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-THE SYDNEY +=====THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER=====
-BUSHWALKER+
  
-FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE +**FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE** 
-1927 - 1977+**1927 - 1977** 
 + 
 + 
 +A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to The Sydney Bush Walkers, Box 4476 G.P.O. Sydney, N.S.W 2001.
  
-Page 2 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October, 1977. 
-THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER -A monthly bUlletin of maters of interest to The Sydney Bush Walkers, Box 4476 G.P.O. Sydney, N.S.11% 2001. 
 Club meetings are held every Wednesday evening from 7.30 p m. at The Wireless Institute Building, 14 Atchison Street, St. Leonards. Club meetings are held every Wednesday evening from 7.30 p m. at The Wireless Institute Building, 14 Atchison Street, St. Leonards.
 +
 ENQUIRIES concerning the Club should be referred to Mrs. Marcia Shappert - telephone 30,2028. ENQUIRIES concerning the Club should be referred to Mrs. Marcia Shappert - telephone 30,2028.
-EDITORS: + 
-Dorothy Pike, +|EDITORS:|Dorothy Pike,53 Wyralla Ave., Epping, 2121. Telephone ​86,1352| 
-53 Wyralla Ave., Epping, 2121. Telephone ​8671352 +| |Owen Marks, In the clubrooms. Telephone 30,1827| 
-Owen Marks, +|BUSINESS MANAGER:|Bill Burke, 3 Coral Tree Drive, Carlingford.| 
-In the clubrooms. Telephone 30,1827 +|TYPISTS:Kath Brown
-BUSINESS MANAGER: Bill Burke, 3 Coral Tree Drive, Carlingford. +| |Sheila Binns| 
-TYPISTS: Kath Brown Sheila Binns +|DUPLICATOR OPERATORS:|Robin Scandrett
-DUPLICATOR OPERATORS: Robin Scandrett Peter Scandrett +| |Peter Scandrett
-* * * * * * * * * * * * * + 
-22122a_1211L +**OCTOBER, 1977** 
-Editorial ​Page + 
-Poem Kath McKay 4 +|Editorial| |3| 
-Our Origins 5 +|Poem|Kath McKay|4| 
-The Jolly Swagman Kath McKay +|Our Origins| |5| 
-One Member'​s S.B.W. Frank Rigby 7 +|The Jolly Swagman|Kath McKay|6| 
-Message from the President 10 +|One Member'​s S.B.W.|Frank Rigby|7| 
-Bouddi National Park Marie B. Byles 11 +|Message from the President| |10| 
-Fifty Years of Conservation Alex Colley 14 +|Bouddi National Park|Marie B. Byles|11| 
-Fifty Years of Walking: +|Fifty Years of Conservation|Alex Colley|14| 
-First Descent of Clear Hill Frank Duncan 18 +|Fifty Years of Walking:| | | 
-Taking the Medicine Ray Kirkby 21 +|First Descent of Clear Hill|Frank Duncan|18| 
-Paddy'​s Ad23 +|Taking the Medicine|Ray Kirkby|21| 
-The Worst Journey in the World Geoff Wagg 24 +|Paddy'​s Ad| |23| 
-First Impressions of the Cox Ivy Painter 27 +|The Worst Journey in the World|Geoff Wagg|24| 
-High Camps in the Blue Breaks Spiro Hajinakitas 29 +|First Impressions of the Cox|Ivy Painter|27| 
-Mountain Equipment Ad 31 +|High Camps in the Blue Breaks|Spiro Hajinakitas|29| 
-Kiandra to Kosciusko on Skis Paddy Pallin 32 +|Mountain Equipment Ad| |31| 
-Rip Jim Brown 35 +|Kiandra to Kosciusko on Skis|Paddy Pallin|32| 
-Past Presidents 37 +|Rip|Jim Brown|35| 
-A. Bushwalker'​s Prayer Owen Marks 38 +|Past Presidents| |37| 
-Page THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October 1977 +|A. Bushwalker'​s Prayer|Owen Marks|38| 
-EDITORIAL  + 
-On the twenty-first of this month The Sydney Bush Walkers reaches fifty years of age. This is quite an accomplishment for a club which started +====EDITORIAL==== 
-as a small group of enthusiasts getting together to enjoy the pleasures of + 
-lightweight camping and walking in the bush. Such activities were almost +On the twenty-first of this month The Sydney Bush Walkers reaches fifty years of age. This is quite an accomplishment for a club which started as a small group of enthusiasts getting together to enjoy the pleasures of 
-unheard of in those early days, and bushwalkers were looked upon as a real curiosity. +lightweight camping and walking in the bush. Such activities were almost unheard of in those early days, and bushwalkers were looked upon as a real curiosity. 
-When looking back a distance of fifty years, nearly quarter of the time that the white man has been in Australia, it can be seen that the major changes occurring in society are reflected to some degree in the affairs and conduct of the club. Although the basic philosophy of bush- + 
-walking remains much the same, there are many things which have changed +When looking back a distance of fifty years, nearly quarter of the time that the white man has been in Australia, it can be seen that the major changes occurring in society are reflected to some degree in the affairs and conduct of the club. Although the basic philosophy of bush-walking remains much the same, there are many things which have changed over the years. 
-over the years.+
 The loss of the challenge of pioneering walking characteristic of the early days was perhaps one of the saddest changes. The well worn tracks and beautiful large-scale contoured maps of today bring a kind of certainty The loss of the challenge of pioneering walking characteristic of the early days was perhaps one of the saddest changes. The well worn tracks and beautiful large-scale contoured maps of today bring a kind of certainty
-to walking in most local areas. Gone are the days when the majority of +to walking in most local areas. Gone are the days when the majority of walks were done from the Blue Mountains Tourist Map. 
-walks were done from the Blue Mountains Tourist Map. + 
-A more recent change has been a technological one. Packs have got +A more recent change has been a technological one. Packs have got lighter, sleeping bags warmer. Airbeds and Alfoil have appeared, and can you imagine packing your food or planning a canyon trip without plastic bags? Nevertheless,​ we still await the perfect tent and parka, made from a substance which lets moisture out but not in. Perhaps the next generation ​of walkers will see this one. 
-lighter, sleeping bags warmer. Airbeds and Alfoil have appeared, and + 
-can you imagine packing your food or planning a canyon trip without plastic bags? Nevertheless,​ we still await the perfect tent and parka, made from +One of the most radical changes affecting the bushwalking movement was the trend about twenty years ago from public to private transport for going on trips. This resulted in many more walking areas being within reach of a weekend walk. The Budawangs in particular were affected this way, an almost un-mapped area and un-walked area except for the odd extended walk of several days. It rapidly gained in popularity with the rise of the private car and is now a bushwalker favouriteThe other effect of private transport trips was the social one. Quite a few people lamented
-a substance which lets moisture out but not in. Perhaps the next genera- +
-tion of walkers will see this one. +
-One of the most radical changes affecting the bushwalking movement was the trend about twenty years ago from public to private transport for going on trips. This resulted in many more walking areas being within +
-reach of a weekend walk. The Budawangs in particular were affected this +
-way, an almost un-mapped area and un-walked area except for the odd extended +
-walk of several days. It rapidly gained in popularity with the rise of +
-the private car and is now a bushwalker favourite The other effect of +
-private transport trips was the social one. Quite a few people lamented+
 the disappearance of the Friday night group travelling together and getting to know each other on the long train journey out, and the happy sing-songs in the train going home. the disappearance of the Friday night group travelling together and getting to know each other on the long train journey out, and the happy sing-songs in the train going home.
-The increasing affluence of society in the last fifteen years or so + 
-may also have had its effect on walking. Whereas in the early days walking was likely to be the only outdoor hobby along with theinevitable photography,​ now there is much more opportunity for other Challenging ​activities. There is sailing and hang-gliding,​ water and snow-skiing,​ skindiving and +The increasing affluence of society in the last fifteen years or so may also have had its effect on walking. Whereas in the early days walking was likely to be the only outdoor hobby along with the inevitable photography,​ now there is much more opportunity for other challenging ​activities. There is sailing and hang-gliding,​ water and snow-skiing,​ skindiving and skydiving, canoeing, car-camping and even orienteering. Consequently,​ not a few walkers have a variety of week-end interests and so the old sense of belonging and of undivided loyalty is less apparent. A more 'free and easy' attitude of members to club affairs seems to be the case, and not so much of the old '​deadly earnest"​ remembered by some of us. 
-skydiving, canoeing, car-camping and even orienteering. Consequently,​ + 
-not a few walkers have a variety of week-end interests and so the old sense +Bushwalking has been further divided by the 'urban sprawl'​ and-the result has been the emergence of many regional walking clubs such as the Mt. Druitt Bushwalkers and the Springwood ​Walkers. This is a necessary and fortunate development,​ and even the S.B.W.seems to be acquiring a more regional membership due to its location. After all, how many people would be prepared to come into the clubrooms from St. Marys or Engadine every Wednesday night? 
-Page 4. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October 1977 + 
-of belonging and of undivided loyalty is less apparent. A more 'free and +A related phenomenon over the last few years has been the increasing ​number of walkers one meets who do not belong to any club but are merely a group of friends who go walking together. Perhaps this is another result of improved maps and well-worn tracks, aided by the modern day spirit of "doing your own thing'​. 
-easy' attitude of members to club affairs seems to be the case, and not so much of the old '​deadly earnest"​ remembered by some of us. + 
-Bushwalking has been further divided by the 'urban sprawl'​ and-the result has been the emergence of many regional walking clubs suchias ​theMt. Druitt Bushwalkers and the SOringwood ​Walkers. This is a necessary and fortunate development,​ and even the S.B.W.seems to be acquiring a+Well those are some of the changes of the last fifty years, and who could hazard a guess as to what the next fifty will bring? Most surely we will want to go bushwalking,​ if only to escape an increasingly ordered ​life style. If there is still a Sydney Bush Walkers in another fifty years, and I suspect there will, it will be because our club is still serving a purpose, and that, as shown by the Objects of the Club, is an ongoing one and no matter how many changes may occur in society, the true "​Spirit of Bushwalking"​ will remain as long as there are bushwalkers to walk. 
-more regional membership due to its location. After all, how many people + 
-would be prepared to come into the clubrooms from St. Marys or-Engadine every Wednesday night? +====CAMP ​BY THE SEA==== 
-. +by Kath McKay. 
-A related phenomenon over the last few years has been the 1.ncreasing ​number of walkers one meets who do not belong to any club but are merely a group of friends who go walking together. Perhaps this is another result + 
-of improved maps and well-worn tracks, aided by the modern day spirit of "doing your own thing'​. +So near, so clear the heavens are 
-Well those are some of the changes of the last fifty years, and who could hazard a guess as to what the next fifty will bring? Most surely +That, peering through the trees
-we will want to go bushwalking,​ if only to escape an increasingly ordered +glimpse the shy small seventh star 
-fife style. If there a Sydney Bush Walkers in another fifty years, and I suspect there will, it will be because our club is still serving a purpose, and that, as shown by the Objects of the Club, is an ongoing one and no matter how many changes may occur in society, the true "​Spirit of Bushwalking"​ will remain as long as there are bushwalkers to walk. +Among the Pleiades. 
-************************************ +
-CAM) BY THE SEA. +
-Kath McKay. +
-So near9 so clear the heavens are That9 peering through the treesglimpse the shy small seventh star Among the Pleiades.+
 The tiny ships at anchor ride, The tiny ships at anchor ride,
-The tiny sails are furled+The tiny sails are furled;
 Soon, soon comes in the midnight tide Soon, soon comes in the midnight tide
 From half across the world. From half across the world.
 +
 On Cliff and shore the bush leans down On Cliff and shore the bush leans down
-.Dim-mirrored in the deep.  +Dim-mirrored in the deep. 
--+
 Hushed as the sea, this tented town Hushed as the sea, this tented town
 Breathes softly, fast asleep. Breathes softly, fast asleep.
-********* + 
-Page THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October 1977 +====OUR ORIGINS==== 
-OUR ORIGINS ​+
 Before the S.B.W. came into being there was no mixed recreational walking club in Sydney. Gradually, however, it became apparent that there was a growing need for a new and freer type of walking club than that existing at the time. Before the S.B.W. came into being there was no mixed recreational walking club in Sydney. Gradually, however, it became apparent that there was a growing need for a new and freer type of walking club than that existing at the time.
-One of the first moves in this direction came from Jack Debert, who wrote a letter to "The Sun" suggesting the formation of - + 
-"a Hiker'​s club, where hikers could meet and discuss routes, places of interest etc."​ +One of the first moves in this direction came from Jack Debert, who wrote a letter to "The Sun" suggesting the formation of - "a Hiker'​s club, where hikers could meet and discuss routes, places of interest etc." 
-A few people answered this letter and the ensuing group of six people arranged a walk (see photo) to discuss plans for a new walking club. Also at this time other people were contacted including a group of three women (Marie ​Bytes was one of them) who had been heard of through a magazine report as having walked the Hawkesbury River. + 
-In the meantime, the Mountain Trails Club had also repliedvia +A few people answered this letter and the ensuing group of six people arranged a walk (see photo) to discuss plans for a new walking club. Also at this time other people were contacted including a group of three women (Marie ​Byles was one of them) who had been heard of through a magazine report as having walked the Hawkesbury River. 
-"The Sun" to Jack Debert'​s letter, and this resulted in an influx of visitors to their meetings. + 
-Eventually, the M.T.C. offered to hold a special meeting so that those interested, including some M.T.C. members who liked the idea of a club which included women, would form a separate walking body, So, at +In the meantime, the Mountain Trails Club had also replied via "The Sun" to Jack Debert'​s letter, and this resulted in an influx of visitors to their meetings. 
- this meeting, on 21st October, 1927, a new club was created and its objects and constitution drawn up. + 
-Thus the S.B.W. came into being, although it was not until a couple of meetings later that the name "The Sydney Bush Walkers"​ was +Eventually, the M.T.C. offered to hold a special meeting so that those interested, including some M.T.C. members who liked the idea of a club which included women, would form a separate walking body, So, at this meeting, on 21st October, 1927, a new club was created and its objects and constitution drawn up. 
-chosen, and incidentally the word "​bushwalker'​ also had its origin in the name of our club. + 
-Page 6. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October 1977 +Thus the S.B.W. came into being, although it was not until a couple of meetings later that the name "The Sydney Bush Walkers"​ was chosen, and incidentally the word "​bushwalker'​ also had its origin in the name of our club. 
-THE JOLLY SWAGMAN + 
-by Kath McKay. +====THE JOLLY SWAGMAN==== 
-Not long ago we were required to vote on'our preference for a national anthem. Four choices were listed: +by Kath McKay 
-God Save the Queen Waltzing Matilda Advance Australia Song of Australia + 
-My friend snorted. Waltzing Matilda! ​That stupid jingle!'​+Not long ago we were required to vote on our preference for a national anthem. Four choices were listed: 
 +  ​* ​God Save the Queen 
 +  * Waltzing Matilda 
 +  * Advance Australia 
 +  * Song of Australia 
 + 
 +My friend snorted. Waltzing Matilda! ​__That__ ​stupid jingle!'​ 
 Stupid jingle? I mused. Maybe. But it's a good tune. An Stupid jingle? I mused. Maybe. But it's a good tune. An
 old tune too - old like our land, but eternally young. I have heard that the Saracens used it as a mourning song for their dead, ages ago. Now, wherever in our planet it is heard we think '​Australia!'​ old tune too - old like our land, but eternally young. I have heard that the Saracens used it as a mourning song for their dead, ages ago. Now, wherever in our planet it is heard we think '​Australia!'​
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 Long may the bushwalking tradition flourish! Long may the bushwalking tradition flourish!
 To you from failing hands we throw The torch: be yours to hold it high' To you from failing hands we throw The torch: be yours to hold it high'
-Page THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October 1977 (k), + 
-ONE MEMBER'​S S.B.W. ​ +====ONE MEMBER'​S S.B.W.====
-1g3+
 by Frank Rigby by Frank Rigby
-a + 
-The Sydney Bush Walkers and I are almost exact contemporaries. I Was an infant of three months in an obscure country district of Queenslan wKen a group of enthusiastic people in Sydney were meeting to form +The Sydney Bush Walkers and I are almost exact contemporaries. I Was an infant of three months in an obscure country district of Queensland when a group of enthusiastic people in Sydney were meeting to form 
-Australia'​s first bushwalking club open to both sexes. Who could har imagined then that the two of us, the boy born in the northern bush and the club born in a distant metropolis, would one day meet?+Australia'​s first bushwalking club open to both sexes. Who could have imagined then that the two of us, the boy born in the northern bush and the club born in a distant metropolis, would one day meet?
 But so it was to be. In 1950, when we were both 23 years old, I But so it was to be. In 1950, when we were both 23 years old, I
 came to that distant metropolis to seek my fortune. I did not find a came to that distant metropolis to seek my fortune. I did not find a
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 I wonder bow many others had a similar introduction to S.B.W.? I wonder bow many others had a similar introduction to S.B.W.?
 After the slides I was taken to a pleasant young man with a hearing aid. This was Ken Meadows, Membership Secretary, my first contact with a bush- walker and later my good friend. After explaining that I wanted to After the slides I was taken to a pleasant young man with a hearing aid. This was Ken Meadows, Membership Secretary, my first contact with a bush- walker and later my good friend. After explaining that I wanted to
-"​launch myself right into the thick of things"​ (day walks were, of course, advised for a start), Ken introduced me to one Jack Perry who was leading +"​launch myself right into the thick of things"​ (day walks were, of course, advised for a start), Ken introduced me to one Jack Perry who was leading a week-end walk in the Blue Mountains. I was small but Jack seemed 
-a week-end walk in the Blue Mountains. I was small but Jack seemed +smaller so I reckoned if he could do it then so could 1. What utter brashness! Anyway, Jack sized me up and agreed that I could come (do you remember, Jack?). Naturally I made all the beginner'​s mistakes - golf
-smaller so I reckoned if he could do it then so could 1. What utter +
-Page 8. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October 1977 +
-brashness! Anyway, Jack sized me up and agreed that I could come (do you +
-remember, Jack?). Naturally I made all the beginner'​s mistakes - golf+
 shoes, paper bags, glass jars etc. - but it was a wonderful experience. shoes, paper bags, glass jars etc. - but it was a wonderful experience.
 The magazine article had come true and a new way of life had begun. On The magazine article had come true and a new way of life had begun. On
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 private cars and friendly, communal cooking fires (were the communal fires a gPmPensation for the loss of the communal trains?) But I. digress and private cars and friendly, communal cooking fires (were the communal fires a gPmPensation for the loss of the communal trains?) But I. digress and
 fjnid myself guilty of reminiscing for its own sake]. Certainly I had fjnid myself guilty of reminiscing for its own sake]. Certainly I had
-youth and vigour going for me then but it was not just that It was the +youth and vigour going for me then but it was not just that It was the time I made so many fine and lasting friendships in S.B.W., the time I shared with them so many worthwhile experiences in both wilderness and city, the time I learned so much about bushwalkinq and its disciples. The Club and
-Page 9. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER .October 1977 +
-time I made so many fine and lasting friendships in S.B.W., the time I shared with them so many worthwhile experiences in both wilderness and city, the time I learned so much about bushwalkinq and its disciples. The Club and+
 the activities it generated became for me, as for others, a pervasive way of the activities it generated became for me, as for others, a pervasive way of
 life outside working hours. Just by way of illustration,​ I would guess life outside working hours. Just by way of illustration,​ I would guess
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 denigrating the C.B.C., S.B.W. retains first place in our hearts. Whenever denigrating the C.B.C., S.B.W. retains first place in our hearts. Whenever
 possible we keep contact and occasionally turn up on a walk. We may even have made S.B.W. history last Queen'​s Birthday by flying to Sydney to join Bob Hodgson'​s walk to Widden Brook - and it was well worth the expense. possible we keep contact and occasionally turn up on a walk. We may even have made S.B.W. history last Queen'​s Birthday by flying to Sydney to join Bob Hodgson'​s walk to Widden Brook - and it was well worth the expense.
-Page 10 THE SYMEY BUSHWALKER October 1977+
 Old friends are true friends, especially when they are Sydney Bush Walkers, and In July many of those old friends celebrated my fiftieth birthday in Sydney, just a mite ahead of the Club's own celebrations in October. Thankyou, Helen and'​George Gray and all the rest of you. Old friends are true friends, especially when they are Sydney Bush Walkers, and In July many of those old friends celebrated my fiftieth birthday in Sydney, just a mite ahead of the Club's own celebrations in October. Thankyou, Helen and'​George Gray and all the rest of you.
 The S.B.W. must and will keep poing. It is important that the frame- The S.B.W. must and will keep poing. It is important that the frame-
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 Club will go on to attain its centenary. That matters. I will not but Club will go on to attain its centenary. That matters. I will not but
 that doesn'​t. However, I do hope, when the time comes to put me away, that I will still be a member of the Sydney Bush Walkers - nobody can separate two old friends as easily as that that doesn'​t. However, I do hope, when the time comes to put me away, that I will still be a member of the Sydney Bush Walkers - nobody can separate two old friends as easily as that
-* * * * * * * * * e + 
-EESSAGE ​FROM THE PRESIDEET. + 
-This month we celebrate the first 50 years of our Club's existance, which began on October ​21st9 19279 with a meeting of nine people. From that meeting began the first mixed 7alking ​club in Sydney. +====MESSAGE ​FROM THE PRESIDENT==== 
-Probably out of the wish and need to create a Llixed ​club comes some of our Club's characteristics. Most important, and obvious,to me is the equality of men and women, socially and physicallythat ​has always existed. Never have I seen S.B.W.s divide into groups of women and men to talk, and never has a member been barred from a walk because of gender. + 
-Itis a club, too, where age is irrelevant, not just in that a spirit of youth exists, but in ties of true friendship and shred experiences.+This month we celebrate the first 50 years of our Club's existance, which began on October ​21st 1927 with a meeting of nine people. From that meeting began the first mixed walking ​club in Sydney. 
 + 
 +Probably out of the wish and need to create a mixed club comes some of our Club's characteristics. Most important, and obvious,to me is the equality of men and women, socially and physically that has always existed. Never have I seen S.B.W.s divide into groups of women and men to talk, and never has a member been barred from a walk because of gender. 
 +It is a club, too, where age is irrelevant, not just in that a spirit of youth exists, but in ties of true friendship and shred experiences.
 The. type of friendship was so well expressed by Kath McKay some The. type of friendship was so well expressed by Kath McKay some
 years. ago: ". I have been hardly anywhere at all. But do Bush- walkers care? Not a jot. They accept me as one of themselves and treat. inc as though I had been everywhere and seen everything. Never were there_ such cobbers."​ years. ago: ". I have been hardly anywhere at all. But do Bush- walkers care? Not a jot. They accept me as one of themselves and treat. inc as though I had been everywhere and seen everything. Never were there_ such cobbers."​
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 fighting to save Blue Gum or Era. fighting to save Blue Gum or Era.
 I am proud to be one of the Sydney Bush Walkers, and I am sure all members share that pride and will join in the festivities this month. Let us r-une and celebrate! I am proud to be one of the Sydney Bush Walkers, and I am sure all members share that pride and will join in the festivities this month. Let us r-une and celebrate!
-XXX**********#​ + 
-Page 11. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October 1977 +====BOUDDI NATIONAL PARK====
-BOUDDI NATIONAL PARK.+
 by Marie B. Byles by Marie B. Byles
 +
 The originator of Bouddi National Park (originally Bouddi NATURAL Park) was the telescope through which we children in the teens of this century looked from the verandah of our Palm Beach cottage across the wide Hawkesbury estuary to rusting boilers of the good ship '​Maitland'​ wrecked on Bouddi headland in 1898. The originator of Bouddi National Park (originally Bouddi NATURAL Park) was the telescope through which we children in the teens of this century looked from the verandah of our Palm Beach cottage across the wide Hawkesbury estuary to rusting boilers of the good ship '​Maitland'​ wrecked on Bouddi headland in 1898.
  On the 5th May 1898 the '​Maitland paddled out from Sydney. It was  On the 5th May 1898 the '​Maitland paddled out from Sydney. It was
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 The black spot has been rutile mining which was forced on the trustees. It was at the northern end of Killcare Ocean Beach. It The black spot has been rutile mining which was forced on the trustees. It was at the northern end of Killcare Ocean Beach. It
 destroyed the rain forest and the best camp Sites, and left a desert. destroyed the rain forest and the best camp Sites, and left a desert.
-Page 14. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October 1977+
 Even deserts can be beautiful. But we can be thankful that it has not been allowed at any other of the beaches. Even deserts can be beautiful. But we can be thankful that it has not been allowed at any other of the beaches.
 Bouddi Natural Park started in 1935 as a strip of land along the coast from Mcrasters Beach to Killcare Ocean Beach of 650 acres (about 260 hectares). Bouddi National Park has an area of 1,067.3 hectares, with a few small additions since that calculation was made at the beginning of 1977. So the offspring of that telescope on a Palm Beach verandah have been considerable,​ Bouddi Natural Park started in 1935 as a strip of land along the coast from Mcrasters Beach to Killcare Ocean Beach of 650 acres (about 260 hectares). Bouddi National Park has an area of 1,067.3 hectares, with a few small additions since that calculation was made at the beginning of 1977. So the offspring of that telescope on a Palm Beach verandah have been considerable,​
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 2. Blue Gum Forest. 2. Blue Gum Forest.
 3. Maitland Bay. 3. Maitland Bay.
-+ + + + + + + ++ + 
-FIFTY YEARS OF CONSERVATION  +====FIFTY YEARS OF CONSERVATION==== 
-by Alex Colley. +by Alex Colley 
-When the S.B.W. was founded the conservation of natural areas was a cause promoted and understood by a very small following, most of which were + 
-to be found in the Mountain Trails Club or the Wild Life Preservation Society. The S.B.W. was guided in its formative period by the Mountain Trails Club and two of the five objects of our constitution were devoted to conservation. These were (c) To establish a definite regard for the welfare and preservation of the wild life and natural beauty of this country and (d) To help others appreciate these natural gifts. The conservation work of the M.T.C. was done mainly through the National Parks and Primitive Areas Council, which +When the S.B.W. was founded the conservation of natural areas was a cause promoted and understood by a very small following, most of which were to be found in the Mountain Trails Club or the Wild Life Preservation Society. The S.B.W. was guided in its formative period by the Mountain Trails Club and two of the five objects of our constitution were devoted to conservation. These were (c) To establish a definite regard for the welfare and preservation of the wild life and natural beauty of this country and (d) To help others appreciate these natural gifts. The conservation work of the M.T.C. was done mainly through the National Parks and Primitive Areas Council, which was disbanded in 1962, and the M.T.C. was wound up later. This leaves the S.B.W., to the best of my knowledge, as the second oldest wilderness conservation association in 
-was disbanded in 1962, and the M.T.C. was wound up later. This leaves the S.B.W., to the best of my knowledge, as the second oldest wilderness conservation association in +Before the formation of walking clubs, conservation was largely the work of prominent citizens. The Royal National Park (1879) was the result of representations by such people, as was Lamington National Park in Queensland, and Ku-ringgai ​Chase was the result of 40 years work by Eccleston du Faur. After these early successes there was a long gap until Myles Dunphy'​s pioneering work started to gain acceptance. 
-Before the formation of walking clubs, conservation was largely the work of prominent citizens. The Royal National Park (1879) was the result of representations by such people, as was Lamington National Park in Queensland, and Ku-ringgal ​Chase was the result of 40 years work by Eccleston du Faur. After these early successes there was a long gap until Myles Dunphy'​s pioneering work started to gain acceptance. +
-+
-Page THE SYDNEY BLISHWALKER October 1977+
 The first major effort of the S. W. was the saving of Blue Gum Forest. It happened that some M.TX. and S.9.1:!. members were walking through it just as the lessee started ringbarking the bluequms. In the words of Dorothy Lawry (S.B.W. Annual, April 1934) He had the legal right to kill The first major effort of the S. W. was the saving of Blue Gum Forest. It happened that some M.TX. and S.9.1:!. members were walking through it just as the lessee started ringbarking the bluequms. In the words of Dorothy Lawry (S.B.W. Annual, April 1934) He had the legal right to kill
 every tree. Reasoning and persuasion failed, so bargaining was resorted to, for the Trailers and Bush lalkers recognised that the trees must be every tree. Reasoning and persuasion failed, so bargaining was resorted to, for the Trailers and Bush lalkers recognised that the trees must be
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 Another successful venture of the thirties was the leasing of Morella Karong situated on a small creek flowing into Heathcote Creek. It was our Another successful venture of the thirties was the leasing of Morella Karong situated on a small creek flowing into Heathcote Creek. It was our
 re-union site for several years and was incorporated into the Heathcote Primitive Area together with the M.T.C.'​s Miara lease. re-union site for several years and was incorporated into the Heathcote Primitive Area together with the M.T.C.'​s Miara lease.
 +
 In 1943 the Club learned that there were plans afoot to build a boarding house and golf club at North Era. Reverting to previous experience In 1943 the Club learned that there were plans afoot to build a boarding house and golf club at North Era. Reverting to previous experience
 with developers it was decided to try to raise sufficient funds to buy the with developers it was decided to try to raise sufficient funds to buy the
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 after difficulties caused by Government land price regulation were overcome, we acquired the block. Later the Government resumed the privately owned land between Garrawarra and National Park and paid us a little more than we after difficulties caused by Government land price regulation were overcome, we acquired the block. Later the Government resumed the privately owned land between Garrawarra and National Park and paid us a little more than we
 had outlaid. had outlaid.
 +
 The importance of the conservation ofrthese Coastal beaches Comes into The importance of the conservation ofrthese Coastal beaches Comes into
 perspective when you look round forother undeveloped beaches on the central coast. There aren't any perspective when you look round forother undeveloped beaches on the central coast. There aren't any
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 responsible for the formation of the National Parks Association'​ of N.S.W. responsible for the formation of the National Parks Association'​ of N.S.W.
 and was for many years its President. Paul Barnes succeeded him as President of the Sydney Branch. and was for many years its President. Paul Barnes succeeded him as President of the Sydney Branch.
-Page 16. THE SYDNEY BUSWALKER. October 1977,+
 Until the late sixties the cause of wilderness preservation was supported by a very limited number of people, inspired largely by bush walkers. A great widening of support took place when the developers started to move in on the magnificent Kananara-Boyd wilderness area, which is perhaps the most popular walking area in the State. In the south of this wilderness Until the late sixties the cause of wilderness preservation was supported by a very limited number of people, inspired largely by bush walkers. A great widening of support took place when the developers started to move in on the magnificent Kananara-Boyd wilderness area, which is perhaps the most popular walking area in the State. In the south of this wilderness
 was the Colong Caves Reserve, itself almost surrounded by the Kanangra-Boyd was the Colong Caves Reserve, itself almost surrounded by the Kanangra-Boyd
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 The saving of Kanangra-Boyd was the key to a much larger project, proposed by Myles Dunphy in 1932 and adopted by the S.B.W. as its principal The saving of Kanangra-Boyd was the key to a much larger project, proposed by Myles Dunphy in 1932 and adopted by the S.B.W. as its principal
 conservation project. This was the creation of a Greater Blue Mountains conservation project. This was the creation of a Greater Blue Mountains
-National Park, extending from the Hunter Valley in the north to Wombeyan Caves in the south. The Federation of Bush Walking Clubs, the N.P.A., the +National Park, extending from the Hunter Valley in the north to Wombeyan Caves in the south. The Federation of Bush Walking Clubs, the N.P.A., the Colong Committee, the Colo Committee and the Bindook Committee pooled their
-Colong Committee, the Colo Committee and the Bindook Committee pooled their+
 various proposals and the N.P.A. devoted a special issue of its Journal to the project. No sooner had this issue been published than the Premier various proposals and the N.P.A. devoted a special issue of its Journal to the project. No sooner had this issue been published than the Premier
 announced that 192,000 hectares would be added to the existing parks in the Southern Blue Mountains. announced that 192,000 hectares would be added to the existing parks in the Southern Blue Mountains.
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 and it will happen if foresight be not shown. After all, until 1788, and it will happen if foresight be not shown. After all, until 1788,
 the whole of Australia was a primitive area." the whole of Australia was a primitive area."
-11.3. + 
-Jk, te;,5 + 
-.00 +====FIFTY YEARS OF WALKING==== 
-I. + 
-"",​... +The following ​articles have been selected to show the different aspects of our bushwalking history. They show how some things have altered and how others have stayed the same. Past issues of The Sydney Bushwaiker were the sources for the:​articles by Geoff. Vagg (1956) and Ivy painter (1967). 
-.',. ; VO + 
-.4e>,,'​.! 11% +====FIRST DESCENT OF CLEAR HILL==== 
-+by Frank Duncan. Reprinted from Sydney Bushwalker Annua1 April 1934 
- ​---7174,​. - "​e"​`...,​_ r-. ---,​N,':,​.es,,​.;​ , ,, __,. ..T0,, ,, , + 
-,k !" +Editorial Note
-1. t yr' , +
-,... +
-+
--", .esg, +
-ti +
-,7 +
-;', 0,` +
-+
-Page 8. THE SYDNEY BUSHRALKER. October, 1977. +
-FIFTY YEARS OF WALKING +
-The following ​artiClesjlave ​been selected to show the differentaspects of our bushwalking-history.. They show how some things+
-have altered-and how others have'stayed the same. Past issues of The Sydney Bushwaiker were the sources for the:​articles by Geoff. Vagg (1956) and Ivy painter (1967).  +
-FIRST DESCENT OF CLEAR HILL. +
-by Frank Duncan. Reprinted from Sydney Bushwalker Annua1 April 1934 - +
-Editorial Note calag Clear Hill is taken for granted by presentday +
-bushwalkers,​ and few even stop to ponder that it was once a real bush walking problem. At the beginning of 1928, the cliffs of Narrow Neck were an unconquered challenge to bushwalkers,​ with Nelliels Glen and Devil'​s Hole (a wellmarked tourist -track then) the only entry to the Megalong, and the Megalong the only passage to the Wild Dogs and the Cox. +
-0 0 3 3 0 -0 di'. 0+
 In other countries people make first ascents. In Australia, which In other countries people make first ascents. In Australia, which
 is a topsyturvy country, we make first descents instead. is a topsyturvy country, we make first descents instead.
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 The charm and grandeur of the unspoilt bush still clings to Clear Hill, but now someone with more ingenuity than poetry in his nature has fixed a rope-ladder for the convenience of weaklings down the one bit of real dilating on our original route. The Philistines-,​-I-fevill yet The charm and grandeur of the unspoilt bush still clings to Clear Hill, but now someone with more ingenuity than poetry in his nature has fixed a rope-ladder for the convenience of weaklings down the one bit of real dilating on our original route. The Philistines-,​-I-fevill yet
 put an escalator up Mount Cook and a lift up Kanchenjungal put an escalator up Mount Cook and a lift up Kanchenjungal
-* * * * * * * * * * * +
-Page 20. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October, 1977.+
 WALKS OF THE PAS T0. WALKS OF THE PAS T0.
 PHOTOGRAPHS OPPOSITE - PHOTOGRAPHS OPPOSITE -
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 7. Canon'​s Farm - Christmas Day, 1941.. 7. Canon'​s Farm - Christmas Day, 1941..
  ​HeatliJave conditions marked the start of a four-day trip, and the party' are seen here chatting to Bert and. Mrs. Carlon.  ​HeatliJave conditions marked the start of a four-day trip, and the party' are seen here chatting to Bert and. Mrs. Carlon.
-Page 21, THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October, 1977. + 
-TAKING THE MEDICINE. +====TAKING THE MEDICINE==== 
-by Ray Kirkby. +by Ray Kirkby 
-I decided recently that bushwalkers are partly in this world and ptrtly ​out. But it is mainly nine-tenths in and one-tenth out. I decided this when looking at a T.V. programme about the people who appear to be trying to do the same but in inverse proportions - nine-tenths out and one-tenth in. I mean the Tuntable Falls, NiMbin People. I'll risk attack by saying that our walking is more like taking medicine; it's a draught to steel us for the next incursion into the civilized world.+ 
 +I decided recently that bushwalkers are partly in this world and partly ​out. But it is mainly nine-tenths in and one-tenth out. I decided this when looking at a T.V. programme about the people who appear to be trying to do the same but in inverse proportions - nine-tenths out and one-tenth in. I mean the Tuntable Falls, NiMbin People. I'll risk attack by saying that our walking is more like taking medicine; it's a draught to steel us for the next incursion into the civilized world. 
 I'm going a long way back to talk about the "​last"​ war. I realise that many of you were not born, you won't be born for years yet, However I was mixed up in that affair and periodically we got some leave, but it was a cardinal rule of the army that you would never be given more than a day's notice. Therefore organising anything was practically out of the question. Which was why I set off on this trip, as on others, alone. I'm going a long way back to talk about the "​last"​ war. I realise that many of you were not born, you won't be born for years yet, However I was mixed up in that affair and periodically we got some leave, but it was a cardinal rule of the army that you would never be given more than a day's notice. Therefore organising anything was practically out of the question. Which was why I set off on this trip, as on others, alone.
 Remember, too, that transport was very limited. I decided on a trip in the Yarrangobilly area and of course the only transport was the Tumut train one end, the Cooma train the other and a mail car in between* Remember, too, that transport was very limited. I decided on a trip in the Yarrangobilly area and of course the only transport was the Tumut train one end, the Cooma train the other and a mail car in between*
 Well, that was a beginning to build on. So I got off the mail car somewhere near Yarrangobilly with the intention of crossing the Bogong Mountains and dropping down into the Goobarragandra River. My bible was the South-E astern Tourist map - there was no other I knew of - and you would have been regarded very suspiciously at that time had you been found with detailed maps. Well, that was a beginning to build on. So I got off the mail car somewhere near Yarrangobilly with the intention of crossing the Bogong Mountains and dropping down into the Goobarragandra River. My bible was the South-E astern Tourist map - there was no other I knew of - and you would have been regarded very suspiciously at that time had you been found with detailed maps.
 +
 I started up through an exotic pine forest having meanly calculated I started up through an exotic pine forest having meanly calculated
 that I muld have an easy undergrowth-free beginning. '​Vividly in my mind that I muld have an easy undergrowth-free beginning. '​Vividly in my mind
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 to speed down the river and eventually to the road into Tumut. There I intended to reprovision* I was offered a ride in a siAlky into town so; the last eight miles into Tumut were covered in great state. to speed down the river and eventually to the road into Tumut. There I intended to reprovision* I was offered a ride in a siAlky into town so; the last eight miles into Tumut were covered in great state.
 Now my plan was to go from Rule's Point, cross the Goodradigbee,​ go Up the gap between Mt. Murray and Bimberi Peak, drop down the other side and eventually get the train at Williamsdale south of Canberra, Now my plan was to go from Rule's Point, cross the Goodradigbee,​ go Up the gap between Mt. Murray and Bimberi Peak, drop down the other side and eventually get the train at Williamsdale south of Canberra,
-Page 22. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALUR October, 1977.+
 I started across the-high plains north of Rule's Point. Do you know, I cannot remeMber the name of those plains. I could look it up on a map but I don't want to. I feel some of the magic of that trip will be loit if I now try to throw too much probing light on it. But through those plains coiled the crystal streams which you come upon suddenly between grassy tufts. I started across the-high plains north of Rule's Point. Do you know, I cannot remeMber the name of those plains. I could look it up on a map but I don't want to. I feel some of the magic of that trip will be loit if I now try to throw too much probing light on it. But through those plains coiled the crystal streams which you come upon suddenly between grassy tufts.
 It all went well, but always one was preoccupied with finding one's way. Instirict, whatever that m*y mean, had to be the guide. The immediate task of walking, tracking and eating pushed all else out of the mind. It all went well, but always one was preoccupied with finding one's way. Instirict, whatever that m*y mean, had to be the guide. The immediate task of walking, tracking and eating pushed all else out of the mind.
-+ 
-iii +The gap between Murray and Bimberi was to me an alpine pasture with delicate green grasses and even a few a very few alpine like flowers. I
-q 1 +
-? (1,-* . +
-,-. .t ...h 4 +
- v, -- +
-. n 5 +
-- - f +
-, ) :,,..._ 4 +
-JI-..., --...4,​..,​..t. -,​.....:​-....-_- +
-_.. +
-The gap between Murray and Bimberi was to me +
-an alpine pasture with delicate green grasses and even a few a very few alpine like flowers. I+
 know now that I was seeing my first anemone. I climbed Bimberi. Then down, down past Mt. Kelly and Mt. Scabby to the valley floor and the beginnings of the first tracks and roads. know now that I was seeing my first anemone. I climbed Bimberi. Then down, down past Mt. Kelly and Mt. Scabby to the valley floor and the beginnings of the first tracks and roads.
 Ahead is a dust cloud hanging in the air and soon I come upon a Ahead is a dust cloud hanging in the air and soon I come upon a
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 "​Hey,"​ says the drover, "did you know the "​Prince of Wales" and "​Repulse"​ have been sunk?" Now disaster seems to have gone as far as is possible I mus,t get back. I cross the ford at Williamsdale and am on the train or Sydney. The guard canes along for my ticket. I did have a return ticket, where is it? I search through my- pack, I search through my clothes, but alas I can't find it. "​Hey,"​ says the drover, "did you know the "​Prince of Wales" and "​Repulse"​ have been sunk?" Now disaster seems to have gone as far as is possible I mus,t get back. I cross the ford at Williamsdale and am on the train or Sydney. The guard canes along for my ticket. I did have a return ticket, where is it? I search through my- pack, I search through my clothes, but alas I can't find it.
 And as I fork out the one pound something agaia for a ticket, thoughts of a calamitous war are blotted out by my personal disaster. And as I fork out the one pound something agaia for a ticket, thoughts of a calamitous war are blotted out by my personal disaster.
-* * * * * * * * * * * + 
-Page 23 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October, 1977. +====ADVERTISEMENT: ​PADDY REMEMBERS==== 
-ADVERTISEMT ​PADDY REMEMBERS.+
 My memory of S.B.W. is of some time in 1931 when I attended a meeting at which a long letter from Jack Debert was read, and for some reason caused heated discussion, Those were deep depression days and Jack, for want of a job, had retreated to a "​farm"​ in Burragorang Valley. My memory of S.B.W. is of some time in 1931 when I attended a meeting at which a long letter from Jack Debert was read, and for some reason caused heated discussion, Those were deep depression days and Jack, for want of a job, had retreated to a "​farm"​ in Burragorang Valley.
-My next vivid recollection is of' ​thefirst Club Reunion at Euroka Clearing, when Jack arrived, having walked from the Valley, and where he initiated the cry - "Let us Re-une"​. It was a bitter cold night with heavy frost but of course we had a roaring fire and I can still see Jack, stripped to the waist, sweat pouring from every pore, as he careered round the fire with his very own rendering of wMarmee". + 
-I think it was the next reunion, again at Euroka, that Ernie Austen was handing over the presidency to Tom Herbert, and he used the bones of a long-dead cow to illustrate his homily. Next day we ;dressedup Tom in those bones tied together with string. ​,Someone rescued a thigh bone and took it to the next club meeting, since when it has been used as the gavel by the Club President. +My next vivid recollection is of the first Club Reunion at Euroka Clearing, when Jack arrived, having walked from the Valley, and where he initiated the cry - "Let us Re-une"​. It was a bitter cold night with heavy frost but of course we had a roaring fire and I can still see Jack, stripped to the waist, sweat pouring from every pore, as he careered round the fire with his very own rendering of "​Marmee". 
-The 30's saw a tremendous growth in bushwalking (dare I suggest this was partly owing to the availability of practical lightweight equipment now being made in Australia - by us, of course, for the first time?). The S.B.W. began to be beseiged ​by would-be members, and it was then that "Test Walks" and that elusive quality of "Compatability" were endlessly discussed at committee meetings. + 
-The war came, with heavy army enlistments from bushwaiking ranks and +I think it was the next reunion, again at Euroka, that Ernie Austen was handing over the presidency to Tom Herbert, and he used the bones of a long-dead cow to illustrate his homily. Next day we dressed up Tom in those bones tied together with string. Someone rescued a thigh bone and took it to the next club meeting, since then it has been used as the gavel by the Club President. 
-alasl the inevitable casualties. With the warand following it for some time came shortages of materials. The sleeping bag position was particularly acute and on the occasions when they were available queues began + 
-to gather in the early hours of the morning. The '​chapat ​the head of one queue told me he had come from Lithgow by the midnight train, slept in Central till 6 a m. and got first place in the lines Keen! +The 30's saw a tremendous growth in bushwalking (dare I suggest this was partly owing to the availability of practical lightweight equipment now being made in Australia - by us, of course, for the first time?). The S.B.W. began to be besieged ​by would-be members, and it was then that "Test Walks" and that elusive quality of "Compatibility" were endlessly discussed at committee meetings. 
-On Christmas Day 1950 came the disastrous fire in the Paddy Shop which destroyed the whole building. I will never forget the messages of sympathy from all over Australia and the solid help given by bushwalkers in the difficult period of about 9 months before I was established in the C.E..N.E.F. + 
-Building in Castlereagh Street. +The war came, with heavy army enlistments from bushwaiking ranks and alas! the inevitable casualties. With the war and following it for some time came shortages of materials. The sleeping bag position was particularly acute and on the occasions when they were available queues began to gather in the early hours of the morning. The chap at the head of one queue told me he had come from Lithgow by the midnight train, slept in Central till 6 a.m. and got first place in the line! Keen! 
-The firm is a mere 47 years old compared with the Club's 50 years+ 
-, but those years have beenones of close association. ​Bay. the Club go from strength to strength. and may "​Paddy'​s"​ still earn the right to serve the needs of its members. +On Christmas Day 1950 came the disastrous fire in the Paddy Shop which destroyed the whole building. I will never forget the messages of sympathy from all over Australia and the solid help given by bushwalkers in the difficult period of about 9 months before I was established in the C.E.N.E.F. Building in Castlereagh Street. 
-Paddy. PADDY PALLIN PTY. LTD.+ 
 +The firm is a mere 47 years old compared with the Club's 50 years, but those years have been ones of close association. ​ ​May ​the Club go from strength to strength. and may "​Paddy'​s"​ still earn the right to serve the needs of its members. 
 + 
 +Paddy. ​ 
 + 
 +PADDY PALLIN PTY. LTD.
 69 Liverpool Street 69 Liverpool Street
 SYDNEY. SYDNEY.
 +
 AND AT MELBOURNE & CANBERRA. AND AT MELBOURNE & CANBERRA.
-Page 24. THE SYDNEY BUSHUALUR - October, 1977. + 
-THE WORST JOURNEY IN THE 1.RLD. +====THE WORST JOURNEY IN THE WORLD==== 
-by Goof Wagg. +by Goof Wagg 
-t, I suppose to everyone there comes a moment when they feel that they'​ve hit utter bedrock - that things just couldn'​t be worse and that any change from here is bound to be for the better. Me too. It happened one night at Coral Swamp, but that wasn't where it started.+ 
 +I suppose to everyone there comes a moment when they feel that they'​ve hit utter bedrock - that things just couldn'​t be worse and that any change from here is bound to be for the better. Me too. It happened one night at Coral Swamp, but that wasn't where it started.
 'Twas a week-end last July I think, and we wore all set to make a do-or-die attempt on Daviels Canyon. "​Morong Creek - Davie'​s Canyon - Katoamba or bust, and who cares if we're a day overdue it'll be good fun and worth it." Thus quoth Stitt and I agreed with him - up until Friday night, that is. But Friday night, about half an hour before I left work, a job bounced and it seemed to be my fault. The big post mortem was going to be held on Monday, and it occurred-to me that if I didn't turn up on Monday it might be better if I didn't turn up again ever. As you might imagine, I was a bit disconcerted by all this, so when I met the others - 'Twas a week-end last July I think, and we wore all set to make a do-or-die attempt on Daviels Canyon. "​Morong Creek - Davie'​s Canyon - Katoamba or bust, and who cares if we're a day overdue it'll be good fun and worth it." Thus quoth Stitt and I agreed with him - up until Friday night, that is. But Friday night, about half an hour before I left work, a job bounced and it seemed to be my fault. The big post mortem was going to be held on Monday, and it occurred-to me that if I didn't turn up on Monday it might be better if I didn't turn up again ever. As you might imagine, I was a bit disconcerted by all this, so when I met the others -
 Grace, Joan and Don Gower at Central I pitched them a sorry tale and they Grace, Joan and Don Gower at Central I pitched them a sorry tale and they
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 Next morning about 6 o'​clock I peeped out at a dim grey world. The ground was white and bristled with frost, but it was no use waiting for the sun; tucked in here amorgthe ridges we wouldn'​t see him for many hours. gr, Noting that Joan was stirring I sprinted across and gave the boys a shout ,\ (it did no good), grabbed the billy and zoomed bacl: inside the tent. BrrrIJI, Do up the flap and get the primus going, quick! Soon the interior of the ' 1 tent was much more tropical and Grace could be coaxed out of her sleeping ITrit 1 bag. By 7 o'​clock we wereiready to move, and by a ouarter past Stitt was, '11 Next morning about 6 o'​clock I peeped out at a dim grey world. The ground was white and bristled with frost, but it was no use waiting for the sun; tucked in here amorgthe ridges we wouldn'​t see him for many hours. gr, Noting that Joan was stirring I sprinted across and gave the boys a shout ,\ (it did no good), grabbed the billy and zoomed bacl: inside the tent. BrrrIJI, Do up the flap and get the primus going, quick! Soon the interior of the ' 1 tent was much more tropical and Grace could be coaxed out of her sleeping ITrit 1 bag. By 7 o'​clock we wereiready to move, and by a ouarter past Stitt was, '11
 JU JU
-Page 26. TF SYDNEY BUSITRALMR October, 1977.+
 the odd fifteen minutes being spent by the party taking turns to stamp in the fire ashes - the only un9rozen spot. the odd fifteen minutes being spent by the party taking turns to stamp in the fire ashes - the only un9rozen spot.
 The frost extended white right to the very running edge of the river, and even the rocks were iced over, as I discovered while attempting to cross with dry feet and sat in it After that I moved very rapidly, no longer worried about my feet which grew less sensitive with each successive crossing, until just before reaching the Cox I had to glance down now and again to see if I still had them. At Kanangaroo the ground was just as white, and where we trod on the sand along the bank the hoar frost crystals crunched under our feet and occasionally the frozen surface layer yielded to show a crisp footprint. The tardy sun was struggling to rise above Yellow Pup as we crossed the Cox, and as the shadowed bank offered no inducement to linger we kept right on until the first patch of reasonably strong sunlight, then changed our socks and kept right on again. The frost extended white right to the very running edge of the river, and even the rocks were iced over, as I discovered while attempting to cross with dry feet and sat in it After that I moved very rapidly, no longer worried about my feet which grew less sensitive with each successive crossing, until just before reaching the Cox I had to glance down now and again to see if I still had them. At Kanangaroo the ground was just as white, and where we trod on the sand along the bank the hoar frost crystals crunched under our feet and occasionally the frozen surface layer yielded to show a crisp footprint. The tardy sun was struggling to rise above Yellow Pup as we crossed the Cox, and as the shadowed bank offered no inducement to linger we kept right on until the first patch of reasonably strong sunlight, then changed our socks and kept right on again.
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 (It all tUrned out that the trouble at work was somebody else's (It all tUrned out that the trouble at work was somebody else's
 fault.).. fault.)..
-* * * * * * * * * + 
-Page 27, THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKEE October 9 1977. +====FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF THE COX==== 
-\1\\ FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF THE COX. +by Ivy Painter. 
--.\\\ by Ivy Painter. + 
- It will be many,many moons, if ever, before I lose the memories of+It will be many,many moons, if ever, before I lose the memories of
 There were mixed feelings of anticipation and apprehension when we decid4 on this, our first long weekend trip, and we got a tremendous kick out of planning and preparing. Roe brought along a pack of cards which helped while away the, two hours journey to Mt. Victoria. There were 15 in all by the time we reached there, and too many for the one taxi and utility that Frank had hired to transport us to the Jenolan Road. Some of us stayed and enjoyed the amenities offering in Mt. Victoria until the truck could return for us. By the time we arrived at camp, the others had bedded down around the fire. It was a beautiful night, crisp and cold, and we took a chance without the tent. This walking and feeling a part of the grey dawn, of seeing blue sky peeping through gums above, is but a little of this wondrous new experience I am growing to know and love so much., There were mixed feelings of anticipation and apprehension when we decid4 on this, our first long weekend trip, and we got a tremendous kick out of planning and preparing. Roe brought along a pack of cards which helped while away the, two hours journey to Mt. Victoria. There were 15 in all by the time we reached there, and too many for the one taxi and utility that Frank had hired to transport us to the Jenolan Road. Some of us stayed and enjoyed the amenities offering in Mt. Victoria until the truck could return for us. By the time we arrived at camp, the others had bedded down around the fire. It was a beautiful night, crisp and cold, and we took a chance without the tent. This walking and feeling a part of the grey dawn, of seeing blue sky peeping through gums above, is but a little of this wondrous new experience I am growing to know and love so much.,
 After a hurried, breakfast we set off, winding our way upwards through pine forests. Our party had now increased to 10 three latecomers having arrived during the early hours. The day began with the promise of the perfect weekend that was in store. On the way to Gibraltar Rock, we loitered occasionally to gaze across the Kanimbla Valley and take in the scene below. Although the valley was a little hazy, we could easily. discern the yellows just starting in the willows along Cullenbenbong Swamp. After a hurried, breakfast we set off, winding our way upwards through pine forests. Our party had now increased to 10 three latecomers having arrived during the early hours. The day began with the promise of the perfect weekend that was in store. On the way to Gibraltar Rock, we loitered occasionally to gaze across the Kanimbla Valley and take in the scene below. Although the valley was a little hazy, we could easily. discern the yellows just starting in the willows along Cullenbenbong Swamp.
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 At last the big ascent up Devil'​s Hole. All day I'd been gripped by the fear that perhaps I might not fit through. Big joke! The tale these bushwaikers tell! Shame! Anyway, none of us stuck in the Devil'​s Hole and we made the top in good time to change, dine and catch the 6.25 p m. from KatoaMba. But oh boy, the last hundred yards to the A.B. I made sans feet or legs even, so it seemed. Tea does revive you, and When Prank produced his song book in the train, we found we still had energy and enthusiasm enough to join with him in a song. At last the big ascent up Devil'​s Hole. All day I'd been gripped by the fear that perhaps I might not fit through. Big joke! The tale these bushwaikers tell! Shame! Anyway, none of us stuck in the Devil'​s Hole and we made the top in good time to change, dine and catch the 6.25 p m. from KatoaMba. But oh boy, the last hundred yards to the A.B. I made sans feet or legs even, so it seemed. Tea does revive you, and When Prank produced his song book in the train, we found we still had energy and enthusiasm enough to join with him in a song.
 At the time it failed to register, but next day at work, my colleagues were sure I was suffering from delayed. bushvralkinc shock, am I kept chuckling on remembering Barry'​s plaintive burst of "​Darling,​ I am Growing Old". They were my sentiments also, Barry. These soon passed, as did the aches and pains, to be replaced by strong desires to return again and again, and_ become as one once more with mountain, trees and sky, streams and grassy banks all that is remote and wild and beautiful. At the time it failed to register, but next day at work, my colleagues were sure I was suffering from delayed. bushvralkinc shock, am I kept chuckling on remembering Barry'​s plaintive burst of "​Darling,​ I am Growing Old". They were my sentiments also, Barry. These soon passed, as did the aches and pains, to be replaced by strong desires to return again and again, and_ become as one once more with mountain, trees and sky, streams and grassy banks all that is remote and wild and beautiful.
-* * * * * * * * * + 
-Page 2 THE SYDNEY BUSHVILKER October, 1977, +====HIGH CAMPS IN THE BLUE BREAKS==== 
-HIGH CAMPS IN THE BLUE BIMEKS201. +by Spiro Hajinakitas 
-by Spiro Hajinakitas. + 
-David Rostron'​s Blue Breaks trip last year on the same weekend (Anzac) proved so successful that he decided to do the trip again. Sixother starters were Alastair Battye, Bob Hodgson, Pat HoBride, John Redfern, Steve Tomkins and myself.+David Rostron'​s Blue Breaks trip last year on the same weekend (Anzac) proved so successful that he decided to do the trip again. Six other starters were Alastair Battye, Bob Hodgson, Pat HoBride, John Redfern, Steve Tomkins and myself. 
 We set off from Parramatta in two cars, encountering some fog ad about six taxis on the Kanangra Road. The Coal Seam Cave was to be our sleeping place that night, so we left the cars at Kanangra and set off quickly. The extremely dry weather had resulted in drying out the muddy and swampy patches of the track and for a change we arrived at the cave with bone dry socks. Also as a result of the dry conditions, we discovered that the plastic bins at the cave were also bone dry - no water! We set off from Parramatta in two cars, encountering some fog ad about six taxis on the Kanangra Road. The Coal Seam Cave was to be our sleeping place that night, so we left the cars at Kanangra and set off quickly. The extremely dry weather had resulted in drying out the muddy and swampy patches of the track and for a change we arrived at the cave with bone dry socks. Also as a result of the dry conditions, we discovered that the plastic bins at the cave were also bone dry - no water!
 In the morning the party produced enough fresh milk and water for muesli and tea, so we breakfasted before tackling the Gina Range. In one way we were thankful of the drought as we were all travelling lightweight In the morning the party produced enough fresh milk and water for muesli and tea, so we breakfasted before tackling the Gina Range. In one way we were thankful of the drought as we were all travelling lightweight
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 The editors wish to thank Kath Brown, Sheila Binnt, Peter Scandrett and Robin Scandrett for their help with this enlarged edition of the magazine, and Frank Duncan and John Noble for providing The editors wish to thank Kath Brown, Sheila Binnt, Peter Scandrett and Robin Scandrett for their help with this enlarged edition of the magazine, and Frank Duncan and John Noble for providing
 historical information and photographs. historical information and photographs.
-Page 31. TIM SYDNEY BUSIMALEER October, 1977. + 
-MOUNTAINM + 
-EQUIPMENT+====MOUNTAIN ​EQUIPMENT====
 17 Falcon Street, Crows Nest,_ 2065. 17 Falcon Street, Crows Nest,_ 2065.
 OW Om ........ am ........... WU . 4 qr, mis. MO *gm mm 4W MO OW Om ........ am ........... WU . 4 qr, mis. MO *gm mm 4W MO
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 ci: ci:
 ea erghaue ea erghaue
-Page 32 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October, 1977, + 
-KIANDRA TO KOSCIUSKO ON SKIS. +====KIANDRA TO KOSCIUSKO ON SKIS==== 
-by Paddy Pallin.. TO COMMORATE THE 0TH ANNIVERSARY +by Paddy Pallin 
-2-111j1FIROG DT927.+ 
 +TO COMMORATE THE 0TH ANNIVERSARY 
 It was one of those trips right from the start. We had arranged to meet Rex at Cooma, have lunch, get to Kiandra by one o'​clock and get away from Kiandra in the early afternoon, with sufficient time to reach Broken Dam Hut before dark, giving us an easy start to get used to skis and packs. Alas, due to snow conditions Rex did not get to Cooma from Charlotte'​s Pass until 2.00 p m. In the meantime, we had met Ted Winter and Bill, who joined our party of six and as we were about to leave, who should turn up It was one of those trips right from the start. We had arranged to meet Rex at Cooma, have lunch, get to Kiandra by one o'​clock and get away from Kiandra in the early afternoon, with sufficient time to reach Broken Dam Hut before dark, giving us an easy start to get used to skis and packs. Alas, due to snow conditions Rex did not get to Cooma from Charlotte'​s Pass until 2.00 p m. In the meantime, we had met Ted Winter and Bill, who joined our party of six and as we were about to leave, who should turn up
 but Ted's daughter, Bronwyn, hitching her way from Perisher to Canberra! On learning our plans, she too decided to join us and proceeded to do some but Ted's daughter, Bronwyn, hitching her way from Perisher to Canberra! On learning our plans, she too decided to join us and proceeded to do some
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  ​Willing hands built up the fire and cameras clided as I stripped off my sodden clothes. Meanwhile, Nan was admiring the scenery anywhere but in my direction.  ​Willing hands built up the fire and cameras clided as I stripped off my sodden clothes. Meanwhile, Nan was admiring the scenery anywhere but in my direction.
 Wi ..19-C.Iitjrj,​Juwiz,​--ivisicle..s pl (1.S11',​1,​ f Wi ..19-C.Iitjrj,​Juwiz,​--ivisicle..s pl (1.S11',​1,​ f
-and we proceeded on our way past Spencers Peak to Cesjackis Hut. Because of the obligation to carry tents and the resultant extra +and we proceeded on our way past Spencers Peak to Cesjackis Hut. Because of the obligation to carry tents and the resultant extra weight, I had arranged for a supply of food to be sent to Kora Grunnsund'​s new lodge ju st outside the Park boundary,, half a mile from Cesjack'​s. A small party went over to collect the food and we found a note addressed to me inviting us to stay in the lodge. The contrast between Cesjack'​s earthen floor and. the solid comfort of Nordheirn was too much and. so the whole party moved over and we had. a very comfortable night and sorted out the new food.
-Page 34 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October, 1977.  +
-weight, I had arranged for a supply of food to be sent to Kora Grunnsund'​s new lodge ju st outside the Park boundary,, half a mile from Cesjack'​s. A small party went over to collect the food and we found a note addressed to me inviting us to stay in the lodge. The contrast between Cesjack'​s earthen floor and. the solid comfort of Nordheirn was too much and. so the whole party moved over and we had. a very comfortable night and sorted out the new food.+
 The trip from Cesjack'​s to Tim Hut was sheer delight. The snow, though not fast, was much The trip from Cesjack'​s to Tim Hut was sheer delight. The snow, though not fast, was much
 -improved, the views were magnificent. Life was -improved, the views were magnificent. Life was
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 into hospital at Canberra, got a lift back to Ktandra, made a quick journey to Tin. Hut and followed- our tracks from Whites, and so we were all together again except for 13ronwyn doing well in hospital. into hospital at Canberra, got a lift back to Ktandra, made a quick journey to Tin. Hut and followed- our tracks from Whites, and so we were all together again except for 13ronwyn doing well in hospital.
 The only trips you regret are the ones you don't. doi The only trips you regret are the ones you don't. doi
-* * * * * * * * * * * * + 
-Page 35 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October, 1977. +====RIP==== 
-RIP. +by Jim Brown 
-by Jim Brown.+
 He had a sort of old.-young look, and with it went a rather out-dated manner. He asked diffidently if I would mind nominating him for membership ef the Club, but he did not thrust the application form towards me. Instead he held it half-hidden inside his coat, and I noticed he was wearing an old-fashioned waistcoat. He had a sort of old.-young look, and with it went a rather out-dated manner. He asked diffidently if I would mind nominating him for membership ef the Club, but he did not thrust the application form towards me. Instead he held it half-hidden inside his coat, and I noticed he was wearing an old-fashioned waistcoat.
 He said., almost apologetically,​ "The young lady -" he-nodded-towards the Membership Secretary - "told. me she wasn't sure if my application would be accepted. You see, I did. a lot of walks, but I haven'​t been into the Club for a while."​ He said., almost apologetically,​ "The young lady -" he-nodded-towards the Membership Secretary - "told. me she wasn't sure if my application would be accepted. You see, I did. a lot of walks, but I haven'​t been into the Club for a while."​
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 There it was on the form - "​Blackheath - Grose River - Richmond"​. There it was on the form - "​Blackheath - Grose River - Richmond"​.
 He hadn't shown a leader, so I asked, "Was that Victor Lewin'​s trip?" and then remembered that Victor had started from Hartioy Vale, not Blackheath. He hadn't shown a leader, so I asked, "Was that Victor Lewin'​s trip?" and then remembered that Victor had started from Hartioy Vale, not Blackheath.
-He repeated as a question, "​Victor Lewin?"​ Then, "No, I don't know him." He added enthusiastically,​ "I like that Groso Valley. I did +He repeated as a question, "​Victor Lewin?"​ Then, "No, I don't know him." He added enthusiastically,​ "I like that Groso Valley. I did another week-end trip there a few weeks 'after Easter. See here, Leura - Mount Hay - Tomah Creek - Mt. Tomah - Bell. Mr. Drake led it. It was pretty rough in places."​
-Page 36 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALIMR October, 1977. +
-another week-end trip there a few weeks 'after Easter. See here, Leura - Mount Hay - Tomah Creek - Mt. Tomah - Bell. Mr. Drake led it. It was pretty rough in places."​+
 Slowly I agreed. "Yes, it would be roughish."​ I turned over to the front of the form. Where the applicant signs that he subscribes to the aims and objects of the Club it was signed. "R. VAN WINKLE"​. Slowly I agreed. "Yes, it would be roughish."​ I turned over to the front of the form. Where the applicant signs that he subscribes to the aims and objects of the Club it was signed. "R. VAN WINKLE"​.
 Like Abou Ben Adam I sensed a great awakening light, and enquired gently, "Do you have the walks programme with you? I seem to have left mine at home." He produced a rather ragged little booklet. The cover page read:- Like Abou Ben Adam I sensed a great awakening light, and enquired gently, "Do you have the walks programme with you? I seem to have left mine at home." He produced a rather ragged little booklet. The cover page read:-
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 "Oh, yes," he said. "Here we are - March 'to September, 1928 and June to December 1929. Do you find them interesting?"​ "Oh, yes," he said. "Here we are - March 'to September, 1928 and June to December 1929. Do you find them interesting?"​
 "​Very,"​ I told him. "​Especially because so many of the same trips' "​Very,"​ I told him. "​Especially because so many of the same trips'
-Page 37 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER October, 1977.+
 are still being done. Of course, there are some places where the suburban sprawl has caught up with us. - - But look here now, 'April 1st, 1928. Leader: Mr. A. Rigby. Bundeena to Helendburgh. 8.24 a m. electric train to Sutherland, tram to Cronulls, launch to Bundeena.'​ That would have been the old steam tram to Cronulla before the electric railway was laid in. Or here, '​August 25tho 1929. Waterfall - Ulccla Creek - Engadine Creek - Engadine. Led. by Max Gentle'​."​ are still being done. Of course, there are some places where the suburban sprawl has caught up with us. - - But look here now, 'April 1st, 1928. Leader: Mr. A. Rigby. Bundeena to Helendburgh. 8.24 a m. electric train to Sutherland, tram to Cronulls, launch to Bundeena.'​ That would have been the old steam tram to Cronulla before the electric railway was laid in. Or here, '​August 25tho 1929. Waterfall - Ulccla Creek - Engadine Creek - Engadine. Led. by Max Gentle'​."​
 "You can borrow them if you like," he said, "I thought people may care to see some programmes that were a few years old," "You can borrow them if you like," he said, "I thought people may care to see some programmes that were a few years old,"
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 (Details of trips mentioned appear in the S.B.W. Walks Programmes in the years 1928 - 1929 as shown above.) (Details of trips mentioned appear in the S.B.W. Walks Programmes in the years 1928 - 1929 as shown above.)
 *********XXX *********XXX
-PRESIDENTS OF THE SYDNEY ​BUSHWALICERS + 
-Until the meeting of 10/2/1928 a Chairman was elected for each meeting. ​Charmen ​up till that date were Alan Rigby (21/10/27), Eric Dickson 0.1/11/27), Roy Rudder (9/12/27) and Frank Duncan (13/1/28). Jack Debert was elected Chairman and later President at the meeting of 10/2/28.+====PRESIDENTS OF THE SYDNEY ​BUSHWALKERS==== 
 +Until the meeting of 10/2/1928 a Chairman was elected for each meeting. ​Chairmen ​up till that date were Alan Rigby (21/10/27), Eric Dickson 0.1/11/27), Roy Rudder (9/12/27) and Frank Duncan (13/1/28). Jack Debert was elected Chairman and later President at the meeting of 10/2/28. 
 -Sopt. '29 -Sopt. '29
 - March '31 - March '31
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 March'​70 - March '72 Bob Younger March'​72 - March '74 Barry Wallace March'​74 - March '76 March'​70 - March '72 Bob Younger March'​72 - March '74 Barry Wallace March'​74 - March '76
 Helen Gray March'​76 - Present Helen Gray March'​76 - Present
-* * * * * * * * * * * * + 
-Page 38 TEE SYDNEY BUSHWALICER October, 1977. +====BUSHWALKER'​S ​PRAYER==== 
-BUSHWALKERTS ​PRAYER. +by Owen Marks 
-by Owen Marks.+
 1.  1. 
 God in Heaven, we beseech God in Heaven, we beseech
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 And on your altar we would lay A votive gift of all Golconda, They could have been as big as And on your altar we would lay A votive gift of all Golconda, They could have been as big as
 an anaconda. an anaconda.
-* * *+
 . MEMBERS FROM THE FIRST TWENTY YEARS WHO STTLL GO ON CLUB WALKS. . MEMBERS FROM THE FIRST TWENTY YEARS WHO STTLL GO ON CLUB WALKS.
 1928 Jean Ashdown 1943 Bob Younger 1928 Jean Ashdown 1943 Bob Younger
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