User Tools

Site Tools


197605

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
197605 [2016/08/29 06:13]
tyreless
197605 [2016/08/29 06:19] (current)
tyreless
Line 1: Line 1:
 ======The Sydney Bushwalker.====== ======The Sydney Bushwalker.======
  
-A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bush Walkers, Box 4476, G.P.O. Sydney, N.S.W. 2001. Club meetings are held every Wednesday evening from 7.30 p m. at the Wireless Institute Building, 14 Atchison Street, St. Leonards. ​Enquries ​concerning the Club should be referred to Mrs. Marcia Shappert - telephone 30.2028.+A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bush Walkers, Box 4476, G.P.O. Sydney, N.S.W. 2001. Club meetings are held every Wednesday evening from 7.30 p.m. at the Wireless Institute Building, 14 Atchison Street, St. Leonards. ​Enquiries ​concerning the Club should be referred to Mrs. Marcia Shappert - telephone 30.2028.
  
 |**Editor**|Neville Page, 14 Brucedale Av., Epping. Tel 86.3739.| |**Editor**|Neville Page, 14 Brucedale Av., Epping. Tel 86.3739.|
Line 46: Line 46:
 (c) following a dry route which the farmer regarded as hazardous. (c) following a dry route which the farmer regarded as hazardous.
  
-It is all very well for us to say "Well, it wasn't our Club" or "We wouldn'​t do something like that". The fact is, it can happen whenever a group of bushwalkers are unaware of the normal courtesies to be accorded landowners, or where they choose to ignore them. Perhaps now is an opportune time to air the subject once again. As was mentioned at our last General Meeting, many of the best bushwalking areas are accessible only through private property, and if we choose to ignore landowners'​ rights we will find ourselves excluded altogether from using these areas. When a leader knows that the route of his walk passes through private property he must ask permission of the owner to traverse it. Preferably permission should be obtained in advance, but if that is not possible it should be done on the spot. In either case leaders should call at the homestead to confirm that the group is passing through. Farmers quite often have good information to pass on regarding track conditions, river heights etc. And anyway, it's normal courtesy to say hullo; a couttesy ​which should never be broached. Don't assume that because an access route is classified a public road you can dispense with the procedure. Again it is a question of plain good '​manners. Tell the farmer how many are in your group and where you intend walking. __Never__ interfere with fences, crops, or livestock. And __never__ forget the golden rule about gates. **Always leave a gate as you found it.** If you pass through an open gate, leave it open; if you come to a closed gate, make sure you close it after you pass through. Breaches of this rule have led to more disputes with farmers than any other factor. If your party is strung out __don'​t__ leave it for a later member to close the gate. If you open a gate make sure you close it. Leave the next person or group to do the same for themselves. It is hard to understand how such simple rules and common courtesies can be overlooked, but they Guard against it by observing the rules yourself, and by explaining them to newcomers.+It is all very well for us to say "Well, it wasn't our Club" or "We wouldn'​t do something like that". The fact is, it can happen whenever a group of bushwalkers are unaware of the normal courtesies to be accorded landowners, or where they choose to ignore them. Perhaps now is an opportune time to air the subject once again. As was mentioned at our last General Meeting, many of the best bushwalking areas are accessible only through private property, and if we choose to ignore landowners'​ rights we will find ourselves excluded altogether from using these areas. When a leader knows that the route of his walk passes through private property he must ask permission of the owner to traverse it. Preferably permission should be obtained in advance, but if that is not possible it should be done on the spot. In either case leaders should call at the homestead to confirm that the group is passing through. Farmers quite often have good information to pass on regarding track conditions, river heights etc. And anyway, it's normal courtesy to say hullo; a courtesy ​which should never be broached. Don't assume that because an access route is classified a public road you can dispense with the procedure. Again it is a question of plain good '​manners. Tell the farmer how many are in your group and where you intend walking. __Never__ interfere with fences, crops, or livestock. And __never__ forget the golden rule about gates. **Always leave a gate as you found it.** If you pass through an open gate, leave it open; if you come to a closed gate, make sure you close it after you pass through. Breaches of this rule have led to more disputes with farmers than any other factor. If your party is strung out __don'​t__ leave it for a later member to close the gate. If you open a gate make sure you close it. Leave the next person or group to do the same for themselves. It is hard to understand how such simple rules and common courtesies can be overlooked, but they Guard against it by observing the rules yourself, and by explaining them to newcomers.
  
 ---- ----
Line 58: Line 58:
 In June Rona rang me from California: "Get here by Tuesday and you'll be just in time to join us for a canoe trip to Alaska via the Canadian Yukon Territory."​ "​Right,"​ said I, "That gives me four days. I'll meet you at Los Angeles Airport."​ In June Rona rang me from California: "Get here by Tuesday and you'll be just in time to join us for a canoe trip to Alaska via the Canadian Yukon Territory."​ "​Right,"​ said I, "That gives me four days. I'll meet you at Los Angeles Airport."​
  
-Rona had prepared food for the 4 week trip - nuts, dates, muesli, ​homomade ​wheatmeal bread, etc. Oh yes, and of course cheese! - the Pettigrew staple.+Rona had prepared food for the 4 week trip - nuts, dates, muesli, ​homemade ​wheatmeal bread, etc. Oh yes, and of course cheese! - the Pettigrew staple.
  
 I tipped all my clothes out of my suitcase at Rona's house and we loaded in the food and my beaut new light-weight wicker-work suitcase accompanied us for the whole 500 miles, crouching down on the floor of the canoe. At the end of the trip it was a psychotic write-off. I tipped all my clothes out of my suitcase at Rona's house and we loaded in the food and my beaut new light-weight wicker-work suitcase accompanied us for the whole 500 miles, crouching down on the floor of the canoe. At the end of the trip it was a psychotic write-off.
Line 80: Line 80:
 The next section is known as the Thirty Mile. This is perhaps the most unique and spectacular part of the Yukon River as it pursues a narrow winding channel only about 60 ft. wide enclosed by almost perpendicular bluffs up to 300 ft. in height. The water flow had not been very appreciable on the wide lake but now it increased to about 4 m.p.h., the illusion of speed being heightened by the proximity of the towering bluffs. The water is clear and clean, pale blue and turquoise as it flows over a rock and cobble bed. No rapids are encountered in this section but there is plenty of excitement. Where there are sunken rocks the water heaps up in mounds and riffles, and there are whirlpools and back currents to be dodged. You take the outer curves of the sharp S-bends and keep your fingers crossed. The next section is known as the Thirty Mile. This is perhaps the most unique and spectacular part of the Yukon River as it pursues a narrow winding channel only about 60 ft. wide enclosed by almost perpendicular bluffs up to 300 ft. in height. The water flow had not been very appreciable on the wide lake but now it increased to about 4 m.p.h., the illusion of speed being heightened by the proximity of the towering bluffs. The water is clear and clean, pale blue and turquoise as it flows over a rock and cobble bed. No rapids are encountered in this section but there is plenty of excitement. Where there are sunken rocks the water heaps up in mounds and riffles, and there are whirlpools and back currents to be dodged. You take the outer curves of the sharp S-bends and keep your fingers crossed.
  
-In the high clay banks are thousands of swallows'​ nests. The birds were swooping over the water in the late afternoon, reducing the sandfly population by millions, Hurrah! In the matter of sandfliess ​we camped each night on an island; the flowing water kept the air moving and sand-flies don't like moving air, so we were free of them. But if we camped on the land we had to be inside our insect-proof tents at sundown or we would have been eaten alive. We soon had the system worked out to our satisfaction.+In the high clay banks are thousands of swallows'​ nests. The birds were swooping over the water in the late afternoon, reducing the sandfly population by millions, Hurrah! In the matter of sandflies; ​we camped each night on an island; the flowing water kept the air moving and sand-flies don't like moving air, so we were free of them. But if we camped on the land we had to be inside our insect-proof tents at sundown or we would have been eaten alive. We soon had the system worked out to our satisfaction.
  
 One day we saw a big tributary entering our river. This is the Teslin River and it brings with it at this time of year a lot of silt which suddenly turns the Yukon a grey-brown colour, but the additional water also makes for greater depth and velocity, and even without paddling we speeded up to 5 miles per hour. Both the Yukon and its tributaries clear towards the end of July. The river valley widens and is bordered by the Glassy Mountains, up to 2,000 ft. high. Later on two other tributaries entered - the Big Salmon and the Little Salmon. And speaking of salmon - fishermen are not allowed to catch them during the months of June/July when they are making upstream from the ocean to their spawning grounds. However an exception is made in the case of the original inhabitants - Indians (and presumably bears). So if you want to taste one you must first catch your Indian, which we did, and enjoyed the taste thrill of the century. The salmon you get out of tins is just hogs' food in comparison. One day we saw a big tributary entering our river. This is the Teslin River and it brings with it at this time of year a lot of silt which suddenly turns the Yukon a grey-brown colour, but the additional water also makes for greater depth and velocity, and even without paddling we speeded up to 5 miles per hour. Both the Yukon and its tributaries clear towards the end of July. The river valley widens and is bordered by the Glassy Mountains, up to 2,000 ft. high. Later on two other tributaries entered - the Big Salmon and the Little Salmon. And speaking of salmon - fishermen are not allowed to catch them during the months of June/July when they are making upstream from the ocean to their spawning grounds. However an exception is made in the case of the original inhabitants - Indians (and presumably bears). So if you want to taste one you must first catch your Indian, which we did, and enjoyed the taste thrill of the century. The salmon you get out of tins is just hogs' food in comparison.
Line 144: Line 144:
 ====For The Cheapest Gear In Australasia.==== ====For The Cheapest Gear In Australasia.====
  
-We have a prompt mail order service to Australian customers - **free postage on all orders**. Below is alist of some of the gear we stock - Prices quoted in New Zealand dollars (NZ $1 = A $0.83). We prefer payment by bank draft in New Zealand currency.+We have a prompt mail order service to Australian customers - **free postage on all orders**. Below is a list of some of the gear we stock - Prices quoted in New Zealand dollars (NZ $1 = A $0.83). We prefer payment by bank draft in New Zealand currency.
  
 | |$| | |$|
Line 182: Line 182:
 |- Heavy duty super|67.50| |- Heavy duty super|67.50|
 |- Expedition standard|58.00| |- Expedition standard|58.00|
-|-Expedition super|63.50|+|- Expedition super|63.50|
 |Mammoth|77.00| |Mammoth|77.00|
  
Line 205: Line 205:
 For the opening weekend of April, Christine Kirkby'​s Barrington plan was amended owing to doubts as to road conditions, and Evelyn Walker reported a trip to Splendour Rock in lieu. To provide a test walk in place of the Barrington escapade, Barry Wallace took a party from Kanangra over Cambage Spire and along a section of the Kowmung. There was a hut working party at Coolana which completed walls and flooring and Dot Butler advised that, when the fireplace had been finished, the place would be ready for Council inspection. The Sunday walk in Dharug Park was led by Ruth Woods, and about 12 people followed an old timber road which took them fairly directly to a ridge where there were good aboriginal rock carvings. Returning by a fire trail to the cars, the trip proved rather easier than expected. For the opening weekend of April, Christine Kirkby'​s Barrington plan was amended owing to doubts as to road conditions, and Evelyn Walker reported a trip to Splendour Rock in lieu. To provide a test walk in place of the Barrington escapade, Barry Wallace took a party from Kanangra over Cambage Spire and along a section of the Kowmung. There was a hut working party at Coolana which completed walls and flooring and Dot Butler advised that, when the fireplace had been finished, the place would be ready for Council inspection. The Sunday walk in Dharug Park was led by Ruth Woods, and about 12 people followed an old timber road which took them fairly directly to a ridge where there were good aboriginal rock carvings. Returning by a fire trail to the cars, the trip proved rather easier than expected.
  
-The final weekend of the period under review was 9-11 April, Alastair ​Batty's trip being cancelled as he was still overseas. For Mount Solitary there was a party of six under Hans Beck: it was suggested the Sunday arrival back at Wentworth Falls about 2.0 p.m. created some sort of record. On the Sunday were two day walks, of which details were not available, save that Bill Hall had a very numerous crowd from Waterfall to Lilyvale (to Otford for 2 of the party), while Victor Lewin was reputed to have had 7 on the jaunt in the Blackheath trails.+The final weekend of the period under review was 9-11 April, Alastair ​Battye's trip being cancelled as he was still overseas. For Mount Solitary there was a party of six under Hans Beck: it was suggested the Sunday arrival back at Wentworth Falls about 2.0 p.m. created some sort of record. On the Sunday were two day walks, of which details were not available, save that Bill Hall had a very numerous crowd from Waterfall to Lilyvale (to Otford for 2 of the party), while Victor Lewin was reputed to have had 7 on the jaunt in the Blackheath trails.
  
 The meeting -wound up about 9.15 after the usual announcements,​ the news of the recent passing of Foundation Member Jack Debert, and the urgings of the Walks Secretary to provide some attractions on the Winter Walks Programme. The meeting -wound up about 9.15 after the usual announcements,​ the news of the recent passing of Foundation Member Jack Debert, and the urgings of the Walks Secretary to provide some attractions on the Winter Walks Programme.
Line 265: Line 265:
 Mr. Sing, Denise'​s friend, suggested a very nice Chinese restaurant for dinner. After all the Indian food we had been having, it was nice to have food we were familiar with. None of us had had very much to eat during the day, so we really enjoyed the meal. Mr. Sing, Denise'​s friend, suggested a very nice Chinese restaurant for dinner. After all the Indian food we had been having, it was nice to have food we were familiar with. None of us had had very much to eat during the day, so we really enjoyed the meal.
  
-After dinner we had a short stroll around Delhi and then back to Sonny'​s for the night. We had pushed two single beds together, ​ard three of us slept across it. Denise was turning out to be a real night owl. Just about the time the rest of us were ready to flake out, she would come to life and suggest a game of cards. Usually, some one would join her. I'm a very light sleeper, so I would join in too. I wouldn'​t be able to sleep anyway. That night Wayne, Denise and I played euchre - until 1.00 a.m. The next morning Neil came in at 7.30, having gone to sleep early the night before. I didn't get one really good night'​s sleep for the whole month.+After dinner we had a short stroll around Delhi and then back to Sonny'​s for the night. We had pushed two single beds together, ​and three of us slept across it. Denise was turning out to be a real night owl. Just about the time the rest of us were ready to flake out, she would come to life and suggest a game of cards. Usually, some one would join her. I'm a very light sleeper, so I would join in too. I wouldn'​t be able to sleep anyway. That night Wayne, Denise and I played euchre - until 1.00 a.m. The next morning Neil came in at 7.30, having gone to sleep early the night before. I didn't get one really good night'​s sleep for the whole month.
  
 Delhi is similar to Washington D.C., with its pattern of concentric circles with a green ring of grass in the centre and radial roads running outwards from the centre in all directions. Actually it is two cities. New Delhi with its broad boulevards, parks, fountains, impressive government buildings and embassies, plus most of the modern hotels and restaurants,​ and Old Delhi with its historic landmarks, crowded streets, bazaars and peripatetic cows. Needless to say, Old Delhi is much more interesting. Delhi is similar to Washington D.C., with its pattern of concentric circles with a green ring of grass in the centre and radial roads running outwards from the centre in all directions. Actually it is two cities. New Delhi with its broad boulevards, parks, fountains, impressive government buildings and embassies, plus most of the modern hotels and restaurants,​ and Old Delhi with its historic landmarks, crowded streets, bazaars and peripatetic cows. Needless to say, Old Delhi is much more interesting.
Line 275: Line 275:
 Wayne and I went to Chandni Chowk, a bazaar area in Old Delhi. This place was fascinating. Scenes from hundreds of years ago. We were the only Europeans around. Lots of women were wearing heavy veils over their faces. People were selling everything imaginable from very small booths. There were horse carts, trishaws, oxen, goats, cows and people everywhere. I couldn'​t believe that just a few miles away was New Delhi, with wide streets and tall buildings. I much preferred the old. Wayne and I went to Chandni Chowk, a bazaar area in Old Delhi. This place was fascinating. Scenes from hundreds of years ago. We were the only Europeans around. Lots of women were wearing heavy veils over their faces. People were selling everything imaginable from very small booths. There were horse carts, trishaws, oxen, goats, cows and people everywhere. I couldn'​t believe that just a few miles away was New Delhi, with wide streets and tall buildings. I much preferred the old.
  
-While in Delhi, Louise ​haa a very interesting experience. She was walking down one of the main streets, eating a chocolate eclair, when a huge hawk swept down and grabbed it right out of her mouth!! She said later the hawk must have known she really shouldn'​t have been eating something so fattening.+While in Delhi, Louise ​had a very interesting experience. She was walking down one of the main streets, eating a chocolate eclair, when a huge hawk swept down and grabbed it right out of her mouth!! She said later the hawk must have known she really shouldn'​t have been eating something so fattening.
  
 While in Delhi we discovered a crafts fair which was very interesting. We got to see crafts from all over India. We all bought some interesting things. We spent Christmas Eve here. We had dinner at an outside cafe. It was pretty cold too. They also had a huge ferris wheel, which was one of the fastest I had ever been on. Some of the group saw a ferris wheel which used three men for power. They used some sort of pedal arrangement to make the wheel go around. While in Delhi we discovered a crafts fair which was very interesting. We got to see crafts from all over India. We all bought some interesting things. We spent Christmas Eve here. We had dinner at an outside cafe. It was pretty cold too. They also had a huge ferris wheel, which was one of the fastest I had ever been on. Some of the group saw a ferris wheel which used three men for power. They used some sort of pedal arrangement to make the wheel go around.
Line 309: Line 309:
 ====Bushwalker Bob.==== ====Bushwalker Bob.====
  
-[Cartoon of man running from one end of tent while cow looks in other end. Two campers cooking ​breafast ​- one says to the other...]+[Cartoon of man running from one end of tent while cow looks in other end. Two campers cooking ​breakfast ​- one says to the other...]
  
 "I see Bob's finally up for breakfast."​ "I see Bob's finally up for breakfast."​
Line 323: Line 323:
 ===Why wait?=== ===Why wait?===
  
-The winter walks programme is now complete, but the spring walks programme is still open. So why vait until the last minute? If you can put a walk on the spring programme, then tell me about it now. The last-minute-rush approach has got whiskers on it.+The winter walks programme is now complete, but the spring walks programme is still open. So why wait until the last minute? If you can put a walk on the spring programme, then tell me about it now. The last-minute-rush approach has got whiskers on it.
  
 ===What'​s it about?=== ===What'​s it about?===
Line 356: Line 356:
 |25, 26, 27|Glen Davis area exploration with David Rostron.| |25, 26, 27|Glen Davis area exploration with David Rostron.|
 |26|Govett'​s Leap - Grand Canyon with John Fox.| |26|Govett'​s Leap - Grand Canyon with John Fox.|
 +
 +----
  
 =====Social Notes.===== =====Social Notes.=====
Line 382: Line 384:
 I caught the other two up and soon we all climbed up to the saddle. The trees were completely covered in moss. We were in a green world; Frank went beserk with the camera. I charged up the pass and in amongst the trees two wild men appeared sitting down with long knives. My God, Bandits! Not stopping I raced down the track and waited for the others. Helen thought they were bandits, too, but finally when Frank and the porters came along it turned out that they were bamboocutters who climb at least 3000 ft to the clumps. I caught the other two up and soon we all climbed up to the saddle. The trees were completely covered in moss. We were in a green world; Frank went beserk with the camera. I charged up the pass and in amongst the trees two wild men appeared sitting down with long knives. My God, Bandits! Not stopping I raced down the track and waited for the others. Helen thought they were bandits, too, but finally when Frank and the porters came along it turned out that they were bamboocutters who climb at least 3000 ft to the clumps.
  
-Down and down through the mists and soon out into the uncultivated rice paddies bathed by the weak sun and then more downhill until Gandrung, a stone village underneath Annapurna and on a prcipice, appeared. After an effort we found the resting house Annapurna Lodge. The view from the verandah was of a deep valley going left to the base of Annapurna 1 (or was it 2?), in front was a 3000ft ravine with another village just in front of us - 1/2 mile away yet it would take all day to reach it, and to our right the valley disappeared into misty bottomless depths.+Down and down through the mists and soon out into the uncultivated rice paddies bathed by the weak sun and then more downhill until Gandrung, a stone village underneath Annapurna and on a precipice, appeared. After an effort we found the resting house Annapurna Lodge. The view from the verandah was of a deep valley going left to the base of Annapurna 1 (or was it 2?), in front was a 3000ft ravine with another village just in front of us - 1/2 mile away yet it would take all day to reach it, and to our right the valley disappeared into misty bottomless depths.
  
 Here the porters reacted strongly to them having to go into snow country without any clothes and they decided to go home. We didn't care either. I gave them all the clothes that I would not be needing. Next morning they were gone. The owner of the lodge gave us breakfast in bed. (T'was no hardship. The beds were at one end of the room, tables in the middle and the kitchen at the other end.) A day at leisure. Walking out to the cliff edges and looking at Annapurna. Helen and Frank were photographing miles away, and here I had a wash. I hadn't washed for two weeks since Benares. The washing place was in full view of the lodge and all the girls sat and watched. I washed ALL over. I didn't care. Here too I washed my sox and had to walk around in my boots soxless. Here the porters reacted strongly to them having to go into snow country without any clothes and they decided to go home. We didn't care either. I gave them all the clothes that I would not be needing. Next morning they were gone. The owner of the lodge gave us breakfast in bed. (T'was no hardship. The beds were at one end of the room, tables in the middle and the kitchen at the other end.) A day at leisure. Walking out to the cliff edges and looking at Annapurna. Helen and Frank were photographing miles away, and here I had a wash. I hadn't washed for two weeks since Benares. The washing place was in full view of the lodge and all the girls sat and watched. I washed ALL over. I didn't care. Here too I washed my sox and had to walk around in my boots soxless.
Line 392: Line 394:
 The sun was setting but I decided to walk to Lumle 2 miles further on. I passed a Tibetan Chief sitting on his mule and all his family riding in single file, followed by 15 to 20 porters, and they camped not far from the village. They all slept on rugs huddled against a stone wall with horse and mules amongst them. The sun was setting but I decided to walk to Lumle 2 miles further on. I passed a Tibetan Chief sitting on his mule and all his family riding in single file, followed by 15 to 20 porters, and they camped not far from the village. They all slept on rugs huddled against a stone wall with horse and mules amongst them.
  
-At Lumle were a hippie American couple on drugs, who meditated in funny yoga postions ​and chanted whilst I was trying to sleep. A Belgian couple were there and they were talking non-stop about their travels in India, and I raved on about the horrors of Bangladesh.+At Lumle were a hippie American couple on drugs, who meditated in funny yoga positions ​and chanted whilst I was trying to sleep. A Belgian couple were there and they were talking non-stop about their travels in India, and I raved on about the horrors of Bangladesh.
  
 Next morning I raced up the hill to see the view but by 9 a.m. it is already obscured. And so on my last day I walked back the way we had come. Noticed a few lunatics sitting on fences and goitered ladies. Must be some deficiencies in the local tucker. For 2 hours I was accompanied by a group of school kids whose one ambition was to steal the string that was holding my rucksack in place. Their other hobby was throwing stones with deadly accuracy at every dog in sight. At sunset I was on a hill overlooking Lake Pokhara, and so raced madly down the hill and in the gloom found the Travellers Rest. Never go there! Next morning I raced up the hill to see the view but by 9 a.m. it is already obscured. And so on my last day I walked back the way we had come. Noticed a few lunatics sitting on fences and goitered ladies. Must be some deficiencies in the local tucker. For 2 hours I was accompanied by a group of school kids whose one ambition was to steal the string that was holding my rucksack in place. Their other hobby was throwing stones with deadly accuracy at every dog in sight. At sunset I was on a hill overlooking Lake Pokhara, and so raced madly down the hill and in the gloom found the Travellers Rest. Never go there!
197605.txt ยท Last modified: 2016/08/29 06:19 by tyreless