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tyreless
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tyreless
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 A door knock appeal is now in the planning stage for early next year, and as many people as possible are being sought to help in a variety of different capacities. As bushwalkers,​ and users of National Parks, we should readily volunteer our services to such a cause. The opportunity to give voluntary help with almost assured payback in terms of benefit (ie. use of parklands acquired as a direct result of fund raising efforts) is a rare opportunity. It is hoped that as many bushwalkers as possible will lend their help. A door knock appeal is now in the planning stage for early next year, and as many people as possible are being sought to help in a variety of different capacities. As bushwalkers,​ and users of National Parks, we should readily volunteer our services to such a cause. The opportunity to give voluntary help with almost assured payback in terms of benefit (ie. use of parklands acquired as a direct result of fund raising efforts) is a rare opportunity. It is hoped that as many bushwalkers as possible will lend their help.
  
-If you feel you would like to give some of your time in helping such a worthy cause, as a door-knocker, ​orteam ​leader, or in some other capacity, contact Graham Pitkin (telephone 661-3347 at home or 20234 extension 7017 at work) and he will give you some details. Or if you would like to just know more about the Foundation or the appeal, I am sure that Graham would be more than happy to help.+If you feel you would like to give some of your time in helping such a worthy cause, as a door-knocker, ​or team leader, or in some other capacity, contact Graham Pitkin (telephone 661-3347 at home or 20234 extension 7017 at work) and he will give you some details. Or if you would like to just know more about the Foundation or the appeal, I am sure that Graham would be more than happy to help.
  
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 Namche Bazaar is an interesting and colourful sight on market day (every Saturday) when "​hawker-merchants"​ came from miles around to sell their wares, mostly grains - rice, dal, millet and corn and several unknowns. Here you hear them chanting sing-song the number of measures they have ladled out, "Ek, ek, ek; dui, dui, dui; tin, tin, tin; chaar, chaar, chaar."​ When you multiply this by some 100 to 150 chanters and talkers all packed into 20 square yards it amounts to quite a din. Namche Bazaar is an interesting and colourful sight on market day (every Saturday) when "​hawker-merchants"​ came from miles around to sell their wares, mostly grains - rice, dal, millet and corn and several unknowns. Here you hear them chanting sing-song the number of measures they have ladled out, "Ek, ek, ek; dui, dui, dui; tin, tin, tin; chaar, chaar, chaar."​ When you multiply this by some 100 to 150 chanters and talkers all packed into 20 square yards it amounts to quite a din.
  
-Leaving Namche at about midday meant a hard fast walk, mostly downhill, to Lukla which we hoped to make before dark. About half an hour or so out of Lukla and about the same before dark I made what should have been a short side trip to return a pair of borrowed snow goggles (another story) and so commeneed ​my second episode of shame.+Leaving Namche at about midday meant a hard fast walk, mostly downhill, to Lukla which we hoped to make before dark. About half an hour or so out of Lukla and about the same before dark I made what should have been a short side trip to return a pair of borrowed snow goggles (another story) and so commenced ​my second episode of shame.
  
 After having a cup of tea, a yarn and returning the goggles, I set out to return to the trail and push on to Lukla. The track, which had been easy to follow in the snow a week or so before, was now not so easy, difficulty compounded by darkness, a torch on the blink and the vanished snow. I found the trail, followed it to a familiar bridge and started to climb, but fatigue had clouded perception and I decided I was on the wrong trail, returned to the bridge, floundered round for half an hour, and went to seek help at some friendly-looking lights half a mile below me. After having a cup of tea, a yarn and returning the goggles, I set out to return to the trail and push on to Lukla. The track, which had been easy to follow in the snow a week or so before, was now not so easy, difficulty compounded by darkness, a torch on the blink and the vanished snow. I found the trail, followed it to a familiar bridge and started to climb, but fatigue had clouded perception and I decided I was on the wrong trail, returned to the bridge, floundered round for half an hour, and went to seek help at some friendly-looking lights half a mile below me.
  
-Mine host was having his evening meal and when I explained my predicament he said, "I show you." I was invited to eat which I did gladly. Offer of payment was refused. Several times during the next two hours he mentioned "​showing me" or "​getting a boy to show me" or saying I should stay the night. Finally he said "​Came,"​ led me to a hutch, knocked up the occupants and yakked to a boy and a man who appeared. ​Eventeally, "He take you to Lukla for 15 rupees."​ Not on your life!" I told him and stomped off. "​Twelve rupees,"​ said mine host. "​No!"​ - "I show you," from mine host. He led me about 40 yards, gestured into the dark and said, "That way." And so I stumbled off very angry end very disgruntled.+Mine host was having his evening meal and when I explained my predicament he said, "I show you." I was invited to eat which I did gladly. Offer of payment was refused. Several times during the next two hours he mentioned "​showing me" or "​getting a boy to show me" or saying I should stay the night. Finally he said "​Came,"​ led me to a hutch, knocked up the occupants and yakked to a boy and a man who appeared. ​Eventually, "He take you to Lukla for 15 rupees."​ Not on your life!" I told him and stomped off. "​Twelve rupees,"​ said mine host. "​No!"​ - "I show you," from mine host. He led me about 40 yards, gestured into the dark and said, "That way." And so I stumbled off very angry end very disgruntled.
  
-Scrambling up a steep Nepalese hillside in the dark and bitter cold was one thing, the thought of spending the night out another. I found a '​flat',​ bedded down, ate a packet of biscuits, drank some water and got my head down about 9.30 p.m. At 3.00 a.m. snow spattering on my face woke me. I snuggled down. Then, horor of horrors, it started to rain. Hurried transfer of larger groundsheet to cover me (luckily I had two) and settled down to "sweat it out" till morning.+Scrambling up a steep Nepalese hillside in the dark and bitter cold was one thing, the thought of spending the night out another. I found a '​flat',​ bedded down, ate a packet of biscuits, drank some water and got my head down about 9.30 p.m. At 3.00 a.m. snow spattering on my face woke me. I snuggled down. Then, horror ​of horrors, it started to rain. Hurried transfer of larger groundsheet to cover me (luckily I had two) and settled down to "sweat it out" till morning.
  
 Dawn, the rain had stopped, and not too wet and miserable, I packed. In ten minutes I found the trail. In another 10/15 I was to the spot where I had turned back the previous evening. In another 5 minutes I topped a rise, and there was the cluster of houses outside Lukla air strip, and Lin coming towards me. One thing, Nepalese hospitality should not be judged by this isolated incident. Dawn, the rain had stopped, and not too wet and miserable, I packed. In ten minutes I found the trail. In another 10/15 I was to the spot where I had turned back the previous evening. In another 5 minutes I topped a rise, and there was the cluster of houses outside Lukla air strip, and Lin coming towards me. One thing, Nepalese hospitality should not be judged by this isolated incident.
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 Kirkabara cocked his head and shrugged his shoulders in his inimitable way, as much as to say, "​Anyone can make a mistake1"​ So when we reached a little village 2000' after another village called Phedi and were told, "Quick way Thodung,"​ by another gesturing Nepali, our enthusiasm was conspicuous by its absence. We accepted the challenge, however. Kirkabara cocked his head and shrugged his shoulders in his inimitable way, as much as to say, "​Anyone can make a mistake1"​ So when we reached a little village 2000' after another village called Phedi and were told, "Quick way Thodung,"​ by another gesturing Nepali, our enthusiasm was conspicuous by its absence. We accepted the challenge, however.
  
-Some sweating and scratched two hours later we made Thodung (The Cheese Factory). Surely it had to be a short cut. Was it not the hypotenuse of a triangular trail? Two other things (minor of course) confirmed the fact. The trail was almost non-existant ​and it was 3000' straight up.+Some sweating and scratched two hours later we made Thodung (The Cheese Factory). Surely it had to be a short cut. Was it not the hypotenuse of a triangular trail? Two other things (minor of course) confirmed the fact. The trail was almost non-existent ​and it was 3000' straight up.
  
 Before reaching Phedi it was hard to have a pull, for pulls were scarce - the Kukra must have been on strike. Kukra is a hook, and "​phul"​ means "egg or seed". Eggs assume a position of importance on the dietary scale in Nepal because of the protein deficient diet. Meat cannot be considered, for your appetite for meat diminishes in proportion to the inverse square of the number of times you see a "​butcher'​s"​ shop. But with Lin, eggs almost became an obsession. Can you envisage her delight when after passing through an area of egg drought we got to the Phedi area where people rushed up to you in the oddest places, bearing their globular gifts in all sorts of carrying media, calling as they came, "Phul, phul?" And I might add at a price which suited the pocket. The look on Lin's face was heaven itself. Before reaching Phedi it was hard to have a pull, for pulls were scarce - the Kukra must have been on strike. Kukra is a hook, and "​phul"​ means "egg or seed". Eggs assume a position of importance on the dietary scale in Nepal because of the protein deficient diet. Meat cannot be considered, for your appetite for meat diminishes in proportion to the inverse square of the number of times you see a "​butcher'​s"​ shop. But with Lin, eggs almost became an obsession. Can you envisage her delight when after passing through an area of egg drought we got to the Phedi area where people rushed up to you in the oddest places, bearing their globular gifts in all sorts of carrying media, calling as they came, "Phul, phul?" And I might add at a price which suited the pocket. The look on Lin's face was heaven itself.
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 It reminded me of the days of rationing during World War II when I tried to purchase some sugar; half a kilo to be exact. First I had to go to the police station where an official coupon was filled out and stamped. And could you purchase the precious kg in Saleri? Certainly not. You had to take a half hour's walk to Daphu where after production of the official document, much scrutiny and the payment of Rs 3 (25 c) the cheenee was yours. It reminded me of the days of rationing during World War II when I tried to purchase some sugar; half a kilo to be exact. First I had to go to the police station where an official coupon was filled out and stamped. And could you purchase the precious kg in Saleri? Certainly not. You had to take a half hour's walk to Daphu where after production of the official document, much scrutiny and the payment of Rs 3 (25 c) the cheenee was yours.
  
-A side excursion was made from Saleri to Chailsa, a Tibetan village where there are rooms and rooms of looms. For here they manufacture from Nepalese sheep'​s wool the most gorgeous carpets of many designs and colours. All these "​factories"​ are owned and run by a company centred in Kathmandu. On the walls, in several places, were typed schedules setting out in meticulous detail the rates per so many threads in each design. At any moment I expected to hear a whistle blast and the cry "​Everybody out!" Workers numbering from 2 to 8 sat at a loom "​knotting"​ and singing, by all appearancee ​happily, as they worked. Others we saw trimming the pile and generally finishing off the completed carpets. We made a rough estimate of earnings and from memory it was about Rs 10-15 per day. A meal was provided during the day. About $A 1 a day. Makes you think, doesn'​t it?+A side excursion was made from Saleri to Chailsa, a Tibetan village where there are rooms and rooms of looms. For here they manufacture from Nepalese sheep'​s wool the most gorgeous carpets of many designs and colours. All these "​factories"​ are owned and run by a company centred in Kathmandu. On the walls, in several places, were typed schedules setting out in meticulous detail the rates per so many threads in each design. At any moment I expected to hear a whistle blast and the cry "​Everybody out!" Workers numbering from 2 to 8 sat at a loom "​knotting"​ and singing, by all appearances ​happily, as they worked. Others we saw trimming the pile and generally finishing off the completed carpets. We made a rough estimate of earnings and from memory it was about Rs 10-15 per day. A meal was provided during the day. About $A 1 a day. Makes you think, doesn'​t it?
  
-Further down the track we made another side excursion to Thodung, commonly referred to as the "​Cheese Factory"​ and previously mentioned. This has to be either a colessal ​Nepalese (Sherpa) or Swiss joke or both, for the "​Factory"​ is set on a hill halfway between Lamsangu and Lukla, 10,000 above sea level, 1,000 ft. above and off the main trail and not a cow in sight. However it was a gastronomic delight. The potato chips, bread rolls and butter - not to mention cheese - after the consistent diet of eggs and dalbhal (rice and dal) was manna indeed.+Further down the track we made another side excursion to Thodung, commonly referred to as the "​Cheese Factory"​ and previously mentioned. This has to be either a colossal ​Nepalese (Sherpa) or Swiss joke or both, for the "​Factory"​ is set on a hill halfway between Lamsangu and Lukla, 10,000 above sea level, 1,000 ft. above and off the main trail and not a cow in sight. However it was a gastronomic delight. The potato chips, bread rolls and butter - not to mention cheese - after the consistent diet of eggs and dalbhal (rice and dal) was manna indeed.
  
 At long last we were on the down hill run to Lamsangu. Run it was for when we could at last look down on Lamsangu there was the 9.00 a.m. bus. The driver blew his horn while I was still 2 or 300 yds. away. We got there 'by the skin of our teeth' and boarded breathlessly. The bus, crammed after a few pick-ups, coughed, wheezed, waggled and ground on its 6 hour journey rounded off by an hour-long climb up the long hill outside Kathmandu. At long last we were on the down hill run to Lamsangu. Run it was for when we could at last look down on Lamsangu there was the 9.00 a.m. bus. The driver blew his horn while I was still 2 or 300 yds. away. We got there 'by the skin of our teeth' and boarded breathlessly. The bus, crammed after a few pick-ups, coughed, wheezed, waggled and ground on its 6 hour journey rounded off by an hour-long climb up the long hill outside Kathmandu.
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 By way of overture to the meeting some films were screened: as your reporter arrived just as one offering, "​Escarpment",​ commenced, he was unable to say whether the projectionists were having trouble with the reproduction of the sound track, or whether the grunts, groans and squeaks were the real McCoy didgeridoo accompaniment to a slow-moving but delightfully photographed film of an inland plateau and its wild life. At all events, it was not "​R"​ class fare, not even naked aborigines being featured. By way of overture to the meeting some films were screened: as your reporter arrived just as one offering, "​Escarpment",​ commenced, he was unable to say whether the projectionists were having trouble with the reproduction of the sound track, or whether the grunts, groans and squeaks were the real McCoy didgeridoo accompaniment to a slow-moving but delightfully photographed film of an inland plateau and its wild life. At all events, it was not "​R"​ class fare, not even naked aborigines being featured.
  
-The meeting took off about 8.30 with a welcome to new member Judy Storer, and quite a deal of the discourse arose from the minutes, when we got down to discussing the 50th Anniversary events as a "​matter arising"​. For the projected bush reunion, several places were suggested, including a hiring for the weekend of the Scout Camp at Pennant Hills. Others, including several quite senior members, favoured a "​bushier"​ setting, and sites in Megalong Valley were put forward. Finally we did get a concrete motion, proposed by Barry Wallace, that Pennant Hills be adopted, so ensurieg ​that the really early members who wished to attend would not feel excluded: this was adopted, and we turned to the gustatory pleasures envisaged probably for the Friday night before the reunion.+The meeting took off about 8.30 with a welcome to new member Judy Storer, and quite a deal of the discourse arose from the minutes, when we got down to discussing the 50th Anniversary events as a "​matter arising"​. For the projected bush reunion, several places were suggested, including a hiring for the weekend of the Scout Camp at Pennant Hills. Others, including several quite senior members, favoured a "​bushier"​ setting, and sites in Megalong Valley were put forward. Finally we did get a concrete motion, proposed by Barry Wallace, that Pennant Hills be adopted, so ensuring ​that the really early members who wished to attend would not feel excluded: this was adopted, and we turned to the gustatory pleasures envisaged probably for the Friday night before the reunion.
  
 After very little preamble we had Bob Hodgson naming and later moving that the dinner be held at the Royal Prince Alfred Yacht Club at Newport. This drew a mixed reception, with some averring it was too remote, particularly for south-elders who would need to drive home across the city at a late hour and possibly after some drinking, while others applauded the attractive setting and did not view the distance to travel as excessive. Prices in the order of $10.00 per head were mentioned and it was pointed out that it would be necessary to book for a guaranteed number. Owen Marks, arriving belatedly and learning the proposed site was Newport, exclaimed "​madness",​ and the motion was lost after Barry Wallace foreshadowed a further motion that the question be explored in greater depth and resolved in November. After very little preamble we had Bob Hodgson naming and later moving that the dinner be held at the Royal Prince Alfred Yacht Club at Newport. This drew a mixed reception, with some averring it was too remote, particularly for south-elders who would need to drive home across the city at a late hour and possibly after some drinking, while others applauded the attractive setting and did not view the distance to travel as excessive. Prices in the order of $10.00 per head were mentioned and it was pointed out that it would be necessary to book for a guaranteed number. Owen Marks, arriving belatedly and learning the proposed site was Newport, exclaimed "​madness",​ and the motion was lost after Barry Wallace foreshadowed a further motion that the question be explored in greater depth and resolved in November.
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 The Treasurer'​s statement showed that income and expenditure would have been almost "​line-ball"​ in September if it had not been for receipt of compensation from the Water Board for its inundation of the fringe of Coolana: as it is, our balance of revenue was $2487 at the close of the month. The Treasurer'​s statement showed that income and expenditure would have been almost "​line-ball"​ in September if it had not been for receipt of compensation from the Water Board for its inundation of the fringe of Coolana: as it is, our balance of revenue was $2487 at the close of the month.
  
-Federation Report included a number of items, but as the newsletter now accompanies the magazine it seems futile to repeat them in the meeting notes unless we debate any special issue. We moved on to the usual report of walks activities, commencing after one false start with the doings on 10-12 September weekend, when the overnight trip was postponed for one week. It was recorded that a total of about 45 gathered for Dungulla - S.B.W. meet at Kuring-gai Wildflower Garden, but only some 8 to 10 could be regarded as curently ​walking S.B.W. members. Some of the discussion focussed on the 50th Anniversary proposals, but clearly nothing could really be settled. On Sunday 11th, David Ingram had 23 people out to Woronora Trig and into Heathcote Creek, viewing some good bushflowers and finding the vegetation quite grown up along Myuna Creek.+Federation Report included a number of items, but as the newsletter now accompanies the magazine it seems futile to repeat them in the meeting notes unless we debate any special issue. We moved on to the usual report of walks activities, commencing after one false start with the doings on 10-12 September weekend, when the overnight trip was postponed for one week. It was recorded that a total of about 45 gathered for Dungulla - S.B.W. meet at Kuring-gai Wildflower Garden, but only some 8 to 10 could be regarded as currently ​walking S.B.W. members. Some of the discussion focussed on the 50th Anniversary proposals, but clearly nothing could really be settled. On Sunday 11th, David Ingram had 23 people out to Woronora Trig and into Heathcote Creek, viewing some good bushflowers and finding the vegetation quite grown up along Myuna Creek.
  
 On 17-19 SepteMber, Peter Harris and one other tackled the deferred jaunt in the Banshee State Forest and evidently had a fairly energetic time, not reaching the car till 11.0 p.m. Sunday. There were 9 people at David Cotton'​s base camp near Capertee, with day walks to the mining ruins and into the hills. Two day walks on the 19th each brought out 18 folk, with Victor Lewin recording a pleasant day on the Blackheath/​Blue Gum country, while John Noble commented in a written report that there was some roughish, bushy going in places along Tunk's Creek out from Hornsby. On 17-19 SepteMber, Peter Harris and one other tackled the deferred jaunt in the Banshee State Forest and evidently had a fairly energetic time, not reaching the car till 11.0 p.m. Sunday. There were 9 people at David Cotton'​s base camp near Capertee, with day walks to the mining ruins and into the hills. Two day walks on the 19th each brought out 18 folk, with Victor Lewin recording a pleasant day on the Blackheath/​Blue Gum country, while John Noble commented in a written report that there was some roughish, bushy going in places along Tunk's Creek out from Hornsby.
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 Over the October holiday weekend there was the somewhat unusual arrangement of two base camps with day walks, and two individual walks of one day's duration, without base camp. The first overnight trip was Victor Lewin'​s based on Yadboro, attended by 10 people, and approached by a somewhat muddy slippery road on the Friday night. Saturday saw a day jaunt to Davidson Head and Pigeon House and the Sunday climb to The Castle was deferred until Monday owing to indifferent weather. At Woodhill Gap Helen Gray's base camp party, numbering up to 30, ate, talked, slept and fed numerous leeches: it was recorded as a very sociable weekend, but some walking was done each day. Of the day walks on Sunday, Margaret Reid's party was 11 in strength and weather in the lower Blue Mountains was fair, despite rain in Sydney; there were waratahs on display. Meryl Watman'​s team was four - plus one who caught up in time for the train home, and there was rain during the morning out from Waterfall. Over the October holiday weekend there was the somewhat unusual arrangement of two base camps with day walks, and two individual walks of one day's duration, without base camp. The first overnight trip was Victor Lewin'​s based on Yadboro, attended by 10 people, and approached by a somewhat muddy slippery road on the Friday night. Saturday saw a day jaunt to Davidson Head and Pigeon House and the Sunday climb to The Castle was deferred until Monday owing to indifferent weather. At Woodhill Gap Helen Gray's base camp party, numbering up to 30, ate, talked, slept and fed numerous leeches: it was recorded as a very sociable weekend, but some walking was done each day. Of the day walks on Sunday, Margaret Reid's party was 11 in strength and weather in the lower Blue Mountains was fair, despite rain in Sydney; there were waratahs on display. Meryl Watman'​s team was four - plus one who caught up in time for the train home, and there was rain during the morning out from Waterfall.
  
-The final weekend reported, October 9/10, included John Fox's Narrow Neck/​Splendour Rock trip, nine people present. Saturday night'​s camp was at the Mobbs Sliamp ​cave in company with members of the Kameruka Club who were airing a new extensive song book. On the way back the old "​Wallaby trail" pass at Clear Hill was followed instead of the iron spikes. Rod Peter'​s Bungonia jaunt was cancelled, and although it was believed to have gone as planned, no news was available of Barry Zieren'​s West Head day walk.+The final weekend reported, October 9/10, included John Fox's Narrow Neck/​Splendour Rock trip, nine people present. Saturday night'​s camp was at the Mobbs Swamp cave in company with members of the Kameruka Club who were airing a new extensive song book. On the way back the old "​Wallaby trail" pass at Clear Hill was followed instead of the iron spikes. Rod Peter'​s Bungonia jaunt was cancelled, and although it was believed to have gone as planned, no news was available of Barry Zieren'​s West Head day walk.
  
 A call for general business produced no matters, and with the usual announcements about coming attractions,​ the meeting folded up quietly at 9.30 p.m. A call for general business produced no matters, and with the usual announcements about coming attractions,​ the meeting folded up quietly at 9.30 p.m.
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   - Enough time and energy left to work before darkness and hypothermia set in - **don'​t start too late**."​   - Enough time and energy left to work before darkness and hypothermia set in - **don'​t start too late**."​
   ​   ​
-You have a choice of what you might like te build: Snow Bivouac, Igloo or Snow Cave.+You have a choice of what you might like to build: Snow Bivouac, Igloo or Snow Cave.
  
 ===Snow Bivouac.=== ===Snow Bivouac.===
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   - Plant spare skiis and stocks to prevent people walking on roof.   - Plant spare skiis and stocks to prevent people walking on roof.
  
-One other hazard of spending time on the snow and rarely ​mentioted ​by by the experts, is the osmetic, but not quite metamorphosis,​ effect that takes plate as people come off the snow and return home. From my participant observations and oun experiences this affects people differently. Some of the types of behaviour are -+One other hazard of spending time on the snow and rarely ​mentioned ​by by the experts, is the osmetic, but not quite metamorphosis,​ effect that takes plate as people come off the snow and return home. From my participant observations and our experiences this affects people differently. Some of the types of behaviour are -
  
   * Quarrel   * Quarrel
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 While a small search party scouted the immediate vicinity, the remainder of the party returned to the cars, where Roger was found playing quite happily with his cousins. While a small search party scouted the immediate vicinity, the remainder of the party returned to the cars, where Roger was found playing quite happily with his cousins.
  
-At this juncture some of us became involved in an exercise in training a horse to enter and leave a horse float. So with much pushing and pulling, tugging and shoving the horse was finally encouraged to enter and leave the horse float. After a few ins and outs the horse seemed to be enjoying herself as much as her temporary trainers. Whilst this small diversion was beine attended to Roger suffered his punishment by returning to the creek to round up his small search party.+At this juncture some of us became involved in an exercise in training a horse to enter and leave a horse float. So with much pushing and pulling, tugging and shoving the horse was finally encouraged to enter and leave the horse float. After a few ins and outs the horse seemed to be enjoying herself as much as her temporary trainers. Whilst this small diversion was being attended to Roger suffered his punishment by returning to the creek to round up his small search party.
  
 Most people had quite an enjoyable day. Due to the rather strange finale to our walk it is not known whether anyone managed to inspect the magnificent cactus display at the farm where we finished our walk. Most people had quite an enjoyable day. Due to the rather strange finale to our walk it is not known whether anyone managed to inspect the magnificent cactus display at the farm where we finished our walk.
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 The first weekend of the month boasts Peter Miller'​s trip in Ku-Ring-Gai Chase from the Basin to America Bay on Sunday 5th. ON the following Sunday Jim Brown leads from Waterfall to Heathcote via Heathcote Creek and Lake Eckersley. Back to Ku-Ring-Gai Chase on Sunday 19th, where Esme Biddulph is to lead from West Head to Flint and Steel Bay, Hungry Head, Mount Bluff and Whitehorse Bay, with an optional extension to Chatswood for Devonshire tea at Esme's home. On the Christmas weekend, Errol Sheedy leads from Heathcote to Waterfall via Goonderra Brook, Karloo Pool, Kangaroo Creek, Head of Navigation, Robertson Knoll Uloola Falls and Waratah Track, but be careful - this trip is on Monday 27th. The first weekend of the month boasts Peter Miller'​s trip in Ku-Ring-Gai Chase from the Basin to America Bay on Sunday 5th. ON the following Sunday Jim Brown leads from Waterfall to Heathcote via Heathcote Creek and Lake Eckersley. Back to Ku-Ring-Gai Chase on Sunday 19th, where Esme Biddulph is to lead from West Head to Flint and Steel Bay, Hungry Head, Mount Bluff and Whitehorse Bay, with an optional extension to Chatswood for Devonshire tea at Esme's home. On the Christmas weekend, Errol Sheedy leads from Heathcote to Waterfall via Goonderra Brook, Karloo Pool, Kangaroo Creek, Head of Navigation, Robertson Knoll Uloola Falls and Waratah Track, but be careful - this trip is on Monday 27th.
  
-===Lilo ​Trik.===+===Lilo ​Trip.===
  
 Finally, for the enthusiast: get wet With Peter Harris. Sunday 19th sees his lilo trip down the Wollongambe Canyon. Finally, for the enthusiast: get wet With Peter Harris. Sunday 19th sees his lilo trip down the Wollongambe Canyon.
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 ====S.B.W. Epicurians.==== ====S.B.W. Epicurians.====
  
-The number of bushwalkers partaking of the montiy ​dinner before general meetings is steadily growing so that now there is quite a big group of monthly diners. Everyone of course is welcome. Next dinner, on Uednesday ​5th. December will be at a restaurant called Pancakes On The Rocks which is in Hickson Road Sydney (as the name implies it's in the Rocks area close to George Street North). Just roll along. ​ Everyone should meet at 6 p.m. __upstairs__.+The number of bushwalkers partaking of the monthly ​dinner before general meetings is steadily growing so that now there is quite a big group of monthly diners. Everyone of course is welcome. Next dinner, on Wednesday ​5th. December will be at a restaurant called Pancakes On The Rocks which is in Hickson Road Sydney (as the name implies it's in the Rocks area close to George Street North). Just roll along. ​ Everyone should meet at 6 p.m. __upstairs__.
  
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197611.txt ยท Last modified: 2016/09/08 05:25 by tyreless