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197102 [2016/03/07 21:48]
tyreless
197102 [2016/03/08 00:24]
tyreless
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 - By David, W. Peacock. - By David, W. Peacock.
  
-Life is the most complicated phenomenon of which we are aware - +Life is the most complicated phenomenon of which we are aware - man is still thrashing through its outer secrets, and slowly de-coding its complexities,​ and each new discovery only exposes more problems. Life on this planet has existed for 3 billion years - think about it - 3 billion years (for those people who find it hard to imagine 3 billion years, imagine that each year is denoted by one second, and three billion seconds equals 95 years; longer than most of us will live!) which is one hell of a time. And yet, individually speaking, life is so very fragile but this very fragility is its saving factor. I assume that you've all heard of natural selection. If you haven'​t shoot off to your local library and grab one of the many books on evolution, there are quite a number of them. The idea behind natural selection is that during ​reproduction some of the cells in the resulting organism are mutated (it is now known to result from inaccurate copying of the parents'​ DNA molecules - but that's a story for another day)Most of these mutations are fairly minor. A typical human being has several million mutated cells in his body, but occasionally there are macro-mutations (macro = large). The majority of macro-mutations however are harmful and the unfortunate organism suffers a premature death. Very occasionally,​ however, the mutations are beneficial and the organism ​is better fitted for existence. It breeds more successfully than its less fortunate counterparts and its advantageous mutation is passed on to its offspring (it's that DNA molecule again) which eventually breed to form a new species. 
-man is still thrashing through its outer secrets, and slowly de-coding + 
-its complexities,​ and each new discovery only exposes more problems. Life +Now this system worked pretty well for 3 billion years and resulted in several million species (the abbreviation is spp.) of animals and plants. These animals and plants got on reasonably well with each other and a very delicate equilibrium was established. But the inevitable happeneda reasoning species emerged. Yes, you're one step ahead of me; it was Homo SapiensMan. (Incidentally Homo Sapiens means "The intelligent,​ wise and judicial ​one"Of course the name was self chosen). Now this prodigal child cast his eye around at this old earth and he decided that it needed "​correcting"​. So off he went with his old shotgun, insecticides or defoliants and began to "​adjust"​ nature. The trail of his merciless slaughter sill echoes across the world. Millions, no billions, of animals died before the barrage and a great part of the distressing toll form the contents of the "Red Books" published by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (I.U.C.N.). But before we go any further we must clarify one point; the sportsmen etc. who helped eradicate so many species often did not do it intentionally. It was just through plain ignorance of the habits of the animals concerned. 
-on this planet has existed for 3 billion years - think about it - 3 billion years (for those people who find it hard to imagine 3 billion years, imagine that each year is denoted by one second, and three billion seconds equals 95 years; longer than most of us will live!) which is one hell of a time. And yet, individually speaking, life is so very fragile but this very fragility is its saving factor. I assume that you've all heard of natural selection. If you haven'​t shoot off to your local library and grab one of the many books on evolution, there are quite a number of them. The idea behind natural selection is that during ​reyroduction Some of the cells in the resulting organism are mutated (it is now known to result from inaccurate copying of the parents'​ DNA + 
-molecules - but that's a story for another day)Most of these mutations are fairly minor. A typical human being has several million mutated cells in his body, but occasionally there are macro-mutations (macro = large). The majority of macro-mutations however are harmful and the unfortunate organism suffers a premature death. Very occasionally,​ however, the mutations are beneficial and the organiSm.is better fitted for existence. It breeds more successfully than its less fortunate counterparts and its advantageous mutation is passed on to its offspring (it's that DNA molecule again) which eventually breed to form a new species. +Anyway, along came 20th. century man, but at his disposal he has vastly more deadly weapons. Take DDT for example ​(I used to know who the initials ​stood for once upon a time, but unfortunately I've forgotten now, and I'm too lazy to find out), it was discovered just before ​WW2, and, as a point of interest, Paul Müller ​who discovered it was immediately presented with the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1939, but that is beside the point. So this "​Miracle powder"​ was chucked about and, lo and behold, all insect pests were falling before its glorious advance - a miracle for scienceNote that I used the past tense, because it began to be noticed that insects, especially house flies, were becoming immune to its effects. It was quite simply a triumph for natural selection, and soon DDT-resistant strains existed all over the world. Ah well, people said it was good while it lasted and so they went off to prepare more deadly sprays: the organo-phosphates and the dreaded "nerve gases" to mention a couple. But what they hadn't realised, or perhaps, had just ignored, was that these insecticides perhaps failed on insects, but they were appallingly effective against higher life-forms, e.g. the birds. DDT is stored in fat and the birds eating the treated insects accumulated the DDT until it passed the threshhold level. Have you ever seen a bird dying of insecticide poisoning? My God, it's the most sickening thing imaginable. Firstly the nervous system goes (all the insecticides affect the central nervous system - C.N.S. ​some more than others) and the animal is convulsed with uncontrollable spasms - it's choking and its pupils dilate - all co-ordination is gone - and it literally suffocates itself. The heart and lungs just give up. And I think man did this- and I hate him for it. The birds of prey are declining rapidly for insecticides affect the eggshell ​forming ​process in the female and the subsequent eggs have very thin shells, the vast majority of which are broken by the parent birds accidentally, and the offspring surviving is therefore considerably reduced
-Now this system worked pretty well for 3 billion years and resulted in several million species (the abbreviation is spp.) of animals and plants. These animals and plants got on reasonably well with each other and a very delicate equilibrium was established. But the inevitable happened a reasoning species emerged. Yes, you're one step ahead of me; it was Homo Sapiens Man. (Incidentally Homo Sapiens means "The intelligent,​ wise and judicial ​on" Of course the name was self chosen). Now this prodigal child cast his eye around at this old earth and he decided that it needed "​correcting"​. So off he wont with his old shotgun, + 
-insecticides or defoliants and began to "​adjust"​ nature. The trail of +There are, of course, other ways of "​controlling"​ unwanted animals. Take the rabbit for example. Way back in '53 when I was but a gleam in my father'​s eye, some boffin, probably at Porttand Down, England'​s Germ Warfare Research Centre, thought of the brilliant idea of releasing rabbits infected with myaxamatosis into the countryside. Boyoh boyhe really must have congratulated himself. It worked beautifully. Approximately 90% of the wild rabbits died, but what a way to die. Just being alive and rotting away; I've seen photographs of rabbits suffering from the disease and it isn't a pleasant sight. 
-his merciless slaughter sill echoes across the world. Millions, no billions, of animals died before the barrage and a great part of the distressing toll form the contents of the "Red Books" published by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (I.U.C.N.). But before we go any further we must clarify one point; the sportsmen etc:. who helped eradicate so many species often did not do it intentionally. It was just through plain ignorance of the habits of the animals concerned. + 
-Anyway, along came 20th. century man, but at his disposal he has vastly more deadly weapons. Take DDT r (I used to know who the +To more recent days, the troops in Vietnam use defoliants to uncover enemy troops, and also lay waste many hundreds of square miles of jungle. The U.S. and others dump obsolete nerve gases into the oceans and the average householder goes wild with "​Flick"​ and "Safe sure Mortein". 
-ititials ​stood for once upon a time, but unfortunately I've forgotten now, and I'm too lazy to find out), it was discovered just before ​W72, + 
-February, 1971. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALICER Page 17. +There is such a state of public apathy existent at the present ​timetoo much time is required just to gain money to survive. 
-and, as a point of interest, Paul Muller ​who discovered it Was immediately presented with the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1939, but that is beside + 
-the point. So this "​Miracle powder"​ was chucked about and, lo and behold, all insect pests were falling before its glorious advance - a miracle for scienceNote that I used the past tense, because it began to be noticed +Well, we are now hurtling towards tho twenty-first century and what will we find? A sterile, antiseptic world inhabited by man and a few domesticated animals. Action is needed NOW, and your help is required. 
-that insects, especially house flies, were becoming immune to its effects. + 
-It was quite simply a triumph for natural selection, and soon DDT-resistant +To close I will now go to sleep listening to the two other fellows in the room describing their encounters with snakes: "I never let one go, I always kill them" says one. "Good on yer" replies the other, and I sigh. 
-strains existed all over the world. Ah well, people said it was good while it lasted and so they went off to prepare more deadly sprays: the +
-organo-phosphates and the dreaded "nerve gases" to mention a couple. But +
-what they hadn't realised, or perhaps, had just ignored, was that these insecticides perhaps failed on insects, but they were appallingly effective +
-against higher life-forms, e.g. the birds. DDT is stored in fat and the +
-birds eating the treated insects accumulated the DDT until it passed the +
-threshhold level. Have you ever seen a bird dying of insecticide poisoning? My God, it's the most sickening thing imaginable. Firstly the nervous system goes (all the insecticides affect the central nervous system- +
-C.N.S. some more than others) and the animal is convulsed with uncontrollable spasms - it's choking and its pupils dilate - all co-ordination is +
-gone - and it literally suffocates itself. The heart an lungs just +
-give up. And I think man did this- and I hate him for it. The birds of prey are declining rapidly for insecticides affect the eggshell ​fox:​Ing ​process in the female and the subsequent eggs have very thin shells, the vast majority of which are broken by the parent birds accident,​dly, and the offspring surviving is therefore considerably reduced, +
-There are, of course, other ways of "​controlling"​ unwanted animals. Take the rabbit for example. Way back in '53 when I was but a gleam in my father'​s eye, some boffin, probably at Porttand Down, England'​s Germ Warfare Research Centre, thought of the brilliant idea of releasing rabbits infected with myaxamatosis into the countryside. Boy oh boyhe really must have congratulated himself. It worked beautifully. Approximately 90% of the wild rabbits died, but what a way to die. Just being alive and rotting away; I've seen photographs of rabbits suffering from the disease and it isn't a pleasant sight. +
-To more recent days, the troops in Vietnam use defoliants to uncover enemy troops, and also lay waste many hundreds of square miles of jungle. The U.S. and others dump obsolete nerve gases into the oceans and the average householder goes wild with "​Flick"​ and "Safe sure Ibrtein". +
-There is such a state of public apathy existent at theresent ​time too much time is required just to gain money to survive. +
-Well, we are now hurtling towards tho twenty-first century and what will we find? A sterile, antiseptic world inhabited by man and a few +
-domesticated animals. Action is needed NOW, and your help is required. To close I will now go to sleep listening to the two other fellows +
-in the room describing their encounters with snakes: "I never lot one go, I always kill them" says one. "Good on yor" replies the other, and I sigh.+
 P.S. I recommend that everyone reads Rachel Carson'​s "​Silent Spring"​. P.S. I recommend that everyone reads Rachel Carson'​s "​Silent Spring"​.
-Page 18. . THE SYDNEY BUSHWALICR February,​ 1971+ 
-k,/,​7,​57397_ +=====The Mighty Williams.===== 
-17 Lri V'YO + 
-I tVL) +By peter Levander
-*********************** ​By peter Levander ​******************************* + 
-The main party left Sydney in the Levander Vauxhall about 8 p.m. +The main party left Sydney in the Levander Vauxhall about 8 p.m. and consisted of Peter Kaye, Peter Franks, Colin Walpole, John Campbell and Peter Levander. We made good time along the Newcastle Expressway despite the fact that the rear springs curved upwards instead of downwards due to a combination of old age and a full load. We turned off the highway at Maitland and proceeded through the moonlit countryside under a clean starry night, a good omen for river trips arriving at Barrington House just after midnight. 
-and consisted of Peter Kaye, Peter Franks, Colin Walpole, John Campbell + 
-and Peter Levander. We made good time along the Newcastle Expressway despite the fact that the rear springs curved upwards instead of downwards due to a combination of old age and a full load. We turned off the highway at Maitland and proceeded through the moonlit countryside under a clean starry night, a good omen for river trips  arriving at Barrington House just after midnight. +The next morning we were joined by John Worrell complete with Land Rover and relief driver. John immediately proposed that we should do the 3,000 ft. climb up the ridge to our dropping off point into the Williams River by Land Rover; to which the whole party readily agreed, and soon we were bouncing our way up the fire trail which runs up the ridge from the guest house to Barrington Tops. We climbed the last 500 ft. on foot to the Corker which is a large lump just before the tops, arriving at about 9 a.m. 
-The next morning we were joined by John Worrell complete with Land Rover and relief driver. John immediately proposed that we should do the 39000 ft. climb up the ridge to our dropping off point into the Williams River by Land Rover; to which the whole party readily agreed, and soon we were bouncing our war up the fire trail which runs up the + 
-ridge from the guest house to Barrington Tops. We climbed the last 500 ft. on foot to the Corker which is a large lump just before the tops, arriving at about 9 a.n+After admiring the view from the lookout, we dropped off the Williams River side and proceeded to scrub bash our way down the 45° slope through various levels of scunge. The going was not too bad until we gravitated into a side creek whose waters supported enormous growths of lawyer vine, nettles etc. Eventually, however, we reached the river at about 11 a.m. and lunched during which two members removed the only two leeches we encountered on the trip (no ticks either). 
-After admiring the view from the llokout, we dropped off the Williams River side and proceeded to scrub bash our way down the 45 slope through various levels of scunge. The going was not too bad uhtil we gravitated into a side creek whose waters supported enormous growths of lawyer vine, nettles etc. Eventually, however, we reached the river at about 11 a.m. and lunched during which two members removed the only two leeches we encountered on the trip (no ticks either). + 
-At noon, we rockhopped dawn the river in brilliant sunshine and within half a mile encountered ​cur first waterfall which was soon overcome by a 20 foot bomb (there being no other way) into a beautiful deep pool. The water temperature was about the same at the Kowmung. This process was repeated about every half mile for the rest of the afternoon with six or so beautiful waterfalls with deep bombable pools below. The only thing which dampened our spirits was the short thunderstorm which struck about 2-30 p.m. The nature of the river was constantly changing with cliffs +At noon, we rockhopped dawn the river in brilliant sunshine and within half a mile encountered ​our first waterfall which was soon overcome by a 20 foot bomb (there being no other way) into a beautiful deep pool. The water temperature was about the same at the Kowmung. This process was repeated about every half mile for the rest of the afternoon with six or so beautiful waterfalls with deep bombable pools below. The only thing which dampened our spirits was the short thunderstorm which struck about 2:30 p.m. The nature of the river was constantly changing with cliffs giving way to lush dense jungle and the boulder strewn bed changing ​to stretches of rock with weird shapes gouged into it by the water. 
-giving way to lush dense jungle and the boulder strewn bed chnaging ​to + 
-stretches of rock with wierd shapes gouged into it by the water. +We set up camp about 5.30 and lit a fire to dry out all our gear which was thoroughly wet after our plastic bags had burst from impact with the water. 
-We set up camp about 5.30 and lit a fire to dry out all our gear whicli. ​was thoroughly wet after our plastic bags had burst from impact with the water. + 
-We set off at eight next morning and soon encountered more falls, ​_11 swims, with the river constantly changing its character at each +We set off at eight next morning and soon encountered more falls, ​[illegible] ​swims, with the river constantly changing its character at each turn, we arrived back at the cars at noon. During the trip we encountered quite a variety of wildlife ranging from eels to platypus. We came upon a tree snake in the river which promptly gave a demonstration of its tree climbing ability. At the top of one of the falls, Peter Franks came face to face with an 18 inch Blue Tongue Lizard. When the poor reptile saw Peter, it did a backwards somersault ​down the waterfall and was churned up in the swirl below. However, Peter rescued it as he swam by, but the thing had stopped breathing so something suggested that Peter give it mouth to mouth, but he made do with a bit of body massage which seemed to do the trick. 
-February, 1971. THE SYDNEY BUSHWALICTR Page 19. + 
-turn, we arrived back at the cars at noon. During the trip we encountered quite a variety of wildlife ranging from eels to platypus. We came upon a tree snake in the river which promptly gave a demonstration of its tree climbing ability. At the top of one of the falls, Peter Franks came face to face with an 18 inch Blue Tongue Lizard. When the poor reptile +=====Coming Walks.===== 
-saw Peter, it did a backwards somersault ​dawn the waterfall and was churned up in the swirl below. However, Peter rescued it as he swam by, but the thing had stopped breathing so something suggested that Peter give it mouth to mouth, but he made do with a bit of body massage which seemed to do the trick. + 
-******************XXXXX**** ​By The Editor ​******************************* +By The Editor
-The Talks Secretary is still recuperating from his big New Zealand ordeal, but he should be sufficinetl ​recovered by next month to write + 
-his magazine piece (by which time his tenure of office will be finished).+The Walks Secretary is still recuperating from his big New Zealand ordeal, but he should be sufficinety ​recovered by next month to write his magazine piece (by which time his tenure of office will be finished). 
 The Autumn Walks Programme is enclosed with this issue, so you will be able to plan your trips for the next three months. Details for March are as follows: The Autumn Walks Programme is enclosed with this issue, so you will be able to plan your trips for the next three months. Details for March are as follows:
-BIRCH 5TH, 6TH, & 7TH. Four walks are programmed for this weekend, two weekenders and two day walks. Alan Round is leading an exploratory trip in one of his favourite areas: Ettrema and Taliangla Gorge.+ 
 +|March 5th6th 7th|Four walks are programmed for this weekend, two weekenders and two day walks. Alan Round is leading an exploratory trip in one of his favourite areas: Ettrema and Taliangla Gorge. 
 If you think that might be a bit hard for you, and you want something a bit easier to start the season, Hans Beck (phone 67-1517 (B)) is leading a Bluegum Forest walk. This is a good one for prospectives who haven'​t yet been to Bluegum to get to see the place. It goes from Mount Victoria, then back up via Grand Canyon. If you think that might be a bit hard for you, and you want something a bit easier to start the season, Hans Beck (phone 67-1517 (B)) is leading a Bluegum Forest walk. This is a good one for prospectives who haven'​t yet been to Bluegum to get to see the place. It goes from Mount Victoria, then back up via Grand Canyon.
-One of the day walks is another of the Combined Club efforts. Jim Gallopaway ​(alias Callaway) will be leading a combined group of S.B.7.'s and Catholic Bushwalkers from Garie, Curracurong Trig, Garie Trig, Little Bola Creek, Upper Causeway. Train is the 8.42 from Central. + 
-Again, if you feel like a lazy day, Jim Brown is leading an easy one, which even includes a ferry ride. He'll be catching the 8.50 electric train and his home number is 81-2675. +One of the day walks is another of the Combined Club efforts. Jim Gallop-away ​(alias Callaway) will be leading a combined group of S.B.W.'s and Catholic Bushwalkers from Garie, Curracurong Trig, Garie Trig, Little Bola Creek, Upper Causeway. Train is the 8.42 from Central. 
-MARCH 12TH, 13TH, & 14TH. This weekend is given over to the Club Reunion, details of which are given on page 14 of this magazine. + 
-Page 20 THE SYDNEY BUSITTALICER February1971. +Again, if you feel like a lazy day, Jim Brown is leading an easy one, which even includes a ferry ride. He'll be catching the 8.50 electric train and his home number is 81-2675.| 
-MARCH 19TH9 20TH9 21ST. The old team of Finch andWyborn (Doone that is for the latter and Don for the former) will be leading a mighty trip from Erris Clare and back via Ettrema Creek, Sentry Box Canyon and Jones Creek. Home telephone numbers are Don, 74-1070 and Doone, 57-5218.+|March 12th13th 14th|This weekend is given over to the Club Reunion, details of which are given on page 14 of this magazine.| 
 +|March 19th20th 21st|The old team of Finch and Wyborn (Doone that is for the latter and Don for the former) will be leading a mighty trip from Erris Clare and back via Ettrema Creek, Sentry Box Canyon and Jones Creek. Home telephone numbers are Don, 74-1070 and Doone, 57-5218. 
 If you haven'​t yet been to Batsh Camp, Mount Colong etc., and you'd like to see what all the fuss is about, make a date with Ray Hookway to go on his trip. He has two telephone numbers : 644-6849 at home, and 20333 Ext. 232 at work. If you haven'​t yet been to Batsh Camp, Mount Colong etc., and you'd like to see what all the fuss is about, make a date with Ray Hookway to go on his trip. He has two telephone numbers : 644-6849 at home, and 20333 Ext. 232 at work.
-The Sunday walk this weekend represents Kath Brown'​s maiden trip (the first one she's led that is), or at least the walks secretary thinks so. In any case, she has agreed to lead a Waterfall, Uloola Falls, Kangaroo Creek, Audley trip. The train is the 8.20 electric and Kath's number is 81-2675 at home. 
-MARCH 26TH, 27TH, & 28TH. The major item of the weekend is the Federation Reunion, details of which will be announced in the Club, posted on the notice board, probably advised in the next magazine (if it's out on time) or failing all else, from the Walks Secretary. The venue for this year's reunion is the Wolgan Valley. 
-Also in the same area this weekend will be Alan Hedstrom with a happy band of bushwalkers. He'll be visiting the Glowworm tunnel and Chinatown as added attractions. Walkers should take every opportunity to visit this beautiful spot in the Wolgan Valley, 
-since word has it that it is soon to be mined again (coal this time). 
-The day walk, for those who have had enough reuning for one month, will be led by Bill Hall. He will be going from Waterfall, Kingfisher Creek, Myuna Creek, Waterfall 
-******** 
-/ 
-ME 
-L .4. 
-'K 
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 +The Sunday walk this weekend represents Kath Brown'​s maiden trip (the first one she's led that is), or at least the walks secretary thinks so. In any case, she has agreed to lead a Waterfall, Uloola Falls, Kangaroo Creek, Audley trip. The train is the 8.20 electric and Kath's number is 81-2675 at home.|
 +|March 26th, 27th & 28th|The major item of the weekend is the Federation Reunion, details of which will be announced in the Club, posted on the notice board, probably advised in the next magazine (if it's out on time) or failing all else, from the Walks Secretary. The venue for this year's reunion is the Wolgan Valley.
 +
 +Also in the same area this weekend will be Alan Hedstrom with a happy band of bushwalkers. He'll be visiting the Glow-worm tunnel and Chinatown as added attractions. Walkers should take every opportunity to visit this beautiful spot in the Wolgan Valley, since word has it that it is soon to be mined again (coal this time).
 +
 +The day walk, for those who have had enough re-uning for one month, will be led by Bill Hall. He will be going from Waterfall, Kingfisher Creek, Myuna Creek, Waterfall.
 +
 +----
 +
 +__Notice.__
 +
 +All members should attend the Annual General Meeting.
197102.txt · Last modified: 2016/03/08 00:30 by tyreless