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-WOODFORDLINDEN AND FAULCONBRIDGE.+=====WoodfordLinden and Faulconbridge.===== 
 by Marion Lloyd. by Marion Lloyd.
-(Marion points out that this is not original ​meteriaI ​but a + 
-collection of information from books, brochures and individual people.) +(Marion points out that this is not original ​material ​but a collection of information from books, brochures and individual people.) 
-WOODFORD ​- The Transit of Venus. + 
-It will be recalled that Capt. Cook came into the southern waters for the purpose of observing the transit of Venus across the sun in June 17699 when he subsequently discovered the east coast of Australia. +===Woodford ​- The Transit of Venus.=== 
-Page 11 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER March, 1973. + 
-A Directory of 1882 states that in 1874 Woodford was chosen by the Government Astronomer to observe the transit of Venus. On Dec.8, ​18749 "​Woodford" ​-the mountain residence of AFairfax, Esq. was selected as a +It will be recalled that Capt. Cook came into the southern waters for the purpose of observing the transit of Venus across the sun in June 1769, when he subsequently discovered the east coast of Australia. 
-suitable site from which this astronomical event could be observed. In + 
-the party was Mr. Du Faur of the Survey Dept. who was associated with the oarly settlement at Mt. Wilson. The day dawned clear and bright and the transit of Venus was observed successfully...."​with zeal and +A Directory of 1882 states that in 1874 Woodford was chosen by the Government Astronomer to observe the transit of Venus. On Dec. 8, 1874, "​Woodford"​ the mountain residence of AFairfax, Esq. was selected as a suitable site from which this astronomical event could be observed. In the party was Mr. Du Faur of the Survey Dept. who was associated with the early settlement at Mt. Wilson. The day dawned clear and bright and the transit of Venus was observed successfully.... "with zeal and worthy of the occasion"​. 
-worthy of the occasion"​. + 
-Woodford and Linden are two places very closely associatedwith +Woodford and Linden are two places very closely associated with Blaxland'​s journey across the Blue Mountains in 1813, and there are still to be found many traces of the old Cox's Road. 
-Blaxland'​s journey across the Blue Mountains in 1813, and there are still + 
-to be found many traces of the old Cox's Road. +===Bull's Camp.=== 
-BULL'S CAMP (Incorporating Bull's Flogging Stone, Bull's Powder Magazine, Bull's Bath, Bull's Seat). + 
-Bull's Camp is about *miles before Woodford after Linden and was a convict road gang stockado. The Cox's Road at this spot followed the top of the ridge, i c4 beyond the railway ​lino (near Woodford Trig) +(Incorporating Bull's Flogging Stone, Bull's Powder Magazine, Bull's Bath, Bull's Seat). 
-When Mitchell was altering the road, late in 1820s to early 1830s, ​ho put the road where it is now. + 
-The man in charge was Lieut, Bull. Bull was a humane man and he is given credit to being the first such officer to ensure Christian burial +Bull's Camp is about  1 1/2 miles before Woodford after Linden and was a convict road gang stockade. The Cox's Road at this spot followed the top of the ridge, i.e. beyond the railway ​line (near Woodford Trig)When Mitchell was altering the road, late in 1820s to early 1830s, ​he put the road where it is now. 
-to convicts who might die. This is one reason why most historians think the "coils", one in the camp and one in the hill above, were really store + 
-rooms for gun-powder or tools. Bull mentioned an Inn, which must have been Pembroke'​s,​ which therefore certainly stood at that time. +The man in charge was Lieut, Bull. Bull was a humane man and he is given credit to being the first such officer to ensure Christian burial to convicts who might die. This is one reason why most historians think the "cells", one in the camp and one in the hill above, were really store rooms for gun-powder or tools. Bull mentioned an Inn, which must have been Pembroke'​s,​ which therefore certainly stood at that time. 
-An interesting spot is Bull's Seat. This scat is in the railway cutting about opposite end of Bull's Camp. It has a seat carved in the rock, a spot carved where the butt of the gun would rest, and it gives a good view of much of the road. + 
-There arc nuMbor ​of "​baths"​ in the area, particularly in the Woodford-Linden area. They wore holes cut out of the rock, some more elaborate than others, some having ​stops loading ​into thorn. They were possibly ​usca to store water, bathing or swimming purposes. +An interesting spot is Bull's Seat. This seat is in the railway cutting about opposite end of Bull's Camp. It has a seat carved in the rock, a spot carved where the butt of the gun would rest, and it gives a good view of much of the road. 
-Cottages opposite Bull'​s ​Cam k (Rockorry ​Cottages).+ 
 +There are number ​of "​baths"​ in the area, particularly in the Woodford-Linden area. They were holes cut out of the rock, some more elaborate than others, some having ​steps leading ​into them. They were possibly ​used to store water, bathing or swimming purposes. 
 + 
 +===Cottages opposite Bull'​s ​Camp (Rockerry ​Cottages).=== 
 The sign on the roadside claims they were convict built in 1839. The Springwood Historical Society knows little about them. The map in the 1882 Directory shows a gate-house on the line just before the railway reaches Bull's Camp, but there is no resemblance to a railway cottage. No other buildings are shown in that area (does any one know the history of those 2 cottages?). The sign on the roadside claims they were convict built in 1839. The Springwood Historical Society knows little about them. The map in the 1882 Directory shows a gate-house on the line just before the railway reaches Bull's Camp, but there is no resemblance to a railway cottage. No other buildings are shown in that area (does any one know the history of those 2 cottages?).
-Back to Woodford  + 
-A test bore for kerosene shale was put down at Woodford and Professor David reported this in 1889. It commenced at an altitude of 2061 foot +===Back to Woodford.=== 
-Page 12 THE SYDNEY BUSHWAUCER March, 1973. +  
-and was struck to within 405 feet of sea level, but no further action was taken. +A test bore for kerosene shale was put down at Woodford and Professor David reported this in 1889. It commenced at an altitude of 2061 foot and was struck to within 405 feet of sea level, but no further action was taken. 
-The 1882 Directory also goes in rhapsodies over the "eight very 1,​.M.king ​waterfalls"​ in the area. + 
-BUSS - Buss's Inn (Woodford Academy) . +The 1882 Directory also goes in rhapsodies over the "eight very striking ​waterfalls"​ in the area. 
-Hard by the north side of the Great Western Highway on the hill at Woodferd_stanAs ​the Woodfoikci-Avzsierays, a building that is steeped in history_ ​of the Blue.E.auntains. Its exterior exudes an atmosphere of the past. To + 
---Iles ​layman and passingmotorist it suggests ​convicts9 ​military troopers-3---.... +===Buss ​- Buss's Inn (Woodford Academy).=== 
--ocadhing ​inns, the goldrush and all the exciting eras-of early Australian history. The Academy has experienced all these periods and has been part of the early history of the Bathurst Road.+ 
 +Hard by the north side of the Great Western Highway on the hill at Woodford stands ​the Woodford Academy, a building that is steeped in history ​of the Blue Mountains. Its exterior exudes an atmosphere of the past. To the layman and passing motorist it suggests ​convicts, ​military troopers, coaching ​inns, the goldrush and all the exciting eras of early Australian history. The Academy has experienced all these periods and has been part of the early history of the Bathurst Road. 
 Latest research into the history of the old building has brought many new facts to light, but unfortunately gaps appear in the chronological history. Latest research into the history of the old building has brought many new facts to light, but unfortunately gaps appear in the chronological history.
-First mention of any inn or building in this site was in the 1820s - it was known as "​Pembroke'​s Hut". In 1836 Pembroke mortgaged the property including the "​Woodman'​s Inn" to John Terry Hughes and John Hosking. There was a Crown Grant to Michael Hogan in 1842, probably for the purpose of "​building a respectable inn". Work done is most likely the nucleus of the present building. Buss acquired the Inn in 1855 for 1040. It reached + 
-its heyday as an inn during the Turon Goldrush. +First mention of any inn or building in this site was in the 1820s - it was known as "​Pembroke'​s Hut". In 1836 Pembroke mortgaged the property including the "​Woodman'​s Inn" to John Terry Hughes and John Hosking. There was a Crown Grant to Michael Hogan in 1842, probably for the purpose of "​building a respectable inn". Work done is most likely the nucleus of the present building. Buss acquired the Inn in 1855 for £1040. It reached its heyday as an inn during the Turon Goldrush. 
-Amilitary depot site was a little to the west of Buss'​s. Graves of soldiers are on this site - headstones may be seen at the back of the Academy - possibly some were used as flooring in a kitchen. (Aftor the + 
-Inn closed it became a popular boarding establishment under various owners.) +A military depot site was a little to the west of Buss'​s. Graves of soldiers are on this site - headstones may be seen at the back of the Academy - possibly some were used as flooring in a kitchen. (After the Inn closed it became a popular boarding establishment under various owners.) 
-FAIRFAX - After Buss the building was ownedby Mr. Alfred Fairfax (possibly of Fairfax and Roberts, the jewellers) who called the house "​Woodford"​.+ 
 +===Fairfax.=== 
 + 
 +After Buss the building was owned by Mr. Alfred Fairfax (possibly of Fairfax and Roberts, the jewellers) who called the house "​Woodford"​. 
 In the 1882 Directory an advertisement appears which says:- In the 1882 Directory an advertisement appears which says:-
 +
 "​Woodford House, Woodford, Blue Mountains "​Woodford House, Woodford, Blue Mountains
 +
 Change of Air and Mountain Scenery Change of Air and Mountain Scenery
 +
 Private Accommodation for Visitors Private Accommodation for Visitors
 +
 Safe bathing places for Ladies and Children at the Falls on the Estate Safe bathing places for Ladies and Children at the Falls on the Estate
 +
 Choice fruit from the Orchard at Table Choice fruit from the Orchard at Table
-Terms strictly moderate - Special arrangements for families Apply Lamb and Fairfax, 23 Hunter Street, Sydney+ 
 +Terms strictly moderate - Special arrangements for families 
 + 
 +Apply Lamb and Fairfax, 23 Hunter Street, Sydney 
 or John R. Place, Woodford. or John R. Place, Woodford.
 +
 A capital Tennis Court on the Grounds."​ A capital Tennis Court on the Grounds."​
-Page 13 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALEER March, 1973. + 
-It was once ownedby Lord Rosebery. In 1907 it was named "​Woodford Academy"​ andbecame a boarding ​schoo and continued as such for over 25 +It was once owned by Lord Rosebery. In 1907 it was named "​Woodford Academy"​ and became a boarding ​school ​and continued as such for over 25 years. The building is at present used as a private residence and its owner and occupier is Miss McManamey, whose father carried on a boys' school there for many years. 
-years. The building is at present used as a private residence and its owner and occupier is Hiss McManamey, whose father carried on a boys' school there for many years. + 
-Railway Stations. +===Railway Stations.=== 
-It seamed ​that there wore two reasons why platforms were placed + 
-at particular spots. One was the presence of an Inn such as Buss's Inn +It seemed ​that there were two reasons why platforms were placed at particular spots. One was the presence of an Inn such as Buss's Inn in 1868 on the south side of the Highway just up the hill from Woodford Academy. When Fairfax owned "​Woodford House" the station was moved to this site in 1871. Woodford Station has been in four different places. The second, in 1887 was only a 1/2 mile from the present ​Hazelbrook. It was moved nearer Sydney in 1880 and finally, in 1902, to its present site at the bottom of the grade. The railway station was known as Buss until 1871. 
-in 1868,on the south side of the Highway just up the hill from Woodford + 
-Academy. When Fairfax owned "​Woodford House" the station was moved tothis site in 1871. Woodford Station has been in four different places. The second, in 1887 was only a mile from the present ​Hazeibrook. It was moved nearer Sydney in 1880 and finally, in 1902, to its present site at the bottom of the grade. The railway station was known as Buss until +The second reason for stations being placed at particular spots was the presence of a residence of a person sufficiently important and influential ​to persuade the railway authorities to cater especially for him and his family. Thus "​Numantia"​ (see below) was present between the present Faulconbridge and Linden Stations. It was close to land owned by Sir James Martin who as one authority claims laid out five acres of foundations for a large house. It became known as "​Martin'​s Folly" after its abandonment. "​Martin'​s Corner"​ was on the Old Bathurst Road. 
-1871. + 
-The second reason for stations being placed at particular spots wEls +Faulconbridge was originally closer to Sydney than the present station and was opened for Sir Henry Parkes, Premier of N.S.W., his home and the station were named for his mother, Martha Faulconbridge. 
-the presence of a residence of a person sufficiently important and influent- + 
-ial to persuade the railway authorities to cater especially for him and his family. Thus "​Numantia"​ (see below) was present between the present Faulconbridge and Linden Stations. It was close to land owned by Sir James +===Linden - Cayley'​s Repulse.=== 
-Martin who as one authority claims laid out five acres of foundations for + 
-a large house. It became known as "​Martin'​s Folly" after its abandonment. "​Martin'​s Corner"​ was on the Old Bathurst Road. +First mention is from Blaxland'​s Journal dated Wed. 19 May, 1813 (9th day of trip) ".... Found a heap of stones piled in the shape of a pyramid by some Europeanone side of which the natives had opened, apparently to see if anything was deposited in the middle..., conjectured it to have been the end of Mr. Bass's track who attempted to pass the mountains"​. 
-Faulconbridge was originally closer to Sydney than the present station and was opened for Sir Henry Parkes, Premier of N.S.7., his home and the + 
-station were named for his mother, Martha Faulconbridge. +It was a mystery as to who had built it and the puzzle is still unsolved. Governor Macquarie thought later that George Caley had built it and named the spot "​Caley'​s Repulse"​. Macquarie passed the cairn on the second day of his trip over the Blue Mountains, and Historical Records of Australia says "The Mountain in the neighbourhood was named Caley'​s Repulse"​. 
-LINDEN ​Cayley'​s Repulse.  + 
-First mention is from Blaxland'​s Journal dated Wed. 19 May, 1813 (9th day of trip) ".... Found a heap of stones piled in the shape of a pyramid +Others thought George Bass had made the pile, but there is no proof of this either. All that is certain is that some unknown white man had previously reached this point. However it is commonly believed that the present cairn is not the original. "The present pile of stones is, however one that has been erected since the original pile was noted, it having been broken down...."​ Stephen. 
-by some European one side of which the natives had opened, apparently to + 
-see if anything was deposited in the middle..., conjectured it to have been the end of Mr.Bass'​s track who attempted to pass the mountains"​. +I have been told that the original was on top of the ridge above the present pile. The track along the ridge above the cairn is part of the Cox's Road. Recently a guard rail was put around the Repulse. (Recently ​houses have been build near the Repulse and it was very hard to find it amongst ​the rubbish, and unless you knew what the pile of rocks was it could easily have been mistaken for rubble as it appears most insignificant.) 
-It was a mystery as to who hadbuilt it and the puzzle is still unsolved. Governor Macquarie thought later that George Caley had built it and named the spot "​Caley'​s Repulse"​. Macquarie passed the cairn on the second day of his trip over the Blue Mountains, and Historical Records of Australia says "The Mountain in the neighbourhood was named Caley'​s Repulse"​. + 
-Others thought George Bass had made the pile, but there is no proof +===King's Cave.=== 
-of this either. All that is certain is that some unknown white man had previously reached this point. However it is commonly believed that the + 
-present cairn is not the original. "The present pile of stones is, however one that has been erected since the original pile was noted, it having been +Whether the story of Bushranger King is fact or legend is not certain. He is supposed to have camped in the Cave when he shot policeman John Donahue in 1837. Donahue'​s grave is buried by the railway, below the northern side of the line near Linden, but the headstone was moved to a spot alongside the track and locals built a rail around it. 
-broken down...."​ Stephen. + 
-I have been told that the original was on top of the ridge above the +===Lady ​Martin'​s Bath and the Railway Line ("​Numantia"​)=== 
-Page 14 Ti-E SYDNEY BUSHWALKER March, 1973.  + 
-present pile. The track along the ridge above the cairn is part of the Cox's Road. Recently a guard rail was put around the Repulse. (Rebently ​houses have been build near the Repulse and it was very hard to find it amonst ​the rubbish, and unless you knew what the pile of rocks was it +(between Linden and Faulconbridge ​see also "​Railway Stations"​). 
-could easily have been mistaken for rubble as it appears most insignificant.) + 
-King's Cave. Whether the story of Bushranger King is fact or legend is not certain. He is supposed to have camped in the Cave when he shot policeman John Donahue in 1837. Donahue'​s grave is buried by the railway, below the northern side of the line near Linden, but the headstone was moved to a spot alongside the track and locals built a rail around it. +This cottage now called "​Weemala"​ was originally called "​Numantia"​ and was built in 1876 for Sir James Martin. Martin was Prime Minister of N.S.W. prior to Parkes and was later Chief Justice of N.S.W. (Note that Martin and Parkes preferred ​the title Prime Minister rather than Premier.) Martin was a man of grand ideas, and his wife had money, so he decided to build a fine mansion further west, and had foundations put in. However ​by this time Lady Martin was rather eccentric and she withdraw financial support. Included in the foundations were two excavated rock tanks, 25' by 6' ​by 10' deep, and about 150 yards south Martin found a spring and had a tiny reservoir built. This was called "​Lady ​Martin's Bath", but it is doubtful whether she bathed in it. These foundations were called "​Martin'​s Folly"and stood until 1908 when E. W. Cansdell bought them and built "The Bungalow"​ on them. This property is now called "​Banool"​ and stands where the highway crosses the line. The tanks are at the rear. The railway siding "​Numantia"​ stood at the western end of the nearby cutting. 
-Lad. Martin'​s Bath and the Railway Line + 
-between Linden and Faulconbridge see also "​Railway Stations"​). +Alfred Stephen, who wrote an article for the Royal Australian Historical Society in 1945, recalls ​that it was in the valley just below Lady Martin'​s Bath that, in 1896, Frank Butler murdered Arthur Preston, a young student he had enduced to go gold mining with him. Butler had also murdered Lee Well in Glenbrook Gully. Ho was later brought back from California and hanged. 
-This cottage now called "​Weemala"​ was originally called "​Numantia"​ + 
-and was built in 1876 for Sir James Martin. Martin was Prime Minister +===Stone House - "​Weemala"​ - between Linden and Faulconbridge.=== 
-of N.S.W. prior to Parkes and was later Chief Justice of N.S.U. (Note + 
-that Martin and Parkes preferred ​tho title Prime Minister rather than Premier.) Martin was a man of grand ideas, and his wife had money, so he decided to build a fine mansion further west, and had foundations put in. Howovor ​by this time Lady Martin was rather eccentric and she withdraw financial support. Included in the foundations were two excavated rock tanks, 25' by 6 by 10' deep, and about 150 yards south Martin found a spring and had a tiny reservoir built. This was called "​Lady ​Mhrtin's Bath", but it is doubtful whether she bathed in it. These foundations were called "​Martin'​s Folly" ​and stood until 1908 when E. W. Cansdell bought them and built "The Bungalow"​ on them. This +The stone house of which only the shell now stands was built in 1881. The builder was a famous local stone mason, Paddy Ryan, and he built it for a city businessman named McCullough. When it was built it was called "Weemala", but a later owner changed the name to "​Errama"​ and it was known by this name until it was burnt down in 1968 bushfires. In 1889 McCullough sold the house to J.W. Cliff, and in about 1898 he sold it to Mr. George Evans, a solicitor, after whom "Evans Lookout"​ in Blackheath is named. He died in 1913, and his daughter Mrs. MacLaurin hold it until 1922; sold it to Gilbert Nathan; in 1927 Mr. Joseph Brown bought it. The Browns left it sometime in 1950s (I think)it was then damaged by vandals and a Mr. Adam had just bought it and was restoring it when it was destroyed. 
-property is now called "​Banool"​ and stands where the highway crosses the + 
-line. The tanks are at the roar. The railway siding "​Numantia"​ stood at the western end of the nearby cutting. +Between Weemala ​and Eurama was a house "Alphington" ​which was built in 1887 for Sir Alfred Stephen (then Chief Justice). It was a weatherboard house, standing fairly close to the stone ruins. In fact McCullough lived in it while the stone residence was being built. In 1921 this weatherboard house was removed and now stands in the Great Western Highway opposite the Faulconbridge School and is now called "​Danville"​. 
-Alfred Stephen, who vroto an article for the Royal Australian Historical Society in 1945, reaalls ​that it was in the valley just below Lady Martin'​s Bath that, in 1896, Frank Butler murdered Arthur Preston, a young student he had enduced to go gold mining with him. Butler had also murdered Lee Well in Glenbrook Gully. Ho was later brought back from California and hanged. + 
-Stone House - "​Weemala"​ - between Linden and Faulconbridge.  +===Faulconbridge.=== 
-The stone house of which only the shell now stands was built in 1881. The builder was a famous local stone mason, Paddy Ryan, and he built it for a city businessman named McCullough. When it was built it was called "Ueemala", but a later owner changed the name to "​Errama"​ and it was known by this name until it was burnt down in 1968 bushfires. In 1889 McCullough sold the house to LW. Cliff, and in about 1898 ho sold it to Mr.George Evans, a solicitor, after whom "Evans Lookout"​ in Blackheath is named. + 
-He died in 19139 and his daughter Mrs. MacLaurin hold it until 19225 sold it to Gilbert Nathan; in 1927 Mr. Joseph Brown bought it. The Browns left it sometime in 1950s (I think) ​it was then damaged by vandals and a Mr. Adam had just bought it and was restoring it when it was destroyed. +This little village is only a mile west of Springwood, but has an air of quiet beauty and serenity. 
-Page 15 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER March, 1973. + 
-  =11.= +Growing at Faulconbridge (Altitude 1465 ft) is a rare type of Malee Tree discovered only recently. Thousands are to be seen on the northern ridge, the largest probably about 100 years old. There are about 100 trees in the Valley of the Waters at Wentworth Falls and about 200 at Braidwood. These are the only known trees of this species in existence. 
-Between Weemala ​and_ Eurama was a house "Alphingtoe ​which was built in 1887 for Sir Alfred Stephen (then Chief Justice). It was a weatherbaard houe, standing fairly close to the stone ruins. In fact McCullough lived in it while the stone residence was being built. In 1921 this weatherboard house was removed and now stands in the Great Western Highway opposite the Faulconbridge School and is now called "​Danville"​. +
-IAULCONBRIDGE+
-This little village is only a mile west of Springwood, but has an +
-air of quiet beauty and serenity. +
-Growing at Faulconbridge (Altitude 1465 ft) is a rare typo of Malice ​Tree discovered only recently. Thousands are to be seen on the northern +
-ridge, the largest probably about 100 years old.. There are about 100 trees +
-in the Valley of the Waters at "Wentworth Falls and about 200 at Braidwood. These are the only known trees of this species in existence.+
 Here lived and is buried Sir Henry Parkes. Here lived and is buried Sir Henry Parkes.
-A few weeks before the Battle of Waterloo and just after Governor ​Liacquarie ​returned to Sydney after travelling over the recently constructed road to the site of Bathurst, Henry Parkes was born on May 27th, 1815 in Uarwickshire, EnglandIn 1839 he came to N.S.U. with his young wife and from his entry into politics in 1848 until his death in 1896 at the ago of 81, ho worked unselfishly for his country. He was the driving force behind the movement for Federation but he didnot live to see its introduction.+ 
 +A few weeks before the Battle of Waterloo and just after Governor ​Macquarie ​returned to Sydney after travelling over the recently constructed road to the site of Bathurst, Henry Parkes was born on May 27th, 1815 in Warwickshire, EnglandIn 1839 he came to N.S.W. with his young wife and from his entry into politics in 1848 until his death in 1896 at the ago of 81, he worked unselfishly for his country. He was the driving force behind the movement for Federation but he did not live to see its introduction. 
 It was Sir Henry Parkes who, in 1866, arranged with Florence Nightingale to send to the Colony a number of trained nurses. It was Sir Henry Parkes who, in 1866, arranged with Florence Nightingale to send to the Colony a number of trained nurses.
-His grave is at Faulconbridge and the village was named after his mother Martha ​Faulcoribridge+ 
-There is a splendid avenue of trees at Faulcohbridge ​known as Prime Ministers'​ Oaks, as all the Prime Ministers of Australia have planted a tree there. +His grave is at Faulconbridge and the village was named after his mother Martha ​Faulconbridge. 
-Acknowledgements:​ + 
-OurI3L_ueMota asun by P. U. Spriggs +There is a splendid avenue of trees at Faulconbridge ​known as Prime Ministers'​ Oaks, as all the Prime Ministers of Australia have planted a tree there. 
-The Snweod HistorIcal S6ciey ​and especially to Mr. T. A. Morony ​its President + 
-Pictorial ​History of the Blue Mountains ​Blue Mountains City Council +===Acknowledgements:​=== 
-The Blue MOuntains CrosSing b Jehn Kennedy + 
-**XXXXXXX***** +__Our Blue Mountains Yesterdays__ ​P. W. Spriggs 
-Page 16 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER March, 1973. + 
-*********X X x ii-****x X x*** +__The Springwood Historical Society__ ​and especially to __Mr. T. A. Morony__ ​its President 
-MOUNTAIN + 
-*X )(XXX -X-X-X-X--X--X-***X X X***-X* +__Pictorial ​History of the Blue Mountains__ - Blue Mountains City Council 
-EQUIPMENT*****************XXX + 
-****************XXXX +__The Blue Mountains Crossing__ by John Kennedy 
-* * * * * * * * * * + 
-IF YOU ARE +---- 
-BUYING OR HIRING HIRING OR BUYING + 
-GEAR FOR +=====Walks Secretary Notes For April.===== 
-WALKING ​ CAMPING ...... CLIMBING ...... CANOEING ......+ 
-WALKING ​ CAMPING ​ CLIMBING ...... CANOEING ....... +by Wilf Hilder 
-THINK OF + 
-ELUNTAIN EQUIPEENT ​ +|1973April| | 
-17 Alexanaer StreetCrow's Nest. 2065 (On the corner of Falcon Street) Telephone 439-3454. +|6,7,8|Roy Higginbottom has been sent to Queensland so we need a substitute leader for this medium to hard walk from Medlow to Mt. Strongleg and the Low Gangerangs. Anyone wanting to lead this interesting walk please see me and place a notice on the board.| 
-for +|6,7,8|The Federation Reunion is on again at Sugee Bag Creek near Spencer on the Hawkesbury. Circulars giving all the details are now available.| 
-FAIRYDOUN STP7PING BAGS +|Sunday 8|Bill Hall leads this medium walk into Heathcote State Park. Good tracks most of the way except the Girrouba Creek section. Very pleasant walking area with delightful views.| 
-HIGH LOAD PACKS Might 3 lb. 10 oz) +|Saturday ​14|Late afternoon start for this hard Colo __day__ ​walk transferred from 4th March and led by Wilf the waster. Waterproof packs are compulsory but fishing rods are not. Photo stops will be made at Bass sized pools on route, says Wilf.| 
-AND ALL THE OTHER THINGS YOU COULD PCOSIBLY NEED +|Sunday ​15|Uncle David Ingram leads this easy Sunday wander thru Heathcote State Park from Waterfall to Heathcote. Tracks about half the way with a bit of scrub pushing for practice. Inspection of the nudist colony at Morella Karong ​by special arrangement only. Please note David can no longer be contacted on the phone no. shown on the walks programme.| 
-* * * * * * * * * * +|Easter ​19-23|Jumping John Campbell is your genial guide to the Victorian Alps, probably one of the great alpine walks. Mount B----y, Mount Speculation,​ Mount Hewitt, The Cross Cut Saw, The Razor the famous peaks of Victoria within your grasp. Book early for this hard walk.| 
-Page 17 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER March1973. +|Easter ​19-23|Uncle Don does it again. Don's Mystery Hike sorry but you can't give him humble pie for going astray. Good company, ? scenery, ? tracks for ? kilometres on this Easter special.| 
-WALKS SECRETARY NOTES FOR APRIL by Wilf Hilder, +|Easter ​19-23|George Catchpole'​s heading for the Monaro ​Alps on this medium Easter trip to Oldfields Hut. Lush snowgrass meadows and pretty snowgums. Excellent views and tracks all the way. Book early please.| 
-1973 +|Easter ​19-23|The good old Nandewars ​great walking country. Alan Fall is leading ​this scenic walk snow grass and snowgums high above the western plains. Fabulous scenery for 360º from spectacular volcanic peaks. Book early please.| 
-April Roy Higginbottom has been sent to Queensland so we need a +|Anzac Day 25|Uncle Sam Hinde leads ye easy stroll to Marley ​and back to Bundeena. Tracks most of the way. Excellent scenery ​ask Sam to show you the aboriginal carvings on Marley ​Head.| 
-6, 7, 8 substitute leader for this medium to hard walk from Medlow to Mt. Strongleg and the Low Gangerangs. Anyone wanting to lead this interesting walk please see me and place a notice on the board. + 
-6, 79 8 The Federation Reunion is on again at Sugee Bag Creek hear Spencer +|27,28,​29|Fondon ​leads it like it is - the two peaks from Kanangra. Spectacular scenery with a lot of hill climbing, but lush campsites. Ideal company on this hard walk.| 
-on the HaWkedbury. Circulars giving all the details are now +|27,28,29|Bendethera Caves are on again with Ray Carter as leader. Steep climb out of valley to cars, but tracks about a third of the way. Spectacular views over Deua Valley.| 
-available. +|Sunday ​29|A test walk in Darug National Park near Wisemans Ferry. Excellent scenery and aboriginal carvings. Tracks and pads about half the distance. Book early please.| 
-Sunday 8Bill Hall leads this medium walk into Heathcote State Park. Good +|Sunday ​29|David Cotton'​s Bee Walk is with us again - sorry, no cactus samples. Easy Sunday picnic at Darkes Forest.| 
-tracks most of the ray except the Girrouba Creek section. Very pleasant walking area with delightful views. + 
-Saturday Late afternoon start for this hard Colo day walk transferred +---- 
-14 - from 4th March and led by Wilf the waster. Waterproof packs are compulsory-but fishing rods are not. Photo stops will be made + 
-at Bass sized Deals on route, says Wilf. +=====Report Of Federation of Bushwalking Clubs Meeting ​- 20 February, ​1973.===== 
-Sunday Uncle David Ingram leads this easy Sunday wander thru Heathcote + 
-15 State Park from Waterfall to Heathcote. Tracks about half the +by Phil Butt. 
-way with a bit of scrub pushing for practice. Inspection of,the nudist colony at Morella Karong by special arrangement only. Please note David can no longer be contacted on the phone no0 shown on the walks programme. + 
-Easter Jumping John Campbell is your genial guide to the Victorian Alps, +1. Re Anzac Day Service. ​Due to the fact that Easter is crowding Anzac Day this year much discussion ensued as to when the service should ​be held at Splendour Rock - this year marks the 25th Anniversary ​of the placing of the plaque. The wish of the meeting was for the actual day, but subsequently the sub-committee ​especially formed to organize the dawn ceremony, under the joint chairmanship of Messrs. Brian Harvey (S.B.W.) and Stan Cattier (C.M.W.), have decided to hold it on the Sunday ​week following Anzac Day, that is May 6th 1973. Please note this date and then attend! 
-19-23 probably one of the great alpine walks. Mount B----y, Mount Speculation,​ Mount Hewitt, The Cross Cut Saw, The Razor the famous peaks of Victoria within your grasp. Book early for this hard walk. + 
-Easter Uncle Don does it again. Don's Mystery Hike sorry but you can'​t ​19-23 give him humble pie for going astray. Good company, ? scenery, ? tracks for ? kilometres on this Easter special. +2. The Federation Reunion is to be held at Sugee Bag Creek on 7-8th April 1973. Be there!! ​Sing-song and campfire Saturday night, competitions on Sunday. 
-Easter George Catchpole'​s heading for the Eonaro ​Alps on this medium + 
-19-23 Easter trip to Oldfields Hut. Lush snowgrass meadows and pretty snowgums. Excellent views and tracks all the way. Book early please. +3. Party of three canoeists missing downstream of Glen Davis. S. & R. asked police to arrange for helicopter to locate the party as the Colo River was in high flood. They were located safely in Capertee Valley. 
-Easter The good old Nandewars great walking country. Alan Fall is + 
-19-23 loading ​this scenic walk snow grass and snowgums high above the western plains. Fabulous scenery for 3600 from spectacular volcanic peaks. Book early please. +4. Mr. Murray Scott - Conservation ​Bureau chairman - presented a copy of a full and comprehensive report for presentation to the Government Inquiry on proposed Natural Gas Pipeline through the Wollangambe Wilderness. A motion was passed praising Murray on his report as it indicates detailed and time consuming research. 
-Anzac Day Uncle Sam Hinde leads ye easy stroll to Earley ​and back to + 
-25 Bundoona. Tracks most of the way. Excellent scenery ask Sam to show you the aboriginal carvings on Earley ​Head. +---- 
-Page 18 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER March1973. + 
-1973 +=====Why Do Walkers Walk?===== 
-April - ;;TOndon-leads it iike'it is - the two peaks from Kanangra. ​27,​28-29 ​Spectacular scenery with-a lot of hill cliMbing, but lush campsites. Ideal company on this hard walk. + 
-27,28-29 Bendethera Caves are on again with Ray Carter as leader. Steep climb out of valley to cars, but tracks about a third of the way. Spectacular views over Deua Valley. +(The following is the text of a letter received by one of our members from his brother, who had just returned from a four-week ​trip to South-West ​Tasmania.) 
-Sunday ​A test walk in Darug National Park near Wisemans Ferry. + 
-29 Excellent scenery and aboriginal carvings. ​,Tracks and pads about half the distance. Book early please. +Well, all back, safe and almost sound. It's funny, the planned 25 days was just about our comfortable physical (and probably psychological) limit. I developed painful blisters in the last two days, someone else had a painful ankle by the end, etc. 
-Sunday ​David Cotton'​s Bee Walk is with us again,- sorry, no cactus ​29 samples. Easy Sunday picnic at Darkes Forest. + 
-*********# +The first four days took us from Catamaran to Melaleuca (Port Davey) where Dennis King mines tin for $100 per sugarbag, and watches the hikers come and go. We got thoroughly fed up with wet and muddy feet every day; putting on wet socks in the morning to walk through bogs (euphemistically known as buttongrass plains). However, after the second week of wet feet, as it was now water rather than mud, one could accept it as the normal way of life. 
-REPORT OF FEDERATION OF BUSHWALKING CLUBS  + 
-MEETING ​- 20 FEBRUARY? ​1973. by Phil Butt. +The weather had become ​less kind to us and we had several days of rain. By now we were out along the Scotts Peak Road, near Pedder, and hoping to climb Mt. Anne (4,675 ft.). However, it decided to remain in cloud while we waited there 3 days, but we did climb to the High Camp (approx. 1,000 m.)From below the High Camp we had the "Lake Edgar Panorama"​ spread to the west. We could see the tree line of the beach of Pedder showing above the water, Mt. Solitary, and Scotts Peak beginning to be encircled by the water. 
-1. Re Anzac Day Service. ​Duo to the fact that Easter is crowding + 
-Anzac Day this year much discussion ensued as to when the service should +We returned to the bush, this time to the Eastern Arthurs where the famed Federation Peak (4,010 ft.) lurks. The track leaves ​from Cracroft Crossing on the Cracroft River (a Huon subsiduary). Here we were awed by a stand of magnificent mountain ash (?) perhaps 200 ft. high. Here and there were "​fallen giants",​ huge paperbark melaleucas, and tall beeches. ​We were to see a lot more beech forests in the Eastern Arthurs. 
-bo held at Splendour Rock - this year marks the 25th Amnivorsary ​of the placing of the plaque. The wish of the meeting was for the actual day, but subsequently the sub-committoo ​especially formed to organize the + 
-dawn ceremony, under tho joint chairmanship of Messrs. Brian Harvey (S.B.W.) +That evening we were visited by a wallaby that ate any food given it. A check of the hut log book showed that it had been coming for 5 years!! 
-and Stan Cattier (C.M..7.), have decided to hold it on the Sunday ​weak following Anzac Day, that is May 6th 1973. Please note this date and then attend1 + 
-2. The Federation Reunion is to be hold at Sugee Bag Creek on 7-8-* April 1973. Be theroN ​Sing-song and campfire Saturday night, competitions on Sunday. +We then had two hot, clear days of climbing, and then scrambling, which became tediously slow when pack hauling for 7 peopleWe had now reached ​Thwaites ​Plateau, but the weather was turning cloudy! The problem with climbing Federation is access. One can either do the southern traverse (if you like heights) from Hanging Lake, or descend the "​forest chute" and ascend the "scree chute"​. Otherwise 1,000 ft. drops get in the way. The final ascent is 700 ft. of rock. 
-3. Party of three canoeists missing downstream of Glen Davis. S. & asked police to arrange for helicopter to locate the party as the ColoRiver was in high flood. They were located safely in Capertee Valley. + 
-4. Mr. Murray Scott - Consorvation ​Bureau chairman - presented a copy of a full and comprehensive report for presentation to the Government Inquiry on proposed Natural Gas Pipeline through the Ubllangathbo Uildernoss. A motion was passed praising Murray on his report as it indicates detailed and time consuming research. +By next day it was blowing hard, the cloud had descended, and the summit gone from view. So we once again sat and waited for two days, only in much less pleasant conditions as we were quite high up. As it was drizzling almost continuously,​ we couldn'​t light a fire (choofers are great, gas stoves are hopeless). We finished all our books, played a lot of cards, told jokes and read a Playboy that we had found. Then we packed up and reluctantly left. However we missed the start of the "​forest chute" and spent three miserable hours stumbling about in the driving rain. So it took two days to get down. Moss Ridge is unbelievable. It's everything ​wet, muddy, you squeeze between vertical trees, horizontal trees, and both at the same time. Of course your pack gets caught a million times (especially the high Canadian type our leader had). Then you have 8 ft. drops with no handholds left in the mud. The track goes up and down several times. Yes, of course it was raining. Thank God we were not trying to climb __up__ ​Moss Ridge. 
-Page 19 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER March, 1973. + 
-WHY -DO WALKERS WALK?  +Then followed three days of 12 hours hiking each day as we tried to hurry out, falling further and further behind our schedule as each day passed. This included scrub bashing through dense scrub for 2 hours, climbing through virgin forest - the logs you stood on squelched like wet papier mache and logs and moss lay everywhere. I forgot how many hours for a 700 ft. climb. ​Then a 19 mile road bash, a fluke 9 p.m. lift from the picnic ground, and the leader and I were at the Geeveston Pub, bathing and lying in strange things called beds. 
-(The following is the text of a letter received by one of our members from his brother, who had just returned from a fourWeek ​trip to SouthWest ​Tasmania.) +
-Well, all back, safe and almost sound. It's funny, the planned 25 day S was just about our comfortable physical (and probably psychological) +
-limit. I developed painful blisters in the last two days, someone else had a painful ankle by the end, etc. +
-The first four days took us from Catamaran to Melaleuca (Port Davey) +
-where Dennis King mines tin for $100 per sugarbsg, and watches the hikers come and go. We got thoroughly fed up with wet and muddy feet every day; putting on wet socks in the morning to walk through bogs (euphemistically known as buttongrass plains). However, after the second week of wet feet, +
-as it was now water rather than mud., one could accept it as the normal way of life. +
-The weather had become ​loss kind to us and we had several days of rain. +
-By now we were out along the Scotts Peak Road, near Podder, and hoping to climb Ht. Anne (49675 ft.). However, it decided to remain in cloud while we waited there 3 days, but we did climb to the High Camp (approx. 1,000 na.) From below the High Camp we had the "Lake Edgar Panorama"​ spread to the west. +
-We could see the tree line of the beach of Pedder showing above the water, +
-Mt. Solitary, and Scotts Peak beginning to be encircled by the water. +
-Uo returned to the bush, this time to the Eastern Arthurs where the +
-famed Federation Peak (4,010 ft.) lurks. The track loaves ​from Cracroft Crossing on the Cracroft River (a Huon sUbsiduary). Here we were awed by +
-a stand of magnificent mountain ash (?) perhaps 200 ft. high. Here and there were "​fallen giants",​ huge paperbark melaleucas, and tall beeches. ​'​de ​were to see a lot more beech forests in the Eastern Arthurs. +
-That evening we wore visitedby a wallaby that ate any food given it. A +
-check of the hut log book showedthat it had been coming for 5 years!! +
-We then had two hot, clear days of climbing, and then scrambling, which became tediously slow when pack hauling for 7 peopleWe had now reached +
-Thwaitos ​Plateau, but the weather was turning cloudy! The problem with +
-climbing Federation is access. One can either do the southern traverse (if you like heights) from Hanging Lake, or descend the "​forest chute" and ascend the "scree chute"​. Otherwise 1,000 ft. drops got in the way. The final ascent is 700 ft. of rock. +
-By next day it was blowing hard, the cloud had descended, and the summit gone from view. So we once again sat and waited for two days, only in much loss pleasant conditions as we were quite high up. As it was drizzling almost continuously,​ we couldn'​t light a fire (choofers are great, gas stoves are hopeless). We finished all our books, played a lot of cards, told jokes and read a Playboy that we had found. Then we packed up and +
-Page 20 +
-TIE SYDNEY BUSHWALICER +
-March 1973. +
-. . +
-reluctantly left. However we missed the start of the "​forest chute" andspent three miserable hours stumbling about in the driving rain. So it took two days to get down. MOSS Ridge is unbelievable. It's everything wet, muddy, you squeeze between vertical trees, horizontal trees, and both at the same time. Of course your pack gets caught a million times (especially the high Canadian type our leader had). Then you have 8 ft. drops with no handholds left in the mud. The track goes up and down several times. Yes, of course it was raining. Thank God we were not trying to climb Moss Ridge. +
-Then followed three days of 12 hours hiking each day as we tried to hurry out, falling further and further behind our schedule as each day passed. This included scrub bashing through dense scrub for 2 hours, climbing through virgin forest - the logs you stood on squelched like wet papier mache and logs and moss lay everywhere. I forgot how many hours +
-for a 700 ft. climb. ​Than a 19 mile road bash, a fluke 9 p m. lift from the picnic ground, and the leader and I were at the Goeveston Pa, bathing and lying in strange things called beds.+
 To me, the relief at being out was immense, as I was utterly exhausted. To me, the relief at being out was immense, as I was utterly exhausted.
-I had arranged for a Rental car through work, so I picked it up in Hobart, collected the othLrs, and then we (six now) toured the country in style, but not before a long stint at the laundromat, and a gluttonous meal at a magnificent restaurant (the Beefeater). We ate like pigs for days. Between scheduled meals we ate icecreams, milk shakes, andpies from the country bakeries. And by now we wore so lazy that even the tourist-type scenic walks weren'​t too polular+ 
-You may ask why we didit if it was so miserable. We were walking so as to reach the spot wo were to have the next meall! One didn't enjoy getting wet, or bush-bashing through impenetrable scrub or trees, but there was a feeling of enjoying being there, seeing the unique country, +I had arranged for a Rental car through work, so I picked it up in Hobart, collected the others, and then we (six now) toured the country in style, but not before a long stint at the laundromat, and a gluttonous meal at a magnificent restaurant (the Beefeater). We ate like pigs for days. Between scheduled meals we ate icecreams, milk shakes, and pies from the country bakeries. And by now we were so lazy that even the tourist-type scenic walks weren'​t too popular. 
-of going somewhere, and of having done something. The unknown lay ahead each day.+ 
 +You may ask why we did it if it was so miserable. We were walking so as to reach the spot we were to have the next meal!! One didn't enjoy getting wet, or bush-bashing through impenetrable scrub or trees, but there was a feeling of enjoying being there, seeing the unique country, of going somewhere, and of having done something. The unknown lay ahead each day. 
 So even though we didn't climb our two peaks, and though we argued amongst ourselves and plagued each other, we all enjoyed something. So even though we didn't climb our two peaks, and though we argued amongst ourselves and plagued each other, we all enjoyed something.
 +
 But I wouldn'​t do it again! But I wouldn'​t do it again!
-******Xxx*** + 
-Page 21 THE SYDNEY BUSE7A1KER March, 1973. +---- 
-S.B.W. ​OFFICE BEARERS ​1973. + 
 +=====S.B.W. ​Office Bearers ​1973.===== 
 The following office-bearers and committee members were elected at the S.B.W. Annual General Meeting held on Wednesday, 14th March, 1973: The following office-bearers and committee members were elected at the S.B.W. Annual General Meeting held on Wednesday, 14th March, 1973:
-President ​VicePresidents + 
-Secretary Treasurer +|President|Bob Younger*| 
-Walks Secretary +|Vice-Presidents|Bill Burke*, Dot Butler*| 
-Social Secretary +|Secretary|Sheila Binns*| 
-Membership Secretary +|Treasurer|Marcia Shappert*| 
-Committee Members +|Walks Secretary|Wilf Hilder*| 
-Federation Delegates +|Social Secretary|Elaine Brown*| 
-Substitution Federation Delegates Conservation Secretary +|Membership Secretary|Geoff Mattingley*| 
-Literary Editor +|Committee Members|Adrienne Shilling*, Jan Studdert*, Roger Gowing*, Barry Wallace*| 
-Magazine Business Manager Duplicator Operator +|Federation Delegates|Wilf Hilder*, Heather White, Rosemary Edmonds*, Don Finch| 
-Keeper of Maps 8c Equipment Hire Search & Rescue Contacts +|Substitution Federation Delegates|Spiro Ketas, Evelyn Walker| 
-Archivist +|Conservation Secretary|Alex Colley| 
-Projectionist Auditor +|Literary Editor|Spiro Ketas| 
-Solicitor Trustees +|Magazine Business Manager|Bill Burke| 
-Bob Younger Bill Burke Dot Butler Sheila Binns Marcia Shappert Wilf Hilder +|Duplicator Operator|Mike Short| 
-Elaine Brown +|Keeper of Maps Equipment Hire|Roger Gowing, Ray Carter, Peter Chorley| 
-Geoff Eattingley +|Search & Rescue Contacts|Elsie Bruggy Don Finch, Christa Younger| 
-Adrienne Shilling Roger Gowing +|Archivist|Phil Butt| 
-Wilf Hilder Rosemary Edmonds Spiro Ketas Alex Colley Spiro Ketas Bill Burke Mike Short +|Projectionist|Geoff Mattingley| 
-Roger Gowing Ray Elsie Bruggy Don Phil Butt +|Auditor|Gordon Redmond
-Geoff Mattingley +|Solicitor|Colin Broad 
-Gordon Redmond Colin Broad +|Trustees|Heather WhiteBill BurkeGordon Redmond| 
-Heather White Bill Burke +|Management Committee "Coolana" ​Kangaroo Valley property|Dot Butler, ​Owen MarksSpiro KetasGeorge Grey, Bill Gillam
-Gordon Redmond +
-* Jan Studdert * Barry Wallace +
-Heather White +
-Don Finch +
-Evelyn WrAker +
-Carter Peter Chorley +
-Finch Christa '​Younger +
-Management Committee "Coolanam) Dot Butler ​Kangaroo Valley property ​Owen Marks +
-Spiro Ketas George Grey Dill Gillam+
 * Indicates members of the Committee. * Indicates members of the Committee.
-Two assistant treasurers were appointed Rosemary Edmunds Gladys Roberts 
-************ 
-Page 22 THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER March, 1973. 
-CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT. ​ 
-At the Annual General Meeting held on Wednesday, 14th March, 19739 
-the following Constitutional Amendment was proposed by Mr. Spiro Kbtas, seconded by Mr. Don Finch: 
-Section 14, Amendments to Constitution,​ paragraph (a), that the 
-following words be deleted, "​except by a throe-quarters majority"​ arid- replaced by the words, "​except by a majority vote". 
-In tho debate which followed, an amendment to the motion was moved 
-by Mr0 Jim Brown, seconded by Mr. Phil Butt, that the words "​except by a 
-majority vote" be altered to: "​except by a three-fifths majority"​. This amendment was carried, and the amended motion was then put to the meeting which carried it by more than throo-quarters majority. 
-The Constitution now roads:- 
-Section 14, Amendments to Constitution,​ paragraph (a), "This 
-Consitution shall not be amended except by a three-fifths majority vote 
-at an extra-ordinary,​ half-yearly or annual general meeting. Fourteen 
-days' notice in writing of such meeting, setting forth the proposed amendment in full, shall be given to each member."​ 
-Also at the Annual General noting the Amount of Annual Subscription 
-and Entrance Foo was determined as the same as the preceding year as follows:- 
-- , 
-Full Members $6,00 p a. 
-Married Couples 88.00 p a. 
-Full Time Students $3.00 p a. 
-Entrance Poo $1.00 p a. 
-Members are reminded that these fees arc duo and payable. 
-************ 
-DCN-ACTIVE Members and other subscribers to the Magazine (apart from 
-Full Members) are remindad that the Magazine Subscription is now duo:- 12 months (including postage) $1.50 
-*********** 
-PACIFIC TOUR - Anyone interested in accompanying John Tickoll 
-on a Polynesian Island trip starting mid-May and ending mid-Juno, including Tonga, Samoa, etc. estimated expense about $300. please phone 498-1782. 
-************* 
  
 +Two assistant treasurers were appointed: Rosemary Edmunds and Gladys Roberts.
 +
 +----
 +
 +=====Constitutional Amendment.=====
 +
 +At the Annual General Meeting held on Wednesday, 14th March, 1973, the following Constitutional Amendment was proposed by Mr. Spiro Ketas, seconded by Mr. Don Finch:
 +
 +Section 14, Amendments to Constitution,​ paragraph (a), that the following words be deleted, "​except by a three-quarters majority"​ and replaced by the words, "​except by a majority vote".
 +
 +In the debate which followed, an amendment to the motion was moved by Mr. Jim Brown, seconded by Mr. Phil Butt, that the words "​except by a majority vote" be altered to: "​except by a three-fifths majority"​. This amendment was carried, and the amended motion was then put to the meeting which carried it by more than three-quarters majority.
 +
 +The Constitution now reads:-
 +
 +Section 14, Amendments to Constitution,​ paragraph (a), "This Constitution shall not be amended except by a three-fifths majority vote at an extra-ordinary,​ half-yearly or annual general meeting. Fourteen days' notice in writing of such meeting, setting forth the proposed amendment in full, shall be given to each member."​
 +
 +----
 +
 +Also at the Annual General Meeting the Amount of Annual Subscription and Entrance Fee was determined as the same as the preceding year as follows:-
 +
 +|Full Members|$6,​00 p.a.|
 +|Married Couples|$8.00 p.a.|
 +|Full Time Students|$3.00 p.a.|
 +|Entrance Fee|$1.00 p.a.|
 +
 +Members are reminded that these fees are due and payable.
 +----
 +
 +Non-Active Members and other subscribers to the Magazine (apart from Full Members) are reminded that the Magazine Subscription is now due:- 12 months (including postage) $1.50
 +
 +----
 +
 +__Pacific Tour__ - Anyone interested in accompanying John Tickell on a Polynesian Island trip starting mid-May and ending mid-June, including Tonga, Samoa, etc. estimated expense about $300. please phone 498-1782.
 +
 +----
197303.txt · Last modified: 2017/06/29 03:01 by tyreless