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197001 [2016/02/21 06:44]
lucym
197001 [2016/02/21 08:41]
lucym
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 Maps? There are excellent ones of the area by the Lands Dept in a scale of two inches to the mile. We used the Quirinal "​B"​ and "​D"​ sheets and one of the joys of the walk was the use of these maps to find our way. A last word. The winter is the best time to walk in these ranges. Snow falls on the high ground and there are hard frosts through mid-winter. Maps? There are excellent ones of the area by the Lands Dept in a scale of two inches to the mile. We used the Quirinal "​B"​ and "​D"​ sheets and one of the joys of the walk was the use of these maps to find our way. A last word. The winter is the best time to walk in these ranges. Snow falls on the high ground and there are hard frosts through mid-winter.
 +
  
  
 ==== The Autumn Walks Program March to May is in the Making ==== ==== The Autumn Walks Program March to May is in the Making ====
- 
  
  
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-**All the World Loves Leader** ​+All the world loves leader! 
 + 
  
  
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 **Jim Brown** **Jim Brown**
 +
  
 I suppose you could say it was Pat Harrison who started it all, well, at least he revived an old flame that had been dormant for about ten years. I suppose you could say it was Pat Harrison who started it all, well, at least he revived an old flame that had been dormant for about ten years.
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 All in all you could count it a successful day too. All in all you could count it a successful day too.
 +
  
  
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 Worcester 01602, Worcester 01602,
 Massachusetts U.S.A. Massachusetts U.S.A.
 +
  
     
 ==== Hope Observed ==== ==== Hope Observed ====
 +
  
 **Observer** **Observer**
  
-One of the words to appear in the sixties was "​environment"​ - an awareness that the quality of life could be as big a consideration as income tax policy. Concern with pollution, whether it be air, water or urban landscape is very likely to become a major issue, in some centres literally a matter of life and death, in the seventies. From this rather narrow immediate concern there has already grown a surprising interest, in the Western world at least, in the overall environment which we recognise as conservation. This is shown as a now willingness to consider other than purely economic factors ​whetherin ​land use, insecticide or a dozen other things. The Little Desert scheme in western Victoria, though shown to be economic nonsense, under present market conditions, would almost certainly have been maintained unless conservationists had also shown it to be cultural vandalism. Barrier Reef drilling5, Colong mining, development schemes not yet proposed, could, hopefully, be looked at with similar realism. + 
-Ironically, Australia'​s huge mineral development in the decade could alter the whole of the quality of Australian rural life. The rather dangerous argument of having to rely on exports of ruralproducts to maintain overseas balances is rapidly ​-becoming out of date. Coupled with chaotic marketing conditions for practically all rural produce there is a very real chance that much margianl ​rural land will find other use. Per far too long a one..;,crop economy has had to be tolerated, producing rural idiocies too numerous to list The desolate way of-life of a North Coast dairy far= will be loss attractive and in an age of increasing affluence should not be tolerated. The poorly considered extension of wheatland in recent years has already extracted its price. +One of the words to appear in the sixties was "​environment"​ - an awareness that the quality of life could be as big a consideration as income tax policy. Concern with pollution, whether it be air, water or urban landscape is very likely to become a major issue, in some centres literally a matter of life and death, in the seventies. From this rather narrow immediate concern there has already grown a surprising interest, in the Western world at least, in the overall environment which we recognise as conservation. This is shown as a now willingness to consider other than purely economic factors ​whether in land use, insecticide or a dozen other things. The Little Desert scheme in western Victoria, though shown to be economic nonsense, under present market conditions, would almost certainly have been maintained unless conservationists had also shown it to be cultural vandalism. Barrier Reef drilling, Colong mining, development schemes not yet proposed, could, hopefully, be looked at with similar realism. 
-In the Sixties ​New South Wales saw the beginning of Professionalism ​and investment in the running of its established National Parks. This saw an almost immediate very large increase in the attractiveness and use of the Parks. Without such use justification for the investment is difficult and justification for further ​Parks even more so. 'The current unified policy for llational ​Parks could ensure that the popular use ones, close to the city, will contribute ​economiCally ​and in general interest to the more remote ones. Certainly introducing people to the parks could not fail to increase aeneral awareness of the need for more parks, for more foreshore access and more investment. + 
-One dream of the Sixties ​was a "​high-country"​ national park to include the greater ​partof ​the divide of the eastern states. Such a + 
-12: The Sydney Bushwalker.''​ January,​ 19.70. +Ironically, Australia'​s huge mineral development in the decade could alter the whole of the quality of Australian rural life. The rather dangerous argument of having to rely on exports of rural products to maintain overseas balances is rapidly becoming out of date. Coupled with chaotic marketing conditions for practically all rural produce there is a very real chance that much marginal ​rural land will find other use. For far too long a "one-crop economy" ​has had to be tolerated, producing rural idiocies too numerous to listThe desolate way of life of a North Coast dairy farm will be less attractive and in an age of increasing affluence should not be tolerated. The poorly considered extension of wheatland in recent years has already extracted its price. 
-park would be sensible, economically and culturally'.and would rival any in the world. It could be part of the better life we hope will be ours in the seventies.'​+ 
 + 
 +In the sixties ​New South Wales saw the beginning of professionalism ​and investment in the running of its established National Parks. This saw an almost immediate very large increase in the attractiveness and use of the parks. Without such use justification for the investment is difficult and justification for further ​parks even more so. The current unified policy for National ​Parks could ensure that the popular use ones, close to the city, will contribute ​economically ​and in general interest to the more remote ones. Certainly introducing people to the parks could not fail to increase aeneral awareness of the need for more parks, for more foreshore access and more investment. 
 + 
 + 
 +One dream of the sixties ​was a "​high-country"​ national park to include the greater ​part of the divide of the eastern states. Such a park would be sensible, economically and culturally and would rival any in the world. It could be part of the better life we hope will be ours in the seventies.'​ 
 + 
  
 ==== Joy Remembered ==== ==== Joy Remembered ====
Line 191: Line 203:
 **Observer** **Observer**
  
-Everyone should have in their lives an Era Period, whether it + 
-is a few days, a summer or one's youth. Era and socialising were, +Everyone should have in their lives an Era Period, whether it is a few days, a summer or one's youth. Era and socialising were, 
-in my youth, synonymous. One went there on ten minutes notice on +in my youth, synonymous. One went there on ten minutes notice on any week-end between November and Easter, argued whether to go by 
-any week-end between November and Easter, argued whether to go by +the rocks, the Granites or Thelma Ridge - it depended on the time of arrival, financial state (taxi, bus or rare private car) - then argued ​whether to camp at Stockyard, among the lillipillis,​ on the flat among the leeches, on the hill to catch the breeze. 
-the rocks, the Granites or Thelma Ridge - it depended on the time of arrival, financial state (taxi, bus or rare private car) - then argue& ​whether to camp at Stockyard, among the lillipillis,​ on the flat among the leeches, on the hill to catch the breeze. + 
-I had a tent that pitched well on the flat but looked very shantytown ​pitched on the slightest slope. Its one redeeming feature was a clip-on mosquito net. To prove my depthless amiability this abode was collapsed at least a dozen times one night to exclude insects. Inevitably one mozzie was always left. The tent would be collapsed and rolled on to eliminate the one mosquito. At last peace reigned. Towards ​=ming a southerly demolished the tent around us. We did not stir but clutched the tent net anda variety of foodbags as a security-blanket. ​7hen,the sun beamedwe covered our heads and slept on. Unembarrassed we woke at midday, + 
-swam, ate four o'​clock lunch and slept that night somewhere between an as hut and the lillipillis. +I had a tent that pitched well on the flat but looked very shanty-town ​pitched on the slightest slope. Its one redeeming feature was a clip-on mosquito net. To prove my depthless amiability this abode was collapsed at least a dozen times one night to exclude insects. Inevitably one mozzie was always left. The tent would be collapsed and rolled on to eliminate the one mosquito. At last peace reigned. Towards ​morning ​a southerly demolished the tent around us. We did not stir but clutched the tent net and a variety of food bags as a security-blanket. ​When the sun beamed we covered our heads and slept on. Unembarrassed we woke at midday, swam, ate four o'​clock lunch and slept that night somewhere between an Era hut and the lillipillis. 
-Era was the place for the most candid of candid photography,​ the results of which were best kept tooneself. From one reel I showed precisely one print - a completely innocuous, out of series shot of a pcelr of horses grazing on the hillside between north and southIt is a print of which I still remain fond-. I wriggled on my stomach, downhill after the horses as they moved on continuously. Perfect composition came only moments before physical collapse. + 
-There was always a balance of alternatives between availability of water and the prevalence of leeches. Paradoxically one walked further for water, in damp years to escape camping with the leeches. Good cicada years were earsplitting. Towards the end of summer ​bind-i-eyes were an obsession. I remember vividly the peculiar agony of one girl 'walking ​tow4r1s ​the' btabh-barefoo'​ted-BOth foot picked up burrs simultaneously. She sat down. Both buttocks ditto. She tried .a handstand, the last desparate ​recourse. One hand found fienay ​territory. + 
-The aboriginal midden provides still the perfect spot for sun-baking. There are endless combinations and possibilities of direct and reflected light and cooling breeze. Either beach was sure to provide just the right surf or the right company. We swam and socialised with future notables, cursed the grazing animals and then late on Sunday ran up a ridge to beat someonets ​sister s record attempt. +Era was the place for the most candid of candid photography,​ the results of which were best kept to oneself. From one reel I showed precisely one print - a completely innocuous, out of series shot of a pair of horses grazing on the hillside between north and southIt is a print of which I still remain fond. I wriggled on my stomach, downhill after the horses as they moved on continuously. Perfect composition came only moments before physical collapse. 
-Era this year is greener than ever. The water in Stockyard + 
-is as clear ana sweet, the leeches still find the one person in the party terrified of them. There is more driftwood than ever to collect and dry and hide in the trees. Cicadas are having a tremendous year. Surf breaks beautifully on the bank. People still walk past with mysterious loads. Optimistic ​fishezmen ​still stand on the rocks. Among the age-old shells and chipped stone on the midden we found a 1925 sixpence. + 
-An epic account of a voyage down the Murray from Tom Groggin to Khancobin has been promised indirectly to grace a future issue. This report, which will rival Shackle-bents ​escape from the ice, will appear when +There was always a balance of alternatives between availability of water and the prevalence of leeches. Paradoxically one walked further for water, in damp years to escape camping with the leeches. Good cicada years were earsplitting. Towards the end of summer ​bindi-eyes were an obsession. I remember vividly the peculiar agony of one girl walking ​towards ​the beach barefooted. Both feet picked up burrs simultaneously. She sat down. Both buttocks ditto. She tried a handstand, the last desperate ​recourse. One hand found friendly ​territory. 
-the author has the manuscript typed since he wishes to avoid ambiguities appearing in the final article. ​Ho is not going to risk recumbent, redundant, ​reeling ​lions in any of his simile ​or metaphor.+ 
 + 
 +The aboriginal midden provides still the perfect spot for sun-baking. There are endless combinations and possibilities of direct and reflected light and cooling breeze. Either beach was sure to provide just the right surf or the right company. We swam and socialised with future notables, cursed the grazing animals and then late on Sunday ran up a ridge to beat someone'​s ​sister's record attempt. 
 + 
 + 
 +Era this year is greener than ever. The water in Stockyard is as clear and sweet, the leeches still find the one person in the party terrified of them. There is more driftwood than ever to collect and dry and hide in the trees. Cicadas are having a tremendous year. Surf breaks beautifully on the bank. People still walk past with mysterious loads. Optimistic ​fishermen ​still stand on the rocks. Among the age-old shells and chipped stone on the midden we found a 1925 sixpence. ​ 
 + 
 + 
 +An epic account of a voyage down the Murray from Tom Groggin to Khancobin has been promised indirectly to grace a future issue. This report, which will rival Shackleton'​s ​escape from the ice, will appear when the author has the manuscript typed since he wishes to avoid ambiguities appearing in the final article. ​He is not going to risk recumbent, redundant, ​reclining ​lions in any of his similes ​or metaphors. 
  
  
 ==== The December General Meeting ==== ==== The December General Meeting ====
 +
  
 **Jim Brown** **Jim Brown**
  
-The last meeting of the calendar year saw four members welcomed ​ Pat Masson, Jan Phillips, Ruth Morgan and George Mayer  and there would have been five had Wendy Major been present. 
-No one wanted to raise any matters on.the count of Minutes, but Don from the Chair, pointed out that we were still short of a Federation Delegate, whereat Jim Calloway was nominated and appointed. Don went on to say that the Kangaroo Valley land Management Committee met on the site early in November, and conferred with the Quakers next door who aid not now seek grazing rights on our block. 
-Frank Ashdown was inspired to ask how the Annual rates would now be paid,- and was told the amount of about $24 p.a. would be met from the Clubs normal funds. 
  
 +The last meeting of the calendar year saw four members welcomed - Pat Masson, Jan Phillips, Ruth Morgan and George Mayer - and there would have been five had Wendy Major been present.
 +
 +
 +No one wanted to raise any matters on the count of Minutes, but Don from the Chair, pointed out that we were still short of a Federation Delegate, whereat Jim Calloway was nominated and appointed. Don went on to say that the Kangaroo Valley Land Management Committee met on the site early in November and conferred with the Quakers next door who did not now seek grazing rights on our block.
 +
 +
 +Frank Ashdown was inspired to ask how the annual rates would now be paid, and was told the amount of about $24 p.a. would be met from the Club's normal funds.
 +
 +
 +Correspondence told us Beryl Chapman had bean reinstated to membership and Jean and Tom Moppett had transferred to non-active. There was a rather non-committal reply from the Premier to our request that the Sim report on beach mining be given an airing in Parliament.
 +
 +
 +The Secretary read the month'​s financial statement showing income of $25, expenditure of $142, and, on hand in the current account at the close of November, $690.
 +
 +
 +Walks Report included the autobiographical comment of some leaders interposed with the Walk's Secretary'​s account. Early in November Frank Leyden'​s jaunt to the Valley of the Swamps, out from Bell, found reduced wild flowers after last year's fires, and pleasant camping at the "​Swamps"​ about 4 1/2 hours walking from the Deep Pass car park. On the Sunday there had been two day walks: Nancy Alderson and party went into the Red Hand Cave-Campfire Creek country, finding the creeks well up after rains; your reporter with a team of 18 visited Burning Palms and rock-hopped to Werrong Beach.
 +
 +
 +The following week-end, which was most wet, was rather a flop, and Instructional Walk being cancelled for lack of prospectives,​ and Ramon U'​Brien'​s Grand Canyon jaunt because of a superfluity of water. Alan Hedstrom took Owen Mark's trip (Owen being on the Pacific Islands Grand Tour) and Frank Leyden with a small party of 5 mombers went to Peat's Farm - a little visited area on Hawkesbury estuary.
 +
 +
 +The week-end 22-23 Nov. was gloriously fine and David Cotton'​s team of six went to the Wild Dog Mountains, finding outsize net tles in Carlons Creek and spending a night camped "on a 45-deg slope"​. Barry Wallace took a crowd to Yalwal and Danjera Creeks: camping early after a near mutiny, they still arrived back to the cars good and early on Sunday but found a pleasant way to kill time in Nowra where George Mayer had access to a Club. On the same weekend Sam Hinde took people into seldom visited territory near Spencer on the Hawkesbury: his account of the trip was scurrilous, highly-coloured,​ and should be ignored (especially most references to your reporter).
 +
 +
 +To conclude the month Spiro Ketas plus six others came down from Kanangra to the Kowmung via Cambage Spire and did come 1i-loing downstream, and Owen Marks somehow prevailed on 31 people to trudge from Bundeena to Garie (morning tea at Marley provided).
 +
 +
 +Thence came Federation Reports for November and December, with Wilf Hilder explaining there had been two schools of thought about installing a second plaque to Taro at Clear Hill, the final decision being no additional memorial but possibly the use of the funds available on improvement of ways and means of leaving the Narrow Nock peninsular.
 +
 +
 +The vacancy for Federation Treasurer had been filled, but an Auditor was yet required. Affiliation fees for 1970 would be the same as '69, the Ball would be in September, place and date to be chosen, and the Federation Reunion on April 11-12 at Sugec Creek near Mangrove Creek (via Spencer).
 +
 +
 +The Catholic Walkers were now affiliated: Kuring-gai Chase Trust evinced some interest in walking tracks and seemed willing to improve them and include them in their information literature. Federation was watching with some concern the Blue Mountains Council'​s schemes for a fire road into Grose Valley.
  
  
-Correspondence toldUs Beryl Chapman had bean r.einat.ated to membership and Jean and Tom:Moppett had transferred to non-active. There was a rather non-committal reply from the Premier to our request that the Sim report on beach mining be given an airing in Parliament. +Wilf reported new 1:50,000 maps of Ettrick ​and Bonalbo ​in thc far north-east of the State, a map of the Jacobs River area (covering ​The Pilot and high spots south of Kosciusko) and provisional maps embracing the Apsloy and Macleay River Gorges ​quite precipitous ravinesPublications ​of interest were "The Melbourne Walker" ​1970 edition ​and a Periwinkle book "Wild Flowers ​of South-East Australia."
-The Secretary read the month'​s.. financial statement,- showing income ​of .$25, expenditure of $142., ​and on hand in the current ​account at the close of November $690. +
-Walks Report included ​the autobiographical comment ​of some leaders interposed with the Walk's Secretary7s account. Early in November Frank Leyden'​s jaunt to the Valley of the Swamps, out from Bell, found reduced wild flowers after last year's fires, and Pleasant camping at the "​Swamps"​ about 4i.ho=s walking from the Deep Pass car park. On the Sunday there had been two day walks: Nan(7 Alderson and party went into the Red Hand Cava-Campfire Creek . country, finding the creeks well up after rains. Your reporter with team of 18 visited Burning Palms and rock-hopped to '​Throng Beach. +
-The following week-end, which was most wet, was rather a flop, and Instructional Walk being cancelled for lack of prospectives,​ an. Ramon U'​Brien'​s Grand Canyon ;jaunt because of a superfluity of water. Alan Hedstrom took Owen Mark's trip (Owen being. on the Pacific Islands Grand Tour) and Frank Leyden with a samll party of 5 momberswent to Peat's Farm a little visited area on Hawkesbury estuary. +
-The week-end 22-23 Nov. was gloriously fine and David Cotton'​s team of six went to the Wild Dog Mountains, finding outsize nettles in Carlon'​s Creek and spending a night camped ​"on a 45-deg slope". Barry Wallace took a crowd to,​.Yalwal ​and Danjera Creeks camping early after near mutiny, they still arrived. back to the cars good and early on Sunday but found a pleasant way to kill time in Nowra where George Mayer had access to a Club. On the same weekend Sam Hinde took. people into seldom visited territory near Spencer on the Hawkesburys his account ​of the trip was sburrilous, highly coloured and should be ignored (especially most references to your reporter). +
-To conclude the month Spiro Ketas plus-six others came down from Kanangra to the Kowmung via CaMbage Spire and-did come 1i-being downstream, and Owen Marks somehow prevailed on 31 people to trudge from Bundeena to Garie (morning tea at Marley provided). +
-Came Federation Reports for November and December, with Wilf Hilder explaining there had been two schools of thought about in-. stalling a second plaque to Tare at Clear Hill, the final decision+
  
  
-being no additional memorial but possibly the use of the funds available on improvement of ways and means of leaving the Narrow Nock peninsular. +On to general business, and Frank Ashdown explaining that his talk in January would not be on "​English Countess"​ but "​Counties"​. ​He hadn't been able to find a countess on his recent visit to Darb - not even Lady Chatterley. From the Chair Don said members attending day walks should contact the leader and not just turn up: all other things apart, the trip may have been changed. Then, as he donged ​the gong at 9.5 p.m. he wished us all a Merry Christmas.
-The vacancy for Federation Treasurer had been filled, but an Auditor was yet required. Affiliation fees for 1970 would be the same as '69, the Ball would be in September, place and date to be chosen, and the Federation Reunion on April 11-12 at Sugoc Creek near Vangriove Creek (via Spencer). +
-The Catholic Walkers were now affiliated: Kuringgai Chase Trust evinced some interest in walking tracks and seemed willing to improve them and include them in their information literature. Federation was watching with some concern the Blue Mountains Council'​s schemes for a fire road into Grose Valley. +
-Wilf reported new 1:50,000 maps of Ettrick and_ Bonalbo in thc far north-east of the State, a map of the Jacob'​s River area (covering The Pilot and high spots south of Kosciusko) and provisional maps embracing the Apsloy and Macleay River Gorges - quite preceipitous ravines. Publications of interest were "The Melbourne Walker"​ 1970 edition and a Periwinkle book "Wild Flowers of South-East Australia."​ +
-On to general business, and Frank Ashdown explaining that +
-his talk in January would not ho on "​English Countess"​ but "​Counties"​. ​Ho hadn't been able to find a countess on his recent visit to Darb - not even Lady Chatterloy. From the Chair Don said members attending day walks should contact the leader and not just turn up: allother ​things apart, the trip may have been changed. Then, as he dongod ​the gong at 9.5 p.m. ho wished us all a Merry Christmas.+
  
  
197001.txt · Last modified: 2016/02/21 08:41 by lucym