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197708 [2019/03/16 14:42]
vievems
197708 [2019/03/21 23:48] (current)
vievems [PADDYMADE]
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 A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to The Sydney Bush Walkers; Box 4476, G.P.O. Sydney, N.S.W. 2001.  A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to The Sydney Bush Walkers; Box 4476, G.P.O. Sydney, N.S.W. 2001. 
  
-Club meetings are held every Wednesday evening from 7.30 p.m. at The Wireless Institute building, 14 Aitchison ​Street, St. Leonards.+Club meetings are held every Wednesday evening from 7.30 p.m. at The Wireless Institute building, 14 Atchison ​Street, St. Leonards.
  
 Enquiries concerning the Club should be referred to Mrs. Marcia Shappert -  telephone 30.2028. Enquiries concerning the Club should be referred to Mrs. Marcia Shappert -  telephone 30.2028.
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 **Don'​t be lumbered with a winter bag in summer** **Don'​t be lumbered with a winter bag in summer**
 Our new '​Superlight'​ summer weight bags are nearly half the packed size and weight (2lbs) of our regular sleeping bags. Nylon covering, superdown filled. Packs into 9" length x 5.5" dia. Can also be used during winter as an "​inner-bag"​. Our new '​Superlight'​ summer weight bags are nearly half the packed size and weight (2lbs) of our regular sleeping bags. Nylon covering, superdown filled. Packs into 9" length x 5.5" dia. Can also be used during winter as an "​inner-bag"​.
- +  * **Kiandra model:** Pillow flap, hooded bag. Well filled. Compact, warm and lightweight. Excellent for warmer summer nights and times when carrying weight can be reduced. Approx 3.75lbs. 
-**Kiandra model:** Pillow flap, hooded bag. Well filled. Compact, warm and lightweight. Excellent for warmer summer nights and times when carrying weight can be reduced. Approx 3.75lbs. +  ​* ​**Hotham model:** Superwarm hooded bag made for cold sleepers and high altitudes. 'Box quilted'​ with no '​through'​ stitching. All bags can be fitted with zippers and draught resisting overlaps. Weight 4.5lbs.
-**Hotham model:** Superwarm hooded bag made for cold sleepers and high altitudes. 'Box quilted'​ with no +
-'​through'​ stitching. All bags can be fitted with zippers and draught resisting overlaps. Weight 4.5lbs.+
  
 **BUNYIP RUCKSACK** **BUNYIP RUCKSACK**
-This '​shaped'​ rucksack is excellent for children. Use-full day pack. Weight 14ozs.+This '​shaped'​ rucksack is excellent for children. Use-full day pack. Weight 14ozs.\\
 **SENIOR RUCKSACK** **SENIOR RUCKSACK**
-A single pocket, shaped rucksack. Suitable for overnight camping. Weight 1.5lbs.+A single pocket, shaped rucksack. Suitable for overnight camping. Weight 1.5lbs.\\
 **BUSHMAN RUCKSACK** **BUSHMAN RUCKSACK**
-Has sewn-in curved bottom for extra comfort in carrying. Will hold 30lbs. 2 pocket model l.25 lbs. 3 pocket model 1.5 lbs. +Has sewn-in curved bottom for extra comfort in carrying. Will hold 30lbs. 2 pocket model l.25 lbs. 3 pocket model 1.5 lbs.\\
 **PIONEER RUCKSACK** **PIONEER RUCKSACK**
-Extra large bag with four external pockets and will carry about 40Ibs of camp gear. Weight 2.25lbs. +Extra large bag with four external pockets and will carry about 40Ibs of camp gear. Weight 2.25lbs.\\
 **'​A'​ TENTS** **'​A'​ TENTS**
-One, two or three man. From 2.5 to 3.75lbs. Choice of three cloths. Supplied with nylon cords and overlapped doors. No walls. +One, two or three man. From 2.5 to 3.75lbs. Choice of three cloths. Supplied with nylon cords and overlapped doors. No walls.\\
 **WALL TENTS** **WALL TENTS**
 Two, three or four man. From 3.5 to 4.5lbs. Choice of three cloths. Supplied with nylon cords and overlapped doors. Two, three or four man. From 3.5 to 4.5lbs. Choice of three cloths. Supplied with nylon cords and overlapped doors.
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 (One of the most Memorable events in conservation this year was the awarding of the 0.B.E. to Miles Dunphy, who is a foundation member of the Sydney Bushwalkers. The following is an extract from a letter of reply written by him to the Dungalla Club on this occasion, and is an outline of conservation efforts that started some fifty years ago. Miles is now 85.) (One of the most Memorable events in conservation this year was the awarding of the 0.B.E. to Miles Dunphy, who is a foundation member of the Sydney Bushwalkers. The following is an extract from a letter of reply written by him to the Dungalla Club on this occasion, and is an outline of conservation efforts that started some fifty years ago. Miles is now 85.)
  
-You are right about remembering places in their primitive condition. It was because of the damaging forces that were at work wrecking the Blue Mountains wilderness that the early members of the Mountain Trails Club were led to study the situation for about ton years, to make sure of the facts. The Blue Mountains National Park Scheme, compiled about 1924-28, was a preliminary step towards it; but National Park, south of Sydney, needed attention first. Other than the public protest against tree-cutting in National Park, about 1921-22, which members supported, in 1924 the club protested to the Under Secretary for Lands, about abuses being perpetrated in National Park; in a number of ways - a list was furnished. The protest, which was not given to the press, went up to the Minister for Lands as first-hand-evidence (7hich it was) and must have caused a stir: the Minister for Lands wrote the club and promised to make an enquiry into the matter. +You are right about remembering places in their primitive condition. It was because of the damaging forces that were at work wrecking the Blue Mountains wilderness that the early members of the Mountain Trails Club were led to study the situation for about ten years, to make sure of the facts. The Blue Mountains National Park Scheme, compiled about 1924-28, was a preliminary step towards it; but National Park, south of Sydney, needed attention first. Other than the public protest against tree-cutting in National Park, about 1921-22, which members supported, in 1924 the club protested to the Under Secretary for Lands, about abuses being perpetrated in National Park; in a number of ways - a list was furnished. The protest, which was not given to the press, went up to the Minister for Lands as first-hand-evidence (which it was) and must have caused a stir: the Minister for Lands wrote the club and promised to make an enquiry into the matter. 
-About the same time, as a separate matter, the club wrote to the Under Secretary for Lands and said that Garawarra ​:Jrce s subject to various kinds of abuse similar to those operating in National Park. It was suggested that the Garawarra belt of superior scenery and coastal jungle should be added to National Park for protection, particularly the Crown Land parts. The Under Secretary replied and saidthat the time was not yet ripe for such a step to be taken, etc.+ 
 +About the same time, as a separate matter, the club wrote to the Under Secretary for Lands and said that Garawarra ​was subject to various kinds of abuse similar to those operating in National Park. It was suggested that the Garawarra belt of superior scenery and coastal jungle should be added to National Park for protection, particularly the Crown Land parts. The Under Secretary replied and said that the time was not yet ripe for such a step to be taken, etc. 
 But in the end the private properties (freehold) were resumed and, with Gardwarra Park (the result of the Garawarra Campaign of 1933) were all added to Royal National Park! If the club's suggestion had been adopted, what a lot of time and trouble would have been saved. But in the end the private properties (freehold) were resumed and, with Gardwarra Park (the result of the Garawarra Campaign of 1933) were all added to Royal National Park! If the club's suggestion had been adopted, what a lot of time and trouble would have been saved.
 +
 The Blue Gum Forest and Garawarra Park campaigns made the Department of Lands people realise certain truths about pedestrian tourists: like motor-tourists they knew what they wanted. Motor-tourists wanted more and better roads, and got them because they cost a lot of money and gave employment, and worked in with accommodation interests, and petrol, oil and car sales interests. The Blue Gum Forest and Garawarra Park campaigns made the Department of Lands people realise certain truths about pedestrian tourists: like motor-tourists they knew what they wanted. Motor-tourists wanted more and better roads, and got them because they cost a lot of money and gave employment, and worked in with accommodation interests, and petrol, oil and car sales interests.
-The int--'​3duction ​of touring cars badly knocked the railways system as the use of cars by vacationists increased. Motor-tourists were independent of the railways they were free to go anywhere. They had no compunction about requesting that some overland tracks be turned into roads. They got them. + 
-The railways were glad to cater for pedestrian tourists at weekends and holidays - but this was as far as Government effort went, the hikers, ​bush:​walkers, boy-scouts, girl guides, picnickers reached their destination stations where the amenities and conveniences were less than minimal for many years - not even a nail on which to hang clothes when changing prior to boarding a return train. +The introduction ​of touring cars badly knocked the railways system as the use of cars by vacationists increased. Motor-tourists were independent of the railwaysthey were free to go anywhere. They had no compunction about requesting that some overland tracks be turned into roads. They got them. 
-Outside built-up areas there were no pads for visiting pedestrians or local school children they had to walk, on the roads, at risk. + 
-Pedestrians had to use what they could find. They wanted areas to walk +The railways were glad to cater for pedestrian tourists at weekends and holidays - but this was as far as Government effort went, the hikers, ​bushwalkers, boy-scouts, girl guides, picnickers reached their destination stations where the amenities and conveniences were less than minimal for many years - not even a nail on which to hang clothes when changing prior to boarding a return train. 
-about in, without roads, where all kinds of walkers could get away from cars and roads and see some wildlife. They wanted Garawarra, ​Heathoote ​and Woronora valleys, roadless parts of National Park, Kuring-gai Chase, Kurnell Peninsula, Patonga and Kariong peninsulas, Blue Labyrinth, Couridjah Corridor, etc. + 
-Remember that motor-tourists and pedestrian-tourists both had legal +Outside built-up areas there were no pads for visiting pedestrians or local school childrenthey had to walk, on the roads, at risk.  Pedestrians had to use what they could find. They wanted areas to walk about in, __without roads__, where all kinds of walkers could get away from cars and roads and see some wildlife. They wanted Garawarra, ​Heathcote ​and Woronora valleys, roadless parts of National Park, Kuring-gai Chase, Kurnell Peninsula, Patonga and Kariong peninsulas, Blue Labyrinth, Couridjah Corridor, etc. 
-right to the use of public roads but car drivers made pack-carrying pedestrians stumble along rough gutters, so sensible pedestrians tried + 
-to stay off roads but no authority provided a path for their safety. +Remember that motor-tourists and pedestrian-tourists both had legal right to the use of public roads but car drivers made pack-carrying pedestrians stumble along rough gutters, so sensible pedestrians tried to stay off roads but no authority provided a path for their safety. 
-As pedestrian tourists had no legal right in Crown land, and were there on sufference, they wanted more parks and reserves suitable for  + 
-pedestrians. But the Dept. of Lands had other plans for the same areas in most cases. There is no time now to go into that. +As pedestrian tourists had no legal right in Crown land, and were there on sufference, they wanted more parks and reserves suitable for pedestrians. But the Dept. of Lands had other plans for the same areas in most cases. There is no time now to go into that. 
-The story of roads in National Park could be quite a tale. The Park and railway nearly coincided in time. The Forest Road to Lugarno and Menai and Thos Mitchell'​s South Coast or Illawarra Road across the Woronora at Sabugal crossing and up to Bottle Forest on the new ridge, gave him the line of Illawarra Road to Helendburgh ​and on. When the railway arrived Sutherland, Heathcote and Waterfall came into being. An Army camp for artillery batteries was made on Loftus Heights beside the new road which was made up from Tom Wylys Point Ferry, via Sutherland. Another artillery cap was made on tor of the ridge east of Aualey ​(which became a picnic resort) but a main purpose of the park - an area, for public recreation, was for Army training, particularly artillery. A road was needed to connect the two caoTs. The first was the precursor of the one down to the river. On the other side the road up to the eastern camp was a sort of rough zig zag. The one which goes up to the top of the ridge, called Artillery Hill, which divides at the summit and goes on to WaruMbul ​and Wattamolla was a later ,1 construction,​ about 1908. All the others were really sulky and horse riding tracks. The Lady Carrington Road was the best of them - only intended for sulkies and buggies. It was the motor car which changed it all, beginning with Lady Carrington Road, reformed only to Upper Causeway, to junction with the new Waterfalls Road. The widened road along the river and the motor cars that travelled it seemed to annoy the lyre-birds and wrecked a good deal of their habitat. My knowlege ​of the various roads and tracks began in 1907. + 
-You mentioned the upper length of Lady Carrington Road; it was a track for timber exaction before the Park was formed and there was a +The story of roads in National Park could be quite a tale. The Park and railway nearly coincided in time. The Forest Road to Lugarno and Menai and Thos Mitchell'​s South Coast or Illawarra Road across the Woronora at Sabugal crossing and up to Bottle Forest on the new ridge, gave him the line of Illawarra Road to Helensburgh ​and on. When the railway arrived Sutherland, Heathcote and Waterfall came into being. An Army camp for artillery batteries was made on Loftus Heights beside the new road which was made up from Tom Wylys Point Ferry, via Sutherland. Another artillery cap was made on top of the ridge east of Audley ​(which became a picnic resort) but a main purpose of the park - an area, for public recreation, was for Army training, particularly artillery. A road was needed to connect the two camps. The first was the precursor of the one down to the river. On the other side the road up to the eastern camp was a sort of rough zig zag. The one which goes up to the top of the ridge, called Artillery Hill, which divides at the summit and goes on to Warumbul ​and Wattamolla was a later construction,​ about 1908. All the others were really sulky and horse riding tracks. The Lady Carrington Road was the best of them - only intended for sulkies and buggies. It was the motor car which changed it all, beginning with Lady Carrington Road, reformed only to Upper Causeway, to junction with the new Waterfalls Road. The widened road along the river and the motor cars that travelled it seemed to annoy the lyre-birds and wrecked a good deal of their habitat. My knowledge ​of the various roads and tracks began in 1907. 
-Page 12. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER August, 1977 + 
-big sawmill just south of Upper Causeway, and another a mile or so nearer to Lily-vale. The Park boundary did not lie across the river but followed it for quite a distance, and in this strip and mostly on the western side of the track, the groves of tree-ferns, cabbage palms and other ferns and jungle growth stood between the big turpentines and +You mentioned the upper length of Lady Carrington Road; it was a track for timber exaction before the Park was formed and there was a big sawmill just south of Upper Causeway, and another a mile or so nearer to Lilyvale. The Park boundary did not lie across the river but followed it for quite a distance, and in this strip and mostly on the western side of the track, the groves of tree-ferns, cabbage palms and other ferns and jungle growth stood between the big turpentines and others that probably were centuries old. On the other side of the track which received more sunshine there was much forest oak (casuarina) and flowering ​bushes including purple mint-bush, very aromatic. In the 1933-36 period the Government departments concerned received permission to build the Lady Wakehurst Drive, an auxiliary Princes Highway, remodelled ​McKell ​Avenue (Waterfalls Road and Stevens Drive Garie Road) and generally made over other roads in National ParkConservationists did their best to preserve the scenic cliff track but Bulli Shire Council made a mile of vehicular track from National ​Park to Maynards'​ 
-others that probably were centuries old. On the other side of the track which received more sunshine there was much forest oak (casuarina) and flowaring ​bushes including purple mint-bush, very aromatic. In the +(surrounded by Garawarra Park). At the south end about a mile of the cliff track was taken over by a part of Lady Wakehurst ​Drive. 
-1933-36 period the Government departments concerned received permission + 
-to build the Lade Wakehurst Drive, an auxiliary Princes Highway, remodelled. DicKell ​Avenue (Waterfalls Road and Stevens Drive Garie Road) and generally made over other roads in National ParkConservationists did their best to preserve the scenic cliff trac'​z: ​but Duni Shire Council made a mile of vehicular track from National ​Pan: to Maynardst +The motor-tourist industry, in successive steps, formed motor roads where before were sulky tracks. We tried with other bushwalkers to have the National Park designed into Tourist Development ​Areas and Primitive Areas, on paper of course, but the suggestion did not work.  We thought the trustees wanted to feel free to put new roads where they liked. When the National Parks and Wildlife Service took over it blocked off some of the roads. 
-(surrounded by Garawarra Park). At the south end about a mile of the cliff track was taken over by a part of Lady Wak:​ehurst ​Drive. +
-The motor-tourist industry, in successive steps, formed motor roads where before were sulky tracks. We tried with other bushwalkers to have the National Park designed into Tourist Development ​Ares and Primitive Areas, on paper of course, but the suggestion did not work. +
-We thought the trustees wanted to feel free to put new roads where they +
-liked. When the National Parks and Wildlife Service took over it blocked off some of the roads. +
-* * * * * * * *+
  
 ====THE JULY GENERAL MEETING==== ====THE JULY GENERAL MEETING====
197708.1552747329.txt.gz · Last modified: 2019/03/16 14:42 by vievems