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196604 [2016/07/29 03:46]
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196604 [2016/08/01 04:15] (current)
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 (c) Letters to the Editor. (These can be really stimulating!) (c) Letters to the Editor. (These can be really stimulating!)
  
-(d) Cartoons with a bushwaiking ​flavour.+(d) Cartoons with a bushwalking ​flavour.
  
 (e) General articles on topics that would appeal to bushwalking types. (e) General articles on topics that would appeal to bushwalking types.
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 Jim Brown. Jim Brown.
  
-It was 7.40 p.m. when the President called attention of the big business event of the year, the Annual General. There was one new member to welcome - David Constable - and enquiries to be made about two members elected during the year and not since sighted. One was remoured ​to be at Newcastle.+It was 7.40 p.m. when the President called attention of the big business event of the year, the Annual General. There was one new member to welcome - David Constable - and enquiries to be made about two members elected during the year and not since sighted. One was rumoured ​to be at Newcastle.
  
-After the minutes of the February meeting had been "​signed as a correct record"​ the President confessed that in fact he had signed them in error at the March Committee Meeting. The only business arising was advice that Federation had no plans at present for an Anzac Day ceremony at Splendour ​Rbck.+After the minutes of the February meeting had been "​signed as a correct record"​ the President confessed that in fact he had signed them in error at the March Committee Meeting. The only business arising was advice that Federation had no plans at present for an Anzac Day ceremony at Splendour ​Rock.
  
 Correspondence contained advice that a body known as Associated Sports Clubs was meeting on 15th March and hoped to arrange Club Rooms in the redevolopment of the Hotel Sydney, that Federation Reunion would be at Murphy'​s Glen (out of Woodford) and the proposed prison camp in the Newnes area would probably be near the "​Twelve Mile" on the plateau out from Newnes Junction. The National Trust was organising a seminar on bush fire control. Correspondence contained advice that a body known as Associated Sports Clubs was meeting on 15th March and hoped to arrange Club Rooms in the redevolopment of the Hotel Sydney, that Federation Reunion would be at Murphy'​s Glen (out of Woodford) and the proposed prison camp in the Newnes area would probably be near the "​Twelve Mile" on the plateau out from Newnes Junction. The National Trust was organising a seminar on bush fire control.
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 Presentation of the February financial statement, the first in dollars showed a commencing figure of $506, income of $37, expenditure of $162 and a concluding balance in the vicinity of $381 with the prospect of a healthy intake for a month or two. Presentation of the February financial statement, the first in dollars showed a commencing figure of $506, income of $37, expenditure of $162 and a concluding balance in the vicinity of $381 with the prospect of a healthy intake for a month or two.
  
-This took us to the utual suspension of standing orders to permit the election of Club officers while other business proceeded. The time honoured system of voting was adopted and old and trusted firm of scrutineers,​ Pallin (senior), Burke, Elfick and Gray were appointed, Eddie Stretton took post at the blackboard and we were away.+This took us to the usual suspension of standing orders to permit the election of Club officers while other business proceeded. The time honoured system of voting was adopted and old and trusted firm of scrutineers,​ Pallin (senior), Burke, Elfick and Gray were appointed, Eddie Stretton took post at the blackboard and we were away.
  
 A list of the officers is given elsewhere and it is sufficient to say that John White became the 21st President, and it looked for a while as though he might reign without a Keeper of Archives until at the very end of proceedings David Ingram was coaxed or coerced into the post of Secretary. A list of the officers is given elsewhere and it is sufficient to say that John White became the 21st President, and it looked for a while as though he might reign without a Keeper of Archives until at the very end of proceedings David Ingram was coaxed or coerced into the post of Secretary.
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 ---- ----
  
-=====Club ​Officiers ​1966-7.=====+=====Club ​Officers ​1966-7.=====
  
 |President|John White| |President|John White|
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 |Committee Members|1. Edna Stretton. 2. Sandra Bardwell. 3. Phil Butt. 4. Greg Reading| |Committee Members|1. Edna Stretton. 2. Sandra Bardwell. 3. Phil Butt. 4. Greg Reading|
 |Editor|Frank Rigby| |Editor|Frank Rigby|
-|Parks and Playgrnunds ​Delegate|Margaret Child|+|Parks and Playgrounds ​Delegate|Margaret Child|
 |Federation Delegates|1. David Ingram. 2. Alan Rigby. 3. Gordon Redmond. 4. Kerry Hore| |Federation Delegates|1. David Ingram. 2. Alan Rigby. 3. Gordon Redmond. 4. Kerry Hore|
 |Substitute Fed. Delegates|1. Brian Harvey. 2. Barbara Evans. 3. Phil Butt| |Substitute Fed. Delegates|1. Brian Harvey. 2. Barbara Evans. 3. Phil Butt|
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 Denise Hull. Denise Hull.
  
-(Denise was a very actve member of the Club until she took up an appointment at Wave Hill Station, as a Nursing Sister about 12 months ago. Her days of adventuring are far from over as you will see in this stirring tale - Editor).+(Denise was a very active ​member of the Club until she took up an appointment at Wave Hill Station, as a Nursing Sister about 12 months ago. Her days of adventuring are far from over as you will see in this stirring tale - Editor).
  
 The word had gone around that the Sister would like to visit the village "​local"​ which happened to be a mere 104 miles away from the station in question. Her three drinking mates decided that Anniversary Weekend was a suitable time for this event - their interest being solely to bring some variety into the Sister'​s life - __no__ thought occurred that that station had been "​dry"​ since New Year. That no one but tourists and idiots travelled in the Wet failed to deter them - and loaded with the customary equipment for a trip in The Territory - one water bag, a big mob of bread and salt beef, tea and sugar and cigarettes. With one eye on gathering clouds they set off after lunch on Saturday in the little jeep with the bore mechanic following in this Land Rover. The word had gone around that the Sister would like to visit the village "​local"​ which happened to be a mere 104 miles away from the station in question. Her three drinking mates decided that Anniversary Weekend was a suitable time for this event - their interest being solely to bring some variety into the Sister'​s life - __no__ thought occurred that that station had been "​dry"​ since New Year. That no one but tourists and idiots travelled in the Wet failed to deter them - and loaded with the customary equipment for a trip in The Territory - one water bag, a big mob of bread and salt beef, tea and sugar and cigarettes. With one eye on gathering clouds they set off after lunch on Saturday in the little jeep with the bore mechanic following in this Land Rover.
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 A room, quite comfortable,​ was forthcoming - recently built to comply with the licensing laws. But the door refused to close - much less lock - so the most sober member of the party undertook to sleep outside on the verandah - one is well looked after in the Territory. A room, quite comfortable,​ was forthcoming - recently built to comply with the licensing laws. But the door refused to close - much less lock - so the most sober member of the party undertook to sleep outside on the verandah - one is well looked after in the Territory.
  
-After a peaceful night and a substantial breakfast of eggs, sausages and lamb chops - none of these previously seen for months - and supplemented somewhat quaintly by slices of beetroot (perhaps it is a Territorian custom, I do not know) the two vehicles set off - heavily laden. We returned by the same road but the ruts seemed smoother somehow and the going merrier until we reached the Cam River - no mere creek now but a roaring torrent. There was nothing else for it but to camp for the night - 3 p.m. until 9 a.m. next morning, Monday. The load on the vehicles by this time was considerably 1ighter, the atmosphere one of the lighthearted approach to all problems. So the Land Rover set off first - and in a few yards bogged herself completely, ​irrevocbly ​and entirely in lovely sloshy mud. Jacks, bags and shovels were brought into play without avail - the jeep was too light to tow her out so finally returned to the property 10 miles back for help. A wait of 2 hours followed until the manager had returned from some part of his several thousand square miles of property - passed pleasantly by the others under the shade of a tree listening to the cricket scores while imbibing the odd tin of Tarax.+After a peaceful night and a substantial breakfast of eggs, sausages and lamb chops - none of these previously seen for months - and supplemented somewhat quaintly by slices of beetroot (perhaps it is a Territorian custom, I do not know) the two vehicles set off - heavily laden. We returned by the same road but the ruts seemed smoother somehow and the going merrier until we reached the Cam River - no mere creek now but a roaring torrent. There was nothing else for it but to camp for the night - 3 p.m. until 9 a.m. next morning, Monday. The load on the vehicles by this time was considerably 1ighter, the atmosphere one of the lighthearted approach to all problems. So the Land Rover set off first - and in a few yards bogged herself completely, ​irrevocably ​and entirely in lovely sloshy mud. Jacks, bags and shovels were brought into play without avail - the jeep was too light to tow her out so finally returned to the property 10 miles back for help. A wait of 2 hours followed until the manager had returned from some part of his several thousand square miles of property - passed pleasantly by the others under the shade of a tree listening to the cricket scores while imbibing the odd tin of Tarax.
  
 The River Cam was finally successfully negotiated - the opposite bank was a sheer perpendicular mud track. I am not quite clear how we managed that but make it we did about 4 p.m. The River Cam was finally successfully negotiated - the opposite bank was a sheer perpendicular mud track. I am not quite clear how we managed that but make it we did about 4 p.m.
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 On April 20 you will have a golden opportunity to hear a tale (illustrated with impressive slides) of raw pioneering adventure, told by one who thrives on the diet. Our own Colin Putt, a member of the now famous 1964-5 Heard Island Expedition, will take us along to the South Indian Ocean in the comfort of our Clubroom chairs. On April 20 you will have a golden opportunity to hear a tale (illustrated with impressive slides) of raw pioneering adventure, told by one who thrives on the diet. Our own Colin Putt, a member of the now famous 1964-5 Heard Island Expedition, will take us along to the South Indian Ocean in the comfort of our Clubroom chairs.
  
-On April 27 Mick Elfick will talk about "How to go about getting information to see if an area is suitable for a National Park" with illustrating slides of what happens when a davelopmental ​authority moves into an area.+On April 27 Mick Elfick will talk about "How to go about getting information to see if an area is suitable for a National Park" with illustrating slides of what happens when a developmental ​authority moves into an area.
  
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 On the Saturday morning we set out from Newnes to walk along the track, inspecting as we went various ruins of old buildings, some with a fireplace and chimney still intact. As we walked further we seemed to be climbing, where we should have still been following the river, so map consultation time was announced. The party rested while the experts consulted the map. The resultant discovery was that we were on the wrong side of the river, so it would be necessary to go down the hill into the valley and across the river onto the right side, where we should find the track. As we climbed down the hill through the scrub, lo and behold, we came upon an old galvanized iron bath tub. This was the cue for photographers in the group to bring out cameras to capture for posterity the portrait of our feerless leader reclining in the bath. Owen Marks, Order of the Bath, is his new title. On the Saturday morning we set out from Newnes to walk along the track, inspecting as we went various ruins of old buildings, some with a fireplace and chimney still intact. As we walked further we seemed to be climbing, where we should have still been following the river, so map consultation time was announced. The party rested while the experts consulted the map. The resultant discovery was that we were on the wrong side of the river, so it would be necessary to go down the hill into the valley and across the river onto the right side, where we should find the track. As we climbed down the hill through the scrub, lo and behold, we came upon an old galvanized iron bath tub. This was the cue for photographers in the group to bring out cameras to capture for posterity the portrait of our feerless leader reclining in the bath. Owen Marks, Order of the Bath, is his new title.
  
-Once on the other side, and following along the track we came upon a line of Processionary worms. These fascinating caterpillars,​ which are each about an inch in length, line up one behind another in a long row, and in this formation they march (they are also called army worms) along together. The line which we saw was about two feet long but this is by no means a long line. They are considered a pest by agriculturists,​ and can reach plague proportions,​ migrating from one area to another, eating crops as they go. As we stood there we became engrossed in a study of the social behaviour of these amazing insects. Someone wondered aloud what would happen if the leader of the procession were taken vay, and put on the end. This was duly done, and apparently the leader knew his place because he refused to follow along on the end of the line, and he simply curled up and stayed put. For a moment it looked as if the second worm was ready to take over the leadership, because the line kept moving ahead as before, but after a few moments panic seemed to hit the front ranks, and the second worm started to lead the line back along itself, evidently looking for the leader. Before the confusion became too great the leader was replaced to his rightful position, and without a great deal of fuss he had the line back in shape again. For a second time the leader was taken away for a more extended time. The front worms started wandering around in circles, completely lost, while further back, they kept moving up, quite oblivious of the confusion ahead. This spectacle put me in mind of motor vehicles on a highway, moving steadily towards a traffic jam, but interested only in moving forward. When all the caterpillars had caught up, they milled around in a big group, with the leader in the centre. Although I am not prepared to vouch for this, though it is stated by those more observant ones in our group, the meeting of the worms resulted in the election of a new leader, who reorganised the masses and led the community once again in a straight line in the direction of their goal. The deposed leader supposedly went to the third last position in the line. It was at this point that we left the worms to go in their direction while we followed ours. I think that a moral can be derived from this episode, so leaders take heed.+Once on the other side, and following along the track we came upon a line of Processionary worms. These fascinating caterpillars,​ which are each about an inch in length, line up one behind another in a long row, and in this formation they march (they are also called army worms) along together. The line which we saw was about two feet long but this is by no means a long line. They are considered a pest by agriculturists,​ and can reach plague proportions,​ migrating from one area to another, eating crops as they go. As we stood there we became engrossed in a study of the social behaviour of these amazing insects. Someone wondered aloud what would happen if the leader of the procession were taken away, and put on the end. This was duly done, and apparently the leader knew his place because he refused to follow along on the end of the line, and he simply curled up and stayed put. For a moment it looked as if the second worm was ready to take over the leadership, because the line kept moving ahead as before, but after a few moments panic seemed to hit the front ranks, and the second worm started to lead the line back along itself, evidently looking for the leader. Before the confusion became too great the leader was replaced to his rightful position, and without a great deal of fuss he had the line back in shape again. For a second time the leader was taken away for a more extended time. The front worms started wandering around in circles, completely lost, while further back, they kept moving up, quite oblivious of the confusion ahead. This spectacle put me in mind of motor vehicles on a highway, moving steadily towards a traffic jam, but interested only in moving forward. When all the caterpillars had caught up, they milled around in a big group, with the leader in the centre. Although I am not prepared to vouch for this, though it is stated by those more observant ones in our group, the meeting of the worms resulted in the election of a new leader, who reorganised the masses and led the community once again in a straight line in the direction of their goal. The deposed leader supposedly went to the third last position in the line. It was at this point that we left the worms to go in their direction while we followed ours. I think that a moral can be derived from this episode, so leaders take heed.
  
 Later, we inspected the remains of fifty or more kilns, which we supposed were used to heat the oil shale, which was mined in the district, in order to extract the oil. The Glen Davis-Newnes area was a large oil shale district, and indeed the last commercial oil shale mines in Australia were operated at Glen Davis until they were closed down in 1952. A report was published on the area entitled "​Newnes-Capertee Shale Oil Project"​ in 1934 and it was the result of findings of a Newnes Investigations Committee. The  railway to Newnes was closed down some time ago, and the rails have all been taken up. Later, we inspected the remains of fifty or more kilns, which we supposed were used to heat the oil shale, which was mined in the district, in order to extract the oil. The Glen Davis-Newnes area was a large oil shale district, and indeed the last commercial oil shale mines in Australia were operated at Glen Davis until they were closed down in 1952. A report was published on the area entitled "​Newnes-Capertee Shale Oil Project"​ in 1934 and it was the result of findings of a Newnes Investigations Committee. The  railway to Newnes was closed down some time ago, and the rails have all been taken up.
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 We followed more or less along the route of the river until we arrived at the junction with Rocky Greek, and it here that we camped for Saturday night The camping ​ spot was pleasant, but because of the dry weather the river was low, and there was no pool deep enough to have a good swim. We followed more or less along the route of the river until we arrived at the junction with Rocky Greek, and it here that we camped for Saturday night The camping ​ spot was pleasant, but because of the dry weather the river was low, and there was no pool deep enough to have a good swim.
  
-we were rather a lazy group, due to the weather that weekend or otherwise, and unfortunatelY insufficient adventurous spirit could be raised to return to Newnos ​via Rocky Creek, so it was decided that we would go back the easy way; that is the way we came.+we were rather a lazy group, due to the weather that weekend or otherwise, and unfortunatelY insufficient adventurous spirit could be raised to return to Newnes ​via Rocky Creek, so it was decided that we would go back the easy way; that is the way we came.
  
 As we passed the small farm in the valley on the way back, we noticed a magpie caught in the wire netting fence. Margaret and David did their good deed for the day, and their bit for conservation,​ by giving the bird a hearty drink of water, after which he had recovered sufficiently to hop to the shade of a tree to recuperate fully. As we passed the small farm in the valley on the way back, we noticed a magpie caught in the wire netting fence. Margaret and David did their good deed for the day, and their bit for conservation,​ by giving the bird a hearty drink of water, after which he had recovered sufficiently to hop to the shade of a tree to recuperate fully.
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 After numerous dips in the creek along the way, we arrived back at the cars for lunch, and a visit to the publican. The hotel is truly a quaint place, with its four ornate beer taps, coloured pink and cream, standing proudly along the bar. Around the walls hang little signs with witty slogans, not to mention the wonderful art treasures (?) which adorn any free space. In the hall is an old organ, which doesn'​t work, and a honky-tonk piano, which almost doesn'​t work. It was here that Owen entertained us with Bach's "​Sanctify Us By Thy Grace" and Margaret followed with a rendition of that much-loved familiar classic, "​Chopsticks"​. After numerous dips in the creek along the way, we arrived back at the cars for lunch, and a visit to the publican. The hotel is truly a quaint place, with its four ornate beer taps, coloured pink and cream, standing proudly along the bar. Around the walls hang little signs with witty slogans, not to mention the wonderful art treasures (?) which adorn any free space. In the hall is an old organ, which doesn'​t work, and a honky-tonk piano, which almost doesn'​t work. It was here that Owen entertained us with Bach's "​Sanctify Us By Thy Grace" and Margaret followed with a rendition of that much-loved familiar classic, "​Chopsticks"​.
  
-A trip to Newnes is not complete without a visit to the glow-worm tunnel, so after lunch we moved off in that direction. It is at this juncture that Fiorenzo Tarlao (ie. Enzo) made an appearance with his friend. To get to the tunnel, one must climb up a very steep hill, so Linda, Roland and Alan decided they couldn'​t face it, and stayed to look after the cars. The spectacle in the tunnel, in my opinion, is worth climbing up five hills to see. Millions of twinkling lights shine out like stars to give the impression that one is looking into the heavens, and with a good imagination,​ different constellations can be picked out. The Australian variety of glow-worms is closely related to the New Zealand variety, which is the larvae of a type of fly. They should not be confused with the European variety though, which is a bettle. No-one seems to be certain just what the purpose of the light is. In Europe it is said that only the female worms shine a light, and it is to attract the male of the species, which flies, but other theories give different ideas, one that the light attracts flying insects into a little net which the worms spins, for food.+A trip to Newnes is not complete without a visit to the glow-worm tunnel, so after lunch we moved off in that direction. It is at this juncture that Fiorenzo Tarlao (ie. Enzo) made an appearance with his friend. To get to the tunnel, one must climb up a very steep hill, so Linda, Roland and Alan decided they couldn'​t face it, and stayed to look after the cars. The spectacle in the tunnel, in my opinion, is worth climbing up five hills to see. Millions of twinkling lights shine out like stars to give the impression that one is looking into the heavens, and with a good imagination,​ different constellations can be picked out. The Australian variety of glow-worms is closely related to the New Zealand variety, which is the larvae of a type of fly. They should not be confused with the European variety though, which is a beetle. No-one seems to be certain just what the purpose of the light is. In Europe it is said that only the female worms shine a light, and it is to attract the male of the species, which flies, but other theories give different ideas, one that the light attracts flying insects into a little net which the worms spins, for food.
  
 After climbing down the hill we found that the ones who were looking after the cars had disappeared in one of them, to who knows where. While we sat down to wait for them, Enzo negotiated with Ramon to buy some petrol from him, since they were a bit low. Not until half of the can had been poured into the petrol tank, did Ramon discover that he had handed over the wrong can, containing water. The petrol tank was drained of water and refilled with petrol. Still there was no sign of the guardians of the cars. Greg and I decided to go since were were not needed and so did Ramon and his crew. Halfway up the hill we passed David and Ramon on the side of the road shoulder deep in a blackberry thicket, thoroughly gorging themselves. A pleasant ending to an enjoyable weekend it seemed. After climbing down the hill we found that the ones who were looking after the cars had disappeared in one of them, to who knows where. While we sat down to wait for them, Enzo negotiated with Ramon to buy some petrol from him, since they were a bit low. Not until half of the can had been poured into the petrol tank, did Ramon discover that he had handed over the wrong can, containing water. The petrol tank was drained of water and refilled with petrol. Still there was no sign of the guardians of the cars. Greg and I decided to go since were were not needed and so did Ramon and his crew. Halfway up the hill we passed David and Ramon on the side of the road shoulder deep in a blackberry thicket, thoroughly gorging themselves. A pleasant ending to an enjoyable weekend it seemed.
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 By Observer By Observer
  
-One of the funniest sights of the Reunion weekend was Alan Round pushing with might and main and curses at a horse'​s rear and getting nowhere ​ that animal might just as well have been a statue in Hyde Park+One of the funniest sights of the Reunion weekend was Alan Round pushing with might and main and curses at a horse'​s rear and getting nowhere ​that animal might just as well have been a statue in Hyde Park.
-The unladen beasts were on the journey back from MbArthur'​s. Flat to the cars when this one was reloaded and turned around. 701, it wouldn'​t +
-April, 1966 The Sydney Bushwalker 19 +
-budge downhill, was more than willing to go uphill to join its mates; in the end it had its way. Do horses have Horse Sense or can they be +
-just plain stubborn like mules? Maybe Jack Perry is right when he says +
-that you have to talk to horses with horses'​ talk. +
-' In the small hours of Reunion Sunday, phantom figure crept stealthily amono the sluMbering tents whisphering "Tiger .. tiger ... tiger"​. It +
-was spinechilling,​ to say the least. We're still not quite sure if this +
-character thought he was roaming the jungles of Assam or whether he was merely looking for the packhorse man's dog. +
-"​Degenerating in North America"​ was the title; doesn'​t seem likely, seeing that Ron Knightley was "​surrounded by virgins",​ as he lAlt it. At Ron's recent slide night, he showed us a picture of a snowfields chair lift, taken just after he had alighted. As far back as the eye could see, +
-the chairlift carried nothing but nuns. +
-One of the most popular social events in a long time was Marie Byles' "​Introducing the Japanese Alps" ​ the Clubroom was packed. Unfortunately,​ just after Marie began, a violent electrical storm broke over the city. The thunder roared and the rain drummed on the roof, quite effectively +
-drowning Marie'​s small v-ice in the rear half of the room. That price a microphone and loudspeaker?​ Perhaps than the badkseat boys might even know what they'​re voting for at some of our general meetings! +
-BOUQUET: So many members performed so many good deeds for the Reunion that it's almost unfair to single out individuals. But let's give Ern and +
-Betty Farquhar a special mention. We were amazed at the quality and quantity of the prizes for the races, to say nothing of the prodigious effort that must have gone into making them; for every single item was handmade in rare qualityby Ern and Betty, from dolls and toy garages for the youngesters to sleeping bag covers and other useful camp gear for the adults. +
-BRICKBAT: For the merrymakers who littered the Reunion campfire ashes with their empty beer cans  and left them there. +
-John White'​s inauguration speech was a beauty ​ short, sweet and very much to the point. +
-Jack Perry lost his teeth while swimming in the Woronora River. +
-Despite a thorough search by Jack, Alan Round AND a skin diver, this +
-valuable piece of personal property did not turn up. Concludes Jack, "​There'​s now some big yabby down there wearing a complete set of new teeth"​. +
-Have you heard about the proposed bicycle trip from Mittagong to Katoomba? No, it's not via the Main Roads system, unless Scott'​s Main Range comes into that category. Says Ross Wyborn,​..one of the enthusiasts,​ +
-"​I'​m going up to 7ahroonga Dump to find me an old bike". Some people are incurable optimists. +
-20. The Sydney Dushwalker April, 1966 +
-DAY PIALKS  +
-APRIL 17. Cowan  Porto Day  Brooklyn. 12 miles. +
-The scrub can be scratchy in parts of this area, but the magnificent views of the HaWkesbury River Estuary are well worth the trip. +
-Trains NOTE ALTERED TITIE 8.30 a m. Gosfora train from Central Steam Station to Cowan. Tickets: Hawkesbury River +
-return @ $1.22. Map: Broken Bay Military or Hawkosbury River Tourist. Leader: Jack Perry. +
-MAY 1. +
-Conlcliffe Stanwell Tops  Kellyls Falls  Otford. ​ Jungle +
-Track  Era  Garie Beach  bus to Waterfall. 10 miles. +
-A steep climb up the Illawarra Range, thence along the tops through the Garrawarra Primitive Area. Good coastal scenery. Train: 8.42 a m. Wollongong train from Central Steam Station +
-to Coalcliffe. Tickets: Coalcliffo return @ 01.27 plus +
-00.25 bus faro. Map: Port Hacking Tourist. Leader: Jack Gentle. +
- BAY 8. 7aterfall ​ Forest Island. Bola Creek  Garie Trig  Garie +
-Beach  bus to Waterfall. 10 miles. +
-(Note Right across the Royal National Park from West to East. +
-2 There is an interesting cave in Lola Creek with the remains of +
-Day limestone formations in it. The scrub could be scratchy. +
-Walks) Train: 8.50 a m. Cronulla train from Central Electric Station to Sutherland. CHANGE AT STJTH7RLA1D for rail motor to Waterfall. Tickets: Waterfall return @ 30-60 plus $0.25 bus fare. +
-Map: Port Hacking Tourist or Port Hacking Military. Leader: Jim Calloway. +
-Pymble ​ Bus to St. Ives (Douglas Street) Middle Harbour Crook  +
-Dungaree ​ Lindfield. 8 miles. +
-Lady Davidson Park along Middle Harbour Creek is very attractive. Ideal as a first walk with the Club. +
-Train 2 9.10 a m. Hornsby train from Central Electric Station via Bridge to Pymble. Tickets: Pymble return @ $0.45 plus 15 c bus fare. Map: Sydney and Broken Bay Military. +
-Leader: Gladys Roberts. +
-MARCH FEDERATION REPORT. +
-Blue Mountains National Park. Paul Barnes advised that about 65,000 acres had been added to the Park  the major portion being in the Wollongambe Creek area +
-Orienteering Competition. Paddy Pallin outline the rules and conditions +
-governing competitions in the United Kin' dom and Which will be generally oopted in the forthcoming competition which will take place on July 2. +
-Fire Trails in the Blue Mountains It was learned that a map was in course of preparation showing fire tails in the area shown in the KatooMba and part of the 7indsor Military Maps.+
  
 +The unladen beasts were on the journey back from McArthur'​s Flat to the cars when this one was reloaded and turned around. Well, it wouldn'​t budge downhill, was more than willing to go uphill to join its mates; in the end it had its way. Do horses have Horse Sense or can they be just plain stubborn like mules? Maybe Jack Perry is right when he says that you have to talk to horses with horses'​ talk.
 +
 +In the small hours of Reunion Sunday, a phantom figure crept stealthily among the slumbering tents whispering "​Tiger... tiger... tiger"​. It was spine-chilling,​ to say the least. We're still not quite sure if this character thought he was roaming the jungles of Assam or whether he was merely looking for the pack-horse man's dog.
 +
 +"​Degenerating in North America"​ was the title; doesn'​t seem likely, seeing that Ron Knightley was "​surrounded by virgins",​ as he put it. At Ron's recent slide night, he showed us a picture of a snowfields chairlift, taken just after he had alighted. As far back as the eye could see, the chairlift carried nothing but nuns.
 +
 +One of the most popular social events in a long time was Marie Byles' "​Introducing the Japanese Alps" - the Clubroom was packed. Unfortunately,​ just after Marie began, a violent electrical storm broke over the city. The thunder roared and the rain drummed on the roof, quite effectively drowning Marie'​s small voice in the rear half of the room. What price a microphone and loudspeaker?​ Perhaps then the backseat boys might even know what they'​re voting for at some of our general meetings!
 +
 +__Bouquet__:​ So many members performed so many good deeds for the Reunion that it's almost unfair to single out individuals. But let's give Ern and Betty Farquhar a special mention. We were amazed at the quality and quantity of the prizes for the races, to say nothing of the prodigious effort that must have gone into making them; for every single item was handmade in rare quality by Ern and Betty, from dolls and toy garages for the youngsters to sleeping bag covers and other useful camp gear for the adults.
 +
 +__Brickbat__:​ For the merry-makers who littered the Reunion campfire ashes with their empty beer cans - and left them there.
 +
 +John White'​s inauguration speech was a beauty - short, sweet and very much to the point.
 +
 +Jack Perry lost his teeth while swimming in the Woronora River. Despite a thorough search by Jack, Alan Round __and__ a skin diver, this valuable piece of personal property did not turn up. Concludes Jack, "​There'​s now some big yabby down there wearing a complete set of new teeth"​.
 +
 +Have you heard about the proposed bicycle trip from Mittagong to Katoomba? No, it's not via the Main Roads system, unless Scott'​s Main Range comes into that category. Says Ross Wyborn, one of the enthusiasts,​ "​I'​m going up to Wahroonga Dump to find me an old bike". Some people __are__ incurable optimists.
 +
 +----
 +
 +=====Day Walks.=====
 +
 +|April 17|Cowan - Porto Day - Brooklyn. 12 miles. The scrub can be scratchy in parts of this area, but the magnificent views of the Hawkesbury River Estuary are well worth the trip. Train: Note altered time: 8.30 a.m. Gosford train from Central Steam Station to Cowan. Tickets: Hawkesbury River return @ $1.22. Map: Broken Bay Military or Hawkesbury River Tourist. Leader: Jack Perry.|
 +|May 1|Coalcliffe - Stanwell Tops - Kelly'​s Falls - Otford - Jungle Track - Era - Garie Beach - bus to Waterfall. 10 miles. A steep climb up the Illawarra Range, thence along the tops through the Garrawarra Primitive Area. Good coastal scenery. Train: 8.42 a.m. Wollongong train from Central Steam Station to Coalcliffe. Tickets: Coalcliffe return @ $1.27 plus $0.25 bus fare. Map: Port Hacking Tourist. Leader: Jack Gentle.|
 +|May 8|Waterfall - Forest Island - Bola Creek - Garie Trig - Garie Beach - bus to Waterfall. 10 miles. Right across the Royal National Park from West to East. There is an interesting cave in Bola Creek with the remains of limestone formations in it. The scrub could be scratchy. Train: 8.50 a.m. Cronulla train from Central Electric Station to Sutherland. Change at Sutherland for rail motor to Waterfall. Tickets: Waterfall return @ $0.60 plus $0.25 bus fare. Map: Port Hacking Tourist or Port Hacking Military. Leader: Jim Calloway.|
 +|May 8|Pymble - Bus to St. Ives (Douglas Street) - Middle Harbour Creek - Bungaroo - Lindfield. 8 miles. Lady Davidson Park along Middle Harbour Creek is very attractive. Ideal as a first walk with the Club. Train: 9.10 a.m. Hornsby train from Central Electric Station via Bridge to Pymble. Tickets: Pymble return @ $0.45 plus 15c bus fare. Map: Sydney and Broken Bay Military. Leader: Gladys Roberts.|
 +
 +----
 +
 +=====March Federation Report.=====
 +
 +===Blue Mountains National Park.===
 +
 +Paul Barnes advised that about 65,000 acres had been added to the Park - the major portion being in the Wollongambe Creek area.
 +
 +===Orienteering Competition.===
 +
 +Paddy Pallin outlined the rules and conditions governing competitions in the United Kingdom and which will be generally adopted in the forthcoming competition which will take place on July 2.
 +
 +===Fire Trails in the Blue Mountains.===
 +
 +It was learned that a map was in course of preparation showing fire trails in the area shown in the Katoomba and part of the Windsor Military Maps.
196604.txt · Last modified: 2016/08/01 04:15 by tyreless