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-TELL-BUNGLED ​ TRIP - By Ross Tyborn+=====Well-Bungled Trip.===== 
-(Or "How to Ride a Brike from Mittagong to Katoomba in a Weekend."​) + 
-As I am writing this I am sitting in the AB cafe after putting away a large meal. The rest of the party has not arrived yet and it is +By Ross Wyborn. 
-already well after dark on Synday night. What's happened to them? + 
-It all started a few weeks before our planned Mittagong-Katoomba bike +(Or "How to Ride a Bike from Mittagong to Katoomba in a Weekend."​) 
-trip. People were combing the dumps looking for ola bikes and overhauling others. Also people were practicing for the big event. Margaret pulled a ligament in her knee on a practice run, Dave Rostron sprained an ankle when he had 15 punctures and the back wheel fell off. By the time of the trip the number ​tad dropped from about 30 to a mare dozen keen bads. + 
-An ther dropped out when he was riding his bike to Central to catch the +As I am writing this I am sitting in the AB cafe after putting away a large meal. The rest of the party has not arrived yet and it is already well after dark on Synday night. What's happened to them? 
-ain and got bowled by a car. + 
-When we reached Mittagong on Friday night we picked up our bikes which had been sent down on Wednesday night and then had a meal at Charlie'​s. +It all started a few weeks before our planned Mittagong-Katoomba bike trip. People were combing the dumps looking for old bikes and overhauling others. Also people were practicing for the big event. Margaret pulled a ligament in her knee on a practice run, Dave Rostron sprained an ankle when he had 15 punctures and the back wheel fell off. By the time of the trip the number ​had dropped from about 30 to a mere dozen keen bodsAnother (Jack Pettigrew) ​dropped out when he was riding his bike to Central to catch the train and got bowled by a car. 
-When we came out of the cafe it was raining hard and the party was debating the merits of such a trip. Eventually we were mounted up and away down + 
-the highway ​rith water splashing up from the road the trail of flickering bike torches sped down the hill only to walk up the other side. +When we reached Mittagong on Friday night we picked up our bikes which had been sent down on Wednesday night and then had a meal at Charlie'​s. When we came out of the cafe it was raining hard and the party was debating the merits of such a trip. Eventually we were mounted up and away down the highway. With water splashing up from the road the trail of flickering bike torches sped down the hill only to walk up the other side. 
-By the time we reached the 7ombeyan ​Caves turnoff the rain had almost stopped (we were getting into the Warragamba Catchment Area). Good time was made along the Wombeyan Caves road and soon we came to the 7anganderry + 
-14. The Sydney Bushwalker June, 1966 +By the time we reached the Wombeyan ​Caves turnoff the rain had almost stopped (we were getting into the Warragamba Catchment Area). Good time was made along the Wombeyan Caves road and soon we came to the Wanganderry ​turnoff. It just so happens ​that this turnoff is on the steepest down hill yet encountered on this road and when I yelled to stop there was a smell of burning sandshoesJust then Bob Smith topped the rise and came hurtling down yelling "No brakes"​There was a great crash and the next thing we saw was Bob hurtling 20 feet into the air. We picked him up from the gutter, ​dazed but not hurt. While we were fixing his bike the local farmer came along and we got talking to him. He suggested that we sleep in his wool shed. His idea was quickly accepted and we followed him up to the house. On the way from the gate to the house we seemed to have lost 2 bodsWe went out to search and found 3 of them. 
-turnoff. It just so happends ​that this turnoff is on the steepest down hill yet encountered on this road and when I yelled to stop there was a + 
-smell of burning sandshoes Just then Bob Smith topped the rise and came hurtling down yelling "No brakes"​There was a great crash and the +The farmer was very hospitable and we were invited in for a cup of tea. As we sat around the fire they served up with hot drinks, chips, biscuits and cake. We sat around talking until 2 a.m. How can a leader be expected to keep his party going with hospitality like this? We slept on bales of wool and hay in the shod and in the morning nobody wanted to get up. Eventually we got away at about 8 a.m., but no sooner had we gone more than 100 yards when Bob Smith got a puncture. In due time we arrived at Burnt Flat Creek where we had breakfast. We had to wheel our bikes down Burnt Flat Creek and at the bottom ​got a puncture. By this time people were beginning to think that the trip was not possible as it was already about 11 a.m. and we had only come a couple of miles. At this stage Paul Hinkley brought out a little sign which read "​Katoombe ​and/​or ​Bust" and tied it onto the back of his bike. A little further on Bob Smith had more trouble with his bike and Tony Dinch remained with him to help with repairs while the others pushed onThis is when Ganderpipe came out with his classic statement - "You can get spread out on a trip like this". Little did he realize what was to come. 
-next thing we saw was Bob hurtling 20 feet into the air. 7e picked him up from the gutter, ​dzed but not hurt, Thile we were fixing his bike the + 
-local farmer came along and we got talking to him. He suggested that we sleep in his wool shed. His idea was quickly accepted and we followed him up to the house. On the xay from the gate to the house we seemed to have lost 2 hods7e went out to search and found 3 of them. +We made good time across the "​Dilly"​ and up the steep walk on the other side. The others caught us up at lunch in Burnes ​Creek. We then pushed our bikes up the long drawn out hills to Yerranderie. Here there was rebellion in the party and most of them camped in the old Hotel while Roger, Rona, Doone and myself pushed on to Byrnes Gap. 
-The farmer was very hospitable and we were invited in for a cup of + 
-tea. As we sat around the fire they served up with hot drinks, chips, biscuits and cake. 7e sat around talking until 2 a m. How can a leader be expected to keep his party going with hospitality like this? We slept on bales of wool and hay in the shod and in the morning nobody wanted to get up. Eventually we got away at about 8 a m., but no sooner had we gone +Next morning we were up at first light and away an hour later. ​We had to go down and up a few valleys before we reached Scott'​s Main Range proper. ​When we were just about on top my bike broke down beyond repair. There was nothing else to do but leave it there. While we were taking the tubes out, Fonny, ​Bob Smith and Alan Pike caught up to us and took more parts. I started walking but was quickly over-taken by the riders as we were now on easy riding country. Not long afterwards Dot and the rest of the party also passed meIt looked like I would be back well behind the others as the cyclists were going much faster than me. 
-more than 100 yards when Bob Smith got a puncture. In due time we arrived at Burnt Flat Creek where we had breakfast. We had to wheel our bikes down Burnt Flat Creek and at the bottom ​got a puncture. By this time people were beginning to think that the trip waw not possible as it was + 
-already about 11 a m. and we had only come a couple of miles. At this +Just as I was getting very weary I stumbled into the Catholic Bushies hut for a drink. ​When I got nearer the hut I heard a rumpus coming from inside and saw a load of bikes parked outside. What I heard was actually old time dance music coming from a record playerInside I found 5 cyclists making merry and stuffing themselves with food. They fed me with some soup and coffee and I was on my way again. 
-stage Paul Hinkley brought out a little sign which read iTATOOMBA ​and/​or ​BUST" and tiedit onto the back of his bike. A little further on Bob Smith + 
-had more trouble with his bike and firony ​Dinch remained with him to help with repairs while the others pushed on This is when Ganderpipe came out with his classic statement - "You can get spread out on a trip like this". +I had only gone a few miles when I heard a rattle of bikes behind me and the party came streaking by again. However I caught them up on top of Mt. Cookem where the road runs out. From the top of Cookem I gave a "​Dayo"​ and received answers from all over the valleyI then headed down the track which looked like an elephant trail, the others wheeling their bikes down behind me. I had only gone a short distance when I met Brian Harding who had come up looking for us. He then told me his story. He had been out on a day walk and was sitting by the Cox's River waiting for us when a rock came rolling over a cliff on the opposite side of the river. Following the rock came a bicycle and following the bicycle came a bod. The first of the party had arrived at the Cox's River! 
-Little did he realize what was to come. + 
-We made good time across the "​Dilly"​ and up the steep walk on the +Brian and I then went down to the river and cut up to the White Dog Road on the other side. We could only see two sets of wheel tracks going up, but continued up to Brian'​s car at Medlow ​Gap. There was still no one in sight so we drove back to Katoomba. We have just finished our meal and being a good leader who always looks after his party I think we will go out to the end of Narrow Neck and see if anyone ​is coming in. 
-other side. The others caught us up at lunchin Barnes ​Creek. We then pushed our bikes up the long drawn oat hills to Yerranderie. Here thare was rebellion in the party ana most of them camped in the old Hotel while Roger, Rona, Doone and myself pushed on to -Byrnes Gap. + 
-Next morning we were up at first light and away an hour later. ​we had to go down and up a few valleys before we reached Scott'​s Main Range proper. ​Mien we were just about on top my bike broke down beyond repair. There was nothing else to do but leave it there. While we were taking the tubes out, Fonny, ​Doi Smith and Alan Pike caught up tb us and took more parts. I started walking but was quickly over-taken by the riders as we were now +===Postscript.=== 
-on easy riding country. Not long afterwards Dot and the rest of the party + 
-also passed meIt looked like I would be back well behind the others as the cyclists were going much faster than me. +We did find some one coming in along Narrow ​Neck. First came my brother, Doone, who had pulled his bike up Taro's ladders on a piece of string and rode in along the Neck. He was closely followed by Roger who had thrown his bike away at Medlow Gap and walked along the Neck. Roger was closely followed by John Scott who had walked the whole distance from Mittagong ​to Katoomba. As there was no sign of anyone ​else we went home. 
-Just as I was getting very weary I stumbled into the Catholic Bushies + 
-hut for a drink. ​when I got nearer the hut I heard a rumpus coming from inside and saw a load of bikes parked outside. What I heard was actually old time +Next day at work I got a phone call from Fonny Dinch to tell us that Bob Smith, Alan Pike, Rona Butler and himself had arrived ​home at 5 a.m. that morning. Apparently they thought that since the leader wasn't there they could have three hours for lunch. This time they spent at the bottom of the White Dog Road and we had passed them by cutting up the ridge. 
-dance music coming from a record playerInside I found 5 cyclists making merry and stuffing themselves with food. They fed me with some soup and + 
-coffee and I was on my way again. +When they eventually dragged themselves away from the lunch spot they pushed ​their bikes up to Medlow  ​Gap which they reached just on nightfall. Being a keen party they pushed on up Deberts Knob, then pulled their bikes up Taro'​s ​ladders ​in the darkDot and the rest of the party stayed at Medlow ​Gap for the night and came out next morning. 
-June, 1966 The Sydney. Bushwalker 15. + 
-I had only gone a few miles when I hear d a rattle of bikes behind me and the-'party came streaking by again. However I caught them up on top of Mt. Cookem wherethe road runs out. From the top of Cookem I gave a "​Dayo"​ and received answers from all over the valley I then headed down the track which looked like an elephant trail, the others wheeling their bikes down behind me. I had only gone a short distance when I met Brian Harding who had come up looking for us. He then told me his story. He had been out on a day walk and was sitting by the Cox 's River waiting for us when a rock came rolling over a cliff on the opposite side of the river. Following the rock came a bicycle and following the bicycle came a bod. The first of the party hadarrived at the Cox 's River! +---- 
-Brian and I then went down to the river and cut up to the White Dog Road on the other side. We could only see two sets of wheel tracks going up, but continued up to Brian'​s car at liEedlow ​Gap. There was still no one in sight so we drove back to Katoomba. We have just finished our meal and being a good leader who always looks after his party I think we will goout to the end of Narrow Neck and see if ahyone ​is coming in. + 
-Postscript. +A certain character who runs a garage-cafe ​in walking country was telling us about the various groups who passed his wayandhe was __not__ ​joking. 
-wu + 
-lid find some one coming in along Narro w Neck. First came my brother, Doone, who had pulled his bike up Taro's ladders on a piece of string androde in along the Neck. He was closely followed by Roger who had thrown his bike away at Medlow Gap and walked along the Neck. ROger was closely followed by John Scott who had walked the whole distance from Mitta6,​rong ​to Katoomba. As there was no sign of else we went home. +"Yes, we've even had the Out of Bounds Movement."​ "​Don'​t you mean the Outward Bound Movement",​ we said. "Yes, that's right, the Out of Bounds Movement."​ 
-, - + 
-Next clay -at work I got a phone call from gronny ,​Pinch ​to tell us that Bob Smith, Alan Pike, Rona Butler and himself had arrived ​horn at 5 a m. that morning. Apparently they thought that since the leader wasn't there they could have three hours for lanch.. This time they spent at the bottom of the +Wonder what he calls the S.B.W? 
-White Dog Roadand we had passed them by cutting up the ridge. + 
-When they eventually ​'dragged themselves ​'away from the lunch spot they pushed-Aheir- ​bikes up to Medlow  ​GaP which they reached just on ilightfall. Being a keen party they pushedon up Deberts Knob, then pulled theirbikes +---- 
-up Taro'​s ​lad c3Rra in the darkDot and the rest of the party stayed at M.edlow ​Gap for the nightand came out next morn ing-- + 
-.....M.11 +=====Profile Of Bushwalker - No. 1 "Tarro".===== 
-A certain character who runs a garageCafe ​in walking:country was telling us abouf the various groups who passed ​'his ityand:​he ​was not joking. ​. -  ​ + 
-"Yes, we've even had the Out of Bounds Movement."​ "​Don'​t you mean the Outward Bound Movement",​ we said. "Yes, that's right*, the Out of Bounds Movement."​ +By Alan Rigby. 
-Wonder what he calls the S.B. + 
-mr.100 +"Who is Sylvia?"​ The opening ​question of that beautiful song by Schubert could also be asked of "​Tarro"​. 
-16. The Sydney Buhwalker June, 1966 + 
-PROFILE OF BUSH7ALKER  ​No. 1.  ​"TARRO". By Alan Rigby. +"Who is Tarro, whence came he?" There must be a great number of Sydney Bushwalkers, ​and other walkers too, who are vividly aware of that amazing person but have no idea of his background. To them he is a living legend. Those who have walked with him, camped with him, talked with him and listened to the music from his flute at the campfire remember him as an ever-refreshing ​and unforgetable character. 
-"Mc is Sylvia?"​ The oeping ​question of that beautiful song by Schubert could also be asked of "​Tarro"​. + 
-"Who is Tarro, whence came he?" There must be a great number of +In mortal years "​Tarro"​ is old but in spirit and manner he is eternally young. He saw twenty one years of the last century, all the boundless days of young manhood. He can recall an immense amount of facts about the Sydney of those far away days, of people, buildings, theatre, and so on, and his reminiscences are well worth listening to. 
-Sydney Bushwalkers, ​a_nd other walkers too, who are vividly aware of that amazing person but have no idea of his background. To them he is a living legend. Those who have walked with him, camped with him, talked with him + 
-and listened to the music from his flute at the campfire remember him as an everrefreshing ​and unforgetable character. +I have known him for over fifty years and have been in close contact through that time. When I first met him he was a black-haired, lean and vigorous young man in his early thirties. And now, an individualist,​ an original thinker with quite a formidable personality. By occupation a first rate painter and signwriter, a craftsman who loved his work. Just take a walk around the city with him and he will point out existing examples of that ancient craft done in his younger days. Born on 23rd of June, 1879, Tarro is one of a family of eight children, two girls and six boys. Of the eight one sister and three brothers (four all toldare still living. I remember his parents well, particularly his wonderful mother. She was over 90 when she died and I had the rare proviledge of writing a letter of congratulations to her on her 90th birthday. 
-In mortal years "​Tarro"​ is old but in spirit and manner he is eternally + 
-young. He saw twenty one years of the last century, all the boundless days of young manhood. He can recall-an immense amount of facts about the Sydney of those far away days, of people, buildings, theatre, and so on, and his reminiscences are well worth listening to. +Tarro'​s home is, as one would expect, quite different from any other home. It is full of gadgets, levers to open the front door of the seven foot fence that surrounds his grounds, a domed ceiling over a twenty foot square room, with a ten by ten room at each corner, but not divided off from the main room. Various alterations were made over the years and one is an upstairs lookout platform, partly covered. Here he sleeps, that is if one can imagine such a man sleeping. From this lookout there is a clear view to the mountains, and various points such as Clear Hill may be picked out. Indeed, on trips to Clear Hill it would be arranged with someone ​at his home to flash a mirror at a given hour and we would flash back. 
-I have known him for over fifty years and have been in close contact through that time. When I first met him he was a blackhaired, lean and vigorous young man in his early thirties. And now, an individualist,​ an + 
-original thinker with quite a formidable personality. By occupation a first rate painter and signwriter, a craftsman who loved his work. Just take a walk around the city with him and he will point out existing examples of that ancient craft done in his younger days. Born on 23rd of June, 1879, Tarro is one of a family of eight children, two girls and six boys. Of the eight one sister and three brothers (four all told are still living. I remember +The grounds are surrounded by a seven foot fence of fine corrugated iron, with entrance by a panelled door. This is secured by a Yale lock and one signals desire for entrance by pressing a bell button, whereon the door will swing silently open with never a soul in sight. It is all done with levers from any part of the house. Consequently he is never bothered by hawkers. The name of the house is "​Voltaire",​ which indicated to soul-saving parsons that their time weuld be wasted. (For further elucidation read Voltaire'​s "​Candide"​ and other stories and essays.) In short Tarro valued his time and seclusion. In the grounds ​he maintained a well-equipped workshop and there were few tasks from expert tin-smithing to tent-making that he did not master. He is a first-class "​gadgeteer"​ with a cunning sense of invention. Highly ​skilled ​in woodwork, he has made many exquisite pieces. 
-his parents well, particularly his wonderful mother. She was over 90 when + 
-she died and I had the rare proviledge of writing-a letter of congratulations to her on her 90th birthday. +As both of us were keen cyclists, we did many rides together, and for many years he celebrated his birthday on the nearest Sunday by riding one hundred miles in the day and on a great number of "century"​ runs I was his partner. The usual run was Auburn to Bulli Lookout and back and then five miles to Parramatta and back to make the exact hundred miles. He still rides the same bicycle, a Canadian ​"​Red-bird"​ that is as hard-wearing as himself. 
-Tarro'​s home is, as one would expect, quite different from any other home. It is full of gadgets, levers to open the front door of the seven foot fence that surrounds his grounds, a domed ceiling over a twenty foot square room, with a ten by ten room at each corner, but not divided off from the main room. Various alterations were made over the years and one is + 
-an upstairs lookout platform, partly covered. Here he sleeps, that is if one can imagine such a man sleeping. From this lookout there is a clear +In 1921 a change came to my life that was to have profound effect on Tarro'​s. In that year I met Myles J. Dunphy and as the result of a two weeks' ​bushwalk that Christmas ​(my first) I was invited to join the Mountain Trails Club of N.S.W. Following ​a number of walks to Era, Burning Palms, Garie, untouched paradise in those days, I invited Tarro and his son Ben to go with me to Clear Hill on the October holiday. It should be remembered that in those days there were no maps, no tracks, no walkers in general, and of course no Paddy Pallin and his lightweight walking gear. Tarro was an expert camper; he maintained ​a permanent camp at Clovelly for years (can you imagine that today?) but had done no bushwalking. The Tarrs' packs were, I think, ex army haversacks and mine was a swag type designed by Myles Dunphy ​and Bert Gallop and called the "​Dungalla"​. ​We arrived at Katoomba ​by the early morning paper train. It is hard to believe it now, but we caused some amazement at that town and some fifty or more people followed us a long way toward Narrow Neck. They had never seen walkers before. 
-view to the mountains, and various points such as Clear Hill mFifr be picked out. Indeed, on trips to Clear Hill it would be arranged with domeone ​at his home to flash a mirror at a given hour and we would flash back. + 
-The grounds are surrounded by a seven foot fence of fine corrugated iron, with entrance by a panelled door. This is securedby a Yale lock and one signals desire for entrance by pressing a bell button, whereon the +Thus was Tarr introduced to walking and when the S.B.W. came into being in 1927 he was in the first group of enthusiastic members. Here he made many friends and his personality developed and blossomed. I think that it is safe to say that this had a profound effect on him, as he met a very wide variety of people from many walks of life. 
-door will swing silently open with never a soul in sight. It is all done + 
-with levers from any part of the house. Consequently he is never bothered by hawkers. The name of the house if "​Voltaire",​ which indicated to soul- +On the Clear Hill trip his gadgeteering ​mind set to work on packs. The rucksak ​was not here then. After many experiments his ultimate was a pack with a moulded plywood back to which the harness and bags were attached. This pack had many innovations and like its owner, was unique. He made a pack for me to my own idea and used his cane frame idea on it. To test this pack he carried the original Tarro'​s Ladder, together with his camping gear to Clear Hill where he erected the ladder. 
-June, 1966 The Sydney Dushwalker 17. + 
-saving parsons that their time weuld be wasted. (For further elucidation read Voltaire'​s "​Candide"​ and ether stories and essays.) In short Tarro valued his time and seclusion. In the grovLds ​he maintained a well-equipped workshop and there were few tasks from expert tin-smithing to +There is one word that is the key to Tarro'​s nature, that word is "​Enthusiasm"​. Enthusiasm is the base of everything that he does, and of everything that he says. Behind it all he has a will of iron, his life is disciplined and to some people, spartan. He will not waste time on things of little interest, but on the other hand he finds enormous interest in little things, to such an end he made his "​Viewascope",​ a device with which to study the tiny, hidden beauty in the heart of a flower. His interests ​are very wide. He has an immense knowledge of music, a keen follower of ballet, opera, the stage, a fine sense of history and a keen and unusual reader. He is by far the fastest reader whom I know, and few can as quickly digest the contents of a book. Among the earlier interests was photography,​ especially stereoscopic photography. 
-tent-making that he did not master. He is a first-class "​gadgeteer"​ with + 
-a cunning sense of invention. Highly ​Skilled ​in woodwork, he has made many exquisite pieces. +Tarro made history in the Thirties, by becoming "​lost"​ near the foot of Mt. Mouin. That did not matter so much, but he had all of our best girls with him and a large and anxious party searched all night around the gullies and gorges and the Glens of Guess looking for them. They turned up all right next morning and eventually a song was written to celebrate the happening. 
-As both of us were keen cyclists, we did many rides together, and for many years he celebrated his birthday on the nearest Sunday by riding +
-one hundred miles in the day and on a groat number of century " runs I was his partner. The usual run was Auburn to Dulli Lookout and back and then five miles to Parramatta and back to make the exact hundred miles. He still rides the same bicycle, a CanaJlian ​"​Red-bird"​ that is as hard- wearing as himself. +
-In 1921 a change came to my life that was to have profound effect on Tarrels. In that year I met Myles J. Dunphy and as the result of a two weeks bushwalk that Christmaz ​(my-first) I was invited to join the Mountain Trails Club of N.S.7, pllowing ​a number of walks to Era, Burning Palms, Garie, untouched paradise in those days, I invited Tarro an-1 his son Ben to go with me to Clear Hill on the October holiday. It should be remembered that in those daYs there were no maps, no tr[oks, no walkers in +
-general, and of course no Paddy Pallin and his lightweight walking gear. Tarro was an expert' ​camper ; he maintrdned ​a permanent camp at Clovelly for years (can you imagine that today?) but had done no bushwalking. The Tarrs' packs were, I think, ex army haversacks and mine was a swag type designedby Myles Dunehy ​and Bert Gallop and called the "​Dungalla"​. ​Te +
-arrivedat Xatoomba ​by the early morning paper train. It is hard to believe it now, but we caused some amazement at that town and some fifty +
-or more people followed us a long way toward Narrow Neck. They had never seen walkers before. +
-Thus was Tarr introduced to walking and when the S.D.7. came into +
-being in 1927 he was in the first group of enthusiastic members. Here +
-he made many friends and his personality developed and blossomed. I think that it is safe to say that this had a profound effect on him, as he met a very wide variety of people from many walks of life. +
-On the Clear Hill trip his gadget coring ​mind set to work on packs. +
-The rudksak ​was not here then. After many experiments his ultimate was a pack with a moulded plywood back to which the harness and bags were attached. This pack had many innovations and like its owner, was unique. He made a pack for me to my own idea and used his cane frame idea on it. To test this pack he carried the original Tarro'​s Ladder, together with his camping gear to Clear Hill where he erected the ladder. +
-There is one word that is the key to Tarro'​s nature, that wedis "​Enthusiasm"​. Enthusiasm is the base of everything that he does, and of everything that he says. Behind it all he has a will of iron, his life is +
-18The Sydney Dushwalker June, 1966 +
-disCiplin6d ald to sOme Peopie; '​s'​Pa:​Xtan: ​He will not waste time on things of little interest, but on the other hand he finds enormous interest in little things, to such an end he made his "​Viewascope",​ a device with which to study the tiny, hidden beauty in the heart of a flower. His tam-rests ​are very wide. He has an immense knowledge of music, a keen follower of ballet, opera, the stage, a fine sense of history and a keen and unusual' ​reader. He is by far the fastest reader whom I know, and few can as quickly digest the contents of a book. Among the earlier interests was photography,​ especially stereoscopic photography. +
-Tarro made history in the Thirties, by becoming "​lost"​ near the foot of Mt. Houin. That did not matter so much, but he had all of our best girls with him and a large and anxious party searched all night around the gullies and gorges and the Glens of Guess looking for them. They turned up all right next morning and eventually a song was written to celebrate +
-the happening.+
 He loved Clear Hill and in fact gave himself the title of "The Duke of Clear Hill", which stuck to him for many years. He loved Clear Hill and in fact gave himself the title of "The Duke of Clear Hill", which stuck to him for many years.
-Tralkers come and go, but the true walkers retain their love of the bush, the memory of their companions and the campfires at night, the sight of sparks leaping to join the myriad stars in the velvet dark sky, of the 
-murmuring stream and the soft sigh of the night breeze through the casuarina 
-needles and whenever I sit by my campfire I just wish to hear again the haunting music of Tarro'​s flute. 
-,​m41....4.11,​1111=11:​11= 
-FEDERATION REPORT - MAY. 
-Search and Rescue Section Practice 7eekend: This excursion will be held on 
-July 16/17. Details will be made available later. Colin Putt is acting Rs 
-Field Officer. 
-Black Jerry'​s Ridge: The Department of Lands advised that the use of the 
-road is leg1 as it was provided for in the original survey. A copy of the District Map is being obtained and the matter will be further investigated. 
-Colong Caves: It was advised that an iron gateway had been erected in the area known as "Kings Cross",​ but it was not known with whose authority. As the caves are in Crown Land further enquirie are being made. 
-Sydney University Rock-Climbing Club: This Club is desirous of affiliating with the Federation. A sub-committee was appointed to report back on its eligibility. 
-Federation Pall: This function will be held at Paddington Town Hall on 
-September 9. Clubs are requested to keep the date before members by means of Club Magazines and general announcement. Tickets are $2.50 single, $5 double. A new band is to be engaged and prizes awarded for table decorations on a selected theme. 
-June, 1966 The Sydny Dushwalker 19. 
- ... 
-     . 
-Power Line in Mt. Irvine Area: The Conservation Dureau announced that a move was on foot to erect a power line which would probably entail destruction of bushland. The purpose waS to pump water from wollangaMbe Creek. 
-Blue Mountains National Park: A move is afoot to have the whole area declared a wild Life,​Refuge. The Trust announced that two fires had been started in the Park by firework. The Trust and the Federation is becoming increasingly concerned at the greater number of fireworks being exploded in bushal nd areas. The Park by-laws prohibit the use of fireworks. Club members are requested to police Blue Gum Forest Area for this menace. 
-Heathcote Primitive AreaA, Er. Paul Barnes announced that a Trust Ranger had been attracted by the explosion of bungers. He found they were being exploded by fcAlr Scouts because they were lost on Heathcote Creek, and wished to attract attention. 
-Darrinpton Tops Area:. It. was learned that a forest of 16,000 pine seedling was ab3ut to be plantdd-by'​the Forestry Commission, to which a letter has been addressed_seekig information as,to,the location of the State Forest. 
-Otford: It is reported intense drives -are being made for permission to establish a coal mine in this area, which may penetrate under Royal National Park, with ventilation shafts. 
-Natural Gas Pipeline, A warning was issued that the proposal to pipe gas from Victoria may encroach on existing reserves. Any new survey marks should be reported to the Federation for investigation,​ irrespective of location. 
-Orienteering Competition:​ Forms are available at Paddy Pallin'​s shop. This innovation should prove to be very enjoyable. Prizes are offered. 
-Radio Fie: This function will be held at Et. Kur-Ring-Gai on Sunday, June 5. 9.30 a.M. train from Hornsby This is an important adjunct to 
-S R. operations. 
-waratah Festival: An investigation is being made on the possibilities of a display on the 1967 Festival Parade. 
-HOw DO YOUR TRIPS SCORE? 
-Ross wyborn. Compare the trip you lead or go on by the table below. 
-1. No. of People on Trip. 1 point per person (females 2 points: 
-2. No;. of Days Overdue 10 points per person per Day. 
-3. People Lost On Trip 5 points per person per day. 
-4. Bungles in Map Reading. 5 points per bungle. 
-20. The Sydney Bushwalker June9 1966 
-5. No of Publicly Known Dludgers 2 points per Dludger. 
-6. No. of Lost Cars 10 points per Oar. 
-7. Car Swap Trips 20 points 
-8. Lost Leader (i e. separated from party. 10 points per day. 
-9. Impossible Route Selected 10 points. 
-10. Arrival Home on Monday Morning. 2 points per hour after midnight. 
-11. Trip Not completed Due to !Mite Ants. 10 Points 
-12. Angle of Campsite 2 points forevery degree over 450  
-Here is how it works: Example. Mittagong ​ Katoomba Dike Trip. 
-Points. Fill in Your Score. 
-No. of people ​ 11 men 2 women 15 
-5 people overdue 1 day 50 
-2 people lost day 5 
-Map Reading Bungles No Map Anyway. 
-No. of lost cars  
-Car Swap trip  
-Lost Loader ​ 1 day 10 
-Impossible Route Selected 10 
-Those not overdue got home 5 a m. 10 Trip was completed 
-.01.1171...711 
-Total 1007 
-0 0 0 0  0   0 
-P  0   ​0 ​  0 
- 0 0    ​ 
- ​0 ​ 0 0 0 0 C.  
-CnE  SCORE 
-0  20  May as well have stayed home. 
-20  40  Could have gone on a Kameruka trip. 40  60  Typical S.B.T. Trip. 
-60  100  A mighty trip (could only be a S.P.7. trip). 
-greattr that 100  still recovering (could only be a 7bssiborn trip). 
  
 +Walkers come and go, but the true walkers retain their love of the bush, the memory of their companions and the campfires at night, the sight of sparks leaping to join the myriad stars in the velvet dark sky, of the murmuring stream and the soft sigh of the night breeze through the casuarina needles and whenever I sit by my campfire I just wish to hear again the haunting music of Tarro'​s flute.
 +
 +----
 +
 +=====Federation Report - May.=====
 +
 +===Search and Rescue Section Practice Weekend:===
 +
 +This excursion will be held on July 16/17. Details will be made available later. Colin Putt is acting as Field Officer.
 +
 +===Black Jerry'​s Ridge:===
 +
 +The Department of Lands advised that the use of the road is legal as it was provided for in the original survey. A copy of the District Map is being obtained and the matter will be further investigated.
 +
 +===Colong Caves:===
 +
 +It was advised that an iron gateway had been erected in the area known as "Kings Cross",​ but it was not known with whose authority. As the caves are in Crown Land further enquiries are being made.
 +
 +===Sydney University Rock-Climbing Club:===
 +
 +This Club is desirous of affiliating with the Federation. A sub-committee was appointed to report back on its eligibility.
 +
 +===Federation Ball:===
 +
 +This function will be held at Paddington Town Hall on September 9. Clubs are requested to keep the date before members by means of Club Magazines and general announcement. Tickets are $2.50 single, $5 double. A new band is to be engaged and prizes awarded for table decorations on a selected theme.
 +
 +===Power Line in Mt. Irvine Area:===
 +
 +The Conservation Bureau announced that a move was on foot to erect a power line which would probably entail destruction of bushland. The purpose was to pump water from Wollangambe Creek.
 +
 +===Blue Mountains National Park:===
 +
 +A move is afoot to have the whole area declared a Wild Life Refuge. The Trust announced that two fires had been started in the Park by fireworks. The Trust and the Federation is becoming increasingly concerned at the greater number of fireworks being exploded in bushland areas. The Park by-laws prohibit the use of fireworks. Club members are requested to police Blue Gum Forest Area for this menace.
 +
 +===Heathcote Primitive Area:===
 +
 +Mr. Paul Barnes announced that a Trust Ranger had been attracted by the explosion of bungers. He found they were being exploded by four Scouts because they were lost on Heathcote Creek, and wished to attract attention.
 +
 +===Barrington Tops Area:===
 +
 +It was learned that a forest of 16,000 pine seedling was about to be planted by the Forestry Commission, to which a letter has been addressed seekig information as to the location of the State Forest.
 +
 +===Otford:​===
 +
 +It is reported intense drives are being made for permission to establish a coal mine in this area, which may penetrate under Royal National Park, with ventilation shafts.
 +
 +===Natural Gas Pipeline:​===
 +
 +A warning was issued that the proposal to pipe gas from Victoria may encroach on existing reserves. Any new survey marks should be reported to the Federation for investigation,​ irrespective of location.
 +
 +===Orienteering Competition:​===
 +
 +Forms are available at Paddy Pallin'​s shop. This innovation should prove to be very enjoyable. Prizes are offered.
 +
 +===Radio Field Day:===
 +
 +This function will be held at Mt. Kur-Ring-Gai on Sunday, June 5. 9.30 a.m. train from Hornsby. This is an important adjunct to S & R. operations.
 +
 +===Waratah Festival:​===
 +
 +An investigation is being made on the possibilities of a display on the 1967 Festival Parade.
 +
 +----
 +
 +=====How Do Your Trips Score?=====
 +
 +Ross Wyborn.
 +
 +Compare the trip you lead or go on by the table below.
 +
 +|1. No. of People on Trip|1 point per person (females 2 points).|
 +|2. No. of Days Overdue|10 points per person per Day.|
 +|3. People Lost On Trip|5 points per person per day.|
 +|4. Bungles in Map Reading|5 points per bungle.|
 +|5. No. of Publicly Known Bludgers|2 points per Bludger.|
 +|6. No. of Lost Cars|10 points per Car.|
 +|7. Car Swap Trips|20 points.|
 +|8. Lost Leader (i.e. separated from party)|10 points per day.|
 +|9. Impossible Route Selected|10 points.|
 +|10. Arrival Home on Monday Morning|2 points per hour after midnight.|
 +|11. Trip Not completed Due to White Ants|10 Points.|
 +|12. Angle of Campsite|2 points forevery degree over 45°.| ​
 +
 +Here is how it works: Example. Mittagong - Katoomba Bike Trip.
 +
 +| |__Points.__|__Fill in Your Score.__|
 +|No. of people - 11 men 2 women|15|...|
 +|5 people overdue 1 day|50|...|
 +|2 people lost day|5|...|
 +|Map Reading Bungles|No Map Anyway|...|
 +|No. of lost cars| - |...|
 +|Car Swap trip| - |...|
 +|Lost Loader ​ 1 day|10|...|
 +|Impossible Route Selected|10|...|
 +|Those not overdue got home 5 a.m|10|...|
 +|Trip was completed| - |...|
 +|Total|100| |
 +
 +Code - Score
 +
 +0 - 20: May as well have stayed home.
 +
 +20 - 40: Could have gone on a Kameruka trip.
 +
 +40 - 60: Typical S.B.W. Trip.
 +
 +60 - 100: A mighty trip (could only be a S.B.W. trip).
 +
 +Greater than 100|Still recovering (could only be a Wossiborn trip).
196606.txt · Last modified: 2016/08/09 06:28 by tyreless