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197608 [2016/09/01 06:06]
tyreless
197608 [2016/09/02 00:29]
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 Being a conservationist,​ and aware of the frequent criticism of conservationists as a body of emotional although well-intentioned but irrational do-gooders, one attempts to retain one's calm and logic as much as possible in discussing environmental issues. On occasions however, one is overcome by a swelling tide of extreme anger at the absolute stupidity of mankind, resulting in violent and blasphemous outburst. Being a conservationist,​ and aware of the frequent criticism of conservationists as a body of emotional although well-intentioned but irrational do-gooders, one attempts to retain one's calm and logic as much as possible in discussing environmental issues. On occasions however, one is overcome by a swelling tide of extreme anger at the absolute stupidity of mankind, resulting in violent and blasphemous outburst.
  
-Such was the case last week when talking with a friend about a forthcoming trip to Newnes. Most bushwalkers have been to the Wolgen Valley at some time, and know it as a beautiful valley where once existed the mining works and township for the extraction and processing of oil shale. It is also a pleasant and relaxing place for family camping and the starting point for some interesting walks c1earby to Newnes itself, and halfway up the hill, are some disused railway tunnels which have always been worthwhile visiting to witness the beauty of countless glow worms residing there. In discussion with my friend last week he told me he had been advised that two despicable individuals with a motor bike had tied brrulches ​to the back of their machines, set them alight, and driven ​throuph ​the tunnels and thereby killed off most of the insect life (i.e. the glow worms). will probably take some years for the colony to regenerate. Unfortunately I have not yet had an opportunity to verify the story, so its truth cannot be vouched for. However, whether true or false, the story serves only to highlight the menace being presented by offroad machines and vehicles and their owners.+Such was the case last week when talking with a friend about a forthcoming trip to Newnes. Most bushwalkers have been to the Wolgen Valley at some time, and know it as a beautiful valley where once existed the mining works and township for the extraction and processing of oil shale. It is also a pleasant and relaxing place for family camping and the starting point for some interesting walks c1earby to Newnes itself, and halfway up the hill, are some disused railway tunnels which have always been worthwhile visiting to witness the beauty of countless glow worms residing there. In discussion with my friend last week he told me he had been advised that two despicable individuals with a motor bike had tied branches ​to the back of their machines, set them alight, and driven ​through ​the tunnels and thereby killed off most of the insect life (i.e. the glow worms). will probably take some years for the colony to regenerate. Unfortunately I have not yet had an opportunity to verify the story, so its truth cannot be vouched for. However, whether true or false, the story serves only to highlight the menace being presented by offroad machines and vehicles and their owners.
  
-At our last monthly general meeting we discussed Federation'​s proposed policy on wilderness areas. Conservation Secretary Alex Colley pointed out that the policy made no mention of machines and their intrusion on nature, and proposed that our delegates raise the matter at the next Federation meeting. Policy should be that vehicles and machines be absolutely excluded from wilderness areas. But it is not an easy task. Trail bikes and four wheel drive vehicles (mini and maxi) are proliferating at a frightening rate. This is partly explained by the rapidly increasing pace of city life and the consequent desire to get away from the rat race. But we must beware that the increased use of offroad vehicles does not occur at the expense of the environment. An enquiry is under way regarding the use of off-road vehicles, and we as users of wilderness areas, should make our viewpoint known - individually as a club, collectively through Federation, and using whatever means and media are at our disposal. If we don't, we will witness further destruction and desecration of the lands and forests which are already so diminshed.+At our last monthly general meeting we discussed Federation'​s proposed policy on wilderness areas. Conservation Secretary Alex Colley pointed out that the policy made no mention of machines and their intrusion on nature, and proposed that our delegates raise the matter at the next Federation meeting. Policy should be that vehicles and machines be absolutely excluded from wilderness areas. But it is not an easy task. Trail bikes and four wheel drive vehicles (mini and maxi) are proliferating at a frightening rate. This is partly explained by the rapidly increasing pace of city life and the consequent desire to get away from the rat race. But we must beware that the increased use of offroad vehicles does not occur at the expense of the environment. An enquiry is under way regarding the use of off-road vehicles, and we as users of wilderness areas, should make our viewpoint known - individually as a club, collectively through Federation, and using whatever means and media are at our disposal. If we don't, we will witness further destruction and desecration of the lands and forests which are already so diminished.
  
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 |Kowmung Gap|215°| |Kowmung Gap|215°|
  
-The difference between the two outside bearings in Mitchell'​s case is 99 1/2° compared with 85 1/2° for Barrallir. But even more alarming is the actual difference in the bearings 81° in the case of Bull Island Gap and 67° in the case of Kowmung Gap. Byrnes Gap instead of being "​west"​ is nearly North 334 1/2°. It is hard to believe that a competent surveyor would make such an error, and his map gives no hint of such a deviation. Well, we looked at maps, read and re-read the journal and historical papers and talked round the subject, but as Omar Khayam says "we ever came out of the door by which we entered in". We decided to try and collect more facts by visiting significant places in the area.+The difference between the two outside bearings in Mitchell'​s case is 99 1/2° compared with 85 1/2° for Barrallier. But even more alarming is the actual difference in the bearings 81° in the case of Bull Island Gap and 67° in the case of Kowmung Gap. Byrnes Gap instead of being "​west"​ is nearly North 334 1/2°. It is hard to believe that a competent surveyor would make such an error, and his map gives no hint of such a deviation. Well, we looked at maps, read and re-read the journal and historical papers and talked round the subject, but as Omar Khayam says "we ever came out of the door by which we entered in". We decided to try and collect more facts by visiting significant places in the area.
  
 First we decided to climb Yerranderie Peak and look the area over. We busily took bearings and then admired the view picking out significant landmarks. Then we made the interesting descent to Coal Seam Gap, and thence back to camp. First we decided to climb Yerranderie Peak and look the area over. We busily took bearings and then admired the view picking out significant landmarks. Then we made the interesting descent to Coal Seam Gap, and thence back to camp.
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 After lunch we decided to climb Axehead Mt. as Barrallier must have done if he came this way. From here he saw "at a distance (of) 40 miles a range of mountains much higher than those we had passed... From where I was I could not detect any obstacle right to the foot of these large mountains"​. When we got to the top we could certainly see the high mountain range in the distance, but the Kowmung Valley was clearly to be seen; the day, however, was especially clear whereas when our explorer was there, they had had heavy rain and a southerly wind was blowing. The scramble up this mountain was the most rewarding of all we had done to date from a scenic point of view. From the rocky top we had a magnificent cycloramic view under perfect condition of visibility. Just below us was the spectacular Bull Island Gap and the cliffs of the Tonalli Range terminating in the dramatic Tonalli Peak. To the east was Lake Burragorang,​ and beyond were the walls shining in the afternoon sun, west were the ranges beyond the Kowmung, and to the south the many peaks of the Yerranderie area. A great spectacle. After lunch we decided to climb Axehead Mt. as Barrallier must have done if he came this way. From here he saw "at a distance (of) 40 miles a range of mountains much higher than those we had passed... From where I was I could not detect any obstacle right to the foot of these large mountains"​. When we got to the top we could certainly see the high mountain range in the distance, but the Kowmung Valley was clearly to be seen; the day, however, was especially clear whereas when our explorer was there, they had had heavy rain and a southerly wind was blowing. The scramble up this mountain was the most rewarding of all we had done to date from a scenic point of view. From the rocky top we had a magnificent cycloramic view under perfect condition of visibility. Just below us was the spectacular Bull Island Gap and the cliffs of the Tonalli Range terminating in the dramatic Tonalli Peak. To the east was Lake Burragorang,​ and beyond were the walls shining in the afternoon sun, west were the ranges beyond the Kowmung, and to the south the many peaks of the Yerranderie area. A great spectacle.
  
-Next day I disgraced myself and led the party to Mt. Moore instead of to Mt. Meier where we hoped to go through "​Barrallier'​s Pass" (Cambage theory). However it was very pleasant on Mt. Moore when we found a tiny tarn surrounded by the greenest of green velvet moss, and so they forgeive ​me!+Next day I disgraced myself and led the party to Mt. Moore instead of to Mt. Meier where we hoped to go through "​Barrallier'​s Pass" (Cambage theory). However it was very pleasant on Mt. Moore when we found a tiny tarn surrounded by the greenest of green velvet moss, and so they forgive ​me!
  
 Well, what did we discover? Our positive findings were mainly negative, if that's not too Irish. I decided that Barrallier may have been a good surveyor (he made an excellent map of the Hunter River) but he was a poor bushman and explorer. He set off on this trip on 22nd November and on the 24th when he had just passed a mountain he had nearly climbed on a previous trip (probably Tonalli Mountain), he found his "​provisions were reduced to a small quantity of flour and some pickled pork". Luckily one of his soldiers shot a 12 lb. eel. Well, what did we discover? Our positive findings were mainly negative, if that's not too Irish. I decided that Barrallier may have been a good surveyor (he made an excellent map of the Hunter River) but he was a poor bushman and explorer. He set off on this trip on 22nd November and on the 24th when he had just passed a mountain he had nearly climbed on a previous trip (probably Tonalli Mountain), he found his "​provisions were reduced to a small quantity of flour and some pickled pork". Luckily one of his soldiers shot a 12 lb. eel.
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 The same week-end Helen Gray's Base Camp in the Budawangs attracted 44 people. (During the telling of this report, suggested accompanying music: muted oboes in a plaintive minor key.) To begin with it rained. They couldn'​t find the camping cave. The cave they did find was very small with a floor at 45° slope. There were day walks which involved progress down a very scrubby scratchy creek. On the credit side, there were fireworks each night. Debit or credit (? - we can't decide which) four didn't turn up but the leader found them on the last day. And on departure Jill's car had to be pushed to get it started. Ah well, as Paddy'​s ad. says, "​It'​s the tough ones you remember."​ The same week-end Helen Gray's Base Camp in the Budawangs attracted 44 people. (During the telling of this report, suggested accompanying music: muted oboes in a plaintive minor key.) To begin with it rained. They couldn'​t find the camping cave. The cave they did find was very small with a floor at 45° slope. There were day walks which involved progress down a very scrubby scratchy creek. On the credit side, there were fireworks each night. Debit or credit (? - we can't decide which) four didn't turn up but the leader found them on the last day. And on departure Jill's car had to be pushed to get it started. Ah well, as Paddy'​s ad. says, "​It'​s the tough ones you remember."​
  
-Two Sunday walks on 13th (Mary Braithwaite to Cowan Creek/​Berowra and Ray Carter to Burning Palms/​Waterfall) reported a good range of wildflowers. On June 18/19/20 Barry Wallace'​s Wine & Cheese Walk down the Cox attracted 12 Sydney Belly Worshipers. They camped from lunch time Saturday till lunch time Sunday (you should never exert yourself on a full stomach!) and even a bit of rain didn't dampen the festive cheer.+Two Sunday walks on 13th (Mary Braithwaite to Cowan Creek/​Berowra and Ray Carter to Burning Palms/​Waterfall) reported a good range of wildflowers. On June 18/19/20 Barry Wallace'​s Wine & Cheese Walk down the Cox attracted 12 Sydney Belly Worshippers. They camped from lunch time Saturday till lunch time Sunday (you should never exert yourself on a full stomach!) and even a bit of rain didn't dampen the festive cheer.
  
 The two Sunday walks - Meryl Watman'​s in the Waterfall area and Kath Brown'​s to Burning Palms were as usual - "​Nothing happened"​ but all enjoyed themselves. June 25/6/7 Dave Rostron reported a pretty rough trip in the Newnes area while Victor Lewin'​s Sunday assault of The Fortress brought out 20 Stormtroopers. The two Sunday walks - Meryl Watman'​s in the Waterfall area and Kath Brown'​s to Burning Palms were as usual - "​Nothing happened"​ but all enjoyed themselves. June 25/6/7 Dave Rostron reported a pretty rough trip in the Newnes area while Victor Lewin'​s Sunday assault of The Fortress brought out 20 Stormtroopers.
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 Pat McBride'​s ski trip in the Twynham/​Watson'​s Crags high country changed its route. The 7 members (1 prospective) camped in the snow, 8" fell on Saturday night. Tigers all. In warmer climate Margaret Reid led 37 to Cowan/​Berowra Creek with a walk through the very pleasant Muogamarra Reserve as an encore. Pat McBride'​s ski trip in the Twynham/​Watson'​s Crags high country changed its route. The 7 members (1 prospective) camped in the snow, 8" fell on Saturday night. Tigers all. In warmer climate Margaret Reid led 37 to Cowan/​Berowra Creek with a walk through the very pleasant Muogamarra Reserve as an encore.
  
-July 9/10/11 found Ray Hookway'​s party base-camped at Airly with day trips to Patoney'​s Crown and Tyan Pic. David Cotton ​reporte ​the trip tremendous, with mysterious great sheets of plastic lying around. (Has someone been trying to tie up Tyan Pic?)+July 9/10/11 found Ray Hookway'​s party base-camped at Airly with day trips to Patoney'​s Crown and Tyan Pic. David Cotton ​reported ​the trip tremendous, with mysterious great sheets of plastic lying around. (Has someone been trying to tie up Tyan Pic?)
  
 Let Neil Brown'​s Mystery Trip remain a mystery. Why spoil a good story? (Neil found himself down to lead a trip before he knew where it was going, which shows the persuasive powers of the Walks Secretary.) En route they had (not scroggin stops) __oyster__ stops! Tony Marshall had 9 (at least at the start - another mystery!) on his Blue Gum Forest trip. Let Neil Brown'​s Mystery Trip remain a mystery. Why spoil a good story? (Neil found himself down to lead a trip before he knew where it was going, which shows the persuasive powers of the Walks Secretary.) En route they had (not scroggin stops) __oyster__ stops! Tony Marshall had 9 (at least at the start - another mystery!) on his Blue Gum Forest trip.
  
-And now back to earth and General Business. It was pointed out that at the September Half-Yearly Meeting we will be discussing the Club's 50th Anniversary and ways to celebrate it (other than getting drunk). ​Wg will confer with the Dungallas, they being the pioneers of the Club.+And now back to earth and General Business. It was pointed out that at the September Half-Yearly Meeting we will be discussing the Club's 50th Anniversary and ways to celebrate it (other than getting drunk). ​We will confer with the Dungallas, they being the pioneers of the Club.
  
 Peter Miller, alias the Stone Horse, announced that there were 5 to the pre-General Meeting dinner and the next will be held at the Stoned Crow at Crows Nest. Peter Miller, alias the Stone Horse, announced that there were 5 to the pre-General Meeting dinner and the next will be held at the Stoned Crow at Crows Nest.
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 Sheep counting is a popular way to pass time (and deter myopia) whilst walking. There is also bull-dodging in the fields, and leaping over sloppy heaps of fly-ridden prairie cakes through the meadows. The ultimate in excitement is to leap six consecutive mounds, leap-frog a bull, then "​slalom"​ through at least 20 sheep before the next stile. For this amazing feat score 20 points. If it is raining heavily, or if the bull has a ring in his nose, double the score. Sheep counting is a popular way to pass time (and deter myopia) whilst walking. There is also bull-dodging in the fields, and leaping over sloppy heaps of fly-ridden prairie cakes through the meadows. The ultimate in excitement is to leap six consecutive mounds, leap-frog a bull, then "​slalom"​ through at least 20 sheep before the next stile. For this amazing feat score 20 points. If it is raining heavily, or if the bull has a ring in his nose, double the score.
  
-The scenery ​ie really nothing to write home about, hence this article is not really a constructive one. Wainwright'​s Pennine Way Companion is quite useful - take some coloured pencils and you can colour in the sketches whilst you're holed-up in a cave somewhere waiting for the snow to stop.+The scenery ​is really nothing to write home about, hence this article is not really a constructive one. Wainwright'​s Pennine Way Companion is quite useful - take some coloured pencils and you can colour in the sketches whilst you're holed-up in a cave somewhere waiting for the snow to stop.
  
 There is no escape anywhere from people, all out to "​enjoy"​ the English countryside. Gird up your loins as they have never been girded up before because the Pennine Way is a penance for sins. There is no escape anywhere from people, all out to "​enjoy"​ the English countryside. Gird up your loins as they have never been girded up before because the Pennine Way is a penance for sins.
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 **Abdul'​s Lebanese Restaurant** **Abdul'​s Lebanese Restaurant**
  
-It is on the corner of Cleveland Street and Elizabeth ​Stree, City. Meet at 6.00 p.m. We need more girls as so far only Helen Rowan has graced these dinners with her presence.+It is on the corner of Cleveland Street and Elizabeth ​Street, City. Meet at 6.00 p.m. We need more girls as so far only Helen Rowan has graced these dinners with her presence.
  
 Suggestions wanted for other cheap and interesting places to eat. Suggestions wanted for other cheap and interesting places to eat.
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 |Vests|$21.70| |Vests|$21.70|
 |Duvets - sewn through with hood|$49.50| |Duvets - sewn through with hood|$49.50|
-|Duvets - double ​constrction ​with hood|$67.00|+|Duvets - double ​construction ​with hood|$67.00|
    
 They feature double zip fronts, snap overlap, velcro closure pockets and handwarmer pockets. ​ They feature double zip fronts, snap overlap, velcro closure pockets and handwarmer pockets. ​
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 Large range of packs by Berghaus, Camptrails, Karrimor, K2, Mountain Mule and Paddymade. Large range of packs by Berghaus, Camptrails, Karrimor, K2, Mountain Mule and Paddymade.
  
-Sleeping bags by Faiiry ​Down, Mountain Design and Paddymade.+Sleeping bags by Fairy Down, Mountain Design and Paddymade.
  
 Our sale on last year's stock of cross country skis is still on - less 10% off last year's prices!! Our sale on last year's stock of cross country skis is still on - less 10% off last year's prices!!
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 Ring for our new price list!! Ring for our new price list!!
  
-We offer you a full range of high quality gear for bushwalking,​ light-weicght ​camping, ski-touring,​ climbing and canoeing.+We offer you a full range of high quality gear for bushwalking,​ light-weight ​camping, ski-touring,​ climbing and canoeing.
  
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 So putting on the hat of mature experienced bushwalker, I decided to test that role on the walk to Yerranderie. Also the symbol beside the walk on the programme intrigued me - was it a composite of the female/male symbol gone wrong (what were the bushwalkers coming to); however on enquiry it was explained as meaning a test walk, and that I know is something entirely different. I thought by wearing my mature/​experienced hat it would mean that if there were any difficulties on the walk there would be eager, willing prospectives to help me on my way. But that theory had to be discarded early Saturday morning when all the party assembled at Bat's Camp - 4 men (including 1 prospective),​ 6 women. So I put on my Liberated Women'​s hat and with hindsight and afterthought,​ have decided that I'll wear it whenever I go walking. So putting on the hat of mature experienced bushwalker, I decided to test that role on the walk to Yerranderie. Also the symbol beside the walk on the programme intrigued me - was it a composite of the female/male symbol gone wrong (what were the bushwalkers coming to); however on enquiry it was explained as meaning a test walk, and that I know is something entirely different. I thought by wearing my mature/​experienced hat it would mean that if there were any difficulties on the walk there would be eager, willing prospectives to help me on my way. But that theory had to be discarded early Saturday morning when all the party assembled at Bat's Camp - 4 men (including 1 prospective),​ 6 women. So I put on my Liberated Women'​s hat and with hindsight and afterthought,​ have decided that I'll wear it whenever I go walking.
  
-As I have not been walking on official trips for some time it was interesting watching the dynamics of the group, male and female, coping with the leader. Nearly everybody had their own maps, compasses; nearly everyone thoroughly checked all navigational decisions, nearly everyone had a voice in making decisions as to which way to go, nearly everyone decided on the camp site, where to light the fire, etc. Very democratic indeed. In fact if I'd realised how much times had changed from the old authoritarian leadership days of the 50's I'd have brought my own campass ​and map as well.+As I have not been walking on official trips for some time it was interesting watching the dynamics of the group, male and female, coping with the leader. Nearly everybody had their own maps, compasses; nearly everyone thoroughly checked all navigational decisions, nearly everyone had a voice in making decisions as to which way to go, nearly everyone decided on the camp site, where to light the fire, etc. Very democratic indeed. In fact if I'd realised how much times had changed from the old authoritarian leadership days of the 50's I'd have brought my own compass ​and map as well.
  
 The party did allow the leader to express at least one of his preferences. Not getting his feet wet meant that we circled the swamp near Bat's Camp so as to need some careful navigational expertise by all to finally pick up the track about 1/2 mile from Rocky Point. Not getting his feet wet meant that we climbed high into Tonalli'​s Gap and picked up the telephone line  1/4 mile from it. Not getting his feet wet meant some of the party accompanied him over Yerranderie Peak instead of taking the track down to the road and crossing some very small creeks. All very tolerant. The party did allow the leader to express at least one of his preferences. Not getting his feet wet meant that we circled the swamp near Bat's Camp so as to need some careful navigational expertise by all to finally pick up the track about 1/2 mile from Rocky Point. Not getting his feet wet meant that we climbed high into Tonalli'​s Gap and picked up the telephone line  1/4 mile from it. Not getting his feet wet meant some of the party accompanied him over Yerranderie Peak instead of taking the track down to the road and crossing some very small creeks. All very tolerant.
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-THE SOU'-WEST OF THE SOU'-WEST - PART 3. +=====The Sou'West Of The Sou'West Part 3.===== 
-by Fraiolk ​Rigby.+ 
 +by Frank Rigby. 
 (The last episode ended in an emergency camp on a side spur of the South-West Cape Range, with Joan and I giving thanks for the end of some quite nasty weather.) (The last episode ended in an emergency camp on a side spur of the South-West Cape Range, with Joan and I giving thanks for the end of some quite nasty weather.)
 +
 Day 7 (now reckoned by the campsites) dawns with lots of promise in the cool air washed clean by the deluge of Day 6. Anxious to put the length of the range behind us before Huey can play his next trick, we are early away. Along the treeless tops with the west coast below on our right and the south coast starting to show on our left, for we are approaching the very corner of Tasmania. We pass one of our rock shelters of the previous day - yesterday it was a haven, today it does not rate a second glance. By mid-afternoon we are standing in the brilliant sunshine near the trig on Mt. Karamu, gazing in awe at all that surrounds us. Day 7 (now reckoned by the campsites) dawns with lots of promise in the cool air washed clean by the deluge of Day 6. Anxious to put the length of the range behind us before Huey can play his next trick, we are early away. Along the treeless tops with the west coast below on our right and the south coast starting to show on our left, for we are approaching the very corner of Tasmania. We pass one of our rock shelters of the previous day - yesterday it was a haven, today it does not rate a second glance. By mid-afternoon we are standing in the brilliant sunshine near the trig on Mt. Karamu, gazing in awe at all that surrounds us.
-Surely this must be one of the grandest vantage points anywhere. Karamu is not high, only 439 metres, and yet it is commanding. Just by turning around through full circle, a'panorama of infinite variety and beauty unfolds in all directions. But I cannot help facing the South- West Cape, rocky, fascinating and yes - inviting, thrusting out into the ocean, the last land this side of Antarctica. From a broad low saddle at the base of Karamu2 ​the Cape rises to a summit at 240 metres, the great slabs on the wester sideplunging ​at a steep angle straight into the sea. Beyond the summit the promontory falls away unseen, but by previous accounts we know that one must abseil to reach the end. It is difficult to wrest the eyes from this challenging feature, even for the view up the west coast - Window Pane Bay now in the middle distance, then Port Davey and beyond; inland the mountains, plains and patches of forest, the soft hues of the Tasmanian wilderness. But it is the other coast that is especially striking, that succession of bays and rocky headlands; and is that South Cape on the horizon? If so, we are seeing the length of the Tasmanian south coast at one glance. + 
-Page 1'7. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER August 9 1976 +Surely this must be one of the grandest vantage points anywhere. Karamu is not high, only 439 metres, and yet it is commanding. Just by turning around through full circle, a panorama of infinite variety and beauty unfolds in all directions. But I cannot help facing the South-West Cape, rocky, fascinating and yes - inviting, thrusting out into the ocean, the last land this side of Antarctica. From a broad low saddle at the base of Karamu, ​the Cape rises to a summit at 240 metres, the great slabs on the western side plunging ​at a steep angle straight into the sea. Beyond the summit the promontory falls away unseen, but by previous accounts we know that one must abseil to reach the end. It is difficult to wrest the eyes from this challenging feature, even for the view up the west coast - Window Pane Bay now in the middle distance, then Port Davey and beyond; inland the mountains, plains and patches of forest, the soft hues of the Tasmanian wilderness. But it is the other coast that is especially striking, that succession of bays and rocky headlands; and is that South Cape on the horizon? If so, we are seeing the length of the Tasmanian south coast at one glance. 
-To the Cape or not, that is the question now. We have been told the return trip from Karamu takes five hours. This means an exposed + 
-camp somewhere down there in the saddle, and although the weather is fine +To the Cape or not, that is the question now. We have been told the return trip from Karamu takes five hours. This means an exposed camp somewhere down there in the saddle, and although the weather is fine now we are longing for security after certain recent experiences. Besides, we have lost a day etc., etc. We opt instead for Wilson Bight, our first bay on the south coast. It is perhaps a cowardly, layman'​s decision, but at least there'​s something left for next time. Our campsite, just off the beach beside a small stream, is suitable compensation. 
-now we are longing for security after certain recent experiences. Besides, + 
-we have lost a day etc,, etc. We opt instead for Wilson Bight, our first bay on the south coast. It is perhaps a cowardly, layman'​s decision, but at least there'​s something left for next time. Our campsite, just off the beach beside a small stream, is suitable compensation. +From Wilson Bight to Cox Bight, our start and finish point, is a mere nine miles as the crow flies. But we are not crows (although on occasions it would have been handy) and not in such a hurry, so it takes us four days, including a rest day at Ketchem Bay. The route is a wee bit tricky, slow in parts but interesting,​ and the rewards are many. Behind each bay is a strip of dense bush and if you find the cut track through to the beach you are home and hosedif not, you are in trouble, like our approach to Ketchem Bay. Try as we might, we could not discover the track (no markings) and so set about bashing our own (no machete). After one hour in time, 200 yards in distance and a plethora of nasty words (no long pants) we reach our destination. (I must confess it was Joan who had the hard yakka because on this occasion she was wearing the pants, no metaphors intended.) The unmarked routes from bay to bay across the intervening hills follow the clear leads for the forest is to be shunned like the devil, but a couple of compulsory creek crossings would test even the tigers. Although this part of the coast is not often walked, there are cut campsites at Wilson Bight, Ketchem Bay, Hidden Bay and New Harbour, and all very welcome too. Ketchem ​Bay is a little gem of a place. 
-From Wilson Bight to Cox Bight, our start and finish point, is a mere +
-nine miles as the crow flies. But we are not crows (although on occasions it would have been handy) and not in such a hurry, so it takes us four days, including a rest day at Ketchem Bay. The route is a wee bit tricky, slow in parts but interesting,​ and the rewards are many. Behind each bay is a strip of dense bush and if you find the cut track through to the beach you are home and hosed if not, you are in trouble, like our approach to Ketchem Bay. Try as we might, we could not discover the track (no markings) and so set about bashing our own (no qachete). After one hour in time, 200 yards in distance and a plethora of nasty words (no long pants) we reach our destination. (I must confess it was Joan who had the hard yakka because on this occasion she was wearing the pants, no metaphors intended.) The unmarked routes from bay to bay across the intervening hills follow the clear leads for the forest is to be shunned like the devil, but a couple of compulsory creek crossings would test even the tigers. Although this part of the coast is not often walked, there are cut campsites at Wilson Bight, Ketchem Bay, Hidden Bay and New +
-Harbour, and all very welcome too. Ketcheal ​Bay is a little gem of a place.+
 The precious days pass and prospect gradually gives way to retrospect. In the outside world '75 gives way to '76, a non-event when all that matters is sunlight and landscape, fitness and a feeling of belonging, a satisfied appetite and a sound night'​s sleep. On Day 11 I stand again on the crest of New Harbour Range, the very same spot on which I had stood five years before when this trip was first conceived. Far below on the eastern side, rank upon rank of rollers march endlessly towards the long curving beaches of Cox Bight. And those tiny moving specks on the beach must surely be human beings! The precious days pass and prospect gradually gives way to retrospect. In the outside world '75 gives way to '76, a non-event when all that matters is sunlight and landscape, fitness and a feeling of belonging, a satisfied appetite and a sound night'​s sleep. On Day 11 I stand again on the crest of New Harbour Range, the very same spot on which I had stood five years before when this trip was first conceived. Far below on the eastern side, rank upon rank of rollers march endlessly towards the long curving beaches of Cox Bight. And those tiny moving specks on the beach must surely be human beings!
-It is incredible that this part of Tasmania is not even in the touth-West National Park. Every member of the State Parliament ought to have his nose rubbed in its natural beauty before he is paid a cent of his salary. Perhaps only then will the Australians of the 21st century be able to enjoy what I have enjoyed in the 20th. + 
-(Maps: Old River and South-West Cape, 1100,000) +It is incredible that this part of Tasmania is not even in the South-West National Park. Every member of the State Parliament ought to have his nose rubbed in its natural beauty before he is paid a cent of his salary. Perhaps only then will the Australians of the 21st century be able to enjoy what I have enjoyed in the 20th. 
-P.S. Many thanks to Phil Butt for the valuable information passed on to me as the result of his own experiences in tbisgem ​of wilderness. + 
-* * * * * * * * * +(Maps: Old River and South-West Cape, 1:100,000) 
-THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER August5, 1976  + 
-Lightweight bushwalking +P.S. Many thanks to Phil Butt for the valuable information passed on to me as the result of his own experiences in this gem of wilderness. 
-and camping ​gear. + 
-Page 1 9 +---- 
-Dan't be lumbered with a winter bag in summer + 
-Our new 'Supertight' summer weight bags are nearly half the packed size and weight (2113s) of our regular sleeping bags. Nylon covering, superdown filled. Packs into 9" length x 514" diaCan also be used during winter as an "​inner-bag"​. +=====Paddymade.===== 
-Kiandre ​modelPillow flap, hooded bag. Well filled. Compact, warm and lightweight. Excellent for warmer summer nights and times when carrying weight can be reduced. Approx 3%lbs. + 
-Hotharn ​modelSuperwarm hooded bag made for cold sleepers and high altitudes. 'Box quilted'​ with no +Lightweight bushwalking and camp gear. 
-'​through'​ stitching. All bags can be fitted with zippers and draught resisting overlaps. ​Weight ​4%lbs. + 
-Everything for the bush- walker, from blankets and air mattresses, stretchers, boots, compasses, maps, books, stoves and lamps to cooking vere and rooze cloicd dehydrated foods. +===Don't be lumbered with a winter bag in summer.=== 
-'​A'​ TENTS + 
-One, two or three man. From 2% to Valbs. Choice of three cloths+Our new 'Superlight' summer weight bags are nearly half the packed size and weight (2 lbs) of our regular sleeping bags. Nylon covering, superdown filled. Packs into 9" length x 5 1/2" diaCan also be used during winter as an "​inner-bag"​. 
-Supplied with nylon cords and overlapped doors. No walls. + 
-WALL TENTS +===Kiandra ​model.=== 
-Two, three or four man. From 3% to 43/21bs. Choice of three cloths. + 
-Supplied with nylon cords and overlapped doors. +Pillow flap, hooded bag. Well filled. Compact, warm and lightweight. Excellent for warmer summer nights and times when carrying weight can be reduced. Approx 3 1/4 lbs. 
-BUNYIP RUCKSACK + 
-This `shapedirucksack ​is excellent for children. ​Use- full day pack. Weight ​14ozs+===Hotham ​model.=== 
-SENIOR RUCKSACk+ 
-A single pocket, shaped rucksack. Suitable for overnight camping. Weight 1%lbs, +Superwarm hooded bag made for cold sleepers and high altitudes. 'Box quilted'​ with no '​through'​ stitching. All bags can be fitted with zippers and draught resisting overlaps. ​Approx ​1/2 lbs. 
-BUSHMAN RUCKSACK + 
-Has sewn-in curved bottom +===Bunyip rucksack.=== 
- for extra comfort in carrying. + 
- Will hold 30Ibs. 2 pocket model 11/41bs. 3 pocket model liAlbs+This '​shaped'​ rucksack ​is excellent for children. ​Useful ​day pack. Weight ​14 ozs
-PIONEER RUCKSACK + 
-Extra large bag with four external pockets and will carry about 40lbs of camp gear. Weight ​TAlbs+===Senior rucksack.=== 
-69 LIVERPOOL STSYDNEY ​26-2686 61-7215 + 
-The summer w(Ika programme is now available, so think about those walks you want to lead, +A single pocket, shaped rucksack. Suitable for overnight camping. Weight 1 1/2 lbs
-WALKS FOR SEPTEMBER. + 
-August, 1976+===Bushman rucksack.=== 
-THE SYDLET BUSTIN-AMER + 
-Page 19+Have sewn-in curved bottom for extra comfort in carrying. Will hold 30 lbs. 2 pocket model 1 1/4 lbs. 3 pocket model 1 1/2 lbs
-pUSHWAIKER-BOB + 
-... and then he said, 'I can see the season'​s first warata-a-a-ahJ +===Pioneer rucksack.=== 
-WALK NOTES.+ 
 +Is an extra large bag with four external pockets and will carry about 40 lbs of camp gear. Weight ​2 1/2 lbs. 
 + 
 +==='​A'​ tents.=== 
 + 
 +One, two or three man. From 2 1/2 to 3 3/4 lbs. Choice of three cloths. Supplied with nylon cords and overlapped doors. No walls. 
 + 
 +===Wall tents.=== 
 + 
 +Two, three or four man. From 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 lbs. Choice of three cloths. Supplied with nylon cords and overlapped doors. 
 + 
 +Everything for the bushwalker, from blankets and air mattresses, stretchers, boots, compasses, maps, books, stoves and lamps to cooking ware and freeze dried and dehydrated foods. 
 + 
 +Paddy Pallin 
 +69 Liverpool St., Sydney. 26-268661-7215. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +====Bushwalker Bob.==== 
 + 
 +[Cartoon of waratah at base of cliff in distance, with bushwalker spreadeagled besideIn foreground, one bushwalker talking to another.] 
 + 
 +"... and then he said, 'I can see the season'​s first warata-a-a-ah!'"​ 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====Walk Notes.===== 
 by Len Newland. Phone 43-2419 (B) by Len Newland. Phone 43-2419 (B)
-TEST 'ULM 
-Geptember 
-3,4,5 - 
-Sunday 5 
-Sunday 19 
-Brogerls Creek - Mt. Ulrich - Budaroo Gerringong Falls - Broger!s Creek. Leader is Brian Hart, but you will have to contact Fazely Read at the club or on 90 1081. South Coast surroundings. 
-Hawkedbury River Rocky Ponds - Wondabyne Trig - Myron Brook tfondabyne with Jim Brown. Mainly track. Plenty of wild, flowers. A busy day. 
-Govett'​s Leap - Pulpit Rock - Hat Hill - Anvil Rock - Perry'​s Iockdown Bluegum Forest - junction Rock - Govott'​s Leap. 41 good test walk with all that spectacular Blue Mountains scenery, including Bluogum while it still stands. See Vic. Lewin, 
-Page 20, THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER August, 1976. 
-TEST WALKS (Cont.) 
-Soptombor 
-24,25,26 Carlon'​s Farm - Carlon'​s Crook - Blackhorso Ridge - Wombat Parade - Morimerigal - Splendour Rock - Blue Pup - Cox's Rivor 
-Tinpot Track - Carlon'​s Farm. This is a very popular area within tho club, on the rugged wostorn side of the Blue Mountains. Fazoly Road leads. 
-DUNGALA DAY. 
-September 11 - Dorothy '​Butler and Ray Kirkby are your contacts for a delightful day in Ku-Ring-gai Wildflower Garden. Details elsewhere, 
-BASE CAMP. 
-September 
-17,18,19 - Airly. 
-Saturday - Airly Turret and. the Diamond Mine. 
-Sunday - Airly Shale Mining ruins and Black Mountain. David Cotton, who is loader and therefore biased declares that this is an Extra Good Trip. It's full of historical interest, too. 
-DAY WALKS. 
-September 
- 5 - Tony Denham loads a walk on this day, but details are not to 
-hand at this writing. (I now hear Bundeena Otford). 
- 12 - Waterfall - Morey Track - Myuna Creek - Woronora Trig - Heathcote Creek - Heathcote. David Ingram loads this walk in the unique south coast bush. 
  
-19 - Hornsby - Tunic's Creek. John Noble leads. I know nothing +====Walks for September.==== 
-of the area either.. - 7:hy not go there and find out? + 
-26 Tahmoor Barge River - Mermaid Pool - Pot Holes Crossing ​7 IarriMbirra ​Sanctuary - Bargo. John Holly leads this walk on tracks along creeks down the cliff to Mermaid Pool, and the walk includes two wild life sanctuaries. +===Test walks.=== 
-26 Mt. Colah Calna Creek - Berowra Creek - Lyrobird ​Creek - + 
-Mt. KU-Ring-Gai. Neil Brown follows up his recent "​Mystery +|September| | 
-Trip" with another walk in the area. The last one was reported to be excellent. +|3,​4,​5|Broger'​s Creek - Mt. Ulrich - Budaroo - Gerringong Falls - Broger'​s Creek. Leader is Brian Hart, but you will have to contact Fazely Read at the club or on 90-1081. South Coast surroundings.| 
-Page 21. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER August, 1976. +|Sunday 5|Hawkesbury River - Rocky Ponds - Wondabyne Trig - Myron Brook - Wondabyne with Jim Brown. Mainly track. Plenty of wildflowers. A busy day.| 
-THE SYDNEY BUSITALKERS. +|Sunday ​19|Govett'​s Leap Pulpit Rock - Hat Hill - Anvil Rock - Perry'​s Lookdown - Bluegum Forest - Junction Rock - Govott'​s Leap. A good test walk with all that spectacular Blue Mountains scenery, including Bluegum while it still stands. See Vic. Lewin.| 
-(Founded  +|24,​25,​26|Carlon'​s Farm - Carlon'​s Creek - Blackhorse Ridge - Wombat Parade - Merimerigal - Splendour Rock - Blue Pup - Cox's River - Tinpot Track - Carlon'​s Farm. This is a very popular area within the club, on the rugged western side of the Blue Mountains. Fazely Read leads.| 
-BOX 4476 G.P.O.SYDNEY + 
-2001. +===Dungala Day.=== 
-NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVENs + 
-That the Hc,lf-Yearly General Meeting of the Sydney Bush Walkers +|September 11|Dorothy Butler and Ray Kirkby are your contacts for a delightful day in Ku-Ring-gai Wildflower Garden. Details elsewhere.| 
-will be held on Wednesday, 8th September, ​19769 at the :​areless ​Institute of Australia9 ​14 Atchinson Street, St, Leonards at 8.00 p m. + 
-AGEND A.  +===Base Camp.=== 
-1. Apologies. + 
-2. Welcome to new members. +|September| | 
-3. Minutes of the General Meeting held on Wednesday, 11th August, 1976. +|17,​18,​19|Airly. Saturday - Airly Turret and the Diamond Mine. Sunday - Airly Shale Mining ruins and Black Mountain. David Cotton, who is leader and therefore biased, declares that this is an Extra Good Trip. It's full of historical interest, too.| 
-4. Correspondence. + 
-5. Treasurer'​s Report. +===Day walks.=== 
-6. Federation Report. + 
-7. Walks Report. +|September| | 
-80 Determination of the venue of the 1977 Annual Re-Union and election of Convenor(s). +|5|Tony Denham loads a walk on this day, but details are not to hand at this writing. (I now hear Bundeena - Otford).| 
-9. Discussion of Motion foreshadowed at the July General Meeting by Kath Brown, the motion ​beings- +|12|Waterfall - Morey Track - Myuna Creek - Woronora Trig - Heathcote Creek - Heathcote. David Ingram leads this walk in the unique south coast bush.| 
-"That members be invited to bring forward ideas and suggestions +|19|Hornsby - Tunk's Creek. John Noble leads. I know nothing of the area either. ​Why not go there and find out?| 
-to the Half-Year17 ​General Meeting as to how the Club may best celebrate its 50th Birthday in 1977"​. +|26|Tahmoor Barge River - Mermaid Pool - Pot Holes Crossing ​- Wirrimbirra ​Sanctuary - Bargo. John Holly leads this walk on tracks along creeks down the cliff to Mermaid Pool, and the walk includes two wild life sanctuaries.| 
-10. Constitutional Amendments. (No notices have been received by the +|26|Mt. Colah Calna Creek - Berowra Creek - Lyrebird ​Creek - Mt. Ku-Ring-Gai. Neil Brown follows up his recent "​Mystery Trip" with another walk in the area. The last one was reported to be excellent.| 
-Secretary as to proposed Constitutional Amendments as at 11/8/76). + 
-11. General Business. +---- 
-12. Announcements ​(a) 17alks. (b) Social. + 
-(Sgd.) ​SPIRO HAJINAKITAS. Hon. Secreta2+=====The Sydney Bushwalkers ​(Founded ​1927).===== 
-Page 22 THE SYDNEY BUSE:ALKER August, 1976. + 
-FEDERATION NOTES. by Len Newland. +Box 4476 G.P.O.Sydney, ​2001. 
-Now that the Federation Newsletter is included with the Club Magazine the bulk of what was formerly included in this article is now appearing in that Newletter.+ 
 +===Notice is hereby given:=== 
 + 
 +That the Half-Yearly General Meeting of the Sydney Bush Walkers will be held on Wednesday, 8th September, ​1976, at the Wireless ​Institute of Australia, ​14 Atchinson Street, St, Leonards at 8.00 p.m. 
 + 
 +====Agenda.==== 
 + 
 +  - Apologies. 
 +  ​- ​Welcome to new members. 
 +  ​- ​Minutes of the General Meeting held on Wednesday, 11th August, 1976. 
 +  ​- ​Correspondence. 
 +  ​- ​Treasurer'​s Report. 
 +  ​- ​Federation Report. 
 +  ​- ​Walks Report. 
 +  ​- ​Determination of the venue of the 1977 Annual Re-Union and election of Convenor(s). 
 +  ​- ​Discussion of Motion foreshadowed at the July General Meeting by Kath Brown, the motion ​being:- "That members be invited to bring forward ideas and suggestions to the Half-Yearly ​General Meeting as to how the Club may best celebrate its 50th Birthday in 1977"​. 
 +  ​- ​Constitutional Amendments. (No notices have been received by the Secretary as to proposed Constitutional Amendments as at 11/8/76). 
 +  ​- ​General Business. 
 +  ​- ​Announcements(a) Walks. (b) Social. 
 +  ​ 
 +(Sgd.) ​Spiro Hajinakitas. Hon. Secretary
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====Federation Notes.===== 
 + 
 +by Len Newland. 
 + 
 +Now that the Federation Newsletter is included with the Club Magazine the bulk of what was formerly included in this article is now appearing in that Newsletter. 
 However, I think that there are one or two points worth noting here. However, I think that there are one or two points worth noting here.
-The current problem with incursions into the Bluegum/​Grose area is of course, the requirement of entry permits. A new problem has cropped + 
-up however, to wit, that on a number of occasions the N.P.'J.S0 has run out +The current problem with incursions into the Bluegum/​Grose area is of course, the requirement of entry permits. A new problem has cropped up however, to wit, that on a number of occasions the N.P.W.S. has run out of permits to issue. Federation are currently approaching ​N.P.W.S. ​with a view to making arrangements by telephone, using a permit number obtained thereby. 
-of permits to issue. Federation are currently approaching ​N0PS0 with a view to making arrangements by telephone, using a permit number obtained thereby. + 
-Some discussion has arisen over the N.P.A.'​s idea of producing a Sketch ​map of part of the western Blue Mountains. Arguments included: that such efforts would lead to increased usage of the area, which in turn would lead to degragation of the wilderness characteristics,​ and that map sales, on the other hand, could be used as a point in increasing public +Some discussion has arisen over the N.P.A.'​s idea of producing a sketch ​map of part of the western Blue Mountains. Arguments included: that such efforts would lead to increased usage of the area, which in turn would lead to degragation of the wilderness characteristics,​ and that map sales, on the other hand, could be used as a point in increasing public and official awareness of the usage of the area as wilderness. 
-and official awareness of the usage of the area as wilderness.+
 "​Cyalume"​ lighting has been reported as satisfactory emergency lighting in the caving situation. "​Cyalume"​ lighting has been reported as satisfactory emergency lighting in the caving situation.
-The recent Search and Rescue practice was a success. Further details 
-should appear in the Newsletter. 
-Federation are preparing a Wilderness Use policy. This is for two purposes: (1) As a guide to Federation in their dealings on wilderness 
-usage questions; (2) As a voluntary guide for those using the wilderness. The five points dealt with in the policy ares (1) Garbage disposal and hygiene; (2) Construction and use of navigational aids; (3) Contruction 
-and use of permanent shelters; (4) Use of resources; (5) Florce,,​fauna 
-ang geology. It is stressed that these points are by no means exhaustive. Suggestions are wanted from meMbers regarding additional points and opinions on any or all of the points considered. 
-Now, the Annual General Meeting held on July 20th. Annual reports appeared in Vol.1 1\To08 of the Newsletter, and reading between the lines, 
-Federation feel that, while no major achievements occurred during the year, they are somewhat better organised than previl sly. The elections were held and the results will no doubt appear in Vo161 No.9 (included 
-I hope with this issue). It should be noted however, that out of approx- 
-imately 15 positions, only one was contested. Members will recall that last year Federation was in trouble, because the old committee stood down 
-and a number of positions had no candidates. Since committees normally 
-stand for about two years, the same problem will probably come up again next year, even though all went smoothly this year. Finally, some dates- 
-or;(-6 Bali 17th September 1976 September 16th 1977 
-L -2--lorstration October 16/17th " October 15/16th " March 26/27th 
-Practice July 16 17th " 
-******** 
  
 +The recent Search and Rescue practice was a success. Further details should appear in the Newsletter.
 +
 +Federation are preparing a Wilderness Use policy. This is for two purposes: (1) As a guide to Federation in their dealings on wilderness usage questions; (2) As a voluntary guide for those using the wilderness. The five points dealt with in the policy are: (1) Garbage disposal and hygiene; (2) Construction and use of navigational aids; (3) Construction and use of permanent shelters; (4) Use of resources; (5) Flora, fauna and geology. It is stressed that these points are by no means exhaustive. Suggestions are wanted from members regarding additional points and opinions on any or all of the points considered.
 +
 +Now, the Annual General Meeting held on July 20th. Annual reports appeared in Vol.1 No.8 of the Newsletter, and reading between the lines, Federation feel that, while no major achievements occurred during the year, they are somewhat better organised than previously. The elections were held and the results will no doubt appear in Vol.1 No.9 (included I hope with this issue). It should be noted however, that out of approximately 15 positions, only one was contested. Members will recall that last year Federation was in trouble, because the old committee stood down and a number of positions had no candidates. Since committees normally stand for about two years, the same problem will probably come up again next year, even though all went smoothly this year. Finally, some dates:-
 +
 +|Federation Ball|17th September 1976|September 16th 1977|
 +|S. & R. Demonstration|October 16/17th 1976|October 15/16th 1977|
 +|Re-Union| |March 26/27th 1977|
 +|S. & R. Practice| |July 16/17th 1977|
 +
 +----
197608.txt · Last modified: 2016/09/02 00:29 by tyreless