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196803 [2014/03/27 22:44] (current)
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 +         ​Monthly Bulletin of matters of interest to The Sydney ​
 +       ​Bushwalkers,,​Nort_icote BuildinG, Roiby Place, Circular: ​
 +       Quay, Sydney. Postal address 8 Box 4476, G.-2.0. Sydney.
 +
 +
 +                           ​wwar....111. ​          10 Cents.
 +
 +
 +     ,​1469..ienaCY, ​ ima
 +                      ET THIS :WNW' S
 +
 +      At the February General Meeting ​      J. Drown. ​   Z.
 +      No Compass, No Hap                    Lyre Bird    4;
 +      Fishing? ​                             J. Martin ​   7.
 +      The Fortyfold Flurry ​                 Taro         9.
 +      Day Walks                                         ​11: ​
 +      Short Thought ​                                    ​ti; ​
 +      LiLo Trip                             R. Lockwood 13.
 +      A Few 'fords from the Dditor
 +      A Pageant of Progress ​                J. Drown    16
 +      An Apllogy. ​                                      ​19. ​
 +      Swimming Carnival Results. ​                      ​20. ​
 +      '​aldornoss Bay                        X. Armand ​  21.
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +EDITOR: Neville Page, 22 Hayvard St., KINGWMD. Ph, 34-3536. ​
 +BUSINESS IliVaC128 Bill Burke, Coral Tree Drive, CARLE7gT0RD. ​
 +SALES & SUBS: Alan Pike, 8 Sunbounl Ave., -.:​14FIETJ).
 +
 +                       THE SYDNEY BUSHFALKER ​             Yarch 1968.
 +
 +      t:
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +             ​1:​1\11-F,​UF:​vis
 +
 +********************** By Our Political Roundaman, Jim Brown ***********
 +      There was a.rather extraordinary state of affairs at the February ​
 + ​General Meeting,as the Preident was walking in Tasmania and both Vice 
 + ​Presidents temporarily absent.from Sydney. Having announced his parlous ​
 + ​situation,​ Secretary Ian Stephen sought a Chairman, and ex-President Brian 
 + ​Harvey was elected. for brae meeting.
 +
 +      First there were five now members to .welcome, four of them being 
 + ​present. These were Nancy Al'​.erson,​ Jennifer Fletcher, Anne Rutherford and 
 + Sandy Persi. The fifth, Rona Woods, was not with us. --
 +
 +      No dispute over January'​s minutes, whi7- as a matter arising Jack 
 + ​Gentle regretted that pressure of other activitipq prevented his   ​Lr ​
 + ​Reunion Convener. In correspondence the only point of real interest was an 
 + ​enquiry from the Australian ConservatiOn Council asking about our policy ​
 + and our vital statistics.
 +
 +      The Treasurer told us that an income of 3164 and expenditure of 01 
 + in January left a balance in operating funds of 3354 at the close of the 
 + Club year, and the Vralks Secretary presented his account of activities in 
 + ​January. A gold-seeking expedition led by Don Woods in the Sofala area 
 + ​brought out 17 people, including some who -wore deluded by fool's gold. 
 + Frank Rigby had 22 on an Instructional which was to climb to trig 1499 
 + ​overlooking the Grose River, but the ascent was abandoned owing to filthy ​
 + ​weather. There were 9 people on Ramon U'​Brien'​s Shoalhaven walk, and 3 on 
 + ​Lorraine Mackaness'​ trip, whilo Jim Callaway had a successful day walk on 
 + the same weekend. Over the Australia Day Holiday Owen Marks had 30 people ​
 + on a coastal jaunt between Bawley Point and Pebbly Beach, and there were 
 + 13 on Barry Pacey'​s jaunt along the Cox, which couldn'​t be negotiated by 
 + li710 owing to the water lying low. Over the same weekend Gladys Roberts ​
 + ​conducted a leisurely spine-bash camp in the Garie-Era area.
 +
 +   ​. ​ There were no Social or ParksAlaTrrounds reports, and Barry
 + ​Wallace recorded Federation activities, including a new likely headquarters ​
 + at 265 Elizabeth Street; Federation had protested to the Fire Commissioners ​
 + ​regarding a fire trail carved not wisely into Nelly'​s Glen. Search and 
 + ​Rescue had an alert in the recovery of a body in the Otford area (New Year 
 + ​77eekend)9 and were carrying out repairs and improvements to equipment, ​
 + ​including the stretcher,/ which should be more comfortable for both patient ​
 + and carriers in future.
 +
 +      Also reported at Federation were changes in the ownership of
 + ​Yadboro House, and'​ofticiaaj?​ WhP1'0 thP illOWbent had some misbegotten ​
 + ​notion that passing walkers may pay a small fee. Federation is to Re-tune
 +
 +March,​.1968:​. ​                                                                                                       TIE SYWEY BUSHWAL1C$R ​                                                                                                                                                           Page 3
 +
 +at Blue Gum on' 29th.                                                                               31st, March weekend. .
 +            ._ The Chairman announced that -the Seeial and Membership Secretaries,​ .                                                                             ​. ​         ,
 +the Assistant Secretary and two Federation delegates would not seek 
 +re-electien in Harch.
 +
 +                          As an opener to General Business, it was stated-that Treasurer ​
 +Gordon Redmond had two notices of motion to be brought Up at the Annual ​
 +Meeting. Gordon sought to go into some detail, but on tho score that it 
 +would be bad enough te hear the whole recital once (at the March meeting) ​
 +let alone have to put up with it now, various speakers prevailed upon the 
 +Chairman, and we were told about the motions only. Briefly it was proposed ​
 +that subscriptions for normal members be 36, for full time students :?4, 
 +and married couples O. This would also include magazine subscription,​ but 
 +members who lod two official walks during the year would be allowed a 
 +rebate of 2. The second proposal provided that entrance fees go to 5 for 
 +full time students and ;10 for all others.
 +
 +                          Brian Harvey announced a scheme to hold an Annual Dinner, this year 
 +possibly on 30th. August, at a cost of 3 per head.
 +
 +                          The Secretary, on the score of members travelling by car to trips, ​
 +said legal advice indicated that there would be no liability attaching to 
 +the Club in the event of an accident. Various speakers suggested this was 
 +not the real question - rather, it was the obligation and liability of the 
 +driver and the situation of the passengers and it was agreed to enquire ​
 +further.
 +
 +                          There was a stony silence ,Then a convener and organising committee ​
 +for the Reunion was sought, and Jack. Gentle suggested the Vice Presidents
 +and members without portfolios on the Committee should be asked to administer ​
 +the event. Ron Knightley said hewas prepared to get a team to assemble the 
 +campfire on the day of the Reunion and Bill Burke assured us that he would 
 +provide supper cooking utensils.
 +
 +                     ​. ​   Frank Ashdown temarked.on the lack of Reunion, enthusiasm amongst some
 +.young members, and suggested they arrange a sports meeting to keep them- 
 +selves gainfully occupied on the Sunday Morning,
 +
 +                          7ilf hider reported new maps of Burri.ar and Caoura covering portions ​
 +of the Shoalhaven Gorge were becoming available, and revised maps embracing ​
 +parts of the old Katoomba and Windsor 1" = 1 mile sheets which should soon 
 +be on sale 9 together with Oberon South, which showed a good part of the 
 +Upper Kowmung.
 +
 +                          Then, after Barry 7Tallace had reminded starters on his trip of the 
 +need to. organise postal votes in the coming State Mections, it was all 
 +over at the very decent hour of 9.05 p.m.
 +
 +                                                                                                                                    *****-*************
 +
 +Page 4.                                                              THE SYDNEY BUSINALICER ​                                                                  ​March,​ 1968.
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +            I 1175_ tr,
 +
 +***********4t**************** By Lyre Bird ********************************
 +                I am making quite a habit of going into unknown country without map
 +or compass. It is quite exciting as I found out recently on'a Blue Mountains ​
 +trip. But this was bound to be even more thrilling as it occurred on a 
 +tramping trip in New Zealand not so long ago. As the trip was decided upon 
 +about a day before leaving home, we could not acquire a map of the river  ​
 +Greenstono River  we were going to walk down, but we did got some 
 +information on where bridges, huts, etc. were.
 +
 +                New Zealand rivers can, be quite treacherous as many people have 
 +drowned in flooded, fast fldwing rivers. After a few inches of rain in the 
 +mountains small creeks become raging torrents in a few hours, and then 
 +return to their original form a few hours or a day or so later. Thus, when 
 +it is raining, people usually stay marooned in the mountain huts, or glutton ​
 +themselves if close to a town.
 +
 +                Having waited for 3 days for the weather to clear to do some rock and 
 +snow climbing we all (12 Aussies) decided to move on, although I had no 
 +choice, having to catch a flight from Queenstown to Christchurch that 
 +Friday afternoon. iVednesday afternoon it was still drizzling and snowing
 +on the mountains a mile away. Ten of the mob were going along the Routeburn ​
 +track which in good weather has beautiful scenery of snow capped mountains, ​
 +the Hollyford River valley stretching out to the sea, and other features ​
 +such as glacial tarns, waterfalls and a large lake  Lake Harris, etc. But 
 +this time the only scenes they saw were mud puddles, mud bogs, and more 
 +puddles, as I later found out.
 +
 +                Gwen, a member of the Adelaide Busbies, and myself had earlier joined ​
 +up to do some climbing (unfortunately VO didn't do any) and we decided against ​
 +a repeat of Routdburn. we had both walked along the track in good weather a
 +1' ow seasons prior to this year. we picked on the Greenstone track through ​
 +which many trampers travel, and part of the' way there was supposedly a good 
 +track.
 +
 +                Decisions made, I thought I had better find out what to expect in this 
 +valley. Pfe had to meet and catch a ferry on Friday morning at 11.00 p.m. as 
 +that was the last ferry I could catch in order to be in time for my flight ​
 +on Saturday. It was 11 p.m. by the time I got hold of a map and glanced ​
 +through it. "c also got some very sketchy first hand accounts from people ​
 +who had previously been there. After packing our gear we made a hasty 
 +retreat into our fea bags at mi4night.
 +
 +                Up at 7 o'​clock we caught a bus from the main road which is 500 yards 
 +from the hut, to the beginning of both Routeburn and Hollyford tracks.
 +
 +March, 1968.            THE SYDNEY BUSH-TALKER ​          Page 5.
 +
 +      Two of the Routeburn party had decided to '​PIKE'​ and go to Q'​town ​
 +by bus all the way. By coincidence one of the chaps had a very appropriate ​
 +name  Pike. We said au revoir and raced away from civilization into the 
 +bush as fast as our legs would take us.
 +
 +      At 11 p.m., approximately 1 hour after we had left the bus, Gwen and 
 +myself parted from the main party to start on our epic trip. 1:re thus had 
 +24 hours to do the 20 mile trip.
 +
 +      The muddy traok MRS just .passible in some parts around Lake Howden. ​
 +"e soon arrived at the flats with open beech forest through which the track 
 +meandered. It was very pleasant walking oven though we often got stuck in 
 +the mud, and it was misty and raining.
 +
 +      ANOTHER LAKE!
 +
 +      "Did anyone mention a second lake, and it seems much larger than 
 +Lake Howden!"​
 +      "​Rpm... Dot saia she camped at a lake, but that was near the end 
 +of the track."​
 +      Came the replyg
 +      "Oh well, we'll find out sooner or later."​
 +
 +      "e trudged on having two 5 minute (approximately) breaks on the way 
 +to the river flats after the second lake. The flats came as quite a surprise ​
 +as one minute we were walking through beech forest and the next along grassy ​
 +flats of the river, approximately t mile long.
 +
 +      To anyone not knowing what an actual New Zealand beech forest is, I 
 +will try to explain as briefly as possible. Beech forest can vary from one 
 +extreme to another; flairly open with the moss covered trees a yard or so 
 +apart, and the smaller scrubby beech which grows so thick and low it is 
 +quite difficult to gain any ground (horizontally).
 +
 +   The type of beech forest I have bashed through was wet with moss 
 +growing on the trees:, huge boulders, :bhe slippery. roots, and holes through ​
 +Which you would always put your foot. It took us a;Whole day to travel
 +3 miles. So At is quite handy te have a track through the forest.
 +
 +      As it had_ been raining for 4 days now the river was well above its 
 +ordinary level and the whole of tho grassy flats were sodden. "e skirted ​
 +the river flats all the way right along side tree line where the going was 
 +only slightly wet underfoot.
 +
 +      lath the constant drizzling rain we didn't sec any peaks but we did 
 +see very stoop snow couloirs descending into beautiful waterfalls. It 
 +scoed MD were making quite good time (although time was unknown to us as 
 +watches weren'​t present) along the flats.fle had a quick lunch and a few 
 +miles further on we crossed a small creek. A fairly large side creek came 
 +in on true (R).
 +      "Did that chap say a suspension bridge was after a creek junction or 
 +do we have to ford to true side and cross a bridge later?"​
 +
 +Page 6             THE SYDNEY BUSHTALKER March, 1968,
 +
 +
 +    "I wonder where the track is supposed to be?" ​
 +    Question, questtons, ,and more questions.
 +
 +    As the river wab in slight flood we kept on a high side of flats 
 +on loft hand side. A mile further we came back to the river. The river 
 +seemed to have gone into a gorge. The mist banks surrounding the valley
 +cliffs were slowly but surely thinning out, but not for today. rre continued ​
 +to race on during the rest of the day looking out for a camp spot with a 
 +tree. It had suddenly become ominously dark and Gwen suggested we had 
 +better look for a camp, spa. The whole day we had_ been travelling a few 
 +yards from trees and now that we wanted one we couldn'​t see a tree for a 
 +mile. 7o ended up camping under a very large tree (the home of some cattle) ​
 +next to a small erqdk.
 +
 +    Quickly we put up the tent, cooked tea and were ready to crawl into 
 +our flea bags again when it appeared lighter in the sky. It seemed it had 
 +just been a dark rain cloud covering the sky for half an hour. 7e had no 
 +choice but to stay where we were and sloop it out.
 +
 +    Breakfast wascooked at a terribly early hour it seemed (calculated ​
 +later as 4 aolla.). The sun's rays shone through the thinner cloud layers ​
 +and away we ware.
 +
 +    The Greenstone turned to the left and into a canyon. It would be 
 +_impossible to cross the canyon; the bridge must be here: Pe came onto 
 +some sort of track (probably a deer track) and blundered through the 
 +bush along the most probable way to this bridge of ours. The river was
 +roaring. A side creek ended our scrub bash which I found to be impossible ​
 +to cross by ordinary tourists which follow the track.
 +
 +    Trudging back to the second hut we had passed earlier we saw a slight ​
 +cutting on the opposite bank of the river which may have been a track. In 
 +hope of finding the track and getting to our boat before 11 a.m, we forded ​
 +                         the river where it split into two just 
 +                       i before the canyon. Indeed, it was the 
 +                       1 track. 7e continued on the 2 yards wide
 +                       ​Imuddy track for 2i hours until we 
 +                         ​reached Lake Wakitipu, crossing the bridge ​
 +                         on the way. The time was 10.30 a.m. Ve met
 +                         the pthers On the boat and had an unevent- ​
 +                         ful trip badk to our sleeping bags under 
 +                         the pine trees.
 +
 +                         P.S. Found out from 2 other Australian ​
 +                        '​walkers that our way would have been 
 +                         the only possible way.as.the creeks on
 +                         the true right bank we in flood and not
 +  .Fordi46jhe rAsht wax) crossable.
 +
 +                                    ************
 +
 +March, 1968,                                      THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER ​                                            Page 7.
 +
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 +
 +
 + ​********************************** By Jess martin *p** *******1******'​***
 +
 +
 +
 +           "​We/​11 take a oouple of lines and do some fishing on this trip: fish 
 +
 + will be a nice change frem the dehy." Fishermen are true optimists!
 +
 +
 +
 +           In the days before Kilcare and that stretch of coast became popular ​
 +
 + with weekenders we had a favourite campsite at the north end of Putty 
 +
 + Beach in the thickly scrubbed and treed area behind the sand dunes, beside ​
 +
 + a very pleasant little running creek with meet water. 'Je would swim, surf, 
 +
 + ​sunbake and scramble around the heights above, visiting Maitland Day and 
 +
 + other beautiful spots.
 +
 +
 +
 +           It was time then to               fish, mainly from the Rocks north of our campsite, ​
 +
 + and one of my jobs was to                   help gather and cut up oungevoi as the menaigais ​
 +
 + ​forget bait. On my first                   ​attempt to catch fish I was told: "Give me that line, 
 +
 + we don't wish to lose it" ​                 ; in casting the line I iad nearly followed it. More 
 +
 + bait and hooks were lost                   than fish caught, but occasionally there would be
 +
 + a small haul of rock cod                   and perhaps a crab or two. The men prided themselveu ​
 +
 + on their cooking ability, ​                  so were encouraged to practise their skill.
 +
 +
 +
 +           The silver eels in the MbruyaiDeua River on the South Coat were 
 +
 + ​prized as a food, and the catching as good sport, by the locals. After dark 
 +
 + small parties waded throu gh the shallows in the clear water, each armed 
 +
 + with a bright lantern and .a hardened sharp spike on the end of a pole. A 
 +
 + quick movement, a splash and a thud as an eel landed on the bank There is 
 +
 + some skill in spearing a quickly moving slimy eel and securing it.
 +
 +
 +
 +           This inspired the organizer of our trip to Bendothera from Moruya ​
 +
 + over the ranges by George'​s pack trail, to carry a homemade spear in 
 +
 + ​anticipation of many a feed of eel. The idea was good, but the spear had 
 +
 + not been hardened sufficiently and bent on contact with the creature, and 
 +
 + all that was acquired was a piece of slime on the spear prong.
 +
 +
 +
 +           River Canoe Club folk carried a line and spinner on their trips 
 +
 + down the Shoalhaven and other rivers: so we had a line and Spinner with us.   
 +
 +
 +           ​Luckily finding Mr. Randolph George in the kitchen, the only 
 +
 + ​remaining portion of the Dendethera homeptead, and yarning with him for a 
 +
 + ​while,​ we went up river to a deep hole where the George family (according ​
 +
 + to Mr. Randolph) had always caught fish. It was not long before a good size
 +
 + perch was caught, the angler'​s estimate being 2 lbs., and this was carefully ​
 +
 + put aside on the bank whilst the line was again thrown in hopefully and 
 +
 + ​another sizable fish caught. As it was late in the afternoon and dinner an
 +
 + ​lawent thought, a move was suggested back to camp. The fishermen decided the 
 +   is n
 +         would be better off washed as they had been lying in the dirt of the
 +
 + bank, so clutching the first fish in,both hands, he waded into the river and 
 +
 + ​dipped hands and fish into the water. The look on his face was indescribable,​
 +
 +.Page.8. .                     THE SL'​DNEYBUSIEALKER ​        March 1968
 +
 +
 + as the fish, with a powerful thrust of its tail and moving. its fins rapidly, ​
 + shot into the safety of dee-13 water. The second fish was washed in a billy 
 + back at our camps
 +
 +       We moved down river next day and, after a hearty.welcome from Mrs. 
 + ​Rankin and the two girls, (being ipvited to lunch), camped on-the river not 
 + far from the house. That evening Mr. Rankin Snr. and Mr. Jim George rode in; 
 + they having been away all day at a cattle sale in Krawarreo. After dark Jim 
 + ​George invited us to accompany him whilst he fished for next day's dinner, ​
 + it being the season of Lent. We quietly fellowedshim up river anti' .1i6 cam. 
 + to a deep poollying at the base of a steep bank. It was a beautiful, still, ​
 + dark night and it was very peaceful sitting listening to the small seunds of 
 + the night creatures ana the river running in.the distance. The lines were 
 + ready and cast in, and ye* soon we understood why a trace of piano wire-was ​
 + tied betWeen hook and line, The eels snapped everything off the' end of the 
 + line not so protected. It seemed no time before we had a couple of big eels 
 + and a fish.
 +
 +       On returning to the houso we were shown how easy it is to skin an eel. 
 + Mr. George cut the skin juin below the head with a sharp knife, continuing ​
 + the cut right round. Then he hung the eel on a large nail in a post and just 
 + ​pulled the skin off, like removing a stocking. Next day we were again invited ​
 + to lunch and were served eel and fresh vegetables. I wondered whether I could 
 + eat my portion but it was delicious; a crisp white flesh. Kathleen Rankin ​
 + told us the best was is to parboil and then fry the eel.    ​
 +
 +*Have you over "​tickled"​ a trout? It is very tempting to try, because ​
 + I have always seen trout in very clear water. I have read of "​tickling"​ and 
 + ​understand one of our previous members has boon successful.
 +
 +       When it is decided by one of the men in the party that trout shall be 
 + on the menu, and he decrees grasshoppers shall be the bait, have urgent ​
 + ​business elsewhere. I can assure you it is very much harder to catch the 
 + bait than the fish. I have vivid recollections of the party darting here,
 + ​stooping and then springing into the air after,the insects, while the fisher- ​
 + men out and trimmed a whippy sapling for a rod. When sufficient bait had been 
 + ​gathered,​ he crept up to the stream quietly and carefully and sheltered behind ​
 + a bush on the bank and cast his line into the clear cold water. We had three 
 + trout for dinner that night. I understand it is illegal to catch trout without ​
 + a licence, and to use grasshoppers as bait.:.!1 Tha.e was no risk of being 
 + ​caught by an Inspector in the high country between Brindaboll and Tumut.
 +       Then, of course, fishermen try to catch fish from our beaches and the 
 + rocks of our South Coast. I prefer to comfortably sit and enjoy the pulse and 
 + surge of the sea, the green of clear water as a wave breaks in a white lacy 
 + foam, and see birds wheeling over the deeper dark blue sea further out. But 
 + when the fisherman gets wet to the waist and the wind turns cold, on our out- 
 + lying beaches one can usually opt enough driftwood together to build a fire 
 + by which to thaw out. Now and than a few fish are'​caught.*
 +
 +       As you can guess I have not enough enthusiasm to be a Fisherwoman! ​
 +                          -x-x:​***.ie*************,;​(.**
 +
 + ​March,​ 1968.                THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER ​           Page. 9... .
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +             ​T@AVYTIF ​                          ​FLUNNyil
 +
 +
 +*******************t************ A I.J-!7,TTER TO TUE EDITOR ******************
 +
 +Mr. Neville Page, 
 +Dear Editor,
 +
 +      The great event has joined the shadows ​ is not much mentioned, so 
 +why not lot it sleep. But since that night, I have often thought of the 
 +groat "Might have been".
 +
 +      Space.... Light..,. Air.... ​ the throe fundamentals of one of Lifols ​
 +finest activities; we call it Bushwalking. Yet, for this rare, moSt 
 +memorable occasion the Plotters of the Club went hard into reverse.
 +SO  hearken to tho tale of the
 +                         Sad Sardine Seminar,
 +      If this title is not clear, next time you ope a tin, observe the .
 +compression,​ and you will exclaim ​ why there was the night at the Crusty;
 +
 +      With October still afar, the Plotters went into long cogitation and 
 +exploration,​ and at last came to an expensiVe hideout below ground; a,​scrappy ​
 +nest of cellars in an old building, in the north end of George Street. For 
 +generations,​ these had served for the storage of merchandise ​ cobwebby and 
 +candle lit, Eventually, the ground floor became a wine shop, and later, after 
 +a little clean up, those cellars became a fake ye olde Cookie.
 +
 +      The -place became a resort for Gourmets; these cr6aturos who spend 
 +large slices of Life in plotting, concocting, consuming truckloads of 
 +fodder that has little relation to the normal simple needs of that most 
 +overworked slave; the stomach!
 +
 +      So elaborate has this religion become, that it approaches obscenity; ​
 +that is  to a happy ancient trouble free broad and bu;btor baby: The latest ​
 +equipment at the P.A.H. indicates a suspicion of the virus in the S.D.W.!!!
 +
 +      To complete the misery, these gloomy-cells were lit by a few fluttering ​
 +struggling candles; to find a pal in that mass of Moat and meat, was a tough 
 +job. So few wandered around, once in a place they stayed ​ mesmerised; did 
 +not Edwin Markham have solaething to say about this? "Bowed down by the 
 +weight of tukker and likka they crouch, happier far than any Joey in its 
 +pouch"​!
 +
 +      For the pleasure of meeting and yarning with old, and cherished friends, ​
 +this night was a total loss.
 +
 +      Most of the chinwagging was fox', the maceration of tucker rather than . 
 +for past memories and present notions. What rich spicy wordy morsels we 
 +missed by not hearing from the so many really mature ones there.
 +
 +    Page 10.                                                                  THE SYDNEY BUSHFALKER ​                                                               . March, 1968..
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +                  And the final crash - 10 R.m. closing! It had some virtue; it.prOved ​
 +
 +  how good was the sky and.the air of old George ptreetr
 +              .                .            ,        t                            . . .                    .   ​.. ​                                                                                       -,
 +                                                                                                                                                                                 ​--,​...,:,​
 +                  Ana,sothe .gre.a: dinner came -b,b its end, in 'a most inapproprlaTe ​
 +
 +  spot, 'for the Maturity Party of that magnificent matrimonial association ​
 +
 +  that has produced,​-(without'​adVertising) moro beautiful fruit to themile ​
 +  than any other groul5 of-citizens. ​                                                                                                       .
 +
 +
 +
 +                  But everyone seemed satisfied. It is not much mentioned,​.so iftP.P. ' ​
 +
 +  comment! Hearken to the tale of the fortieth that wasn'​t.
 +
 +
 +
 +                  For such a night,​ffiat'​ took 40 years to grew, it should have bean 
 +
 +  in a suburban Town Hall; say in the Phrramatta district,. Such halla have 
 +
 +  abundant space, light, free seating, and plainly labelled spots to find. 
 +
 +  Catering could bo private or professional. These halls have kitchens for 
 +
 +  billy boiling, and tables and chairs could 3oe,​placed.at random. for .any 
 +
 +  congenial group,
 +
 +
 +
 +                  What revivals we could have had with a hall that included stage 
 +
 +  and piano! Rene - that tireless fount of quality could have made the 
 +
 +  piano sing for hours. Such treasures of the many musical and artistic ​
 +  triumphs, of the past could have delighted the young of the-species. ​                                                                                                                         . 
 +
 +  Strangely, so many of the singers and player were there at the Tavern. ​
 +
 +  Peter Page, still a lyric tenor, fiddlers Olive Greenacre and Hilda 
 +
 +  Liacartney, Ian Ualcolm, great actor and verse reader. Enough there to 
 +
 +  revive.momories of practice nights at Reno's Artarmon nest. Yes - even
 +
 +  Albort,​Crandon of the mouthy was. Quite'​modestly - with Rene as conductor, ​
 +
 +  we called it an orchestro...(But what a sour memory of Hilda Mac; she left 
 +
 +,.her 4ddle in a tram!! Fiddlocidel)
 +
 +
 +
 +                  Beginning at 4  on to 12. All that time to see, hear, mix, do, eat, 
 +
 +  drink, and make merry, and coming out, how the car drivers would have 
 +
 +  discovered they wore well on the way to the other half of the Roune, which 
 +
 +  reached every expectation,​ and rewarded the faithful with perfect wer:​ther, ​
 +
 +  and many with the supreme luxury of campfire chairsill
 +
 +
 +
 +                  If ever our Editor is short of script,- he should reprint the programs ​
 +
 +  of S.B. shows at St. James in Philip Street. For quality and variety, oven 
 +
 +  drama - these programs are the most amazing dopuments in the archives of the 
 +
 +  SOO. How they would show the youngies what the oldie'​s used to do, when 
 +
 +  they were youngies.
 +
 +
 +
 +                                                                                                                              Signed' ​                        Taro
 +
 +                                                                                                                                                              February 6, 1968.
 +
 +
 +
 +  P.S. And wasn't Jim Brown'​s choochoo night a knockout. Little we knew -Uhat 
 +
 +  such a non driver, fireman, shunter, guard.or signalman, could know so much 
 +
 +  about man's greatest invention,​.the.Steamy! But how terrible to think that 
 +
 +  the trusty unfailing friends of over a century should be wiped and shoved ​
 +
 +  down the drain: Note: if going by train, near Springwood - on the left, is a 
 +
 +  fine sandstone cottage put there for.the-ghnger of that '​stretch;​ look at the
 +
 +      March, 1968'​4\ ​                                                                                                                                  THE SYDNEY 713.1.5-egviAncm ​                                                                                                                                                           Page. )1.
 +
 +_gable, and ,sce chiselled, 18671 JiM                                                                    .                                           , ​                                                     .s1,ides gave a splendid night..
 +    and a certain wise Womatiofjlahroonga reMarkod "hat .a. superb touch was 
 +    jWs ever smoking pip such realisiiii arinr the dangers.of'​nicotine for 
 +    the humour of showbusiness1"​.
 +
 +                                                                                                                                                       ​********************
 +
 +
 +                                                                                                                                                 ​AeN ​                                                           t kg_ CCIAcc, AAC: rI/V`,1Ajts
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +      17TH. MARCH. There is no Sunday walk. programmed for this weekend due 
 +                                                                           to the Reunion.
 +
 +      24TH.                        MATCH. ​                                 Mr, Laurie Rayner'​s name makes an appearance on the current ​
 +                                                                           walks programme, with this day walk from riest Head (other- ​
 +                                                                           wise known as Commodore Heights) to 7est Head via Arden 
 +                                                                           Trig, Salvation Creek and Refuge Bay. There will be an 
 +                                                                           ​opportunity to do SUMO swimming, and also plenty of views 
 +                                                                           for photographer (viz. Lion Island, Pittwater and Palm Beach 
 +                                                                           ​Peninsula). Private transport is the order of the day, and 
 +                                                                           ​Laurie can be contacted on telephone number 36-5344 (Home). ​
 +                                                                           The map covering the area is Broken Bay (Military) and the 
 +                                                                           ​approximate garding of the walk is 8 miles Medium.
 +
 +      31ST. MARCH. Stanwell Fark Stanwell Tops - Scarborough Lookdown - 
 +                                                                           ​Coaleliff. This is the route proposed by Jim Brown (the 
 +                                                                           ​Choo-choo man). The walk is classified as 8 miles Medium. ​
 +                                                                           The train to catch leaves Central Country Platform at 
 +                                                                           8.42 a.m. An further information can be got from Jim by 
 +                                                                           ​ringing his home telephone number, 81-2675.
 +
 +      1224_01a, Sammy Hinde will be on his old tramping ground when he 
 +                                                                           leads this walk from Lilyvale to Garie9, going through ​
 +                                                                           Palm Jungle, down to Figure Eight Pool, to Era and thence
 +                                                                           to Garie (bus to 7aterfall). Map is the Port Hacking Tourist, ​
 +                                                                           and grading of the walk is 10 miles Medium. Once again, the 
 +                                                                           train is the 8.42 a.m. from Central (Country Platform).
 +                                                                           Sammy can be contactedon 789-2145 (at home).
 +
 +                                                                                                                                                     ​**********N4******
 +
 +                                                                                                                                                     SHORT THOUGHT (NOT SNORT)
 +
 +
 +                                                                                          He walks withyature, and her paths are peace.
 +
 +                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         ... Young - "Night Thoughts"​
 +
 +             ​samairomornaliarsrefetwv;​anksiasatersolwais.rmsw.avuaverialwomiusPorwmitne.mt~lowessodAniowomargt,​
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +                              .  PADDY PALLIN
 +
 +                     ,The shop with everything fof, 
 +                           ​BUSIMALKERS
 +                              CAMPERS
 +                                  ROCKCLDBERS ​
 +                                      SXIERS.
 +
 +
 +               -A wide choice of footwear from boots to
 +               ​.Kletters to Volley OC's. Laces too 
 +                Cooking gear, nesting billies both squat 
 +                and tall.
 +
 +                Stoves in.miniature,​ both petrol and gas._ 
 +                Also matches waterproof. Food for camping. ​
 +                All sorts of dried foods for fancy face 
 +                feeding.
 +
 +                Tent pegs, tent cord, tent poles.;. tent
 +                bags; even tents. Socks, famous for 20 years 
 +                among walkers, popularly called Paddy'​s ​
 +               '​Pinkies (Ye Gods). Jackets and.Parkas in 
 +                practical variety, a remarkable range
 +                                         (To be continued).
 +
 +                There? ​      15T0 FLOOR     
 +                              109A.BATHURST ST"
 +                             ​SYDNEY,​ N.S.7b ​   Phone 26-2685.
 +
 +                      irilinute from Town Hall Station.
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +I
 +                                DYV PLLR
 +                           ​Lightunight Camp Gear
 +                             .1st Flier, !OSA $etherst Street, Syhey
 +                                     ​3W03685
 +
 + ​March,​ 1968. -            THE SYDNEY BUSIFIAMR ​             Page 13'.
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +************************* By Roger Lockwood ***************************
 +
 +Dates New Year Weekend, 1968.
 +Party: Doone Wyborn, Colin Burton, John Millthorpe, Roger Lockwood.
 +
 +      We left our cars near the end of the sealed road on Mt. Irvine ​
 +and made our way to Tessellate Hill. From these we were able to drop 
 +down to the Wollongambe,​ downstream 200 yards and up a.relatively easy 
 +ridge onto Lost Flat. There are no landmarks visible once on the flat 
 +anft in spite of the warning implied in the name, we did aCtually become ​
 +disoriented for a short time. When we had re-established our bearings
 +we were obliged to make a 180 degree adjustment to our course. Following ​
 +this we could commence our descent into Yarramun Creek, a tributary of 
 +Buhgleboori Creek. Both the descent into the 7ollongambe and into Yarramun ​
 +Creek are cut up by low bluffs on the ridges and waterfalls in the gullies ​
 +and it required some re-tracking and a lot of persistence to complete this 
 +leg of the trip by nightfall. About 100 yards from our proposed campsite ​
 +(at' the junction of the creek we were following and Yarramun Creek) we 
 +were confronted in this hitherto almost dry canyon by a short pool through ​
 +which it was necessary to swim. Ilhen.Doone tested the water temperature ​
 +with his toes, apparently a three foot eel suddenly swam out from under
 +a rock to investigate. Though Doane had elected to swim through first and 
 +get our packs to the other side dry he now       ​rather reluctant and 
 +there was some discussion centring on the eating habits of eels, their 
 +alleged timidity and so forth. Eventually be plunged in and we fortunately ​
 +saw no more of the eel.
 +
 +      The next day the three miles of Yarramun-Creek took us all morning at 
 +an average speed of --   a mile an hour, our way being hindered by 
 +boulders and great masses of vegetable debris. At tlfe Bungleboori there 
 +seemed to be reasonable hi-loing conditions though it did involve a fair 
 +amount of carrying. I was sceptical of the feasibility of hi-loing in 
 +general and preferred to walk until it became clear that I was working a 
 +lot harder than the others and travelling slower. There were parts of the 
 +gorge indeed which would have been impossible to negotiate on foot. In 
 +places tremendouscliffs over 300 feet high rose abruptly from the water. ​
 +We'​found'​that by wearing the pack and sitting upright so that pack rested
 +on the cushion of the li-bo with the legs resting on the rest of the mattress ​
 +we were able to keep the unwaterproofed pack and the upper part of the body 
 +fairly dry. We camped halfway along the Bungleboori and arrived at the . 
 +junction with the Wollongambe at 10 o'​clock on New Year's Day. Our speed.dh ​
 +the Bungleboori averaged.- of a mile an hour, as on Yarramun Creek. However ​
 +there was very little vegetable debris, it only being encountered at the 
 +rapids between the long pools. It was due to such debris that Doone'​s li-lo
 +
 +                                              -
 +Page 14.                     THE SYDNEY TAISHWALICER ​    ​- ​  ​March,​ 1968.
 +1.11........,​......ew ​
 +
 +received several larg6.holes,​ but no-one- else's was_punctued. ThbTflow ​
 +rate below the junction of Bungleboori and Dbilongambe was at least as great 
 +as the Kowmung, so WollengaMbe Creek-really deserves the statubf 4 riVer.-.
 +
 +      The way out onto -the ridge leading back to Mt. Irvine was very devious. ​
 +We followed a small side creek which cut through the cliff line about 300 
 +yards upstreath'​from the junction. There were ,several waterfalls to contend ​
 +with, one being quite dangerous, but we eventually got to the top. On the 
 +ridge itself were two tricky bluffs which necessitated the man handling of 
 +packs. Ile reached thecars just after 6 o'​clock,​ being slowed up by very
 +hot conditions on the ridge.
 +
 +      This type of river trip can be recommended,​ though one should under- ​
 +take it it this area knowing that there will be difficult travelling and map 
 +and compass work to get to the sections of streams which are suitable for 
 +li-los. A good three day trip from the Newnas road right through the 
 +Bungleboori Creek is a must for next summer programme. ,
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +                          .A FElii WORDS FROM THE EDITOR
 +
 +      This being the last magazine to be published in my term of office, ​
 +  would like to say a few public thank-yous, particularly to those people ​
 +who don't got their names into print.
 +      Firstly, we are indebted to Don Finch, ​      Ketas and Boat, who did' -
 +most of the duplicating work; and that can bp hard work with our duplicator. ​
 +Also, I want to thank Joan Rigby, who arrange'​s the production schedule, ​   ' ​
 +and:lends. her time and home for duplicating collating. stapling, wrapping ​
 +etc, Joan ' also has the job of rounding up helpers, and has graciously ​
 +provided us with supper every lilonth.
 +      Thank you also to the "​helpers"​ who did all the production work      '
 +too many to mention individually. Further, Alan Pike has had the unenviable ​
 +job of selling the magazine, and typing names and addresses on wrappers ​
 +every month.
 +      Next, I want -to thank the contributors,​ without whom.tliero would be 
 +no magazine at all. Although they have the hondur and glory. (?) of 
 +getting their names at the top of a page, I still think they rate a great 
 +deal of appreciation for their efforts, Particular thanks I would offer 
 +to those people who contribute something to the magazine month after 
 +month (and I think you know who I mean).
 +      Well that'​s/​about it. To sum up, may I say thank you to everyone ​
 +who has in any way helped to keep the magazine going, and to everyone ​
 +who has offered encouragement.
 +      In conclusion, may I say that I have enjoyed immensely being Editor, ​
 +and I hope the new Editor gets.the same level of satisfaction. I-offier the 
 +nowEatoz my full support, and I express the hoPe-that 6,14, who-havo ​
 +supported me will support Rose to the same degree.
 +
 +March, 1968.THE =CY BUSHULKER Page 15.
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +           HAS A NEW BUSINESS ADDRESS,
 +
 +             AND TO GO WITH IT
 +
 +           A NEVI SET OF BUSINESS HOURS 
 +
 +             ​o*o*o*o*o*o*o*o*o*o*
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +          We would like to advise all our 
 +          patrons of a change in the address ​
 +          of our showrooMs. The new rooms 
 +          are at 165 Pacific Highway,. North 
 +          Sydney.
 +
 +          We would like alsoto advise that 
 +          we are now open during normal ​
 +          retail trading hours, namely
 +          9 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. Mondays to 
 +          Fridays, and 9 a.m, to 12 noon 
 +          on Saturdays.
 +
 +          MOUNTAIN EQUIPMENT.
 +
 +                     THE SYD1)EY BUSHO,​ALICER March 1968.
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 + By JIM BROWN : The Fth1.1 InStalmeht of a Pageant Turitten,​fOr-OA0fire ​
 +            performance at the Fortieth ​  ​Reunion of
 +
 +
 +1953. THE YEAR MOUNT EVEREST WAS CON UERED.
 +
 +          Despite walkers pressure, Era was added to the National Park, 
 +
 +          A proposal to change the Club's meeting night from Friday to 
 +      Thursday was defeated.
 +          The "​Lovaduck"​ made its famous voyage - four members in an inflat- ​
 +
 +      able rubber dinghy covered 8 miles of Wollondilly in 2 days. Of course, ​
 +      it could have been walked in 2 hours, or driven in 15 minutes. But not 
 +      now; you'd really need "​Lovaduck"​.
 +
 +
 +1.521 THE YEAR OF THE ROYAL TOUR,
 +
 +          Our landlords wore hard to got on with, and told ua- WQ 001.114 nO 
 +      lohaxe the Club room on Fridays.-We a4tched to Weclne/​440713f
 +
 +          The Club endorsed a Parks and Playgroundwviow-,​that t'h.P PPPra 
 +      HOMO should not be built in the PomaXP, We thought. the Ortcl Ottbp 014 
 +      tram depot at Port Macquarie would be all right,'​
 +
 +
 +      TELEVISION COLES TO SYDNEY,
 +
 +
 +          Geoff gagg revived. Tiger walks with the 85 miler from latoPm'​Oa ​
 +      to Picton via,​Cox'​s River and Burragorang - appropriately it staxied ​
 +      on 1st, April.
 +
 +          In September Federation expressed its disapproval of SalW,
 +      Marathons. go said ours were not marathons as oonducted by lossbreeds; we just did long walks,
 +
 +
 +
 +           '​feets of motorisation began to .ppar country that was 
 +      little trodden before camo within rah, Trips that needed 3 or 4
 +      days could be reached and dope in 2, The Corang-Castle area '​became popular ​
 +      and some daring souls tackled filoctions of the Colo.
 +
 +
 +1956: THE YEAR OF THE SUEZ CRISIS.
 +
 +          Members'​ attire was still a good point for dispute. In May it 
 +     was resolved that the removal of shirts by male members should be 
 +      loft to the discretion of the member disrobing.
 +          It was announced that a nudist colony had been discovered in 
 +
 +     ​MYtina Crook. The Walks Secretary promptly announced that no walks were 
 +      set down .1,n that area on the next programme.'​
 +
 +  March, 1968.                     THE SIDNEY BUSHWALKER ​                       Page -17..
 +
 +          In DecdMber an enthusiastic ski group proposed a scheme to-buy ​
 +          or build a hut in the Kosciusko area.. -           -
 +
 + 122/. '​THEJOAR OF THE FIRST SPUTNIK.
 +                 The summer of 1957/58 was marred by -more savage bushfires. In 
 +          December several mombers,of a Scouting party lost their lives while 
 +          climbing out of Blue Gum.
 +                 On 16th. February tho inaugural meeting of the National Parks 
 +          Association was held.
 +                 At long last prospectivos were permitted to attend Reunions. ​
 +                 A motion to donate E5 each year to the Opera House Appeal was
 +          lost.
 +
 +221, AUSTRALIA WINS THE ASH.T.IS AND LOOS TEE DAVIS CUP.
 +                 The then Minister for Lands declines mining leases at Oolong. ​
 +          A different story nine years later.
 +                 After a year of exploration and considering,​ the Club ski hut 
 +          project lapsed.
 +                 ​During a discussion on investment of the Club's surplus funds, ​
 +          Mr. Ashdown opposed purchasing stocks and shares, and said that if 
 +          the Clilb needed more money, it should not bother about interest from 
 +          shares but should ' orea subscri tions.
 +             s In Juno a JUd0 o'​bnstration was held and two of the floor 
 +          boards were broken. It was rumoured that this was due to the many 
 +          white ants ih the Club.
 +                 Two strenuous walks came to notice: a hundred-miler from 
 +          Hill Top to Katoomba and the Three Peaks (Cloudmaker,​ Paralyser, ​
 +          Guouogang).
 +                 We weren'​t happy about our landlords: attention was drawn at 
 +          one meeting to-the plates of cat meet and the sand trays around the 
 +          room. The trouble was the cats knew what the meat was for, but didn'​t ​
 +          seem-certain about the sand trays. We had nowhere else to go, so we 
 +          decided to suffer in silence.
 +
 + ​125.2,​THE COMPLETION OF WARRAGAMBA DAg.
 +                 Wo found a Club room at'​Reiby Place and moved there very 
 +          smartly. The rental was 5.5.0 per week.
 +                 In South West Tasmania a S4B.W. party was in difficulties. ​
 +          Snow Brown and Mick Perryman made news with a fast dash over . 
 +          rough country to bring SUCQOUT to Bob Duncan, injured in a fall.
 +                 At Easter a party camped in the slot between Mounts Renwick ​
 +          and Roswaine spent the wettest, washed-outest night ever.
 +
 + 19a, THE START OF THE CREDIT SQUEEZE.
 +               - A motion to buy a public address system was thrown out, Ah, but
 +          you can still hear the echoes of that debate.
 +                 The Club was advertising again. In the telephone directory we
 +          had entries Under B7 nushwalkers,​ The Sydney"​ and St "​Sydney ​
 +          Bushwalkers"​.
 +
 + Page 18.                  THE SYDNEY BUSH1VALICER ​          ​March,​ 1968,
 +
 +1961. THE YEAR OF THE LAST TRAM IN SYDNEY AND THE FIRST MAN IN SPACE.
 +             The Era Funds were invesfed in Special Commonwealth Bonds.
 +             In July Colin Putt led a party exploring the highest mountain ​
 +      ranges of New Guinea: the Carstenz Peaks.
 +             A pool of camping gear for loan to prospectives was,​.creatbd. ​
 +             ​Members were warned to beware of dog traps, on Cedar/Road.
 +
 +       THE OPENING OF THE A.M.P. BUILDING IN SYDNEY.
 +             ​S.B.W. members took part in the rescue of a climber injured in 
 +       a fall in Kanangra Rivulet,
 +             In Septemlaer the Treasurer drew, attention to the unhealthy ​
 +       state of Club finances, Mr. Ashdown asked if this was a preliminary ​
 +       to an increase in subscriptions.
 +             The %ter Board started to take a hard lino with people ​
 +       ​trespassing on 7arragamba Catclmient. In "​Stored vatee we wrote:
 +                    You are not camped where you oughter; ​
 +                    At least two miles away.       ,
 +                    You are camping on stored water. ​
 +                    And the penalty must pay.
 +                    From the sewerage farms at Leura 
 +                    Prom theigutters of Moss Vale 
 +                   '​.o 'have draln this water purer 
 +                   '​Map the sno'​w'​ upon the gale.. .
 +                    But to practice these ablutions ' ​
 +                    In the brew that Sydney swills. ​
 +                    Could produde untold pollutions
 +                    Filling the city with di....direful ills.
 +
 +1963,. THE YEAR OF THE PROFUMO SCANDAL.
 +             ​Exploratory parties were still reaching out into areas only 
 +       ​rarely touched before: the Upper Deua9 '​Iollongambe Creek. Car swap 
 +       trips and canyoneering jaunts began to appear on the walks programme.
 +             In September it was decided to adopt walks programmed of three 
 +       ​months duration instead of four.
 +             Subs rose to 29 with a special 3 rate for marrieds.. Mbo 
 +       ested the increase? well, we won't tell you, see.
 +             It was decided that examiners of prospectives in first aid. and 
 +       map reading should be selected from people Who didn't answer their 
 +       own questions. ,
 +
 +       TH: YEAR OF THE VOYAGER DISASTER.
 +             ​Drought was increasing over Eastern Australia.
 +             The Treasurer foreshadowed a possible rise in subscriptions, ​
 +      , -which met with resistance.
 +             ​walkers were showing increased interest in the country around ​
 +       ​Mounts Coricudgy and Monundilla.
 +             An attempt was made to purchase a key block in the Deua River 
 +       ​Valley at Bendethera9 using as a nucleus the Era Fund. At an auction ​
 +       we couldn'​t go high enough. ​                                      
 +
 + ​March,​ 1968,               THE SYDNEY BUSITAIKER ​                Page 19.
 +
 +122. THE YTJAR OF THE TOPLESS (MAZE.
 +             The Reunion was deferred until September owing to the fire hazard.
 +             The possibility of securing land on the coast south: Of '​Pretty ​ - -
 +       Beach was discussed; it was discovered all areas not already developed ​
 +       were likely to be reserved.
 +             ​Despite the fires early in the year there were two parties in 
 +       Blue Gum Forest during mid-July who had a difficult time extricating ​
 +       ​themselves from one of the severest snow falls recorded in the area.
 +
 +1966. THE YEAR OF DECIMAL CURRYdCY.
 +             ​Walkers,​ always good on the tooth, excelled themselves at the 
 +       first Gourmet Weekend in November.
 +             A push-bike trip from Mittagong to Katoomba left a trail of 
 +       ​busted cycles along Scott'​s Main Range and the Mite Dog Track.
 +             In July the Club suffered a heavy loss in the passing of Alan . 
 +       ​Rigby;​ one of its founders and a man still marvellously young in 
 +       ​spirit.
 +
 +1967. MI YEAR OF THE BIG CELEBRATION.
 +             The Sydney Bushwalkers celebrate their 40th. Anniversary with 
 +       a dinner at Ye Olde Crusty Tavern, and a special Reunion.
 +                   They say that life begins again
 +                   At forty years of ago.
 +                   ​Although tonight we've looked behind, ​
 +                   "​Oro not afraid of what we'll find 
 +                   "​hen we have turned the page.
 +                   ​Let'​s have no hates or doubts or fears 
 +                   ​Let'​s walk into the coming years.
 +                            *****************
 +
 +           *by.. pli VW*         .%i MUNI. ou.A.
 +
 +                            AN APOLOGY.
 +
 +               ​Unfortunately this month'​s magazine is a 
 +               week late in being published. The Editor ​
 +               ​wishes to apologise for this state of 
 +               ​affairs,​ and offer the eplanation that 
 +               he has been on holidays in the Central ​
 +               West of New South "ales, some hundreds ​
 +               of miles from his typewriter and 
 +               ​obligations. Ho hopes that you will find 
 +               it within your hearts to forgive him.
 +
 +Page 20,.                    THE SYDNEY '​BUSMIALICER ​    '​14aroh9-1968:​-
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +                              (41.11N111\-.VIA{(1
 +
 +
 +*************************** By The/​sporting Editor ******************4**
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +      The following are the results of the 1968 S.B.W. Swimming Carnival ​
 +held recently at Lake Eckersley. The Carnival was organised by Nan Bourke ​
 +and Owen Marks jointly.
 +
 +
 +IZODIEN FREESTYLE: ​ 1st. Places ​ Bronwyn.Secombe. ​
 +
 +                    2nd. Places ​ Nan Bourke.
 +                    3rd. Place: ​ Lyn Drummond.
 +
 +
 +MEN'S FREESTYLE: ​   1st. Place: ​ Laurie Quaken. ​
 +
 +                    2nd. Places ​ Rolf Janssen. ​
 +                    3rd. Place: ​ Barry Wallace.
 +
 +
 +WOMEN'​S LL-.L0 RACE:1st. Places ​ Bronwyn Secombe. ​
 +                    2nd. Place: ​ Lindsey Gilroy. ​
 +                    3rd. Place: ​ Nan Bourke.
 +
 +
 +MEN'S LI-LO RAGE:   1st. Place: ​ Neville Page. 
 +
 +                    2nd. Place: ​ Laurie Quaken. ​
 +                    3rd. Place: ​ Rolf Janssen.
 +
 +
 +CHILDREN'​S FREESTYLE1st. Place: ​ Penny Dean.
 +
 +                    2nd. Place: ​ Chris Brown. ​
 +                    3rd. Place: ​ Julia Younger.
 +
 +
 +'​OMEN'​S LONG PLUNGE:1st. Place: ​ Nan Bourke who plunged 50 feet. 
 +
 +                    2nd. Place: ​ Lyn Drummond who plunged 47 feet, 
 +                    3rd. Place: ​ Kay Kywood who plunged 43 feet.
 +
 +
 +MEN'S LONG PLUNGE: ​ 1st. Place: ​ Rolf Janbben who-plunged 43 feet. 
 +
 +                    2nd. Place: ​ Owen Marks who plunged 42 feet. 
 +                    3rd. Place: ​ Laurie Quaken & Barry 7allace, who 
 +                                 both plung6d 41 feet.
 +
 +
 +CHILDREN'​S PEANUT ​  1st. Place: ​ Rosemary Bourke with 28 peanuts. ​
 +    SCRAMNR: ​       2nd. Places ​ Penny Dean with 24 peanuts. . 
 +                    3rd. Place: ​ Chris Brown with 20 peanut'​s.
 +
 +
 +'​OMEN'​S PEANUT ​     1st'. Place: Lyn Drummond with 28 peanuts. ​
 +
 +    SOMME :         2nd. Places ​ Jan Stacey, Lindsey Gilroy, and
 +                                 Nan Bourke, each with 21 peanuts. ​
 +                    3rd.. Place: Bronwyn Secombe with 19 peanuts.
 +
 +
 +MEN'S PEANUT ​       1st. Places ​ Rolf Janssen with 38 peanuts. ​
 +
 +    SCRAMBLE: ​      2nd. Place: ​ Laurie Quaken with 27 peanuts. ​
 +                    3rd. Place: ​ Alan Pike with 22 peanuts.
 +
 +March; 1968.                               THE SYDNEY BUSIMALKER ​                                             Page 21..
 +                                                                                                              +1101.1=md
 +
 +
 +DUAL LILO RELAY:. 1st. Places Bronwyn-SecoMbe and. Neville Page. 
 +                                 2nd. Places LynTrummend and Rolf Janssen.
 +   ​(PFARQUAR CU         ​) ​       3rd. Place: Nan Bourke and Barry 77allace.
 +
 +          The trophy for this race was donated: by Bett abd Bit Farquar, ​
 +
 +and their name attaches to it as a consequence. On the basis of the 
 +Above results, it was awarded to Bronwyn Secombe and Neville Page.
 +
 +
 +TELEGRAN RELAY:
 +
 +(NAPDETRERG CUP)                 1st. Placqs Bronwyn Secombe and Rolf Janssen.
 +                                 2nd. Places Kay Kywood and Jim Callaway. ​                                       , 
 +                                 3rd, Places Lindsey Gilroy and Laurie Quaken.
 +
 +          On the basis of the above results, the Mandoiberg Cup II was
 +awarded to Bronwyn Secombe and Rolf Janssen,
 +
 +
 +THE HENLEY CUP:                  This Cup is awarded to the competitor who gains 
 +                                 the highest aggregate point score, taking into 
 +                                 ​account all events in the Carnival. The 1968 
 +                                 ​Henley Cup winner is Rolf Janssen, who gained ​
 +
 +                                 14 points.
 +
 +
 +
 +                                                *************
 +
 +
 +
 +                                               ​IFILDERNESS BAY. By Kareno Armand, Class 5A (1967)
 +                                                                                 ​Padstow Park Public School.
 +                                                                                 ​Teachers Miss J. Hallman.
 +OFF TO riILDERNESS BAY. The train stopped off and I went through the 
 +tremendous crowd hoping to find my cousin Faye who was off with merem 
 +my journey which would take us to alderness Bay.
 +          Ve stopped and asked a friend of Faye's which road to take and he 
 +replied, "To the right."​ So we turned right, off on our long journey ​
 +which would take six long, dreary hours of our time.
 +          7e made sure we had everything, including plenty of water to drink. ​
 +Before long we were happy to find that four hours had gone by and there 
 +was hope of reaching wilderness Bay at five o'​clock.
 +          Very soon we saw between tvro mountains the .rough rugged bush and
 +a bright, blue silvery river running through. Faye thought if we hurried ​
 +we would reach there in half an hour instead of fortyfive minutes.
 +          After a while we finally reached "​ilderness Bay so we found a 
 +suitable spot to set up our camp which was' on the banks of a river.
 +          Soon we both became tired and so we put up the tont and slipped ​
 +into our sleeping bags to have a sleqp. "hen we woke up we found it was 
 +now dark, so without saying anything to each other we made ourselves
 +some scrambled egg on toast and a cup of hot chocolate. re then undressed ​
 +and got into our sleeping bags again. 'e could not sleep because we were 
 +
 +so excitthd, so we sat up and waited till morning and then we cooked ​
 +ourselves some sausages and tomatoes.
 +
 +
 +SETTLING D01."​1. "hen we had finished our breakfast we started off into ti 
 +bush to explore it. Soon we came to a beautiful patch of wildflowers
 +
 +!larch, 1968.               THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER ​              Page
 +
 +but we did not toueh'​them because we did not want tD harm thep#
 +      Further along the stream, We came to ,a flock of wild birds Q,Qfl41 to 
 +get a drink, because the water wa0 fresh. Soon we grew hungryand:​fol ()Wed 
 +the stream upward.
 +      An *oon as we reached theiie we washed our faces with water and made 
 +ourselves some nandwie:les and a drink of lime. After dinner had gone down 
 +We felt like a swim so we get into our costumes and hEia a swim. soon time 
 +had passed so we went baek to camp and had our tea.
 +
 +VNDING FAYE.. After tea we went to bed. We went to bed at seven thirty so 
 +we could get up early. ,In the morning whcm I woke up,Faye had gone and she 
 +had made her breakfast. I quickly got dressed and had some breakfast and 
 +then wont after her. Soon an hour had passed and I had not found a trace of 
 +her anywhere. Then I found her water bottle. Then I heard a sound oming 
 +from the bush and there was Faye, trying tp release a bird which was caught ​
 +among the branches. We both pulled down one end each and the b.abY bIrd had' ​
 +been released. When we got back we sat dewn and 1.1a01.s rep.
 +      After a while we theught whai YIP *0W explore the '​stream. We set out 
 +at the beginning arid started to eXploro. First We came *o a lot of little ​
 +fish W1ich;​w6r0-b14.0. with yellow &pots on thoir backs. up further We found 
 +s-Ome bierds.
 +      Soon we came to some shiny pebbles which were on the bdttom pf the 
 +water. Faye pulled up her sleeve and pulled them oUt. They were Valewf ​
 +green, black and white. Up further we co to a little lizard which Watf 
 +basking in the spl., I quickly got up and it loolced,​liko it was gding to ,run 
 +at us, but we quickly turned back and hurried away. We eamo to a trek) W11141 ​
 +had three nests in it so we deOded to climb it,, but the i?other cailie back 
 +and we had to go. After sem time we thought we had bettor go back.
 +
 +HELFTN FAri. The n(P=t mernipg We woke early and made ourselves a _q4ok 
 +breakfast-. When we had finiihed we went out.
 +     -Faye and I seParated. SO.Qn f heard some serpaping pp I quiekli raP4 
 +c4x1 then stepped OlAdderaY 1?ogause there was 4 b,ig, hole. iinthe grellnd- and . 
 +Nre hid fallen ​    So ran back, found oeme V4e, and went t6 the *cue'.
 +      I tio it te a tree and.pt the ;est' ciown t4osh-ple. Then IbrtlUghi it 
 +IV and pulled Faye to the top. Faye. wanted to have a real p4d 411-4 go wheo 
 +we get Imek I made her one. The Faye remembered that we on had tomor*Av ​
 +left and we had to ge.
 +
 +GO:01q*KE. The not morning we arose bright and early so we could, get off 
 +   a good start home. When we had started we romemtered that we wore going 
 +to hurry home.
 +      When we arriyed vo WelN PAP.a4R4 tQ P90 C:11.r p4Fent91 ceouppl
 +and aunties ratting or us to atrtye. They wore z*1,370 us I;(50.0 cit160!401 ​
 +41 at 011c0;. s9M-0 ef 14110M Were Y.4.01).PerP. When we gt hglie 411 our fti6nds ​
 +644e to see us.
 +      When we went back to 0011.04 the teacher told us that we sOuld tho
 +014$s. about our tAp.
 +                             ​*if**0*******
 +
  
196803.txt ยท Last modified: 2014/03/27 22:44 (external edit)