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196912 [2016/04/09 10:46]
kennettj
196912 [2019/06/16 03:43] (current)
sbw
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 There had been heavy rain during the afternoon and consequently the road from Wolgan Gap to Newnes was very greasy and dangerous and we were down to second gear and 10 mph most of the way. We were lucky to miss a kangaroo on the narrow part of the road just before the old hotel. Everything was saturated and there was a drip, drip, drip from the trees when we reached Newnes and found John Scott there, as arranged. John had driven up alone earlier in the afternoon and had encountered the full blast of the rain and the hail. After doing the walk with us, John (who was freelancing in the area) would drive the Caliph'​s car back to Newnes. A very providential arrangement indeed, for otherwise it would not have been possible to complete the car swapping. There had been heavy rain during the afternoon and consequently the road from Wolgan Gap to Newnes was very greasy and dangerous and we were down to second gear and 10 mph most of the way. We were lucky to miss a kangaroo on the narrow part of the road just before the old hotel. Everything was saturated and there was a drip, drip, drip from the trees when we reached Newnes and found John Scott there, as arranged. John had driven up alone earlier in the afternoon and had encountered the full blast of the rain and the hail. After doing the walk with us, John (who was freelancing in the area) would drive the Caliph'​s car back to Newnes. A very providential arrangement indeed, for otherwise it would not have been possible to complete the car swapping.
  
-We were walking at 11.5 p.m. but at 11.40 p.m. Ray remembered that that he had not locked Ross's car and he had to walk back to Newnes. The rest of us kept going, dodging the mud and the puddles of water and sliding everywhere, and reached the hut at 12.30 a.m. on Saturday morning and lost no time in hitting the hay, but Ray woke us all up again when he arrived at 2.00 a.m. By the way, when Ray got to Glen Davis and to his own car he found that Ross had left it unlocked!+We were walking at 11.5 p.m. but at 11.40 p.m. Ray remembered that that he had not locked Ross's car and he had to walk back to Newnes. The rest of us kept going, dodging the mud and the puddles of water and sliding everywhere, and reached the hut at 12.30 a.m. on Saturday morning and lost no time in hitting the hay, but Ray woke us all up again when he arrived at 2.00 a.m. By the way, when Ray got to Glen Davis and to his own car he found that Ross had left it **unlocked**!
  
 By 5.00 a.m. when we got out of bed the temperature had dropped and it was a bleakish daybreak with a sky full of wet-looking clouds but the view from the Hut was as good as ever and the great cliff across the river was made more impressive by the morning. There was no rain, however, and sharp at 6.00 a.m., after cooeeing up the river with all our might, we set down the Wolgan. I cannot understand why some people do not like early starts, for it is the pleasantest time of the day and the birds are at their noisiest and the trees and grasses have their freshest look. It is the time when you can saunter along with old rhymes running through your head. Of course the kind of stuff that would run through my head would not be everybody'​s kettle of fish. I am not enamoured of those who enumerate their ancestry and pass it off as poetry. This is sorry stuff and is far worse than Homer'​s Catalogue of the Ships, and of course they are not Homers and cannot make up the deficiencies otherwise. Having browsed my way through several thousand volumes of poetry and religiously eschewed all poetasters(even including modern Australian ones, dozens of whom would be insufficient to make a Campbell or a Hope) I fully subscribe to Byron'​s dictum that : By 5.00 a.m. when we got out of bed the temperature had dropped and it was a bleakish daybreak with a sky full of wet-looking clouds but the view from the Hut was as good as ever and the great cliff across the river was made more impressive by the morning. There was no rain, however, and sharp at 6.00 a.m., after cooeeing up the river with all our might, we set down the Wolgan. I cannot understand why some people do not like early starts, for it is the pleasantest time of the day and the birds are at their noisiest and the trees and grasses have their freshest look. It is the time when you can saunter along with old rhymes running through your head. Of course the kind of stuff that would run through my head would not be everybody'​s kettle of fish. I am not enamoured of those who enumerate their ancestry and pass it off as poetry. This is sorry stuff and is far worse than Homer'​s Catalogue of the Ships, and of course they are not Homers and cannot make up the deficiencies otherwise. Having browsed my way through several thousand volumes of poetry and religiously eschewed all poetasters(even including modern Australian ones, dozens of whom would be insufficient to make a Campbell or a Hope) I fully subscribe to Byron'​s dictum that :
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-====== The November General Meeting======+====== The November General Meeting ======
  
 Jim Brown Jim Brown
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 Out of correspondence was a proposal by the Nature Conservation Council that the Sim report on beach mining should be discussed in parliament. The Club resolved, on a motion by Phil Hall, to request the Premier to take this action. It was reported that, after tabling of the report, it appeared to have been conveniently forgotten. Out of correspondence was a proposal by the Nature Conservation Council that the Sim report on beach mining should be discussed in parliament. The Club resolved, on a motion by Phil Hall, to request the Premier to take this action. It was reported that, after tabling of the report, it appeared to have been conveniently forgotten.
  
-In the "​Reports"​ department, the Treasurer stated that the on-hand cash at the end of October was $807+In the "​Reports"​ department, the Treasurer stated that the on-hand cash at the end of October was $807
  
 Mike Short introduced the walks report, revealing that the scheduled trips in October attracted 73 members, 52 prospectives and 46 visitors. Some of the leaders told their own tales. Mike Short introduced the walks report, revealing that the scheduled trips in October attracted 73 members, 52 prospectives and 46 visitors. Some of the leaders told their own tales.
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 At the beginning of the month five members were amongst 27 people at a joint trip on Watson'​s Crags in the Alps, and Ray Hookway'​s Budawangs trip had 17, the area was so crowded it "​resembled Pitt Street"'​ Jack Perry'​s Labour Day trip was attended by 8 people, but no report was available. On the second week-end of the month Dot Noble'​s party of 9 members and 5 Prospectives were out under showery conditions in the hills near Kanangra, and there were two day walks, one led. by Meryl Watman into flannel flower, country near Kurnell, while Gladys Robert'​s trip near Belrose was joined by a S.M. Herald feature writer. At the beginning of the month five members were amongst 27 people at a joint trip on Watson'​s Crags in the Alps, and Ray Hookway'​s Budawangs trip had 17, the area was so crowded it "​resembled Pitt Street"'​ Jack Perry'​s Labour Day trip was attended by 8 people, but no report was available. On the second week-end of the month Dot Noble'​s party of 9 members and 5 Prospectives were out under showery conditions in the hills near Kanangra, and there were two day walks, one led. by Meryl Watman into flannel flower, country near Kurnell, while Gladys Robert'​s trip near Belrose was joined by a S.M. Herald feature writer.
  
-Mid October saw the car swap trip of Pat Harrison and Ross Hughes on Wo1gan ​and Capertee Rivers and what must be the fastest passage from Newnes to Glen Davis via the rivers. Indeed the tail end of Pat's party never caught up with the advance guard. Sheila Binns and crew of 11 had a pleasantly leisured camp a the erstwhile Reunion site at Woods Creek, while Jim Callaway took a test walk from Heathcote to Bundeena.+Mid October saw the car swap trip of Pat Harrison and Ross Hughes on Wolgan ​and Capertee Rivers and what must be the fastest passage from Newnes to Glen Davis via the rivers. Indeed the tail end of Pat's party never caught up with the advance guard. Sheila Binns and crew of 11 had a pleasantly leisured camp a the erstwhile Reunion site at Woods Creek, while Jim Callaway took a test walk from Heathcote to Bundeena.
  
 For his Instructional walk over Paddy'​s Peak and to the Wollondilly,​ Owen Marks had a team of 13,​including 9 prospectives. Owen's report of the trip, was quite lyrical in spite of hot  weather, but by all accounts there was little time for instruction. ​ Mabel Pratt'​s day walk to Marley was enlivened by a savage storm which caused the Bundeenda ferry to ground on a shoal. At this point Wilf Hilder commented that Owen's observations of the Aurora Borealis (a northern hemisphere phenomenon) was a truly remarkable feature on the Wollondilly. For his Instructional walk over Paddy'​s Peak and to the Wollondilly,​ Owen Marks had a team of 13,​including 9 prospectives. Owen's report of the trip, was quite lyrical in spite of hot  weather, but by all accounts there was little time for instruction. ​ Mabel Pratt'​s day walk to Marley was enlivened by a savage storm which caused the Bundeenda ferry to ground on a shoal. At this point Wilf Hilder commented that Owen's observations of the Aurora Borealis (a northern hemisphere phenomenon) was a truly remarkable feature on the Wollondilly.
196912.1460198771.txt.gz ยท Last modified: 2016/04/09 10:46 by kennettj