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197610 [2016/09/06 23:54]
tyreless
197610 [2016/09/07 00:00] (current)
tyreless
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 Every ten miles or so we would come across giant colonies of flying foxes hanging upside down in the paperbarks. As we went by they would leave their roost and turn the sky black and settle in another tree about half a mile further down. Sometimes we would see the same group four or five times before they decided to head back upstream. Bird life was very good - cockatoos, galahs, cranes, ibises, spoonbills, eagles, pelicans, ducks, waterhens, etc, and Marco spent a lot of his time until his camera was wrecked at the St. George weir, perched on the front of the canoe taking pictures. Every now and again we would stop at a homestead and find out where we were and often they would feed us up with lots of goodies. Once we even had a fortnight'​s supply of fruit, which was much appreciated. Every ten miles or so we would come across giant colonies of flying foxes hanging upside down in the paperbarks. As we went by they would leave their roost and turn the sky black and settle in another tree about half a mile further down. Sometimes we would see the same group four or five times before they decided to head back upstream. Bird life was very good - cockatoos, galahs, cranes, ibises, spoonbills, eagles, pelicans, ducks, waterhens, etc, and Marco spent a lot of his time until his camera was wrecked at the St. George weir, perched on the front of the canoe taking pictures. Every now and again we would stop at a homestead and find out where we were and often they would feed us up with lots of goodies. Once we even had a fortnight'​s supply of fruit, which was much appreciated.
  
-One day we found an echnidna ​swimming across the river. He was travelling very slowly so we decided to take him in. That night I heard a scratching at the canoe. I wondered what it was and then I realised I hadn't let the echidna out. I got out of my mosquito-proof tent and went over and with a paddle tried to get him out of the canoe. Meanwhile I was having trouble staying on the ground as the mosquitoes were just about carrying me up into the sky. The echidna wedged himself under the seat and I had lost three litres of blood so I decided he could stay there until the morning and went back to bed. Next morning I had to sink the canoe before I could get him out.+One day we found an echidna ​swimming across the river. He was travelling very slowly so we decided to take him in. That night I heard a scratching at the canoe. I wondered what it was and then I realised I hadn't let the echidna out. I got out of my mosquito-proof tent and went over and with a paddle tried to get him out of the canoe. Meanwhile I was having trouble staying on the ground as the mosquitoes were just about carrying me up into the sky. The echidna wedged himself under the seat and I had lost three litres of blood so I decided he could stay there until the morning and went back to bed. Next morning I had to sink the canoe before I could get him out.
  
 This country is very flat, whereas the country up till now was not so flat. We had been used to the river rising about 1 ft. overnight, so when we were looking for a campsite we wanted something at least one or two feet above the river level. We travelled for miles and miles and the highest bit of land was only 6 inches above river level, so well into the night we decided 6 inches would just have to do. It turned out quite O.K. as the river now was spreading out and not up; the locals reckoned a 12 ft. rise at St. George would only cause a 3 or 4 inch rise where they were. This country is very flat, whereas the country up till now was not so flat. We had been used to the river rising about 1 ft. overnight, so when we were looking for a campsite we wanted something at least one or two feet above the river level. We travelled for miles and miles and the highest bit of land was only 6 inches above river level, so well into the night we decided 6 inches would just have to do. It turned out quite O.K. as the river now was spreading out and not up; the locals reckoned a 12 ft. rise at St. George would only cause a 3 or 4 inch rise where they were.
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 __7 p.m. sharp__ __7 p.m. sharp__
  
-All you dancers who enjoyed the Scottish Folk Dancing evening in September (and that was everyone) - we offer you one hour's worth of folk dancing per favour of the Kameruka Club (Brydon Allen is the experienced ​mastro ​- he's got the goods).+All you dancers who enjoyed the Scottish Folk Dancing evening in September (and that was everyone) - we offer you one hour's worth of folk dancing per favour of the Kameruka Club (Brydon Allen is the experienced ​maestro ​- he's got the goods).
  
 Come and get the blood coursing in your veins before sitting down to a couple of hours' earbash at the General Meeting. This is an experiment. If you like it we can make it a regular thing. Get-togethers with other clubs are to be encouraged. Be there! Come and get the blood coursing in your veins before sitting down to a couple of hours' earbash at the General Meeting. This is an experiment. If you like it we can make it a regular thing. Get-togethers with other clubs are to be encouraged. Be there!
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 In "​Correspondence"​ we heard that the transfer of property to provide an easement for an electricity line across a section of Coolana had been signed by the Trustees and was now going to the Solicitor. The Treasurer'​s account showed our bread-and-butter funds to be $1784 at the close of August. In "​Correspondence"​ we heard that the transfer of property to provide an easement for an electricity line across a section of Coolana had been signed by the Trustees and was now going to the Solicitor. The Treasurer'​s account showed our bread-and-butter funds to be $1784 at the close of August.
  
-No doubt the matters mentioned in the Federation report will have been covered by the bulletin which accompanied the September magazine, but there was one question which arose from an advice that the people now re-developing Yerranderie were asking for more direct road access - probably via Burragorang. We debated this and concluded we should tell Fedarmtion ​we were opposed to construction of a new road, or the opening to general traffic of the Water Board'​s access route. Alex Colley remarked on revived interest in the Greater Blue Mountains National Park project, with various bodies urging establishment of reserves around Bindook, on the Nattai Tableland, and the N.P.A. seeking the region north of the Colo River. Peter Scandrett commented on growing interest in bush parklands by the National Trust.+No doubt the matters mentioned in the Federation report will have been covered by the bulletin which accompanied the September magazine, but there was one question which arose from an advice that the people now re-developing Yerranderie were asking for more direct road access - probably via Burragorang. We debated this and concluded we should tell Federation ​we were opposed to construction of a new road, or the opening to general traffic of the Water Board'​s access route. Alex Colley remarked on revived interest in the Greater Blue Mountains National Park project, with various bodies urging establishment of reserves around Bindook, on the Nattai Tableland, and the N.P.A. seeking the region north of the Colo River. Peter Scandrett commented on growing interest in bush parklands by the National Trust.
  
 We now pushed on to walking activities, with John Redfern reporting on Tony Denham'​s Myall Lakes trip of August 13-15: what with bad weather and one car party which didn't reach the walking ground, things were not good and the trip was abandoned on Saturday afternoon. Alastair Battye'​s Megalong journey went generally as planned, but one member suffered an injury and two others returned with him: the depleted team went on, arriving back to the cars quite late on Sunday night. We now pushed on to walking activities, with John Redfern reporting on Tony Denham'​s Myall Lakes trip of August 13-15: what with bad weather and one car party which didn't reach the walking ground, things were not good and the trip was abandoned on Saturday afternoon. Alastair Battye'​s Megalong journey went generally as planned, but one member suffered an injury and two others returned with him: the depleted team went on, arriving back to the cars quite late on Sunday night.
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 '​Eidex'​ hooded oilskin zip front parkas, considered by experienced walkers to be an indispensible item of their gear. Weight 1 lb 7ozs. Improved model made to Paddy'​s specifications. All sizes. '​Eidex'​ hooded oilskin zip front parkas, considered by experienced walkers to be an indispensible item of their gear. Weight 1 lb 7ozs. Improved model made to Paddy'​s specifications. All sizes.
  
-Everything for the 'well dressed'​ bushwalker... heavy wool shirts, wind ackets, duvets, overpants, string singlets, bush hats, webbing belts etc.+Everything for the 'well dressed'​ bushwalker... heavy wool shirts, wind jackets, duvets, overpants, string singlets, bush hats, webbing belts etc.
  
 ===Bunyip rucksack.=== ===Bunyip rucksack.===
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-=====Emotinoal ​Conservationists.=====+=====Emotionalist ​Conservationists.=====
  
 by Marie B. Byles. by Marie B. Byles.
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 In the case that the editor mentioned, the offenders were trail bike riders who are believed to have tied bushes to their vehicles, set them on fire, and dashed through the disused tunnels thereby destroying the exquisitely beautiful glow worms. They were doubtlessly perfectly pleasant lads, but they were considering their own fun regardless both of the needs of others and the needs of nature. In other words, it was their own self interests that guided their activities - just a lark, why not? In the case that the editor mentioned, the offenders were trail bike riders who are believed to have tied bushes to their vehicles, set them on fire, and dashed through the disused tunnels thereby destroying the exquisitely beautiful glow worms. They were doubtlessly perfectly pleasant lads, but they were considering their own fun regardless both of the needs of others and the needs of nature. In other words, it was their own self interests that guided their activities - just a lark, why not?
  
-I like to think that bushwalkers,​ who were first among the conservationists following Myles Dunphy (the father of Mylo), would never do such a dastardly thing as those trail bike riders. But are we really any better, when we follow our own self interests regardless of the interests of nature and of other peole?+I like to think that bushwalkers,​ who were first among the conservationists following Myles Dunphy (the father of Mylo), would never do such a dastardly thing as those trail bike riders. But are we really any better, when we follow our own self interests regardless of the interests of nature and of other people?
  
-When there was a proposal to take a road along Narrow Necks the bushwalkers to whom I talked about it, remarked, "Good oh! We can then get out to the Gangerangs (or whatever their pet objective) in a short week end." They were oblivious of the superb beauty of the Narrow ​Nedks and the views that the cars rushing through would never reveal. They cared nothing that this area provided the best bushwalking country within easy reach of the railway; they knew nothing of the tourist type of bushwalker who '​adores walking'​ nor of the numerous children who enjoy it.+When there was a proposal to take a road along Narrow Necks the bushwalkers to whom I talked about it, remarked, "Good oh! We can then get out to the Gangerangs (or whatever their pet objective) in a short week end." They were oblivious of the superb beauty of the Narrow ​Necks and the views that the cars rushing through would never reveal. They cared nothing that this area provided the best bushwalking country within easy reach of the railway; they knew nothing of the tourist type of bushwalker who '​adores walking'​ nor of the numerous children who enjoy it.
  
 If we bushwalkers are seeking only our own selfish pleasures regardless of others and of the well being of nature, are we any better than those trail motor cyclists who were merely having a good lark? If we bushwalkers are seeking only our own selfish pleasures regardless of others and of the well being of nature, are we any better than those trail motor cyclists who were merely having a good lark?
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 It was indeed a pleasant change to see the difference in culture between the Sherpa people and Gurung people, the most striking difference is the construction of dwellings. Sherpa houses are chiefly made of disorderly stones or mud, with either nonconforming slate or bamboo as roofing material, whilst Gurung houses are more neat, comprising walls chiefly made of mud, and either thatched or neat slate roofs. The Gurung people are less outgoing by nature than the Sherpas, and their mode of dress is more stereotyped. It was indeed a pleasant change to see the difference in culture between the Sherpa people and Gurung people, the most striking difference is the construction of dwellings. Sherpa houses are chiefly made of disorderly stones or mud, with either nonconforming slate or bamboo as roofing material, whilst Gurung houses are more neat, comprising walls chiefly made of mud, and either thatched or neat slate roofs. The Gurung people are less outgoing by nature than the Sherpas, and their mode of dress is more stereotyped.
  
-At Henja we pitched the tent in the river bed. Having been in many similar, embarrassing situations like this one before, I was well awre of the possilility ​of rain and flood. Suffice to say, nature did not spoil my unbroken record, and early morning saw me floating, tent and pack in hand, through flood waters to high ground in the form of a leaking tea house. It was the only house that I have ever been in where full waterproof gear and umbrella were needed to keep dry.+At Henja we pitched the tent in the river bed. Having been in many similar, embarrassing situations like this one before, I was well aware of the possibility ​of rain and flood. Suffice to say, nature did not spoil my unbroken record, and early morning saw me floating, tent and pack in hand, through flood waters to high ground in the form of a leaking tea house. It was the only house that I have ever been in where full waterproof gear and umbrella were needed to keep dry.
  
 After studying the rather suspect sediment in my tea, and standing over the water pot to ensure that it boiled, we made our way up the river valley to a tiny group of tea houses called Suikhet, and left the standard path to begin the arduous climb to Dhumpus. The rhododendron forest was almost jungle-like in its density, with much lichen and mosses hanging from the branches and with bright sunshine the branches were shimmering with the early morning rain, After a climb of 4,000 feet, and passing through the terraced village of Astern, we arrived at an inn on the ridge top. Here, at lunchtime, my sherpa complained of headaches, so feeling the part of the big white medicine man, I supplied him with two aspirin. Poor chap nearly died! How was I to know he was allergic to A.P.C.? I carried the pack and gear up to our campsite at Dhumpus, and returned to the inn to assist the sherpa back to Dhumpus. After studying the rather suspect sediment in my tea, and standing over the water pot to ensure that it boiled, we made our way up the river valley to a tiny group of tea houses called Suikhet, and left the standard path to begin the arduous climb to Dhumpus. The rhododendron forest was almost jungle-like in its density, with much lichen and mosses hanging from the branches and with bright sunshine the branches were shimmering with the early morning rain, After a climb of 4,000 feet, and passing through the terraced village of Astern, we arrived at an inn on the ridge top. Here, at lunchtime, my sherpa complained of headaches, so feeling the part of the big white medicine man, I supplied him with two aspirin. Poor chap nearly died! How was I to know he was allergic to A.P.C.? I carried the pack and gear up to our campsite at Dhumpus, and returned to the inn to assist the sherpa back to Dhumpus.
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 About here I fell into conversation with a Nepalese farmer who was later described to me as a "very rich man" because he owned 60 sheep. He was very keen for my little knowledge of fruit cultivation and described his country as a useless place which will grow nothing. Questions also directed at me were in regard to the number of wives I had in Australia, number of children from each wife, and my "​extra-curricular"​ sex life. Being somewhat on guard, I bade him farewell at Landrang and made a most knee-jarring descent to the Mode Khola River, glancing unbelievingly at the route up the cliffs opposite the village of Ghandrung perched high above the river. About here I fell into conversation with a Nepalese farmer who was later described to me as a "very rich man" because he owned 60 sheep. He was very keen for my little knowledge of fruit cultivation and described his country as a useless place which will grow nothing. Questions also directed at me were in regard to the number of wives I had in Australia, number of children from each wife, and my "​extra-curricular"​ sex life. Being somewhat on guard, I bade him farewell at Landrang and made a most knee-jarring descent to the Mode Khola River, glancing unbelievingly at the route up the cliffs opposite the village of Ghandrung perched high above the river.
  
-A break at a tea house about one-third of the way up the climb refreshed me for the remainder of the ascent, and it was with a feeling of deep exhaustion that I stumbled into the Hotel Annapurna at Ghandrung, making all sorts of noises and signs for food and water. With me in the hotel were a French hippie, a Japanese couple, an Australian girl and a Frenchman who later accomparied ​me up into the Sanctuary. In this hotel you pay only for the food you eat, and nothing for accommodation,​ and the evening was passed by drinking much "​chang",​ which is an alcoholic drink fermented from rice, and discussing the qualities of hashish, both good but more bad.+A break at a tea house about one-third of the way up the climb refreshed me for the remainder of the ascent, and it was with a feeling of deep exhaustion that I stumbled into the Hotel Annapurna at Ghandrung, making all sorts of noises and signs for food and water. With me in the hotel were a French hippie, a Japanese couple, an Australian girl and a Frenchman who later accompanied ​me up into the Sanctuary. In this hotel you pay only for the food you eat, and nothing for accommodation,​ and the evening was passed by drinking much "​chang",​ which is an alcoholic drink fermented from rice, and discussing the qualities of hashish, both good but more bad.
  
 The following morning was wet, and as we made our way through the orderly, neat slate-roofed houses of Ghandrung, it was possible to see way up the Mode Khola Valley into the canyon area, about two day's walk away. I was shattered! The rain continued as we passed through the slate quarries for Ghandrung village, and finally took shelter in a tea house perched high on a ridge before the 2500 feet descent to the Khumnakhola. The following morning was wet, and as we made our way through the orderly, neat slate-roofed houses of Ghandrung, it was possible to see way up the Mode Khola Valley into the canyon area, about two day's walk away. I was shattered! The rain continued as we passed through the slate quarries for Ghandrung village, and finally took shelter in a tea house perched high on a ridge before the 2500 feet descent to the Khumnakhola.
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 The weekend November 19,20,21, in addition to Peter Harris'​ hard walk, there is another weekend trip to Bungonia Gorge. Peter Miller is the master here. The weekend November 19,20,21, in addition to Peter Harris'​ hard walk, there is another weekend trip to Bungonia Gorge. Peter Miller is the master here.
  
-The Budowangs ​is the destination of Tony Denham on 26,27,28, but I don't know whether his route is unknown, or secret, or exploratory,​ or whether he is searching for new morning tea sites. Ask him.+The Budawangs ​is the destination of Tony Denham on 26,27,28, but I don't know whether his route is unknown, or secret, or exploratory,​ or whether he is searching for new morning tea sites. Ask him.
  
 ===Day Walks.=== ===Day Walks.===
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 At the October General Meeting a site for the Club's 50th Anniversary Dinner (in October 1977) was discussed. At the October General Meeting a site for the Club's 50th Anniversary Dinner (in October 1977) was discussed.
  
-It was resolved to seek the opinions of members as to a sultable ​place and to reach a decision at the November meeting.+It was resolved to seek the opinions of members as to a suitable ​place and to reach a decision at the November meeting.
  
 If you intend to attend the dinner and have any suggestions,​ please let the Committee know before the November General Meeting. If you intend to attend the dinner and have any suggestions,​ please let the Committee know before the November General Meeting.
197610.txt ยท Last modified: 2016/09/07 00:00 by tyreless