. We took some dreaded Cox's water with us to make teas for lunch as we would not be down to water level again until late afternoon. The 3,000 ft climb up to Jenolan was indeed a pleasant one if a little hot, but we looked forward to the predicated cool change at 9 o'​clock. We didn't rush things, in fact Brian is a great believer in having a short breather every hour or so and by the time we got to Queahgong it was time for lunch. After lunch we continued along Krungle Bungle to Hawkfell Point and up to the trig point on Guouogang. Although not the highest spot in the Blue Mountains, at 4,232 feet altitude, it must rank as the highest mountain that bushwalkers climb in the area.
  
-We browsed through the log book and relaxed in the sun for a while before heading off down Nooroo Gable. It was the first time that I had gone down Nooroo Gable as on other trips up to Guauogang ​we had climbed up Nooroo Gable. Eventually Kanangra River was reached and the very cold water soon cooled us down. Hundreds of tall yellow daisies dotted the banks of the river as we made our way to the junction of Kanangra Creek. On the very large clear grassy flat we pitched our tent flys. I can remember when I first joined the Club, how we minimised on tent carrying by squeezing as many in a tent as possible, usually by "​abdulling"​ the tent, but these days lightweight tent flys are in everyone'​s pack.+We browsed through the log book and relaxed in the sun for a while before heading off down Nooroo Gable. It was the first time that I had gone down Nooroo Gable as on other trips up to Guouogang ​we had climbed up Nooroo Gable. Eventually Kanangra River was reached and the very cold water soon cooled us down. Hundreds of tall yellow daisies dotted the banks of the river as we made our way to the junction of Kanangra Creek. On the very large clear grassy flat we pitched our tent flys. I can remember when I first joined the Club, how we minimised on tent carrying by squeezing as many in a tent as possible, usually by "​abdulling"​ the tent, but these days lightweight tent flys are in everyone'​s pack.
  
 After dinner we were all a bit tired, so an early night was the order of the day and we awoke to another fine clear sunny day. Still no sign of the cool change. By eight o'​clock we were ready to move off. We were in no hurry as a relatively easy day lay ahead - we had our "​hard"​ day yesterday. No climbing at all to-day, except for the last pull up Carlon'​s Creek to Carlon'​s Farm. The walk down Kanangra Creek to our first stop at Konangaroo was most enjoyable in ideal spring conditions. The Cox's River glistened in the sunlight and its gentle bends and banks created a feeling of peace and harmony. Quite a few wild ducks were enjoying themselves on the river and we disturbed a small family of ducklings on the river bank that quickly scurried off into the foliage. After dinner we were all a bit tired, so an early night was the order of the day and we awoke to another fine clear sunny day. Still no sign of the cool change. By eight o'​clock we were ready to move off. We were in no hurry as a relatively easy day lay ahead - we had our "​hard"​ day yesterday. No climbing at all to-day, except for the last pull up Carlon'​s Creek to Carlon'​s Farm. The walk down Kanangra Creek to our first stop at Konangaroo was most enjoyable in ideal spring conditions. The Cox's River glistened in the sunlight and its gentle bends and banks created a feeling of peace and harmony. Quite a few wild ducks were enjoying themselves on the river and we disturbed a small family of ducklings on the river bank that quickly scurried off into the foliage.
198112.txt · Last modified: 2016/04/13 03:53 by richard_pattison