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197003 [2016/01/25 02:53]
kennettj
197003 [2016/02/15 00:40] (current)
johnflint
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 EDITOR : Bill Gill EDITOR : Bill Gill
-BUSINESS MANAGER ​ Bill Burke +BUSINESS MANAGER Bill Burke 
-2TYPIST ​ChriSta ​Younger  +TYPISTChrista ​Younger  
-ILLUSTRATOR : Helen Gray.+ILLUSTRATOR:​ Helen Gray.
  
 NOTE: Please forward all contributions to the new Editor: Neville Page, 139 Riverview Road, Avalon, 2107. NOTE: Please forward all contributions to the new Editor: Neville Page, 139 Riverview Road, Avalon, 2107.
  
 March 1970 March 1970
 +Contents
 The One Way River Don Matthews 2 The One Way River Don Matthews 2
-raday'Aa. 11+Paddy’Ad. 11
 Kangaroo Valley Land - Report 12 Kangaroo Valley Land - Report 12
-Kangaroo Valley ​Lan 14+Kangaroo Valley ​Land 14
 February General Meeting Jim Brown 16 February General Meeting Jim Brown 16
-Mountain Equipment ​Aa. 17+Mountain Equipment ​Ad. 17
 List of Office Bearers 18 List of Office Bearers 18
     
Line 25: Line 25:
 Don Matthews Don Matthews
  
-That better summer occupation could a skiing enthusiast find than +That better summer occupation could a skiing enthusiast find than to canoe through (or should it be over) the water which, a few months before, he was skiing on. Purists may argue that it's not the same water, but the idea appeals to me immensely. 
-to canoe through (or should it be over) the water which, a few months before, he was skiing on. Purists may argue that it's not the same water, but the idea appeals to me immensely. +The plan to canoe the Murray Gorge from Tom Groggin was the result ​of two main range tours and their later reunions, and the four members of the party were all skiers. 
-The plan to canoe the Murray Gorge from Tom Groggin was the re- +Griff, a fast, very fast downhill man who also tours, builds fibreglass .canoes. Gunther, another downhill skier, who has magnificent ​cross-country potential if his still water paddling rate is any indication, used to have a heavy seventeen foot kayak, and can lift the lightweight Canadian fifteen footer with one hand, so to speak. 
-sult of two main range tours and their later reunions, and the four  members of the party were all skiers. +George Gray, the complete ​all-rounder, is a canoeist of long standing. He used to build his own canoes and knows the sport backwards 
-Griff, a fast, very ft downhill man who also tours, builds +The thought of a white water canoe trip brought to mind some of my previous river trips without the benefit of canoe. The time, for example, when I built a raft to sail down the Cox's, or the flooded Shoalhaven Gorge trip one Easter with the Waggs. On that occasion the river below Badgerys ​was so fast and light that we’d ​tie a rope to Grace at different ​places ​and push her out to see if it was a goer (she was the strongest ​swimmer). 
-fibreglass .canoes. Gunther, ​'another downhill skier, who has magnifi- +The Kowmung ​had provided the most thrills, of course, in low water and high, with every misfortune in the book at one time or another. 
-cent cross-country potential if his still water paddling rate is any +Then I thought back to my introduction to skiing in the glorious days of Illawong. "Put them (the skis) on with the pointed ends at the front" said Snow Brown, our fearless leader "​There'​s Twynam up there; ​let’s ​go.” Getting up there was easy enough with skins on the skis, and once there, two thousand vertical feet and three miles from the hut, you just had to learn how to ski downhill. There'​s nothing like total commitment. 
-indication, used to have a heavy seventeen foot kayak, and can lift the lightweight Canadian fifteen footer with one hand, so to speak. +The Murray Gorge seemed a fine idea. The only information I could find on the Murray Gates, as the Gorge is called, was an article in “Walk” ​the Journal ​of the Melbourne Bushwalkers for 1952 which described a walk from Colemans ​flat to Tom Groggin, following where possible the track shown on the current S.M.A. map. This track when it could be found, ​did not approach closer than a couple of hundred vertical feet to the river until it reached the top and of the Gates. Wading upstream was implied to be extremely difficult and the scrub around the river was formidable. 
-George Gray, the complete ​allrounder, is a canoeist of long +Griff had lived at Corryong for some years and had fished at various spots on either side of the main Gorge. Generally, the river could be approached at specific places but progression up or downstream was hampered by the steep sides of the Valley and the thorny scrub liberally laced with blackberries. The locals, of course, laughed at the idea of getting the canoes through.
-standing. He used to build his own canoes and knows the sport backwards +
-The thought of a white water canoe trip brought to mind some of +
-my previous river trips without the benefit of canoe. The time, for example, when I built a raft to sail down the Cox's, or the flooded +
-Shoalhaven Gorge trip +
-_ one Easter with the +
- Taggs. On that occasion the river below Badgery'​s ​was so fast and light that we3d tie a rope to Grace at +
- +
-different ​Places ​and +
-LA r-s +
-push her out to see if it was a goer (she was the strongeL;​t ​swimmer). +
-+
-10 ! 2.0 sc.,​ +
-The Kbwmung ​had provided the most thrills, of course, in low+
-water and high, with every misfortune in the book at one time or +
-another. +
-Then I'thought back to my introduction to skiing in the glorious days of Illawong. "Put them (the skis) on with the pointed ends at the front" said Snow Brown, our fearless leader "​There'​s Twynam up there; ​letts go." . Getting up there was easy enough with skins on the skis, and once there, two thousand vertical feet and three miles from the hut, you just had to learn how to ski downhill. There'​s nothing like total commitment. +
- +
-+
-/4.f,/ +
-+
-+
- +
-The Murray Gorge seemed a fine idea. The only information I could find on the Murray Gates, as the Gorge is called, was an article in 77alk" ​the Jouranl ​of the Melbourne Bushwalkers for 19525 which described a walk from Coleman'​s ​flat to Tom Groggin, following where possible the track shorn on the current S.M.A. map. This track when it could be found, ​aid not approach closer than a couple of hundred vertical feet to the river until it reached the top and of the Gates. Wading upstream was implied to be extremely difficult and the scrub around the river was formidable. +
-Griff had lived at Corryong for some years ana had fished at various spots on either side of the main Gorge. Generally, the river could be approached at specific places but progression up .r downstream was hampered by the steep sides of the Valley and the' ​thorny scrub liberally laced with blackberries. The locals, of course, laughed at the idea of getting the canoes through.+
 My own experience of the river was limited to a memory of the Murray at Bringenbrong which didn't help much and at Tom Groggin where it is an amiable though swiftly moving stream about forty feet wide and, at this time of the year, a couple of feet deep. My own experience of the river was limited to a memory of the Murray at Bringenbrong which didn't help much and at Tom Groggin where it is an amiable though swiftly moving stream about forty feet wide and, at this time of the year, a couple of feet deep.
-I had jumyed ​across the Murray at QuaMbat ​flat which means that up there it was about five feet wide but that bit of information didn't help much either. It was George who commented on the remarkable rate of fall of the river. ​Wo studed ​the Murray Gates more closely and divided the trip into sections according to the fall per mile. The steepest section, according to the two hundred feet contour +I had jumped ​across the Murray at Wombat ​flat which means that up there it was about five feet wide but that bit of information didn't help much either. It was George who commented on the remarkable rate of fall of the river. ​We studied ​the Murray Gates more closely and divided the trip into sections according to the fall per mile. The steepest section, according to the two hundred feet contour lines, was of one and a bit miles just inside ​the Gates. ​This you might say, was a fair drop for a canoeable ​river! The profile of the river, dropping eight hundred feet in the forty miles of the trip was something like the graph opposite. 
-.lines, was of one and abit miles just insi-3 ​the Gates. ​This2you ​might say, was a fair drop for a canoedble ​river! The profile of the river, dropping eight hundred feet in the forty miles of the trip was something like the graph opposite. +For comparison, the Con's River between ​Sandy Hook and the Heartbreaker bend is shown by the dotted ​line. The steepest bit is the two mile section below the Megalong Creek junctions ​Ted Constable of the River Canoe Club described a canoe trip through the Cox's in "The Bushwalker"​ for 1948:
-(Rw. +
- +
-For comparison, the Con's River between ​Sanay Hook and the Heartbreaker bend is shown by the dottDd ​line. The steepest bit is the two mile section below the Megalong Creek junctions ​TGa Constable of the River Canbe Club described a canoe trip through the Cox's in "The Bushwalker"​ for 1948:+
 "The Billy Healy Range next claimed our attention for several lays. This is the most spectacular part of the river and is the most difficult to negotiate.......our speed at times was reduced to little more than a mile per day...."​ "The Billy Healy Range next claimed our attention for several lays. This is the most spectacular part of the river and is the most difficult to negotiate.......our speed at times was reduced to little more than a mile per day...."​
- +Our first day at Tom Groggin was largely ​spent in preparation,​ including the ferrying of a car to the finishing ​point of the trip, and of the gear to a road bridge a mile or so downstream 
-Our first day at Tom Groggin was laregely ​spent in preparation,​ including the ferrying of a car to the finidhing ​point of the trip, and of the gear to a road bridge a mile or so downstreamc +It was after three, on a steaming hot day when we pushed off. The first obstacle, just downstream, was a six foot waterfall ​down which the canoes were roped. Then we enjoyed an easy paddle to the bridge which was a few feet above the water. It might have been three feet, but it looked a lot less. It was obvious that if the canoe rose in the water for any reason I'd whack my head on the bridgeWe stopped to wait for the others and to have a closer look for hazards. In the middle of the steam below the bridge was a large boulder. My imagination ran wild if we didn’t ​hit our heads, we'd be so busy not hitting them that wets lose control and bolt into the boulder. 
-It was after three, on a steaming hot day when we pushed off. The first obstacle, just downstrePm, was a six foot waterfall ​clown which the canoes were roped. Then we enjoyed an easy paddle to the bridge which was a few feet above the water. It might have been three feet, but it looked a lot loss. It was obvious that if the canoe rose in the water for any reason I'd whack my head on the bridgeWe stopped to wait for the others and to have a closer look for hazards. In the middle of the steam below the bridge was a large boulder. My imagination ran wild  if we didn2t ​hit our heads, we'd be so busy not hitting them that wets lose control and bolt into the boulder. +George was unperturbed and glided under the bridge Solo with a foot to spare, neatly skirted the rock and sat waiting for me with a grin on his face.
-George was unperturbed and glided under the bridge Solo with a foot to spare, neatly skirted the rock and sat waiting for me with a in on his face.+
 We loaded the gear and paddled downstream for a few miles over quiet water until we found a beach to camp on. It was after six o'​clock but still warm enough to enjoy a swim. We loaded the gear and paddled downstream for a few miles over quiet water until we found a beach to camp on. It was after six o'​clock but still warm enough to enjoy a swim.
 70 sot off very late next morning and a group of six or seven canoes appeared isb as we were leaving. George recognised a friend from his early canoeing days and we chatted for a- 2hile while they prepared for an early lunch. 70 sot off very late next morning and a group of six or seven canoes appeared isb as we were leaving. George recognised a friend from his early canoeing days and we chatted for a- 2hile while they prepared for an early lunch.
197003.txt · Last modified: 2016/02/15 00:40 by johnflint