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196912 [2016/04/08 12:23]
kennettj
196912 [2019/06/16 03:43]
sbw
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 A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bushwalkers,​ Northcote Building, Reiby Place, Circular Quay, 2000. A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bushwalkers,​ Northcote Building, Reiby Place, Circular Quay, 2000.
  
-CONTENTS. +**CONTENTS** 
-Swan Song, or Antidote for White Ants -Pat Harrison 2 + 
-November General Meeting - Jim Brown 9. +|Swan Song, or Antidote for White Ants -Pat Harrison ​|2| 
-Observer Plants Some Trees 11 +|November General Meeting - Jim Brown |9| 
-Apology Publicly Made - Observer 12 +|Observer Plants Some Trees |11| 
-Mt.Equipment Ad 13 +|Apology Publicly Made - Observer ​|12| 
-A Mountain Between Four - Paddy Pallin 14. +|Mt.Equipment Ad |13| 
-Paddy'​s. Ad+|A Mountain Between Four - Paddy Pallin |14| 
 +|Paddy'​s. Ad| |
  
 |**EDITOR** | Bill Gillam, 19 Old Bush Rd, Engadine | |**EDITOR** | Bill Gillam, 19 Old Bush Rd, Engadine |
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 ====== Swan Song or Antidote for White Ants ====== ====== Swan Song or Antidote for White Ants ======
   ​   ​
- 
 Pat Harrison. Pat Harrison.
  
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 There had been heavy rain during the afternoon and consequently the road from Wolgan Gap to Newnes was very greasy and dangerous and we were down to second gear and 10 mph most of the way. We were lucky to miss a kangaroo on the narrow part of the road just before the old hotel. Everything was saturated and there was a drip, drip, drip from the trees when we reached Newnes and found John Scott there, as arranged. John had driven up alone earlier in the afternoon and had encountered the full blast of the rain and the hail. After doing the walk with us, John (who was freelancing in the area) would drive the Caliph'​s car back to Newnes. A very providential arrangement indeed, for otherwise it would not have been possible to complete the car swapping. There had been heavy rain during the afternoon and consequently the road from Wolgan Gap to Newnes was very greasy and dangerous and we were down to second gear and 10 mph most of the way. We were lucky to miss a kangaroo on the narrow part of the road just before the old hotel. Everything was saturated and there was a drip, drip, drip from the trees when we reached Newnes and found John Scott there, as arranged. John had driven up alone earlier in the afternoon and had encountered the full blast of the rain and the hail. After doing the walk with us, John (who was freelancing in the area) would drive the Caliph'​s car back to Newnes. A very providential arrangement indeed, for otherwise it would not have been possible to complete the car swapping.
  
-We were walking at 11.5 p.m. but at 11.40 p.m. Ray remembered that that he had not locked Ross's car and he had to walk back to Newnes. The rest of us kept going, dodging the mud and the puddles of water and sliding everywhere, and reached the hut at 12.30 a.m. on Saturday morning and lost no time in hitting the hay, but Ray woke us all up again when he arrived at 2.00 a.m. By the way, when Ray got to Glen Davis and to his own car he found that Ross had left it unlocked!+We were walking at 11.5 p.m. but at 11.40 p.m. Ray remembered that that he had not locked Ross's car and he had to walk back to Newnes. The rest of us kept going, dodging the mud and the puddles of water and sliding everywhere, and reached the hut at 12.30 a.m. on Saturday morning and lost no time in hitting the hay, but Ray woke us all up again when he arrived at 2.00 a.m. By the way, when Ray got to Glen Davis and to his own car he found that Ross had left it **unlocked**!
  
 By 5.00 a.m. when we got out of bed the temperature had dropped and it was a bleakish daybreak with a sky full of wet-looking clouds but the view from the Hut was as good as ever and the great cliff across the river was made more impressive by the morning. There was no rain, however, and sharp at 6.00 a.m., after cooeeing up the river with all our might, we set down the Wolgan. I cannot understand why some people do not like early starts, for it is the pleasantest time of the day and the birds are at their noisiest and the trees and grasses have their freshest look. It is the time when you can saunter along with old rhymes running through your head. Of course the kind of stuff that would run through my head would not be everybody'​s kettle of fish. I am not enamoured of those who enumerate their ancestry and pass it off as poetry. This is sorry stuff and is far worse than Homer'​s Catalogue of the Ships, and of course they are not Homers and cannot make up the deficiencies otherwise. Having browsed my way through several thousand volumes of poetry and religiously eschewed all poetasters(even including modern Australian ones, dozens of whom would be insufficient to make a Campbell or a Hope) I fully subscribe to Byron'​s dictum that : By 5.00 a.m. when we got out of bed the temperature had dropped and it was a bleakish daybreak with a sky full of wet-looking clouds but the view from the Hut was as good as ever and the great cliff across the river was made more impressive by the morning. There was no rain, however, and sharp at 6.00 a.m., after cooeeing up the river with all our might, we set down the Wolgan. I cannot understand why some people do not like early starts, for it is the pleasantest time of the day and the birds are at their noisiest and the trees and grasses have their freshest look. It is the time when you can saunter along with old rhymes running through your head. Of course the kind of stuff that would run through my head would not be everybody'​s kettle of fish. I am not enamoured of those who enumerate their ancestry and pass it off as poetry. This is sorry stuff and is far worse than Homer'​s Catalogue of the Ships, and of course they are not Homers and cannot make up the deficiencies otherwise. Having browsed my way through several thousand volumes of poetry and religiously eschewed all poetasters(even including modern Australian ones, dozens of whom would be insufficient to make a Campbell or a Hope) I fully subscribe to Byron'​s dictum that :
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-====== The November General Meeting======+====== The November General Meeting ======
  
 Jim Brown Jim Brown
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 Out of correspondence was a proposal by the Nature Conservation Council that the Sim report on beach mining should be discussed in parliament. The Club resolved, on a motion by Phil Hall, to request the Premier to take this action. It was reported that, after tabling of the report, it appeared to have been conveniently forgotten. Out of correspondence was a proposal by the Nature Conservation Council that the Sim report on beach mining should be discussed in parliament. The Club resolved, on a motion by Phil Hall, to request the Premier to take this action. It was reported that, after tabling of the report, it appeared to have been conveniently forgotten.
  
-In the "​Reports"​ department, the Treasurer stated that the on-hand cash at the end of October was 4807, +In the "​Reports"​ department, the Treasurer stated that the on-hand cash at the end of October was $807. 
  
 Mike Short introduced the walks report, revealing that the scheduled trips in October attracted 73 members, 52 prospectives and 46 visitors. Some of the leaders told their own tales. Mike Short introduced the walks report, revealing that the scheduled trips in October attracted 73 members, 52 prospectives and 46 visitors. Some of the leaders told their own tales.
  
-At the beginning of the month five members were amongst 27 pedple ​at a joint trip on Watson'​s Crags in the Alps, and Ray Hookway'​s ​?​47,​da-cang ​trip had 17 the area was so crowded it "​resembled Pitt Street"'​ Jack Perry'​s Labour Day trip was attended by 8 people, but no report was available. On the second week-end of the month Dot Noble'​s party of 9 members and 5 Prospectives were out under showery conditions in the hills near Kanangra, and there were two day walks, one led. by Meryl Watman into flannel flower, country near Kurnell, while Gladys Robert'​s trip near Belrose was joined by a S.M. Herald feature writer.+At the beginning of the month five members were amongst 27 people ​at a joint trip on Watson'​s Crags in the Alps, and Ray Hookway'​s ​Budawangs ​trip had 17the area was so crowded it "​resembled Pitt Street"'​ Jack Perry'​s Labour Day trip was attended by 8 people, but no report was available. On the second week-end of the month Dot Noble'​s party of 9 members and 5 Prospectives were out under showery conditions in the hills near Kanangra, and there were two day walks, one led. by Meryl Watman into flannel flower, country near Kurnell, while Gladys Robert'​s trip near Belrose was joined by a S.M. Herald feature writer.
  
-Mid October saw the car swap trip of Pat Harrison and Ross Hughes on Wo1gan ​and Capertee Rivers and what must be the fastest passage from Newnes to Glen Davis via the rivers. Indeed the tail end of Pat's party .p.ovor:,,​ca.,​141.t , ​with the advance guard. ​'Sheila ​Bint. and 'crew .tof 11 haa Plqq4-432-t1Zr ei4ur ed.. ,camp a the--erStwhile -Reunion site at Woods Creek, while %Tim Lcallaway. tdok,. ,test -walk from Heathcote to Bundeena.+Mid October saw the car swap trip of Pat Harrison and Ross Hughes on Wolgan ​and Capertee Rivers and what must be the fastest passage from Newnes to Glen Davis via the rivers. Indeed the tail end of Pat's party never caught up with the advance guard. Sheila ​Binns and crew of 11 had pleasantly leisured ​camp a the erstwhile ​Reunion site at Woods Creek, while Jim Callaway took a test walk from Heathcote to Bundeena.
  
-For his Instructional walk over Paddy'​s Peak and to the +For his Instructional walk over Paddy'​s Peak and to the Wollondilly, ​Owen Marks had a team of 13,including ​prospectives. Owen'report of the trip, was quite lyrical in spite of hot  weather, but by all accounts there was little time for instruction Mabel Pratt's day walk to Marley was enlivened by a savage storm which caused the Bundeenda ferry to ground on a shoal. At this point Wilf Hilder commented that Owen's observations of the Aurora Borealis (a northern hemisphere phenomenon) was a truly remarkable feature on the Wollondilly.
-71ollon.dilly;​ -Owen. Mp,​.-aks ​had , 31-,​eam. ​of 13, .-inclUdThg ​,​iplospeCtj_ves. +
-Owen.'isi report of the trip, wag, q14--b ,1rica1, iisqPite'​ Jef 'hot +
-weather, but by all accounts there was little time, forAns,​truotibn. Mabel Pratf's day _;,​valk ​to Marley was enlivened by a savage storm which caused the Bundeenda ferry -to ground on a shoal. At this point Wilf Hilder commented that Owen's observations of the Aurora Borealis (a northern hemisphere phenomenon) was a truly remarkable feature on the Wollondilly.+
  
 Wilf proceeded with a Federation Report, including congratulations to the Melbourne Walking Club on its 75th anniversary. Federation had also debated the Little Bay "wrap up" and decided NOT to contradict conservationists who were opposed to the stunt. This might be construed as supporting the critics. Delegates were wanted for the Conservation Bureau and apparently ​ one Volunteer (evidently unknown) was obtained. Wilf also reported the footbridge over Hacking River above Audley was "​officially closed"​. Wilf proceeded with a Federation Report, including congratulations to the Melbourne Walking Club on its 75th anniversary. Federation had also debated the Little Bay "wrap up" and decided NOT to contradict conservationists who were opposed to the stunt. This might be construed as supporting the critics. Delegates were wanted for the Conservation Bureau and apparently ​ one Volunteer (evidently unknown) was obtained. Wilf also reported the footbridge over Hacking River above Audley was "​officially closed"​.
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 ====== Observer Plants Some Trees ====== ====== Observer Plants Some Trees ======
  
-Whenever your observer has to move trees in tins he waits until heavy rains brings the weight of the tins to double the dry weight. This time was no exception. Overnight it rained down pouring rain so that when he set off for Kangaroo Valley with eighty six trees, his older son and a shovel the truck was groaning. ​'7 at brakes, ​18w cloud., waterfall on Cambowarra, a smoky hut. Adventure and adversity are closer than Katmandu.+Whenever your observer has to move trees in tins he waits until heavy rains brings the weight of the tins to double the dry weight. This time was no exception. Overnight it rained down pouring rain so that when he set off for Kangaroo Valley with eighty six trees, his older son and a shovel the truck was groaning. ​Wet brakes, ​low cloud, waterfall on Cambowarra, a smoky hut. Adventure and adversity are closer than Katmandu.
  
-The trees were carried down, planted in the damp soil and because it began again to rain the rain the tins were left as temporary litter. Your observer and his tree-planting son wanted to go home to electric cooking, the right wine with the right guests and his own non-smoked mattress+The trees were carried down, planted in the damp soil and because it began again to rain the rain the tins were left as temporary litter. Your observer and his tree-planting son wanted to go home to electric cooking, the right wine with the right guests and his own non-smoked mattress. ​
-Planted was a catholic selection of potentially big trees, medium trees and shrubs. +
-Tristania confenta - the Brush Box. Popular as a street tree, growing fairly symetrically in the northern rain forests. Usually seen in Molnar'​s cartoons as THE amputated tree. Acacia rubida - Rea Stemmed Wattle. A graceful form with a distinct difference be- +
- tween jurenile and adult leaves. +
-Hakea saligna - grows ten to twelve feet, pale pink and white flowers in spring. Not Hate scratchifolia. +
-Various callistemons. Bottle brushes. Melaleucaluypericafolia - +
-you will recognise it when you see it.+
  
-The melaleucas and callistemons were in flower when planted and will certainly flower next spring. Subsequent reports say the trees are thriving. If you are going to Kangaroo Valley, strongly recommended,​ call in at W. Gillam 19 Old Bush Road Engadine and fill your car With grevilleas, waratahs, spotted gums. Next autumnthere Will be hundreds of trees to take down so please help.+Planted was a catholic selection of potentially big trees, medium trees and shrubs.  
 + 
 +Tristania confenta - the Brush Box. Popular as a street tree, growing fairly symetrically in the northern rain forests. Usually seen in Molnar'​s cartoons as THE amputated tree. Acacia rubida - Rea Stemmed Wattle. A graceful form with a distinct difference between juvenile and adult leaves. 
 + 
 +Hakea saligna - grows ten to twelve feet, pale pink and white flowers in spring. Not Hakea scratchifolia. 
 + 
 +Various callistemons. Bottle brushes. Melaleucaluypericafolia - you will recognise it when you see it. 
 + 
 +The melaleucas and callistemons were in flower when planted and will certainly flower next spring. Subsequent reports say the trees are thriving. If you are going to Kangaroo Valley, strongly recommended,​ call in at W. Gillam 19 Old Bush Road Engadine and fill your car with grevilleas, waratahs, spotted gums. Next autumn there Will be hundreds of trees to take down so please help.
  
  
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 Now fades the last, long streak of snow\\ ​ Now fades the last, long streak of snow\\ ​
-Now burgeons-every maze of quick About the-floteriquares ​and thick  By ashen roots the violets blow.+Now burgeons-every maze of quick \\ 
 +About the flowering squares ​and thick  ​\\ 
 +By ashen roots the violets blow
 + 
 +It has been pointed out to your editor that the first line quoted above had words transposed, altering in the opinion of the pointer out, the noble association of Tennyson and cross-country skiing. There is much of beauty and value in both Tennyson and cross country skiing and, though your editor does claim to be literate, scansion and iambic pentameters are like putty in his hands.
  
-It has boon pointed out to your editor that the first line quoted above had words transposed,​.altering,​ in the opinion of the pointer out, the noble association of Tennyson ​and cross-,​country skiing. There is much of beauty ​and value.in,both Tennyson and cross country skiing and, though your editor does claim to be literate, scansion ​and iambic pentameters are like putty in his hands.+By choice he has not read much poetry published between 1614 and 1940 from the Stratford accent rhyming blood and good and the famous celibate ratHe has promised ​to mend his ways and widen his prejudices.
  
-By choice he has not read much poetry published. between 1614 and 1940 from the Stratford accent rhyming blood and good and the famous celibate rat. He has promised to mend his ways and widen his prejudices. 
 While in this humble mood he would also like to state publicly that he did not write the line While in this humble mood he would also like to state publicly that he did not write the line
-"​The ​crI;​e1 ​girls we loved are over forty"​.+"​The ​cruel girls we loved are over forty"​.
  
-The line comes from a short but beautiful poem called "​Mothers and Daughters"​ by David Campbell. A phone all will put you in touch with someone who supports Australian poets by buying their books rather than +The line comes from a short but beautiful poem called "​Mothers and Daughters"​ by David Campbell. A phone call will put you in touch with someone who supports Australian poets by buying their books rather than  
 +filching their copyright.
  
  
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 Paddy Pallin. Paddy Pallin.
  
-At the risk of being called a misanthrope I must confess that I enjoyed being one of the only four people who for a week in September occupied that elevated snow capped plateau known as MtBogong.+At the risk of being called a misanthrope I must confess that I enjoyed being one of the only four people who for a week in September occupied that elevated snow capped plateau known as Mt Bogong.
  
-In March I went with two other Old Buffers, Reg Meakins and Ken Brown on a reconnaissance. We sweated up the 4,200 foot climb of the Staircase Spur with cathp gear and a week's food on our backs. We met members of the M.U.M.C. leaving the mountain. During the week the area was visited by Jack Mad.ison, a cattleman and his two sons plus a handsome character called Ken Mills who locked ​as though he had stepped right out of a western movie.+In March I went with two other Old Buffers, Reg Meakins and Ken Brown on a reconnaissance. We sweated up the 4,200 foot climb of the Staircase Spur with camp gear and a week's food on our backs. We met members of the M.U.M.C. leaving the mountain. During the week the area was visited by Jack Madison, a cattleman and his two sons plus a handsome character called Ken Mills who looked ​as though he had stepped right out of a western movie
 + 
 +On the way down the mountain we got tangled up in the stream of a conquestathon (who perpetrates these verbal atrocities?​). This was a race from Mountain Creek up the Staircase Spur to the cairn on Mt. Bogong, down the Eskdale Spur to Camp Creek Gap, then down Mountain Creek to the starting point. Quite a trip - running up 4,200 and then running down again by a circuitous.route. Think the winners time was 3.5 hours.
  
-On the way down the mountain we got tangled up in the stream of 
-a conquestathon (Who perpetrates these verbal atrocities?​). This was a race from Mountain Creek up the Staircase Spur to the cairn on Mt. Bogong2 down the Eskdale Spur to Camp. Creek Gap then dawn Mountain Creek to the starting point. Quite a trip - running up 4,200 and then running down again by a eirCuitous.route. Think the'​winnpr'​s time was 3Z-hours. - f 
 We thoroughly enjoyed our trip on the mountain but we sort of shared it with others. We thoroughly enjoyed our trip on the mountain but we sort of shared it with others.
  
-In early September we watiched tho snow reports and saw that what +In early September we watched the snow reports and saw that what little snow there was, was being washed away by unseasonable rains. ​We actually were so sure there would be a dearth of snow, we took walking shoes with us in case we could not ski, Our film hero Ken had promised to get us up the mountain ​road in his four wheel drive vehicle to save part of the climb, as we would be burdened with extra clothing, waxes, skis and stocksHowever we got to Tawonga - no Ken. In bed with '​flu'​. Having seen the road at Camp Creek Gap in March, I reckoned we had a good chance of getting a car up that far, but alas at Trappers Gap, over three miles short of our objective the road was impassable. At 11.30 a.m. we reluctantly ​left the car and shouldered packs, skis and stocks. Two hours, ​three miles and about 2000 feet (up and down) later we arrived ​at Camp Creek Gap. 
-little snow there was, was being washed away by unseasonable rains. ​7e actually were so sure there would bd-a dearth of snow, we took walking shoes with us in case we could not ski, Our film hero Ken had promised to get us up the :​Eountain ​road in his four wheel drive vehicle to save part of the cliMb, as we would be burdened with extra clothing, waxes, skis and stocks-- However we got to Tawonga - no Ken. In bed with '​flu'​. Having seen the road at Camp Creek Gap in March, I reckoned we had a good chance of getting a car up that far, but alas at Trappers Gap, over three miles short of our objective the road + 
-was impassable. At 11.30 a.m. we reluctantly ​loft the car and shouldprqd ;9a,c11.-.s, skis and stocks. Two hours, ​threee46ifeWZrz:​=,,​ +We disturbed the sole inhabitant, a very well fed wombat ​who promptly scuttled ​into a hollow 
-.L `about 29000 feet (up 6. u doun) later we +log much too small for him and got stuck leaving a plump backside exposed to our astonished gaze. I prodded him gently with a stock and the rump disappeared. (I hope he didn't get quite stuck and have to stay there for keeps). We still had 3,000 feet to climb. There was a snow covering of six inches and the skies were heavy and grey. We got to Michell Shelter 5,100 ft. at about 4.00 p.m. after an arduous climb, partly on foot and partly on skis. Progress on both was tiring and frustrating owing to deep soft snow under which lay all manner of obstacles
-ived at Camp Creek Gap.+ 
- kr, \h. +The area round the hut was a silent brooding place. The twelve foot gum saplings were weighted down under the snow. Large flakes of snow filled the air, dropping straight from a leaden sky, but away above us on the mountain top we heard the roar of the wind. The scene was beautiful, fairy like, yet somehow sinister. We still had a 1,400 ft. climb to the summit and approximately three miles further to go to Cleve Cole Hut. We decided to camp in the Michell Shelter.
-We disturbed the sole inhabitant, a very well -..,, +
-+
-fed vmmbat ​who rfewitrVayscuttled ​into a hollow +
-log much too small for him and got stuck leaving a plump backside exposed to our astonished gaze. I prodded him gently with a stock +
-.15. The Sydney Bushwaikar,​ December91969. +
-and the rump disappeared. (I hope he didn'tglet quite stuck and have to stay there for keeps). We still had 3,000 feet to climb. There was a snow covering of six inches and the skies were heavy and grey. We got to Michell Shelter 5,100 ft. at about 4.00 p.m. after an arduous climb, partly on foot and partly on skis. Progress on both was tiring and frustrating owing to deep soft snow under which lay all manner of obstacles.+
  
-The area round the hut was a silent brooding place. The twelve foot gum saplings were weighted down under the snow. Large flakes of snow filled the air, dropping straight from a leaden sky, but away above us on the mountain top WO heard the roar of the wind. The scene was beautiful, fairy like, yet somehow sinister. We still had a 1,400 ft. climb to the summit and approximately three miles further to go to Cleve Cole Hut. We decided to camp in the Michell Shelter. 
 The party consisted of Rex Cox, an experienced cross country skier who had shared many mountain ski trips with me, Martin Pentley a competent downhill skier, but new to ski touring, Robert Pallin The party consisted of Rex Cox, an experienced cross country skier who had shared many mountain ski trips with me, Martin Pentley a competent downhill skier, but new to ski touring, Robert Pallin
-and me..+and me.
  
 We got the stove alight and after a little work we transformed the muddy, grubby hut into a snug shelter and enjoyed a meal by candlelight. Our only food supplies were bread, butter and meat, but we found a bag of hardened powdered milk and a scraping of sugar which eventually provided us with a comforting hot drink. We got the stove alight and after a little work we transformed the muddy, grubby hut into a snug shelter and enjoyed a meal by candlelight. Our only food supplies were bread, butter and meat, but we found a bag of hardened powdered milk and a scraping of sugar which eventually provided us with a comforting hot drink.
-1Text morning conditions were unchanged, the wind still roared on the mountain top and another six inches had been added to the snow on the ground. We decided to give it a go. Walking was now vixtually impossible owing to the depth of snow so we waxed Up and sot off. Soon we found our blue wax slipping so we deciaed on drastic measures and took off skis and plastered them with yellow klister wax. This was all wrong according to the book, but it worked like magic and we climbed the 30 degree slope with 
  
-vi-tually ​no slipping. We soon got above the tree line ana the +Next morning conditions were unchanged, the wind still roared on the mountain top and another six inches had been added to the snow on the ground. We decided to give it a go. Walking was now virtually impossible owing to the depth of snow so we waxed up and set off. Soon we found our blue wax slipping so we decided on drastic measures and took off skis and plastered them with yellow slister wax. This was all wrong according to the book, but it worked like magic and we climbed the 30 degree slope with virtually ​no slipping. We soon got above the tree line and the wind started. Luckily it was partly behind us. The snow poles were 30 yards apart and quite often we failed to see the next pole, until we were half way towards itAt this point I was glad to have been on the mountain ​before. I know the run of the poles.
-wind started. Luckily it was partly behind.us. The sTnow poles +
-were 30 yards apart and quite often we failed to see the next +
-pole, until we wor6 half way towards it At this point I was glad to delay been on the mountqin ​before. I know the run of the Doles.+
  
-It was a long, long climb and pretty tiring as every now +It was a long, long climb and pretty tiring as every now and then an extra steep bit made us side step up to it. We didn't hurry, We knew we had all day and had no wish to exhaust ourselvesFinally there was no next pole above us and we reached Eskdale Point on top of the ridge. ​Here we met the southwest wind in all its fury and in the saddle of Hill Gap ,it was as much as we could do to stand. However, I knew there were poles every 30 yards on the whole way to the hut 2.5 miles away, and so off we plodded. Our skis were not running well; we had too much soft goo on them, but we were thankful for this as visibility was so bad we dare not let them slide. The snow poles were a fantastic sight. They were 24 inches wide with rime they had accumulated in the blizzard
-and then an extra steep bit made us side step up it0 we didn't hurry, We knew we had all day and had no wish to exhaust ourselves + 
-Finally there was no next pole above us and we reached Eskdale Point on 'top of the ridge. ​Hero we met the southwest wind in all its fury and in the saddle of Hill Gap it was as much as we could do to stand. However, I knew there wore poles every 30 yards on the whole way to the but 21 miles away, and so off we plodded. Our skis were not running well; we had too much soft goo on them, but we were thankful for this as visibility was so bad we dare not let them slide. The snow poles were a fantastic sight. They were 24 inches wide with rime they had accumulated in the blizzard.+The last mile to the hut is a gentle run down into trees and here at last we got some relief. The wind eased a little, visibility increased and glory be: We got a fleeting glimpse of the sun. We must have worn off most of the slister by now because our skis started running and as a final bonus, as we came in sight of the hut, the sun shone and it looked just like a traditional Christmas card. 
 + 
 +In the hut all was peace - but rather a chilly peace. The thermometer registered 19 degrees F. We soon had a fire going, of course, but it was two days before we warmed that granite walled hut to above 32 degrees F and the washing up water stopped freezing on the sink.
  
-The last mile to the hut is a gentle run down into trees and here at last we got some relief. The wind eased a little, visibility increased and glory be: We got a fleeting glimpse of the sun. We must have worn off most of the slister by now becauseour skis started running and as a final bonus, as we came in sight of the hut, the sun shone and it looked just like a traditional Christmas card. 
-In the hut all was peace - but rather a chilly. peace. The thermomter. registered 19 degrees F. We soon had a fire going, 4)JE course, but it was two days before we .  warmed that granite walled hut 
-to above 32 degrees F and the 
-washing up water stopped freez- 
-ing on the sink. 
-c" 
 During the summer we had arranged to have some goodies transported into the hut including a bottle of During the summer we had arranged to have some goodies transported into the hut including a bottle of
 Bacardi rum. They were to have been taken in by packhorse but eventually they were air dropped in. Unfortunately the bottle of Bacardi got broken. Members of the Tangaratta Ski Club were so touched by Bacardi rum. They were to have been taken in by packhorse but eventually they were air dropped in. Unfortunately the bottle of Bacardi got broken. Members of the Tangaratta Ski Club were so touched by
 this loss that they unselfishly deprived themselves of liquor and left us a half bottle of rum to console us. That's mate-ship for you. this loss that they unselfishly deprived themselves of liquor and left us a half bottle of rum to console us. That's mate-ship for you.
  
 +On the second day we thawed out the hot.water system with a blow lamp, we had brought for waxing and from then on had H and C running water and H C showers (mainly H of course). ​
  
-On the second daY we thawed out the hot. water system with a blow lamp, we had brought, for waxing and from then on had H and C running water and H C showers (mainly H of course). +The snow gums in sheltered places ​were burdened with snow and it was easy to understand how their branches become contorted and broken. Photographically they were irresistible and for two days we hardly 
-The snow gums in sheltered places ​wore burdened with snow and it was easy to understand how their branches become contorted and broken.+stopped finding better and better trees to record on imperishable celluloid.
  
-Photographically they were irresistible and for two days we hardly +On the second day we had wonderful sunshine and the air was so clear we saw and could plainly identify the main range of Kosciusko. We could see the Ramshead Range and Townsend and to the north quite unmistakably Jagungal crouching like a lion in lonely splendour. We estimated the distance as 70 miles. To the south lay Feathertop, Mount Loch (Hiding Hotham), Mt. Mackay with its fire tower clearly visible and the Bogong High Plains. To the west lay the broad mass of Buffalo
-stopped finding better and bettor trees to record on imperishable celluloid. + 
-On the second day we had wonderful sunshine and the air was so clear we saw and could plainly identify the main rangoof ​Kosciusko. We could see the Ramshead Range and Townsend and to the north quite unmistakably Jagungal crouching like a lion in lonely splendour. We estimated the distance as 70 miles. To the south lay Feathertop, Mount Loch (Hiding Hotham), Mt. Mackay with its fire tower clearly visible and the Bogong High Plains. To the west lay the broad mass of Buffalo.+We had a wonderful week as sole occupants of this mountain eyrie. We skied east, we skied west and we tried every ridge north and south. We had only one other companion on the mountain, a fox. Every night he made his rounds and travelled the full length of the mountain over snow, a round journey of over ten miles and so far as we could see with no chance of food, for there were no rabbit or hare tracks and no signs of birds having been killed. There would no doubt have been game in the gullies hundreds of foot below, but each night he seemed to beat the rounds of the tops. We thought maybe he was asserting his territorial rights by this otherwise apparently wasted journey. 
 + 
 +In mid week we went to the summit cairn and then down to the summit hut, which is a few hundred feet below the top on the steep north side. In March this hut was in a state of extreme delapidation with sheets of iron flapping in the slightest breeze. In the meantime someone had nailed down the loose shoots of iron and made the place weather tight but scarcely habitable. Just below the hut is a cairn marking the spot where three Victorian skiers died in a blizzard whilst attempting to reach the Summit Hut. In fine weather it is difficult to grasp the fact that three capable skiers perished within eighty yards of shelter and safety, but our memories of our recent climb up the Eskdale Spur in less severe weather made us realise the possibility. Another ten miles an hour to the wind, a little more snow falling and an extra 10 or 20 lbs in our pack could have made a tragic difference to the end of our story too.
  
-We had a wonderful week as sole occupants of this mountain eyrie. We skied east, we skied west and we trieq every ridge north and south. We had only one other companion on the mountain ​ a fox. Every night he made his rounds and travelled the full length of the mountain over snow, a round journey of over ton miles and so far as We could see with no chance of food, for there were no rabbit or hare tracks and no signs of birds having been killed. There would no doubt have been game in the gullies hundreds of foot below, but each night he seamed to beat the rounds of the tops. We thought maybe he was asserting his territorial rights by this otherwise apparently wasted journey. 
-In mid week we went to the summit cairn and then down to the summit hut, which is a few hundred feet below the top on the stoop north side. In March this hut was in a state of extreme delapidation with sheets of iron flapping in the slightest breeze. In the meantime someone had nailed down the loose shoots of iron and made the place weather tight but scarcely habitable. Just below the hut is 
-a cairn marking the spot where three Victorian skiers died in a blizzard whilst attempting to reach the Summit Hut. In fine weather it is difficult to grasp the fact that three capable skiers perished within eighty yards of shelter and safety, but our memories of our recent climb up the Eskdale Spur in less severe weather made us realise the possibility. Another ton miles an hour to the wind, a little more snow falling and an extra 10 or 20 lbs. in our pack 6 could have made a tragic difference to the end of our story too. 
 The snow poles nearby are hollow steel with holes punched in them. Under normal conditions with a little wind they act like organ pipes and produce eerie moaning noises as if mourning the dead. The snow poles nearby are hollow steel with holes punched in them. Under normal conditions with a little wind they act like organ pipes and produce eerie moaning noises as if mourning the dead.
  
-'​Vhen ​we Visited ​the spot in winter the holes were plugged up with snow and so they were silent.+When we visited ​the spot in winter the holes were plugged up with snow and so they were silent. Too soon the week passed and on Saturday morning at 8.15 we bid good bye to Cleve Cole Hut silently thanking the Mt. Bogong Club for their work in maintaining and provisioning this place for those who love the mountains.
-Too soon the week passed and on Saturday morning at 8.15 we bid good bye to Cleve Cole Hut silently thanking the ht. Bogong Club for their work in maintaining and provisioning this place for those who love the mountains+
-The mountain was not content to let us go in peace however. As we arrived at Eskdale Point a great mist ascended from the valley of Mountain Creek reducing visibility to 10 or 20 yards. Consequently we fumbled our way dawn the steep ridge, successfully avoiding the precipitous drop on each side of the spur. Eventually we reached Michell Shelter. Here we took off our skis and waded deep in snow down the narrow track between the trees. We got back to the,car at 2 otclock and were home in bed by 1.00 a.m. on Sunday. +
-It was good to own a quarter of a mountain if only for a week.+
  
 +The mountain was not content to let us go in peace however. As we arrived at Eskdale Point a great mist ascended from the valley of Mountain Creek reducing visibility to 10 or 20 yards. Consequently we fumbled our way down the steep ridge, successfully avoiding the precipitous drop on each side of the spur. Eventually we reached Michell Shelter. Here we took off our skis and waded deep in snow down the narrow track between the trees. We got back to the car at 2 o'​clock and were home in bed by 1.00 a.m. on Sunday.
 +It was good to own a quarter of a mountain if only for a week.
  
-The qoLD FIRM" wishes all S.B.W. friends a merry Xmas and, as we pass from the 60s into the 70s a happy-New Year. +------
-We thank all our bushwalking friends for their valued custom and look forward to serving you as well in the next decade as we have done during the past four.+
  
-,+The "Old Firm" wishes all S.B.W. friends a merry Xmas andas we pass from the 60s into the 70s a happy-New Year. We thank all our bushwalking friends for their valued custom and look forward to serving you as well in the next decade as we have done during the past four.
  
196912.txt · Last modified: 2019/06/16 03:43 by sbw