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196606 [2016/08/09 06:19]
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196606 [2016/08/09 06:28] (current)
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 Thus to General Business, the first matter being the election of Joanna Hallman to the vacancy for Lady Committee Member. The President called attention to a stock of pamphlets supplied by Paul Barnes and describing the Heathcote Primitive Area and invited all present to please take one. Thus to General Business, the first matter being the election of Joanna Hallman to the vacancy for Lady Committee Member. The President called attention to a stock of pamphlets supplied by Paul Barnes and describing the Heathcote Primitive Area and invited all present to please take one.
  
-Mick Eifick ​now had a proposition to put. We all knew of the spread of fire fighters'​ roads in our walking territory. The Water Board alone had built 600 miles of 'em and proposed to construct more at the rate of 10O miles in each of the next four years. One route was planned for the Gingra Range from Kanangra to link up with the Cedar Road on the Kowmung. However contact had been made with the Chief Forester who had indicated he thought that particular trail could be left undone if there were a volunteer fire brigade amongst ​Bushwaikers ​who would be willing to suppress fires in the areas. He moved that Federation be advised, and that S.B.W. indicate its support. In answer to a question Mick said if successful the proposal may save construction of other trails in the region - say along the Gangerang.+Mick Elfick ​now had a proposition to put. We all knew of the spread of fire fighters'​ roads in our walking territory. The Water Board alone had built 600 miles of 'em and proposed to construct more at the rate of 10O miles in each of the next four years. One route was planned for the Gingra Range from Kanangra to link up with the Cedar Road on the Kowmung. However contact had been made with the Chief Forester who had indicated he thought that particular trail could be left undone if there were a volunteer fire brigade amongst ​Bushwalkers ​who would be willing to suppress fires in the areas. He moved that Federation be advised, and that S.B.W. indicate its support. In answer to a question Mick said if successful the proposal may save construction of other trails in the region - say along the Gangerang.
  
 Frank Ashdown foresaw difficulties of transport and obtaining leave from work. Someone observed that the State Government services in N.S.W. appeared willing to grant leave for fire fighting if not for orthodox S & R activity. The President explained that there were kinds of forest fires where a small self-contained group could be more effective than bigger parties who would only operate from a road line, and he was convinced that the work given such an organisation would be suitable to its character. Ron Knightley indicated he was willing to support both the fire fighting and transport needs and after the motion was carried a show of hands indicated that there should be no problem in mustering the requisite strength from Federated Clubs. Frank Ashdown foresaw difficulties of transport and obtaining leave from work. Someone observed that the State Government services in N.S.W. appeared willing to grant leave for fire fighting if not for orthodox S & R activity. The President explained that there were kinds of forest fires where a small self-contained group could be more effective than bigger parties who would only operate from a road line, and he was convinced that the work given such an organisation would be suitable to its character. Ron Knightley indicated he was willing to support both the fire fighting and transport needs and after the motion was carried a show of hands indicated that there should be no problem in mustering the requisite strength from Federated Clubs.
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 It seems that this adventurous trip started out with twelve mounted and one on foot. Now the dogged foot-slogger,​ John Scott, was the first to finish the course. For a bushwalker in this mechanised age, it's somehow gratifying to reflect that a pair of sturdy legs can still outstrip the wheel - the triumph of man over machine at last! It seems that this adventurous trip started out with twelve mounted and one on foot. Now the dogged foot-slogger,​ John Scott, was the first to finish the course. For a bushwalker in this mechanised age, it's somehow gratifying to reflect that a pair of sturdy legs can still outstrip the wheel - the triumph of man over machine at last!
  
-For sustained, superb photography,​ you couldn'​t go past Henry Gold's colour slides of "​Scenic California"​. Every one was a gem. One part of Henry'​s success formula is patience - waiting for THE right moment. Would you be prepared to wait indefinitely for a flower to stop moving in the breeze, for just the right sky effects to come, for the odd-ball wave that will send up a spectaculor ​plume of spray? No? That's one reason there are not many Henry Golds around.+For sustained, superb photography,​ you couldn'​t go past Henry Gold's colour slides of "​Scenic California"​. Every one was a gem. One part of Henry'​s success formula is patience - waiting for THE right moment. Would you be prepared to wait indefinitely for a flower to stop moving in the breeze, for just the right sky effects to come, for the odd-ball wave that will send up a spectacular ​plume of spray? No? That's one reason there are not many Henry Golds around.
  
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 "At the time called Easter in the year 1885, Mr. Nathaniel Winkle and Mr. Samuel Weller made a journey to the world-famed "​Binda"​ or "Fish River Caves."​ They were so impressed with the trip that on their return, they consulted with Mr. Pickwick as to the desirability of again visiting that famous spot in company with the whole of the Pickwick Corresponding Club. The idea of taking ladies on such a journey was rather much for Pickwick'​s keen sense of what Weller would call '​propriety';​ but, after several days weighty consideration the President fell in withWTinkle and Weller'​s recommendation. "At the time called Easter in the year 1885, Mr. Nathaniel Winkle and Mr. Samuel Weller made a journey to the world-famed "​Binda"​ or "Fish River Caves."​ They were so impressed with the trip that on their return, they consulted with Mr. Pickwick as to the desirability of again visiting that famous spot in company with the whole of the Pickwick Corresponding Club. The idea of taking ladies on such a journey was rather much for Pickwick'​s keen sense of what Weller would call '​propriety';​ but, after several days weighty consideration the President fell in withWTinkle and Weller'​s recommendation.
  
-"The day appointed for the start was the 19th March, 1886. Long before the start day came round, all sorts of rumours were afloat about the ill-formed and crude ideas of the Club regarding the length, breadth, and dangers of the unmade track from Katoomba to the Binda Mountain. The Club's friends implored Pickwick to have members of the Club tested closely by Dr. Edwards. Pressure was brought to bear upon him from all quarters, and he was seriously warned of the great responsibilities resting on his shoulders. Mrs. Barjokim said it was anything but proper that three unprotected young women should for one moment be permitted to attempt such a journey without their parents to accompany them. Sir Simeon Baker implored Mr. Pickwiok, if only to avoid the appearance of wrong, to get the Rev. Timothy Pecksniff to form one of the party. Others assured the good President that all manner of difficulties would occur on the way, in the shape of thunderstorms,​ rivers too high to ford, snakes, kangaroos, snowstorms, want of water, tight boots, teeth aching, cold, heat, wild dogs, bull-dog ants, spiders, no tracks, blackfellows,​ crows, want of food, milk, butter etc. However, Pickwick was proof against all the objectionists,​ for he had confidence in Mr. Nathaniel Winkle and Mr. Samuel Weller."​+"The day appointed for the start was the 19th March, 1886. Long before the start day came round, all sorts of rumours were afloat about the ill-formed and crude ideas of the Club regarding the length, breadth, and dangers of the unmade track from Katoomba to the Binda Mountain. The Club's friends implored Pickwick to have members of the Club tested closely by Dr. Edwards. Pressure was brought to bear upon him from all quarters, and he was seriously warned of the great responsibilities resting on his shoulders. Mrs. Barjokim said it was anything but proper that three unprotected young women should for one moment be permitted to attempt such a journey without their parents to accompany them. Sir Simeon Baker implored Mr. Pickwick, if only to avoid the appearance of wrong, to get the Rev. Timothy Pecksniff to form one of the party. Others assured the good President that all manner of difficulties would occur on the way, in the shape of thunderstorms,​ rivers too high to ford, snakes, kangaroos, snowstorms, want of water, tight boots, teeth aching, cold, heat, wild dogs, bull-dog ants, spiders, no tracks, blackfellows,​ crows, want of food, milk, butter etc. However, Pickwick was proof against all the objectionists,​ for he had confidence in Mr. Nathaniel Winkle and Mr. Samuel Weller."​
  
 Then a doleful Mr. Winkle went to see Pickwick - "Did I tell you," he said, "Mr. Greyship called on to inquire if reports were true, and warned me against the venture, feared the Club ladies would never do the distance, and half a dozen others doubt the results? Now, Pickwick, the whole matter rests with you: I see it all before me if I can rest on your honour."​ The President rose from his chair, took Winkle'​s hand, and gave him his assurance of loyalty. From this time, operations fairly commenced."​ Then a doleful Mr. Winkle went to see Pickwick - "Did I tell you," he said, "Mr. Greyship called on to inquire if reports were true, and warned me against the venture, feared the Club ladies would never do the distance, and half a dozen others doubt the results? Now, Pickwick, the whole matter rests with you: I see it all before me if I can rest on your honour."​ The President rose from his chair, took Winkle'​s hand, and gave him his assurance of loyalty. From this time, operations fairly commenced."​
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 These Parks are very different from our concept of a National Park. They are areas of particular scenic beauty which cater for specialised interests such as walking, climbing or any one of the branches of natural science, within the limits of which no building or development may take place without, virtually, a Royal Commission to establish a valid reason for such an intrusion. Civilisation is still a part of the Park scene however, in the shape of busy arterial roads, small villages (with every trap set for the tourist) and farms, whose trap takes the form of a "Bed and Breakfast"​ sign swinging in the breeze. One almost comes to the conclusion that Bed and Breakfast is really Great Britain'​s most profitable and enduring industry. The intense farming that has taken place over the centuries perhaps accounts for the most noticeable feature of all Parks to a Blue Mountains-geared walker - the lack of trees or extensive tracts of dense undergrowth. There are of course specially planted forests and very beautiful groves of trees, especially beeches which make a very colourful splash in the autumn, but there is never the joy of doing battle with impenetrable scrub or of acrobatics through a sally gum forest, and of course, the view from the top is never obscured by trees, the weather usually does an ever better job. These Parks are very different from our concept of a National Park. They are areas of particular scenic beauty which cater for specialised interests such as walking, climbing or any one of the branches of natural science, within the limits of which no building or development may take place without, virtually, a Royal Commission to establish a valid reason for such an intrusion. Civilisation is still a part of the Park scene however, in the shape of busy arterial roads, small villages (with every trap set for the tourist) and farms, whose trap takes the form of a "Bed and Breakfast"​ sign swinging in the breeze. One almost comes to the conclusion that Bed and Breakfast is really Great Britain'​s most profitable and enduring industry. The intense farming that has taken place over the centuries perhaps accounts for the most noticeable feature of all Parks to a Blue Mountains-geared walker - the lack of trees or extensive tracts of dense undergrowth. There are of course specially planted forests and very beautiful groves of trees, especially beeches which make a very colourful splash in the autumn, but there is never the joy of doing battle with impenetrable scrub or of acrobatics through a sally gum forest, and of course, the view from the top is never obscured by trees, the weather usually does an ever better job.
  
-Most Parks have a permanent resident warden and a varying number of voluntary assistants. Their job is to patrol the Park on the lookout for vandals or to search for lost parties, and also to provide information to visitors. This information is plentiful and helpful, in the form of maps and booklets ​givinq ​full details of all grades of walks in the Park and details of local accommodation. There are well appointed camping and caravan sites, though you may put your tent in a slightly less crowded area. This may be difficult to find however, as everywhere else is someone else's or on the side of a steep hill. These sites provide all the amenities of citilization ​- just like home, except that the walls are canvas and the bed is not quite as soft.+Most Parks have a permanent resident warden and a varying number of voluntary assistants. Their job is to patrol the Park on the lookout for vandals or to search for lost parties, and also to provide information to visitors. This information is plentiful and helpful, in the form of maps and booklets ​giving ​full details of all grades of walks in the Park and details of local accommodation. There are well appointed camping and caravan sites, though you may put your tent in a slightly less crowded area. This may be difficult to find however, as everywhere else is someone else's or on the side of a steep hill. These sites provide all the amenities of civilization ​- just like home, except that the walls are canvas and the bed is not quite as soft.
  
-Footpaths and tracks are well trodden, though by our standards, highway would be a better description. Close to civilisation,​ a footpath will be indicated by a green post bearing a board such as "​Public Footpath to Castleton - 3 miles"​. In Wales the signs are bilingual, in Scotland scarce and in Ireland non existent. Should you come to a junction, if you are lucky, there are usually adequate signs to ensure you make the right turning. The National Trust use blue signs indicating the location of ancient monuments and buildings of historical interest. In "​high"​ country there are tracks, usually well cairned, and often white highways are worn over boulder fields by millions of tramping boots In farming country, well used sheep tracks are very confusing until one grows accustdmed ​to the sheep-like tendency to shun climbing and merely follow the contours. Cairns on summits are almost universal, but Visitors'​ Books, say of the Splendour Rock size, would have to be replaced every month on the most Popular peaks.+Footpaths and tracks are well trodden, though by our standards, highway would be a better description. Close to civilisation,​ a footpath will be indicated by a green post bearing a board such as "​Public Footpath to Castleton - 3 miles"​. In Wales the signs are bilingual, in Scotland scarce and in Ireland non existent. Should you come to a junction, if you are lucky, there are usually adequate signs to ensure you make the right turning. The National Trust use blue signs indicating the location of ancient monuments and buildings of historical interest. In "​high"​ country there are tracks, usually well cairned, and often white highways are worn over boulder fields by millions of tramping boots In farming country, well used sheep tracks are very confusing until one grows accustomed ​to the sheep-like tendency to shun climbing and merely follow the contours. Cairns on summits are almost universal, but Visitors'​ Books, say of the Splendour Rock size, would have to be replaced every month on the most Popular peaks.
  
 The whole of Great Britain is covered by 1"/​mile contoured maps published by the Ordnance Survey Commission. They come in a special cardboard folder either on paper or cloth. There are larger and smaller scale maps but they are rarely used by the average walker. There is an excellent series of maps put out by Bartholomew'​s of Edinburgh, either 1/2" or 1/​4"/​mile which are ideal for cycling but not of sufficient detail for the walker. British Railways publish two very useful books describing 50 day walks in the Home Counties, escaping from London by one or other of their excellent systems of transport. These books contain reproduction from. Ordnance Survey maps and pictures and are minutely detailed. The average length of a day's walk would be 15 miles - much further and you could walk out of the Park into civilisation. Unless one added the handicap of a 60 lb pack, there did not seem to be many walks which would exceed our grading of "​Hard"​. Basically one climbs up onto a ridge, bashed along its undulating length and then descends. Creek walking is rare, either because there are farms all along the way or perhaps a road. Canyoneering or cascading would necessitate the wearing of a super insulated rubber suit to ensure survival. Road bashes are almost unavoidable in a walk of any distance - quite fun on the narrow winding lanes of Wales with high walls or hedges on either side. The whole of Great Britain is covered by 1"/​mile contoured maps published by the Ordnance Survey Commission. They come in a special cardboard folder either on paper or cloth. There are larger and smaller scale maps but they are rarely used by the average walker. There is an excellent series of maps put out by Bartholomew'​s of Edinburgh, either 1/2" or 1/​4"/​mile which are ideal for cycling but not of sufficient detail for the walker. British Railways publish two very useful books describing 50 day walks in the Home Counties, escaping from London by one or other of their excellent systems of transport. These books contain reproduction from. Ordnance Survey maps and pictures and are minutely detailed. The average length of a day's walk would be 15 miles - much further and you could walk out of the Park into civilisation. Unless one added the handicap of a 60 lb pack, there did not seem to be many walks which would exceed our grading of "​Hard"​. Basically one climbs up onto a ridge, bashed along its undulating length and then descends. Creek walking is rare, either because there are farms all along the way or perhaps a road. Canyoneering or cascading would necessitate the wearing of a super insulated rubber suit to ensure survival. Road bashes are almost unavoidable in a walk of any distance - quite fun on the narrow winding lanes of Wales with high walls or hedges on either side.
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 You recognise his ability to cope with adverse conditions and be fed, warm and comfortable when others would be utterly miserable. You recognise his ability to cope with adverse conditions and be fed, warm and comfortable when others would be utterly miserable.
  
-When you examine his equipment you see that it is practical, well made and well thought out. Once again you will recognise the stamp of experience in his choice, and nine times out of ten you will see that it is "​Paddymade"​ - the equipment ​expeienced ​walkers and campers have preferred for over 30 years.+When you examine his equipment you see that it is practical, well made and well thought out. Once again you will recognise the stamp of experience in his choice, and nine times out of ten you will see that it is "​Paddymade"​ - the equipment ​experienced ​walkers and campers have preferred for over 30 years.
  
 You can learn to be comfortable when camping. You can learn to be comfortable when camping.
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 You will find it easiest when using Paddymade gear. You will find it easiest when using Paddymade gear.
  
-Paddy Pallin Pty.Limited,​+Paddy Pallin Pty. Limited,
  
 109A Bathurst Street, 1st Floor, Cnr. George Street, Sydney. Phone 26-2685. 109A Bathurst Street, 1st Floor, Cnr. George Street, Sydney. Phone 26-2685.
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 Here is a tale of a time when the manliness of men was measured by their walking ability; not vulgar show off competitive stuff - but walking - to get from here to there without any fuss. Here is a tale of a time when the manliness of men was measured by their walking ability; not vulgar show off competitive stuff - but walking - to get from here to there without any fuss.
  
-It comes from a book by Geo. Borrow, "​Wales"​ his six months ​wanlder ​there in 1854.+It comes from a book by Geo. Borrow, "​Wales"​ his six months ​wander ​there in 1854.
  
-He covered all Wales by foot power - 30 mile a day - just a trifle - he carried no swag - BUT - an umbrella - always a pa at days end, with a big fire waiting, however soaked was. Ha. Imagine it. Night - strange ​cruntry ​- rain - torchless, but no complaint, he always reached his mark.+He covered all Wales by foot power - 30 mile a day - just a trifle - he carried no swag - BUT - an umbrella - always a pa at days end, with a big fire waiting, however soaked was. Ha. Imagine it. Night - strange ​country ​- rain - torchless, but no complaint, he always reached his mark.
  
 So - here is a glimpse at one of many such happy meetings - So - here is a glimpse at one of many such happy meetings -
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 (Or "How to Ride a Bike from Mittagong to Katoomba in a Weekend."​) (Or "How to Ride a Bike from Mittagong to Katoomba in a Weekend."​)
  
-As I am writing this I am sitting in the AB cafe after putting away a large meal. The rest of the party has not arrived yet and it is already well after dark on Synday ​night. What's happened to them?+As I am writing this I am sitting in the AB cafe after putting away a large meal. The rest of the party has not arrived yet and it is already well after dark on Sunday ​night. What's happened to them?
  
 It all started a few weeks before our planned Mittagong-Katoomba bike trip. People were combing the dumps looking for old bikes and overhauling others. Also people were practicing for the big event. Margaret pulled a ligament in her knee on a practice run, Dave Rostron sprained an ankle when he had 15 punctures and the back wheel fell off. By the time of the trip the number had dropped from about 30 to a mere dozen keen bods. Another (Jack Pettigrew) dropped out when he was riding his bike to Central to catch the train and got bowled by a car. It all started a few weeks before our planned Mittagong-Katoomba bike trip. People were combing the dumps looking for old bikes and overhauling others. Also people were practicing for the big event. Margaret pulled a ligament in her knee on a practice run, Dave Rostron sprained an ankle when he had 15 punctures and the back wheel fell off. By the time of the trip the number had dropped from about 30 to a mere dozen keen bods. Another (Jack Pettigrew) dropped out when he was riding his bike to Central to catch the train and got bowled by a car.
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 By the time we reached the Wombeyan Caves turnoff the rain had almost stopped (we were getting into the Warragamba Catchment Area). Good time was made along the Wombeyan Caves road and soon we came to the Wanganderry turnoff. It just so happens that this turnoff is on the steepest down hill yet encountered on this road and when I yelled to stop there was a smell of burning sandshoes. Just then Bob Smith topped the rise and came hurtling down yelling "No brakes"​. There was a great crash and the next thing we saw was Bob hurtling 20 feet into the air. We picked him up from the gutter, dazed but not hurt. While we were fixing his bike the local farmer came along and we got talking to him. He suggested that we sleep in his wool shed. His idea was quickly accepted and we followed him up to the house. On the way from the gate to the house we seemed to have lost 2 bods. We went out to search and found 3 of them. By the time we reached the Wombeyan Caves turnoff the rain had almost stopped (we were getting into the Warragamba Catchment Area). Good time was made along the Wombeyan Caves road and soon we came to the Wanganderry turnoff. It just so happens that this turnoff is on the steepest down hill yet encountered on this road and when I yelled to stop there was a smell of burning sandshoes. Just then Bob Smith topped the rise and came hurtling down yelling "No brakes"​. There was a great crash and the next thing we saw was Bob hurtling 20 feet into the air. We picked him up from the gutter, dazed but not hurt. While we were fixing his bike the local farmer came along and we got talking to him. He suggested that we sleep in his wool shed. His idea was quickly accepted and we followed him up to the house. On the way from the gate to the house we seemed to have lost 2 bods. We went out to search and found 3 of them.
  
-The farmer was very hospitable and we were invited in for a cup of tea. As we sat around the fire they served up with hot drinks, chips, biscuits and cake. We sat around talking until 2 a.m. How can a leader be expected to keep his party going with hospitality like this? We slept on bales of wool and hay in the shod and in the morning nobody wanted to get up. Eventually we got away at about 8 a.m., but no sooner had we gone more than 100 yards when Bob Smith got a puncture. In due time we arrived at Burnt Flat Creek where we had breakfast. We had to wheel our bikes down Burnt Flat Creek and at the bottom I got a puncture. By this time people were beginning to think that the trip was not possible as it was already about 11 a.m. and we had only come a couple of miles. At this stage Paul Hinkley brought out a little sign which read "Katoombe ​and/or Bust" and tied it onto the back of his bike. A little further on Bob Smith had more trouble with his bike and Tony Dinch remained with him to help with repairs while the others pushed on. This is when Ganderpipe came out with his classic statement - "You can get spread out on a trip like this". Little did he realize what was to come.+The farmer was very hospitable and we were invited in for a cup of tea. As we sat around the fire they served up with hot drinks, chips, biscuits and cake. We sat around talking until 2 a.m. How can a leader be expected to keep his party going with hospitality like this? We slept on bales of wool and hay in the shod and in the morning nobody wanted to get up. Eventually we got away at about 8 a.m., but no sooner had we gone more than 100 yards when Bob Smith got a puncture. In due time we arrived at Burnt Flat Creek where we had breakfast. We had to wheel our bikes down Burnt Flat Creek and at the bottom I got a puncture. By this time people were beginning to think that the trip was not possible as it was already about 11 a.m. and we had only come a couple of miles. At this stage Paul Hinkley brought out a little sign which read "Katoomba ​and/or Bust" and tied it onto the back of his bike. A little further on Bob Smith had more trouble with his bike and Tony Dinch remained with him to help with repairs while the others pushed on. This is when Ganderpipe came out with his classic statement - "You can get spread out on a trip like this". Little did he realize what was to come.
  
 We made good time across the "​Dilly"​ and up the steep walk on the other side. The others caught us up at lunch in Burnes Creek. We then pushed our bikes up the long drawn out hills to Yerranderie. Here there was rebellion in the party and most of them camped in the old Hotel while Roger, Rona, Doone and myself pushed on to Byrnes Gap. We made good time across the "​Dilly"​ and up the steep walk on the other side. The others caught us up at lunch in Burnes Creek. We then pushed our bikes up the long drawn out hills to Yerranderie. Here there was rebellion in the party and most of them camped in the old Hotel while Roger, Rona, Doone and myself pushed on to Byrnes Gap.
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 Next day at work I got a phone call from Fonny Dinch to tell us that Bob Smith, Alan Pike, Rona Butler and himself had arrived home at 5 a.m. that morning. Apparently they thought that since the leader wasn't there they could have three hours for lunch. This time they spent at the bottom of the White Dog Road and we had passed them by cutting up the ridge. Next day at work I got a phone call from Fonny Dinch to tell us that Bob Smith, Alan Pike, Rona Butler and himself had arrived home at 5 a.m. that morning. Apparently they thought that since the leader wasn't there they could have three hours for lunch. This time they spent at the bottom of the White Dog Road and we had passed them by cutting up the ridge.
  
-When they eventually dragged themselves away from the lunch spot they pushed their bikes up to Medlow ​ Gap which they reached just on nightfall. Being a keen party they pushed on up Deberts Knob, then pulled their bikes up Taro's ladders in the dark. Dot and the rest of the party stayed at Medlow Gap for the night and came out next morning.+When they eventually dragged themselves away from the lunch spot they pushed their bikes up to Medlow Gap which they reached just on nightfall. Being a keen party they pushed on up Deberts Knob, then pulled their bikes up Taro's ladders in the dark. Dot and the rest of the party stayed at Medlow Gap for the night and came out next morning.
  
 ---- ----
  
-A certain character who runs a garage-cafe in walking country was telling us about the various groups who passed his way, andhe was __not__ joking.+A certain character who runs a garage-cafe in walking country was telling us about the various groups who passed his way, and he was __not__ joking.
  
 "Yes, we've even had the Out of Bounds Movement."​ "​Don'​t you mean the Outward Bound Movement",​ we said. "Yes, that's right, the Out of Bounds Movement."​ "Yes, we've even had the Out of Bounds Movement."​ "​Don'​t you mean the Outward Bound Movement",​ we said. "Yes, that's right, the Out of Bounds Movement."​
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 In mortal years "​Tarro"​ is old but in spirit and manner he is eternally young. He saw twenty one years of the last century, all the boundless days of young manhood. He can recall an immense amount of facts about the Sydney of those far away days, of people, buildings, theatre, and so on, and his reminiscences are well worth listening to. In mortal years "​Tarro"​ is old but in spirit and manner he is eternally young. He saw twenty one years of the last century, all the boundless days of young manhood. He can recall an immense amount of facts about the Sydney of those far away days, of people, buildings, theatre, and so on, and his reminiscences are well worth listening to.
  
-I have known him for over fifty years and have been in close contact through that time. When I first met him he was a black-haired,​ lean and vigorous young man in his early thirties. And now, an individualist,​ an original thinker with quite a formidable personality. By occupation a first rate painter and signwriter, a craftsman who loved his work. Just take a walk around the city with him and he will point out existing examples of that ancient craft done in his younger days. Born on 23rd of June, 1879, Tarro is one of a family of eight children, two girls and six boys. Of the eight one sister and three brothers (four all told) are still living. I remember his parents well, particularly his wonderful mother. She was over 90 when she died and I had the rare proviledge ​of writing a letter of congratulations to her on her 90th birthday.+I have known him for over fifty years and have been in close contact through that time. When I first met him he was a black-haired,​ lean and vigorous young man in his early thirties. And now, an individualist,​ an original thinker with quite a formidable personality. By occupation a first rate painter and signwriter, a craftsman who loved his work. Just take a walk around the city with him and he will point out existing examples of that ancient craft done in his younger days. Born on 23rd of June, 1879, Tarro is one of a family of eight children, two girls and six boys. Of the eight one sister and three brothers (four all told) are still living. I remember his parents well, particularly his wonderful mother. She was over 90 when she died and I had the rare priviledge ​of writing a letter of congratulations to her on her 90th birthday.
  
 Tarro'​s home is, as one would expect, quite different from any other home. It is full of gadgets, levers to open the front door of the seven foot fence that surrounds his grounds, a domed ceiling over a twenty foot square room, with a ten by ten room at each corner, but not divided off from the main room. Various alterations were made over the years and one is an upstairs lookout platform, partly covered. Here he sleeps, that is if one can imagine such a man sleeping. From this lookout there is a clear view to the mountains, and various points such as Clear Hill may be picked out. Indeed, on trips to Clear Hill it would be arranged with someone at his home to flash a mirror at a given hour and we would flash back. Tarro'​s home is, as one would expect, quite different from any other home. It is full of gadgets, levers to open the front door of the seven foot fence that surrounds his grounds, a domed ceiling over a twenty foot square room, with a ten by ten room at each corner, but not divided off from the main room. Various alterations were made over the years and one is an upstairs lookout platform, partly covered. Here he sleeps, that is if one can imagine such a man sleeping. From this lookout there is a clear view to the mountains, and various points such as Clear Hill may be picked out. Indeed, on trips to Clear Hill it would be arranged with someone at his home to flash a mirror at a given hour and we would flash back.
  
-The grounds are surrounded by a seven foot fence of fine corrugated iron, with entrance by a panelled door. This is secured by a Yale lock and one signals desire for entrance by pressing a bell button, whereon the door will swing silently open with never a soul in sight. It is all done with levers from any part of the house. Consequently he is never bothered by hawkers. The name of the house is "​Voltaire",​ which indicated to soul-saving parsons that their time weuld be wasted. (For further elucidation read Voltaire'​s "​Candide"​ and other stories and essays.) In short Tarro valued his time and seclusion. In the grounds he maintained a well-equipped workshop and there were few tasks from expert tin-smithing to tent-making that he did not master. He is a first-class "​gadgeteer"​ with a cunning sense of invention. Highly skilled in woodwork, he has made many exquisite pieces.+The grounds are surrounded by a seven foot fence of fine corrugated iron, with entrance by a panelled door. This is secured by a Yale lock and one signals desire for entrance by pressing a bell button, whereon the door will swing silently open with never a soul in sight. It is all done with levers from any part of the house. Consequently he is never bothered by hawkers. The name of the house is "​Voltaire",​ which indicated to soul-saving parsons that their time would be wasted. (For further elucidation read Voltaire'​s "​Candide"​ and other stories and essays.) In short Tarro valued his time and seclusion. In the grounds he maintained a well-equipped workshop and there were few tasks from expert tin-smithing to tent-making that he did not master. He is a first-class "​gadgeteer"​ with a cunning sense of invention. Highly skilled in woodwork, he has made many exquisite pieces.
  
 As both of us were keen cyclists, we did many rides together, and for many years he celebrated his birthday on the nearest Sunday by riding one hundred miles in the day and on a great number of "​century"​ runs I was his partner. The usual run was Auburn to Bulli Lookout and back and then five miles to Parramatta and back to make the exact hundred miles. He still rides the same bicycle, a Canadian "​Red-bird"​ that is as hard-wearing as himself. As both of us were keen cyclists, we did many rides together, and for many years he celebrated his birthday on the nearest Sunday by riding one hundred miles in the day and on a great number of "​century"​ runs I was his partner. The usual run was Auburn to Bulli Lookout and back and then five miles to Parramatta and back to make the exact hundred miles. He still rides the same bicycle, a Canadian "​Red-bird"​ that is as hard-wearing as himself.
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 ===Barrington Tops Area:=== ===Barrington Tops Area:===
  
-It was learned that a forest of 16,000 pine seedling was about to be planted by the Forestry Commission, to which a letter has been addressed ​seekig ​information as to the location of the State Forest.+It was learned that a forest of 16,000 pine seedling was about to be planted by the Forestry Commission, to which a letter has been addressed ​seeking ​information as to the location of the State Forest.
  
 ===Otford:​=== ===Otford:​===
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 ===Radio Field Day:=== ===Radio Field Day:===
  
-This function will be held at Mt. Kur-Ring-Gai on Sunday, June 5. 9.30 a.m. train from Hornsby. This is an important adjunct to S & R. operations.+This function will be held at Mt. Ku-Ring-Gai on Sunday, June 5. 9.30 a.m. train from Hornsby. This is an important adjunct to S & R. operations.
  
 ===Waratah Festival:​=== ===Waratah Festival:​===
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 |10. Arrival Home on Monday Morning|2 points per hour after midnight.| |10. Arrival Home on Monday Morning|2 points per hour after midnight.|
 |11. Trip Not completed Due to White Ants|10 Points.| |11. Trip Not completed Due to White Ants|10 Points.|
-|12. Angle of Campsite|2 points ​forevery ​degree over 45°.| ​+|12. Angle of Campsite|2 points ​for every degree over 45°.| ​
  
 Here is how it works: Example. Mittagong - Katoomba Bike Trip. Here is how it works: Example. Mittagong - Katoomba Bike Trip.
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 |Lost Loader ​ 1 day|10|...| |Lost Loader ​ 1 day|10|...|
 |Impossible Route Selected|10|...| |Impossible Route Selected|10|...|
-|Those not overdue got home 5 a.m|10|...|+|Those not overdue got home 5 a.m.|10|...|
 |Trip was completed| - |...| |Trip was completed| - |...|
 |Total|100| | |Total|100| |
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 60 - 100: A mighty trip (could only be a S.B.W. trip). 60 - 100: A mighty trip (could only be a S.B.W. trip).
  
-Greater than 100|Still recovering (could only be a Wossiborn trip).+Greater than 100Still recovering (could only be a Wossiborn trip).
196606.txt · Last modified: 2016/08/09 06:28 by tyreless