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197306 [2017/07/04 05:55]
tyreless
197306 [2017/07/05 03:19]
tyreless
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-MORE LETTERS FROM DOROTHY ​ALAN PEKE+=====More Letters From Dorothy ​Alan Pike.===== 
-Tehran. + 
-8/3/73s+Tehran. 8/3/73. 
 Dear Everyone, Dear Everyone,
-Well, today we got up early and after breakfast, went in search of the Museum of Archeology. Once again, as we got into the crowded city streets a young "​Can-I-help-youn came along, this time a student of + 
-politics and he told us about a lady in Australia who had had 9 babies. +Well, today we got up early and after breakfast, went in search of the Museum of Archeology. Once again, as we got into the crowded city streets a young "​Can-I-help-you" ​came along, this time a student of politics and he told us about a lady in Australia who had had 9 babies. It made headlines in the Teheran papers, he said, so we agreed that it was amazing (although we couldn'​t remember it). The museum was very interesting ​for us, and also for a group of schoolchildren,​ boys and girls about 12 or 13 years old. They forgot about all the glass cases, and crowded around us all the time, staring at Dot, and laughing at us. Even the teachers and museum men couldn'​t stop them, until they took them to a different floor. 
-It made headlines in the Teheran papers, he said, so we agreed that it was amazing (although we couldn'​t remember it). The museum was very interest- + 
-ing for us, and also for a group of schoolchildren,​boys and girls about 12 +After the museum, we had lunch - soup, tea and bread, total price 21 rials (21 cents Aust) for the two of us. The soup was cooking in a big copper pot on the foot-path. He gave Dot a taste as we went past, so we went into a dirty little room, and sat down at a ricketty ​table. Another man gave us bread out of a hessian bag. The soup would have been good, except that he put sour goats milk on it. Well, it's cheap enough. 
-or 13 years old. They forgot about all the glass cases, and crowded around us all the time, staring at Dot, and laughing at us. Even the teachers and museum men couldn'​t stop them, until they took them to a different floor. + 
-After the museum, we had lunch - soup, tea and bread, total price +In the afternoon we saw the Crown Jewels of the Shah, which are quite impressive, a huge room full - but not really interesting. Tomorrow we catch the bus to Isfahan. 
-21 rials (21 cents Aust) for the two of us. The soup was cooking in a big copper pot on the foot-path. He gave Dot a taste as we went past, so we went into a dirty little room, and sat down at a rickotty ​table. Another man gave us bread out of a hessian bag. The soup would have been good, except that he put sour goats milk on it. Well, it's cheap enough. + 
-In the afternoon we saw the Crown Jewels of the Shah, which are quite +Shiraz. 13/3/73. 
-impressive, a huge room full - but not really interesting. Tomorrow we catch the bus to Ispahan+ 
-Shiraz. +Isfahan was very interesting and beautiful. The mosques are incredibly ​beautiful with all the inlay tile work on them. In the (covered) bazaar we saw how the tiny shops made bread, crystallised sugar, and even watched a man make a felt hat, starting from little pieces of fluff. Isfahan still very cold - (6,000 ft) so we bought coats of sheepskin. Yesterday took bus to Shiraz (400 miles for $1.40 each and free glucose sweets and free soft drinks in super tourist coach - we were the only non-locals). The coaches are covered with curtains, tassels and pompoms and look like an ancient camel caravan. Today we went to Persepolis, which as you know from Paddy, is just fabulous. Has been very dry up till now, cracked skin, nose-bleeds etc. for us both
-13/3/73. + 
-Isfahan was very interesting and beautiful. The mosques are incredp. +Baghdad, ​Iraq. 19/3/73. 
-ibly beautiful with all the inlay tile work on them. In the (covered) bazaar we saw how the tiny shops made bread, crystallised sugar, and even watched a man make a felt hat, starting from little pieces of fluff. + 
-Isfahan still very cold - (6,000 ft) so we bought coats of sheepskin. +Here we are in Iraq, land of three revolutions since 1957 when they shot the King and his relatives and Iraq became a republic. However, we have found no evidence of such violence and indeed it is hard to believe of such happy, friendly people, and the only reminder of the country'​s hostilities to Israel and perhaps Iran is presence of soldiers (much like Iran) toting rifles and bayonets. 
-Yesterday took bus to Shiraz (400 miles for $1.40 each and free glucose + 
-sweets and free soft drinks in super tourist coach - we were the only +Crossing the border from Abadan in Iran to Basra in Iraq was really quite a feat. We first took 2 taxis and a bus to get to Korramshire and then another taxi to a desolate outpost called "​Shelamahire",​ which was the Iranian border. After getting through the customs we were rather unsure what to do next, as the Persians hadn't been across the border and couldn'​t tell us how far to the next place, but indicated (sign language) that Iraq was ahead and that we should start walking. So we marched off into the flat desert of nothingness except for a few palm trees in the distance and a line of telegraph poles. Presently we came across a notice that said "Basra 20 km", which is about 12 miles, and our hearts sank at the prospect of walking ​that far with packs and no shade. However, after about 2 miles walking we came to some low buildings of mud bricks, which turned out to be the Iraqi customs and border (apparently there is a neutral zone between countries ​we weren'​t game to take a photo). 
-non-locals). The coaches are covered with ovrtains, tassels and pompoms and look like an ancient camel caravan. Today we went to PersepOlis, which as you know from Paddy, is just fabulous. Has been very dry up till now, cracked skin, nose-bleeds etc. for us both, + 
-Baghdad, ​Ira. +We walked past the army and went into the "​custome office"​ where we spent about 1 1/2 hours while the customs man examined our passports and particularly our visa which we had got in Australia. He was apparently very unsettled by our presence and was scared of doing the wrong thing and letting us in if we weren'​t allowed. He was very puzzled by the word "​tourism"​ in the visa which was the described reason for our visit. He said that "​tourism"​ was a French word so how come it appeared in an Australian visa. The problem was that the visa didn't actually say "​Australia",​ only said "​issued at Canberra"​ which the man hadn't heard ofAlso he wanted to know if Australia had broken off relations with Iraq because we had no embassy there. (He was a consul in United ​Arab Republic embassy). We had to impress upon him that it never had an embassy; ​Canberra was Australia'​s capital city and that tourism was an English word. It didn't help that he only had about 10 words of English himself. Eventually we got everything sorted out and he was all smiles and wanted to know (so does everybody else) since we ware married, where were all our little ones? Being Alan'​s ​age himself he was very proud of his six children. 
-19/3/73. + 
-Here we are in Iraq, land of three revolutions since 1957 when they shot the King and his relatives and Iraq became a republic. However, we have found no evidence of such violence and indeed it is hard to believe of such happy, friendly people, and the only reminder of the country'​s +Well, after waiting another half hour, a taxi took us 10 miles or so to the to the town, travelling all the way in clouds of dust and about 4 soldiers in the car too, singing their heads off (all wailing eastern type music) and laughing and having a great old time. We arrived at a punt where we changed taxis and waited for the punt which only took two cars at a time. I forgot to mention that through all this we had a money problem. We didn't want to change money unnecessarily in Iran and we got to the border after much wangling, with about 50 cents. ​Once in Iraq we had no money (Iraqi dinars) and it was a Friday, which is like a Sunday in Sydney and so all banks closed. The taxi wanted 2 dinars (about 4 dollars anerican) to take us from the customs (20 kms) to Basra and we could only scrape together about 3 dollars using Iran and Australian money. Fortunately we were saved by a kind young man (one of three others crossing the border in the time we were there) from Kuwait who gave us 2 dinars (as a "​welcome"​ present he said) and so we got to Basra. Once across the river by punt, the taxi took us way out of town, much to our dismay, (he spoke no English) and deposited us at a huge hotel beside the Iraqi Airways airport. It was called the Shalt-al-Arab ​and there we werehobnobbing with all the wealthy businessmen,​ Russian spys and airlines staff and eating 4-course meals and still not a cent (Iraqi) to our names. 
-hostilities to Israel and perhaps Iran is presence of soldiers (much like Iran) toting rifles and bayonets. + 
-Page 12 THE SYDNEY BUSHWAIIMR June9 1973. +We spent the day around the hotel. There was a nice little park nearby on the river (Euphrates) where we met a group of young schoolgirls. They could speak a little English and we had a great conversation as they fed us on date cakes and pumpkin seeds. A soldier came along (armed to the teeth) and tried to join in but he was much ridiculed by the girls. We spent the night at the Arab hotel. It was a strange place. All very upper class English, but in fact rather untidy and in much need of paint and repairs. Next day the banks opened, so we went into the town which was absolutely terrible, got some money and bought train tickets to Baghdad for the night train. We had quite a long talk to an Englishman (motor-bike salesman) that afternoon at the hotel. It was good to talk to someone who could understand us for a change. 
-*********************** + 
-MOUNTAIN +The train trip to Baghdad was a nightmare but we survived it. Found a cheap but passable hotel in the centre of town and now are having a look around. Baghdad has the most fantastic museum. We will probably stay a week or two more in Iraq then fly to Lebanon and then Eqypt. 
-**.xf-.*******44-*********** + 
-EQUIPMENT*************XXXX**** +---- 
-********XXX*********** + 
-* * * * * * * * * * +=====Social Secretary's Notes.===== 
-IF YOU ARE  +
-BUYING OR HIRING HIRING OR BUYING +
-GEAR FOR +
-WALKING ​ CAYT.ING CLIMBING CANOEING  +
-WALKING e. CAMPING , CLIMBING ​ CANOEING  +
-TTE.= OF +
-MOUNTAIN EQUIP= +
-17 Alexander Street9 Crow's Nest 2065 (On the cornea- of Falcon Street) Telephone 439-3454. +
-for +
-7.:LIPYDOWN STRTIPING BAGS +
-HIGH LOAD PACKS (Weight 3 lb. 10 oz) +
-AND ALL TEE OTHER THINGS YOU COULD POSSIBLY 1\T}TED +
-* * * * * * * * * +
-Page 13 _5HE SYDNEY BUSHUALKER Juno, 1973. +
-Crossing the border from Abadan in Iran to Basra in Iraq was really +
-quite a feat. We first took 2 taxis and a bus to get to Korramshire and +
-then another taxi to a desolate outpost called "​Shelamahire",​ which was the Iranian border. After getting through the customs we were rather unsure what to do next, as the Persians hadn't been across the border and couldn'​t tell us how far to the next place, but indicated (sign language) that Iraq was ahead and that we should start walking. So we marched off into the flat desert of nothingness except for a few palm trees in the distance and a line of telegraph poles. Presently we came across a notice that said "​Basra ​ +
-20 km", which is about 12 miles, and our hearts sank at the prospect of malking ​that far with packs and no shade. However, after about 2 miles walking we came to some low buildings of mud bricks, which turned out to be the +
-Iraqi customs and border (apparently there is a neutral zone between countries we weren'​t game to take a photo). +
-We walked past the army andwent into the "​custome office"​ where we spent about hours while the customs man examined our passports and particularly our visa which we had got in Australia. He was apparently very unsettled by our presence and was scared of doing the wrong thing and letting us in if we weren'​t allowed. He was very puzzledby the word "​tourism"​ in the visa which was the described reason for our visit. He said that "​tourism"​ was a French word so how come it appeared in an Australian visa. The problem was that the visa didn't actually say "​Australia",​ only said "​issued at +
-Canberra"​ which the man hadn't heard of Also ho wanted to know if Australia +
-had broken off relations with Iraq because we had no embassy there. (He +
-was a consul in United_ ​Arab Republic embassy). We had to impress upon him that it never had an ombassy3 ​Canberra was Australia'​s capital city and +
-that tourism was an English word. It didn't help that he only had about +
-10 words of English himself. Eventually we got everything sorted out and he was all smiles and wanted to know (so does everybody else) since we ware married, where were all our little ones? Being Alan'​s ​ago himself he was very proud of his six children0 +
-oll after waiting another half hour, a taxi took us 10 miles or so +
-to the toMn, travelling all the way in clouds of dust and about 4 soldiers in the car too, singing their heads off (all wailing eastern type music) +
-and laughing and having a great old time. We arrived at a punt where we changed taxis and waited for the punt which only took two cars at a time. I forgot to mention that through all this %,e had a money problem. We didn't want to change money unnecessarily in Iran and we got to the border +
-after much wangling, with about 50 cents. ​Oncr, in Iraq we had no money (Iraqi dinars) and it was a Friday, which is like a Sunday in Sydney and so all banks closed. The taxi wanted 2 dinars (about 4 dollars anerican) to take us from the customs (20 kms) to Basra and we could only scrape together about 3 dollars using Iran and Australian money. Fortunately we were saved by a kind young man (one of three others crossing the border in the time we were there) from Kuwait who gave us 2 dinars (as a "​welcome"​ present he said) and so we got to Basra. Once across the river by punt, the taxi took us way out of town, much to our dismay, (he spoke no English) and deposited us at a huge hotel beside the Iraqi Airways airport. It was called the ShaltalArab ​and there we were hobnobbing with all the +
-Page 14 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER June, 1973. +
-wealthy businessmen,​ Russian spys and airlines staff and eating 4-course meals and still not a cent (Iraqi) to our names. +
-We spent the day around the hotel. There was a nice little park nearby on the river (Euphrates) where we met a group of young schoolgirls. They could speak a little English and we had a great conversation as they +
-INNi us on date cakes and pumpkin seeds. A soldier came along (armed to +
-the teeth) and tried to join in but he was much ridiculedby the girls. +
-We sport the night at the Arab hotel. It was a strange place. All very upper class English, but in fact rather untidy and in much need of paint and repairs. Next day the banks opened, so we went into the town which was absolutely terrible, got some money and bought train tickets to Baghdad for the night train. We had quite a long talk to an Englishman (motor- +
-bike salesman) that afternoon at the hotel. It was good to talk to +
-someone who could understand us for a change. +
-The train trip to Baghdad was a nightmare but we survived it. Found a cheap but passable hotel in the centre of town and now are having a look +
-around. Baghdad has the most fantastic museum. We will probably stay a week or two more in Iraq then fly to Lebanon and then Eqypt. +
-********XXXX*XXX +
-SOCIAL SECRETARY'S NOTES+
 by Elaine Brown. by Elaine Brown.
-On June 27th Mouldy Harrison was to give a talk and show slides on 
-"​Gardens Around the World"​. Mouldy unfortunately for us will be in Canada and has transferred his evening to the 17th October. Frank Taeker has agreed to give a talk and show slides on New Guinea on 27th. Frank as 
-you all know is a very good photographer so this should be an interesting evening. 
-On July the 18th we have "The Concert"​. Those of you who missed the 
-great actors at The Reunion will have another chance to see the Club's talent. 
-7e have had numerous requests for Dot Butler to repeat the Andean Expedition slide night. This falls on the 15th August - these slides are first class and can be seen again and again. 
-17e also had requests for Jim Brown to show his slides of steam trains 
-po on August 22nd_ Jim will give us an evening "An End to Steam Locomotives";​ August 29th we are having a slide competition. Members are asked to 
-bring along 6 of their best slides spotted on the bottom left hand side and with their names on. Er. Don Mackenzie, President of the Warringah Camera Club, will be the judge. Could you please hand the slides in 
-before 8 p m. on the night of judging. 
-***********#​ 
  
 +On June 27th Mouldy Harrison was to give a talk and show slides on "​Gardens Around the World"​. Mouldy unfortunately for us will be in Canada and has transferred his evening to the 17th October. Frank Taeker has agreed to give a talk and show slides on New Guinea on 27th. Frank as you all know is a very good photographer so this should be an interesting evening.
 +
 +On July the 18th we have "The Concert"​. Those of you who missed the great actors at The Reunion will have another chance to see the Club's talent.
 +
 +We have had numerous requests for Dot Butler to repeat the Andean Expedition slide night. This falls on the 15th August - these slides are first class and can be seen again and again.
 +
 +We also had requests for Jim Brown to show his slides of steam trains so on August 22nd Jim will give us an evening "An End to Steam Locomotives"​.
 +
 +August 29th we are having a slide competition. Members are asked to bring along 6 of their best slides spotted on the bottom left hand side and with their names on. Mr. Don Mackenzie, President of the Warringah Camera Club, will be the judge. Could you please hand the slides in before 8 p.m. on the night of judging.
 +
 +----
197306.txt · Last modified: 2017/07/05 03:24 by tyreless