User Tools

Site Tools


197601

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
197601 [2015/12/13 04:19]
tyreless
197601 [2016/01/13 21:27] (current)
tyreless
Line 31: Line 31:
  
 Once a month you are liable to find your correspondent in a mood of deep depression, internally tormented, and pensive. It's no easy task, after all, thinking up new subjects for "​Bushwalker"​ editorials. What on earth will I write about this month? Sometimes I wonder why on earth I took the job on. After all, what does a person of my vocation, dealing all the time in figures and numbers, know about putting words together. "I am a numerate rather than a literate person",​ I told myself. I hearkened back to a week or so ago, when a work colleague had said to me, "I admire your absolute ability to think figures instead of words."​ I don't know if it was meant as a compliment, but it doesn'​t help me in my editorial endeavours. I could hardly present you with a page of yield calculations and call it an editorial. "What indeed",​ I asked myself again, "​prompted me to take this job on." My mind wandered again (it wanders a lot when I'm trying to write an editorial) to the lunch I had last Monday with a merchant banker friend, whose judgement, I might add, I trust implicitly. After Once a month you are liable to find your correspondent in a mood of deep depression, internally tormented, and pensive. It's no easy task, after all, thinking up new subjects for "​Bushwalker"​ editorials. What on earth will I write about this month? Sometimes I wonder why on earth I took the job on. After all, what does a person of my vocation, dealing all the time in figures and numbers, know about putting words together. "I am a numerate rather than a literate person",​ I told myself. I hearkened back to a week or so ago, when a work colleague had said to me, "I admire your absolute ability to think figures instead of words."​ I don't know if it was meant as a compliment, but it doesn'​t help me in my editorial endeavours. I could hardly present you with a page of yield calculations and call it an editorial. "What indeed",​ I asked myself again, "​prompted me to take this job on." My mind wandered again (it wanders a lot when I'm trying to write an editorial) to the lunch I had last Monday with a merchant banker friend, whose judgement, I might add, I trust implicitly. After
-pre-lunch chatter over gin-and-tonic,​ ranging through percentages,​ yield curves, discount factors and gross-ups, my friend happened to mention, "You know, I've learnt a lot about people by studying their birth signs."​ Being an astrological cynic from way back, it was my first inclination to ignore the remark and change the subject by asking whether he thought 9.5% November 1980's were a good buy. But as I said, I trust this fellow'​s judgement implicitly so I let him go on. "​Yes",​ he said, "​I'​ve found that with practice I can accurately anticipate the reaction I will get from someone with whom I'm negotiating,​ simply by knowing their birth sign." The conversation was terminated at this juncture by the adrival of my turtle soup, and I forgot it for the time being. But as I lumbered back to the office under the influence of the poulet a is bourguignonne,​ the half bottle of Elizabeth riesling, and the glass of Portuguese port I'd just consumed, I stopped in at Dymocks and bought a copy of Linda Goodman'​s "Sun Signs" which, according to the blurb on the cover, has sold more than a million copies. Back at the office I asked my assistant to do a quick survey of money market dealers'​ birthsigns. From this rather limited survey I found that there are more Geminis in the Sydney money market than other sun signs. This, according to Linda Goodman, would be because Geminis are such fast-thinking,​ agile minded, imaginitive people who can come to a decision quickly (my Co-editor Spiro is a Gemini by the way). Maybe there is something in it after all. At this point my mind reverts to the subject of my editorial. Perhaps +pre-lunch chatter over gin-and-tonic,​ ranging through percentages,​ yield curves, discount factors and gross-ups, my friend happened to mention, "You know, I've learnt a lot about people by studying their birth signs."​ Being an astrological cynic from way back, it was my first inclination to ignore the remark and change the subject by asking whether he thought 9.5% November 1980's were a good buy. But as I said, I trust this fellow'​s judgement implicitly so I let him go on. "​Yes",​ he said, "​I'​ve found that with practice I can accurately anticipate the reaction I will get from someone with whom I'm negotiating,​ simply by knowing their birth sign." The conversation was terminated at this juncture by the adrival of my turtle soup, and I forgot it for the time being. But as I lumbered back to the office under the influence of the poulet a is bourguignonne,​ the half bottle of Elizabeth riesling, and the glass of Portuguese port I'd just consumed, I stopped in at Dymocks and bought a copy of Linda Goodman'​s "Sun Signs" which, according to the blurb on the cover, has sold more than a million copies. Back at the office I asked my assistant to do a quick survey of money market dealers'​ birthsigns. From this rather limited survey I found that there are more Geminis in the Sydney money market than other sun signs. This, according to Linda Goodman, would be because Geminis are such fast-thinking,​ agile minded, imaginitive people who can come to a decision quickly (my Co-editor Spiro is a Gemini by the way). Maybe there is something in it after all. At this point my mind reverts to the subject of my editorial. Perhaps I could write about what birth signs make the best bushwalkers. I wonder what she says about Virgo (that'​s me)? Turn to page 254: "​Virgos usually shine in businesses such as publishing, the literary field.... service agencies, bookkeeping and accountancy."​ How about that? Virgos must enjoy the dual abilities of literacy __and__ numeracy. Say, I must remember that idea about bush walkers sun signs for next month'​s editorial.
-I could write about what birth signs make the best bushwalkers. I wonder what she says about Virgo (that'​s me)? Turn to page 254: "​Virgos usually shine in businesses such as publishing, the literary field.... service agencies, bookkeeping and accountancy."​ How about that? Virgos must enjoy the dual abilities of literacy __and__ numeracy. Say, I must remember that idea about bush walkers sun signs for next month'​s editorial.+
  
 =====Fiordland (N.Z.) for us Aussies===== =====Fiordland (N.Z.) for us Aussies=====
Line 60: Line 59:
 __Dusky Bay__ by A.C. & N.C. Begg. A very treasured and interesting book giving early account of the history of Dusky-Sound from Capt. Janes Cook through to ornithologist Richard Henry. Whitcombe and Tombs Ltd., P.O. Box 1465, Christchurch,​ New Zealand. __Dusky Bay__ by A.C. & N.C. Begg. A very treasured and interesting book giving early account of the history of Dusky-Sound from Capt. Janes Cook through to ornithologist Richard Henry. Whitcombe and Tombs Ltd., P.O. Box 1465, Christchurch,​ New Zealand.
  
-__Murihiku__ by Robert McNab. An account of history and sealing on the +__Murihiku__ by Robert McNab. An account of history and sealing on the southern Fiordland Coast. This man travelled the world to gain information. Wilson and Horton Ltd. Queen St., Auckland N.Z.
-southern Fiordland Coast. This man travelled the world to gain information. Wilson and Horton Ltd. Queen St., Auckland N.Z.+
  
 __Pioneers of Martins Bay__ by A. Mackenzie. An account of the history of the lower Hollyford River. __Pioneers of Martins Bay__ by A. Mackenzie. An account of the history of the lower Hollyford River.
Line 83: Line 81:
 Further information and application forms for bookings obtainable from __The Chief Ranger, Fiordland National Park, P.O.Box 29, Te Anau, N.Z.__ The track is usually open in summer __only__. Further information and application forms for bookings obtainable from __The Chief Ranger, Fiordland National Park, P.O.Box 29, Te Anau, N.Z.__ The track is usually open in summer __only__.
  
-__The Routeburn Track.__ Equally as magnificent as the Milford Track. A beautiful and picturesque way of arriving in To Anau from Queenstown. +__The Routeburn Track.__ Equally as magnificent as the Milford Track. A beautiful and picturesque way of arriving in To Anau from Queenstown. Bus from Queenstown, walk to Routeburn Falls Hut. A superb Burn. Climb is steep to Harris Saddle, then outstanding views into the glaciers of the Darran Mountains and down the magnificent Hollyford Valley to Martins Bay. It is possible to '​short-cut'​ after Harris Saddle and descend to camp in Murray Gunns Hollyford Camp (book for December-January period). Alternately continue along track to Howdon Hut. Key Summit is worthy of a brief detour to view Lake Marion below Mt. Christina. (One may walk to Lake Marion), Continue on to road. Afternoon bus leaves Milford Sound at 3.00 p.m. and should pick you up at track-road confluence at about 3.45 p.m. Bus goes to Te Anau. Cheap accommodation at Motor Lodge, out of town, southern edge of lake.
-Bus from Queenstown, walk to Routeburn Falls Hut. A superb Burn. Climb is steep to Harris Saddle, then outstanding views into the glaciers of the Darran Mountains and down the magnificent Hollyford Valley to Martins Bay. It is possible to '​short-cut'​ after Harris Saddle and descend to camp in Murray Gunns Hollyford Camp (book for December-January period). Alternately continue along track to Howdon Hut. Key Summit is worthy of a brief detour to view Lake Marion below Mt. Christina. (One may walk to Lake Marion), Continue on to road. Afternoon bus leaves Milford Sound at 3.00 p.m. and should pick you up at track-road confluence at about 3.45 p.m. Bus goes to Te Anau. Cheap accommodation at Motor Lodge, out of town, southern edge of lake.+
  
 It is also possible to undertake this as a guided walk, but full packs must be carried as there are no caretakers at the T.H.C. huts. Check! The full-pack, or freedom, walkers will find sleeping accommodation at the huts a case of 'first in best dressed'​. It is not uncommon to see people running along the Routeburn Track in order to gain a bed in one of the huts. Sandflies would make tent camping __extremely__ unpleasant. It is also possible to undertake this as a guided walk, but full packs must be carried as there are no caretakers at the T.H.C. huts. Check! The full-pack, or freedom, walkers will find sleeping accommodation at the huts a case of 'first in best dressed'​. It is not uncommon to see people running along the Routeburn Track in order to gain a bed in one of the huts. Sandflies would make tent camping __extremely__ unpleasant.
Line 106: Line 103:
 A trackless return over Pillans Pass via Gair Loch to Lake Manapouri is a good walk. I have yet to do this epic walk, but have been assured of its quality. The track continues, crossing Deadwood Creek on the longest ,​wirecrossing in the Park. It is not unusual to give up halfway across, and flop into the river to wade across. A trackless return over Pillans Pass via Gair Loch to Lake Manapouri is a good walk. I have yet to do this epic walk, but have been assured of its quality. The track continues, crossing Deadwood Creek on the longest ,​wirecrossing in the Park. It is not unusual to give up halfway across, and flop into the river to wade across.
  
-Now begins the climb of almost 4000' to Lake Roe Hut, above the treeline. Indeed, the alpine area is the highlight of the walk, and much time could be spent at Lake Roe Hut as a base for easy climbs and longer walks. This is a different world to the beech forests of the lower valleys. And a blessed haven from sandflies. In fact it is possible to strip off outside the hut to wash the body - a feat no one would dare for fear of loss of life in the valleys. +Now begins the climb of almost 4000' to Lake Roe Hut, above the treeline. Indeed, the alpine area is the highlight of the walk, and much time could be spent at Lake Roe Hut as a base for easy climbs and longer walks. This is a different world to the beech forests of the lower valleys. And a blessed haven from sandflies. In fact it is possible to strip off outside the hut to wash the body - a feat no one would dare for fear of loss of life in the valleys. There is a track all the way from Lake Roe Hut to the head of Lake Hauroka, and it is possible to undertake this distance in a long day, but another hut, aptly called Halfway Hut, is located halfway down the Hauroka Burn. The Hauroka Burn is a very pretty river, and it is with some regret that one arrives at the head of Lake Hauroka, at Hauroka Hut.
-There is a track all the way from Lake Roe Hut to the head of Lake Hauroka, and it is possible to undertake this distance in a long day, but another hut, aptly called Halfway Hut, is located halfway down the Hauroka Burn. The Hauroka Burn is a very pretty river, and it is with some regret that one arrives at the head of Lake Hauroka, at Hauroka Hut.+
  
 It is not possible to walk around the lake. Arrangements for a '​pick-up'​ should be made in advance, and confirmed in writing, and from New Zealand immediately before departure, with Mr. Don Dickens, Private Bag, Tuatapere, New Zealand, Southland. The boat will take you to the road-end at Lake Hauroka. It is not possible to walk around the lake. Arrangements for a '​pick-up'​ should be made in advance, and confirmed in writing, and from New Zealand immediately before departure, with Mr. Don Dickens, Private Bag, Tuatapere, New Zealand, Southland. The boat will take you to the road-end at Lake Hauroka.
Line 154: Line 150:
  
 Both John Redfern'​s and Victor Lewin'​s trips on the weekend 6/7 December were cancelled but a canyon trip not on the programme, led by David Rostrum, attracted 14 starters. Ross and Margriet Wyborn on a short visit from Canada, were the guests of honour on the trip, David re-scheduling and changing another summer trip for their benefit. Rain marred the start of the trip down Jerrara Creek - Bungonia Gorge, but the next day on the Shoalhaven and Barber'​s Creek was very hot and sunny, excluding a 60 minute period in the afternoon when the party had lunch in a tropical downpour. On the way out of Barber'​s Creek a large loose stone almost wiped out a couple of the tail-enders. Twelve starters went on Mary Braithwaite 's trip to the Basin led by Mary's husband Roy. A lazy hot day. Both John Redfern'​s and Victor Lewin'​s trips on the weekend 6/7 December were cancelled but a canyon trip not on the programme, led by David Rostrum, attracted 14 starters. Ross and Margriet Wyborn on a short visit from Canada, were the guests of honour on the trip, David re-scheduling and changing another summer trip for their benefit. Rain marred the start of the trip down Jerrara Creek - Bungonia Gorge, but the next day on the Shoalhaven and Barber'​s Creek was very hot and sunny, excluding a 60 minute period in the afternoon when the party had lunch in a tropical downpour. On the way out of Barber'​s Creek a large loose stone almost wiped out a couple of the tail-enders. Twelve starters went on Mary Braithwaite 's trip to the Basin led by Mary's husband Roy. A lazy hot day.
 +
 There being no General Business the meeting closed at 9.25 p.m. There being no General Business the meeting closed at 9.25 p.m.
  
Line 245: Line 242:
 |1976| | |1976| |
 |February| | |February| |
-|6, 7, 8|Frank Tacker is off once more to that scenic wonderland that is +|6, 7, 8|Frank Tacker is off once more to that scenic wonderland that is the Northern Budawang Range. This time Frank is gaining entry from Sassafras and walking the well—trodden path through to Monolith Valley. If you have not seen the Budawangs this walk is a must.| 
-the Northern Budawang Range. This time Frank is gaining entry from Sassafras and walking the well—trodden path through to Monolith Valley. If you have not seen the Budawangs this walk is a must.| +|7, 8|— A Saturday start with Alan Pike on this leisurely walk starting at Carlonts up the Cox's River from Breakfast Creek. Lots of opportunities to cool off in the river, a very pleasant trip.|
-|7, 8|— A Saturday start with Alan Pike on this leisurely walk starting +
-at Carlonts up the Cox's River from Breakfast Creek. Lots of opportunities to cool off in the river, a very pleasant trip.|+
 |7, 8|— A trip for the speliologist at heart. Even if you have never been caving before, Ray Carter will be happy to teach you the fundamentals. All you need is a little of that adventurous spirit and the rewards of entry into "​another world" are yours. Wyanbene is Ray's target so book early as small parties only.| |7, 8|— A trip for the speliologist at heart. Even if you have never been caving before, Ray Carter will be happy to teach you the fundamentals. All you need is a little of that adventurous spirit and the rewards of entry into "​another world" are yours. Wyanbene is Ray's target so book early as small parties only.|
 |7, 8|— What a weekend, something for everyone. Now we come to a lazy beach camp with Elaine Brown at Little Marley. Swimming, sunbathing and other bludge type activities that are necessary to have a good weekend.| |7, 8|— What a weekend, something for everyone. Now we come to a lazy beach camp with Elaine Brown at Little Marley. Swimming, sunbathing and other bludge type activities that are necessary to have a good weekend.|
-|13,​14,​15|— A meaty test walk with John Redfern, fantastic scenery out from  +|13,​14,​15|— A meaty test walk with John Redfern, fantastic scenery out from Katoomba along Narrow Neck and out to Splendour Rock. Tracks all the way, so what more could you want.|
-Katoomba along Narrow Neck and out to Splendour Rock. Tracks all the way, so what more could you want.|+
 |13,​14,​15|— For the more adventurous a quick sortie into librong Deep with David Rostron to see the spectacle of the Kowmung contained in a very narrow gorge. Canyon bags required for the cascading.| |13,​14,​15|— For the more adventurous a quick sortie into librong Deep with David Rostron to see the spectacle of the Kowmung contained in a very narrow gorge. Canyon bags required for the cascading.|
 |Sunday 15|- An easy Sunday stroll with Jim Brown from Otford to Lilyvale. Bring your swimmers as Jim is not one to stay out of the surf when it's hot.| |Sunday 15|- An easy Sunday stroll with Jim Brown from Otford to Lilyvale. Bring your swimmers as Jim is not one to stay out of the surf when it's hot.|
 |Sunday 15|- Elaine Brown is also doing a water baby trip down Tukawa Hill to Heathcote via Karloo Pool, so it had better be a hot day.| |Sunday 15|- Elaine Brown is also doing a water baby trip down Tukawa Hill to Heathcote via Karloo Pool, so it had better be a hot day.|
-|20,21,22|- Oliver Crawford leads this exciting but not diffioult trip down +|20,21,22|- Oliver Crawford leads this exciting but not diffioult trip down the magnificent Bungonia Gorge and up the Shoalhaven to the grand spectacle of the Block Up. Spectacular country and an excellent route to see it.|
-the magnificent Bungonia Gorge and up the Shoalhaven to the grand spectacle of the Block Up. Spectacular country and an excellent route to see it.|+
 |Sunday 22|- Highway type tracks all the way with Jeff Bridger'​s Govetts Leap, Grand Canyon walk. Some of the finest sandstone country around with sheer cliffs and deep narrow canyons.| |Sunday 22|- Highway type tracks all the way with Jeff Bridger'​s Govetts Leap, Grand Canyon walk. Some of the finest sandstone country around with sheer cliffs and deep narrow canyons.|
 |Sunday 22|- I can't imagine Roy Braithwaite walking past the North Era beach without having a dip, so bring your costumes for this sea-side walk in the Royal National Park.| |Sunday 22|- I can't imagine Roy Braithwaite walking past the North Era beach without having a dip, so bring your costumes for this sea-side walk in the Royal National Park.|
-|27,28,29|- Alastaire Battye is out to re-discover the "​lost"​ pass from the +|27,28,29|- Alastaire Battye is out to re-discover the "​lost"​ pass from the Capertee into the lower Wolgan River. There were many and varied vague reports which set Peter Miller on the quest without avail. Now Alastair has taken over. Awesome cliffs with magnificent views and scenery, so don't miss out.|
-Capertee into the lower Wolgan River. There were many and varied vague reports which set Peter Miller on the quest without avail. Now Alastair has taken over. Awesome cliffs with magnificent views and scenery, so don't miss out.|+
 |27,28,29|- That water baby from way back, Bill Burke, is off on one of his "tea bag" trips. He will have to be good to beat the record set by the last Jerrara Creek party of fourteen dips per trip, but I'm sure he will do his best. The highlight of this trip, except for the magnificent scenery, must be the Barber'​s Creek swimming/ slippery dip/ bombing hole.| |27,28,29|- That water baby from way back, Bill Burke, is off on one of his "tea bag" trips. He will have to be good to beat the record set by the last Jerrara Creek party of fourteen dips per trip, but I'm sure he will do his best. The highlight of this trip, except for the magnificent scenery, must be the Barber'​s Creek swimming/ slippery dip/ bombing hole.|
-|Sunday 29|- Unrivalled Hawkesbury River views with Margaret Reid on her Rocky Ponds walk. In views per kilometres walked this little trip scores very highly, so scratch out that other engagement you had, and contact Margaret.+|Sunday 29|- Unrivalled Hawkesbury River views with Margaret Reid on her Rocky Ponds walk. In views per kilometres walked this little trip scores very highly, so scratch out that other engagement you had, and contact Margaret.|
  
 =====Official Notice!===== =====Official Notice!=====
197601.txt · Last modified: 2016/01/13 21:27 by tyreless