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196603 [2016/07/26 05:32]
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 Margaret Child presented the Parks and Playgrounds report, saying all were domestic matters except some debate on land resumptions in the Fitzroy Falls area in connection with Morton National Park. Margaret Child presented the Parks and Playgrounds report, saying all were domestic matters except some debate on land resumptions in the Fitzroy Falls area in connection with Morton National Park.
  
-As the opening gambit of General Business, Jack Perry reported on a visit to the Reunion site - Macarthurts ​Flat. There was wood and water aplenty, and the well marked track from the end of the road was about three miles in length with a descent of, say, 1500 ft. For those who may find it difficult to travel with all their gear, he believed he could arrange to hire pack horses.+As the opening gambit of General Business, Jack Perry reported on a visit to the Reunion site - Macarthur'​s ​Flat. There was wood and water aplenty, and the well marked track from the end of the road was about three miles in length with a descent of, say, 1500 ft. For those who may find it difficult to travel with all their gear, he believed he could arrange to hire pack horses.
  
 Jack Gentle mentioned that the question of Water Board Catchment restrictions had been raised, but the information obtained indicated that the camp site was just outside the proclaimed catchment and the Water Board officials seemed to have faith in our good behaviour. Jack Gentle mentioned that the question of Water Board Catchment restrictions had been raised, but the information obtained indicated that the camp site was just outside the proclaimed catchment and the Water Board officials seemed to have faith in our good behaviour.
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 No one took up this item at the time. Instead we heard Alan Rigby'​s report that it was proposed to establish a Prison Farm in the Newnes Area, and his motion that we seek information as to its location and whether it would hamper access by walkers. Wilf Hilder suggested it could be in the Pine Forest on the plateau, like the forest out from Oberon. It was agreed to make some informal enquiries in the first place. No one took up this item at the time. Instead we heard Alan Rigby'​s report that it was proposed to establish a Prison Farm in the Newnes Area, and his motion that we seek information as to its location and whether it would hamper access by walkers. Wilf Hilder suggested it could be in the Pine Forest on the plateau, like the forest out from Oberon. It was agreed to make some informal enquiries in the first place.
  
-Ron Knightley proposed that we advise Federation if a 1966 Anzac cerdmony ​were to be held at Splendour Rock, the Club would support and assist in the arrangements. We carried the motion and Jack Gentle informed us from the chair that on a recent walk in the Heathcote Primitive area some crudely written (and crudely phrased) slogans had been found - obviously inscribed by some one who was __not__ a SBW admirer. He recommended that any similar messages be carefully erased without damaging the rock or tree on which they were displayed.+Ron Knightley proposed that we advise Federation if a 1966 Anzac ceremony ​were to be held at Splendour Rock, the Club would support and assist in the arrangements. We carried the motion and Jack Gentle informed us from the chair that on a recent walk in the Heathcote Primitive area some crudely written (and crudely phrased) slogans had been found - obviously inscribed by some one who was __not__ a SBW admirer. He recommended that any similar messages be carefully erased without damaging the rock or tree on which they were displayed.
  
 Now we came back to the climbing equipment. Frank Ashdown said the actual hire of the gear had been made by an experienced climber who had an opportunity to see if it were satisfactory before passing it on to a novice. He considered there should be no refunds of money paid for the hire, but on the other hand, if the gear were not up to standard, we should have nothing more to do with it. He moved we reconsider the whole policy about hiring it established several months previously. Now we came back to the climbing equipment. Frank Ashdown said the actual hire of the gear had been made by an experienced climber who had an opportunity to see if it were satisfactory before passing it on to a novice. He considered there should be no refunds of money paid for the hire, but on the other hand, if the gear were not up to standard, we should have nothing more to do with it. He moved we reconsider the whole policy about hiring it established several months previously.
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 =====Day Walks.===== =====Day Walks.=====
  
-|March 20|Engadine - Woronora River - Woronora Trig. - Waterfall. 12 miles. A rock hop along the Woronora River through portion of the Heathcote Primitive Area. Well off the beaten track. Train: 8.20 a m. Cronulla Train from Central Electric Station to Sutherland. Change at Sutherland for rail motor to Engadine. Tickets: Waterfall return $0.60. Map: Heathcote Primitive Area or Port Hacking Tourist. Leader: Jim Callaway.|+|March 20|Engadine - Woronora River - Woronora Trig. - Waterfall. 12 miles. A rock hop along the Woronora River through portion of the Heathcote Primitive Area. Well off the beaten track. Train: 8.20 a.m. Cronulla Train from Central Electric Station to Sutherland. Change at Sutherland for rail motor to Engadine. Tickets: Waterfall return $0.60. Map: Heathcote Primitive Area or Port Hacking Tourist. Leader: Jim Callaway.|
 |March 27|Cronulla - ferry to Bundeena - Wattamolla - Garie Beach - Era Beach - Lilyvale. 16 miles (at least). Starting in the North-Eastern corner of the Royal National Park, this walk takes in the beach resorts Southward. Could be scratchy. Train: 7.50 a.m. Cronulla Train from Central Electric Station 9.00 a.m. Ferry Cronulla - Bundeena. Tickets: Cronulla return, plus single rail fare Lilyvale - Sutherland plus 2/- ferry fare. Total about 12/- ($1.20). Map: Port Hacking Tourist. Leader: Edna Stratton.| |March 27|Cronulla - ferry to Bundeena - Wattamolla - Garie Beach - Era Beach - Lilyvale. 16 miles (at least). Starting in the North-Eastern corner of the Royal National Park, this walk takes in the beach resorts Southward. Could be scratchy. Train: 7.50 a.m. Cronulla Train from Central Electric Station 9.00 a.m. Ferry Cronulla - Bundeena. Tickets: Cronulla return, plus single rail fare Lilyvale - Sutherland plus 2/- ferry fare. Total about 12/- ($1.20). Map: Port Hacking Tourist. Leader: Edna Stratton.|
 |April 3|Chatswood - bus to Terry Hills - Ryland Trig. - Cowan Creek - Bobbin Head - Mt. Kuringai Station. 12 miles. An excursion through portion of the other major National Park close to Sydney, Kuringai Chase. The Ryland Trig area could contain some thick going, otherwise, mainly tourist track. A bus service is available from Bobbin Head for anyone requiring it. Train: 7.55 a.m. Lindfield train from Central Electric Station to Chatswood. 8.25 a.m. bus Chatswood to Terry Hills. Tickets: Mt. Kuringai return via Bridge @ $0.58 plus about $0.25 bus fare. Map: Broken Bay Military. Leader: John White.| |April 3|Chatswood - bus to Terry Hills - Ryland Trig. - Cowan Creek - Bobbin Head - Mt. Kuringai Station. 12 miles. An excursion through portion of the other major National Park close to Sydney, Kuringai Chase. The Ryland Trig area could contain some thick going, otherwise, mainly tourist track. A bus service is available from Bobbin Head for anyone requiring it. Train: 7.55 a.m. Lindfield train from Central Electric Station to Chatswood. 8.25 a.m. bus Chatswood to Terry Hills. Tickets: Mt. Kuringai return via Bridge @ $0.58 plus about $0.25 bus fare. Map: Broken Bay Military. Leader: John White.|
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 On December 30 last we left an old tine shed at the foot of the Fox Glacier, accompanied by a New Zealander who was to fly out of Pioneer Hut when our food was flown in. We followed the track down through the thick jungle which abounds along the West Coast and crossed a small wire suspension bridge which spans the swirling torrent of milky water that comes from the Fox Glacier. From this bridge we got a good view up the valley and of the surrounding peaks. The sky was a deep blue and the sun glistened on the fresh snow which plastered the mountains right down to the brilliant green of the bush. On December 30 last we left an old tine shed at the foot of the Fox Glacier, accompanied by a New Zealander who was to fly out of Pioneer Hut when our food was flown in. We followed the track down through the thick jungle which abounds along the West Coast and crossed a small wire suspension bridge which spans the swirling torrent of milky water that comes from the Fox Glacier. From this bridge we got a good view up the valley and of the surrounding peaks. The sky was a deep blue and the sun glistened on the fresh snow which plastered the mountains right down to the brilliant green of the bush.
  
-The terminal face of any glacier is not usually very scenic and that of the Fox Glacier is no exception, looking something like a gravel quarry. It is only 757 feet above sea level and the main attraction of this glacier, like its sister the Franz Josef is that it flows down between the green slopes of snow grass and bush. We climbed onto the terminal ice up some old steps cut into the ice, and made good progress up the clear ice, being comparatively free of moraine. Soon however the ice became more jumbled as we started to get into the first ice fall. Here the route follows the gully between the ice and the side of the valley, but we had gone too high and were now confronted with 150 feet high ice cliffs. Retracing our foot steps we eventually gained access into the trough by cutting some steps across an ice cliff. We made good time up the moraine in this trough but the rocks were loose and dirty and it was not very pleasant going. It was with some relief that we climbed back onto the glacier where it flattened before the second and largest ice fall. We now had to cross the glacier and climb up steep snow grass and rock on the other side to reach Chancellor Hut which appeared like a small triangular rock on a wide snow ledge. At first the ice was relatively flat but as we climbed higher we found ourselves in a labyrinth of tottering ice pinnacles which formed fantastic shapes as if we were in a sculptor'​s workshop. The crevasses also got deeper and we fuund ourselves staring down into the blue depths of the glacier as we jumped over them.+The terminal face of any glacier is not usually very scenic and that of the Fox Glacier is no exception, looking something like a gravel quarry. It is only 757 feet above sea level and the main attraction of this glacier, like its sister the Franz Josef is that it flows down between the green slopes of snow grass and bush. We climbed onto the terminal ice up some old steps cut into the ice, and made good progress up the clear ice, being comparatively free of moraine. Soon however the ice became more jumbled as we started to get into the first ice fall. Here the route follows the gully between the ice and the side of the valley, but we had gone too high and were now confronted with 150 feet high ice cliffs. Retracing our foot steps we eventually gained access into the trough by cutting some steps across an ice cliff. We made good time up the moraine in this trough but the rocks were loose and dirty and it was not very pleasant going. It was with some relief that we climbed back onto the glacier where it flattened before the second and largest ice fall. We now had to cross the glacier and climb up steep snow grass and rock on the other side to reach Chancellor Hut which appeared like a small triangular rock on a wide snow ledge. At first the ice was relatively flat but as we climbed higher we found ourselves in a labyrinth of tottering ice pinnacles which formed fantastic shapes as if we were in a sculptor'​s workshop. The crevasses also got deeper and we found ourselves staring down into the blue depths of the glacier as we jumped over them.
  
-Some of the party were now beginning to get their own ideas about the route to be taken and soon we found that there were five people going in five different directions. We then all tied onto one rope and this tendency was reduced somewhat. Valuable time had been lost on this section and now clouds had filled the valley and misty rain began to fall. We climbed off the glacier under an arch of ice and continued up the snow grass terraces which would lead us to the hut. As we climbed higher we got into fresh snow and we ploughea ​along up to our knees. Beneath the snow lay an entanglement of stunted bushes, grass and rock and it was a weary little group that stumbled into Chancellor Hut (4,100 feet) that night. Even Peter'​s D.V. stew tasted good that night.+Some of the party were now beginning to get their own ideas about the route to be taken and soon we found that there were five people going in five different directions. We then all tied onto one rope and this tendency was reduced somewhat. Valuable time had been lost on this section and now clouds had filled the valley and misty rain began to fall. We climbed off the glacier under an arch of ice and continued up the snow grass terraces which would lead us to the hut. As we climbed higher we got into fresh snow and we ploughed ​along up to our knees. Beneath the snow lay an entanglement of stunted bushes, grass and rock and it was a weary little group that stumbled into Chancellor Hut (4,100 feet) that night. Even Peter'​s D.V. stew tasted good that night.
  
 Chancellor Hut is an old hut but well built and gave us very good protection from the weather. In the morning we set out under an overcast sky and made our way up the wide shelf which sidles the main ice fall. The snow was still soft and it got deeper as we climbed. Progress was made in a caterpillar fashion - the leading person collapsing in the snow after plugging about 10 yards of steps. He would then join the end of the line and the process repeated again. By midday, five hours after setting out, we gained a snow slope overlooking the Fox neve. Since we had only travelled one mile in these five hours we had to turn back. Later we calculated it would have taken us 35 hours at that rate to get to Pioneer Hut. We returned to the hut in l 1/2 hours along the trail we had made. Chancellor Hut is an old hut but well built and gave us very good protection from the weather. In the morning we set out under an overcast sky and made our way up the wide shelf which sidles the main ice fall. The snow was still soft and it got deeper as we climbed. Progress was made in a caterpillar fashion - the leading person collapsing in the snow after plugging about 10 yards of steps. He would then join the end of the line and the process repeated again. By midday, five hours after setting out, we gained a snow slope overlooking the Fox neve. Since we had only travelled one mile in these five hours we had to turn back. Later we calculated it would have taken us 35 hours at that rate to get to Pioneer Hut. We returned to the hut in l 1/2 hours along the trail we had made.
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 A muffled voice crying "​Hold!"​ told us that Duncan, who was leading at the time, had fallen into a crevasse. Wile Peter held the rope tight I got the pack off his back and he managed to climb out leaving behind a gaping hole. After about 45 minutes on the compass bearing we knew that we were nearing the hut and strained our eyes peering into the mist. Through the swirling mist we spotted some rocks and this led to a heated argument between the leaders who thought the hut was on top of the rocks and the navigators who wanted to keep on the compass bearing. As we were spread out over 120 feet - the length of the rope - we had to shout at the top of our voices. Then we noticed a sixth voice in the argument and when our voices died down we realised that it was coming from the hut. We changed direction by 45° and found the hut 100 yards further on. Later when the mist cleared we discovered that the rock on which some of the party thought the hut was situated was actually a mountain - Mt. Alack. A muffled voice crying "​Hold!"​ told us that Duncan, who was leading at the time, had fallen into a crevasse. Wile Peter held the rope tight I got the pack off his back and he managed to climb out leaving behind a gaping hole. After about 45 minutes on the compass bearing we knew that we were nearing the hut and strained our eyes peering into the mist. Through the swirling mist we spotted some rocks and this led to a heated argument between the leaders who thought the hut was on top of the rocks and the navigators who wanted to keep on the compass bearing. As we were spread out over 120 feet - the length of the rope - we had to shout at the top of our voices. Then we noticed a sixth voice in the argument and when our voices died down we realised that it was coming from the hut. We changed direction by 45° and found the hut 100 yards further on. Later when the mist cleared we discovered that the rock on which some of the party thought the hut was situated was actually a mountain - Mt. Alack.
  
-Our stay at Pioneer Hut (8,500 feet) was blessed with the luck of the Gods as the following morning the weather was perfect and we were able to get our food flown in. We also managed to climb four peaks - Mt. Lindenfeld (10,503 ft), Glacier Peak (9,865 ft), Gray Peak (9,490 ft) and Mt. Alack (9,300 ft). An attempt on Mt. Haidinger (10,059 ft) however was replused ​by a strong icy wind blowing across the knife-edged ice ridge.+Our stay at Pioneer Hut (8,500 feet) was blessed with the luck of the Gods as the following morning the weather was perfect and we were able to get our food flown in. We also managed to climb four peaks - Mt. Lindenfeld (10,503 ft), Glacier Peak (9,865 ft), Gray Peak (9,490 ft) and Mt. Alack (9,300 ft). An attempt on Mt. Haidinger (10,059 ft) however was repulsed ​by a strong icy wind blowing across the knife-edged ice ridge.
  
 Some concern over the weather forced us to leave the hut a couple of days earlier than planned. We were now to cross Governor'​s Col (9,300 ft) and descend to the Tasman Glacier thus completing our crossing of the main divide. The snow conditions were not the best due to a couple of inches of soft snow so we decided to leave early. We got up at 1 a.m. and after our usual breakfast of oatmeal and after cleaning up the hut we left at 3 a.m. Using our head torches we made our way across the neve of the Fox towards Governor Col. At 4 a.m. the first rays of light were upon us and we were able to turn off our torches. We could see that the weather was coming over bad and that we would have to race it across the divide or risk being caught out. Some concern over the weather forced us to leave the hut a couple of days earlier than planned. We were now to cross Governor'​s Col (9,300 ft) and descend to the Tasman Glacier thus completing our crossing of the main divide. The snow conditions were not the best due to a couple of inches of soft snow so we decided to leave early. We got up at 1 a.m. and after our usual breakfast of oatmeal and after cleaning up the hut we left at 3 a.m. Using our head torches we made our way across the neve of the Fox towards Governor Col. At 4 a.m. the first rays of light were upon us and we were able to turn off our torches. We could see that the weather was coming over bad and that we would have to race it across the divide or risk being caught out.
  
-As we neared Governor Col. the wind hit us and this was made worse by the bad snow conditions - the dreaded wind slab. Down several hundred feet on the other side we fought against the wind, climbing carefully across the treacherous snow. At one stage Gerry - 14 stone, plus heavy pack - got blown completely off the ground at the same time that Duncan got blown off his feet. Fortunately the slope was not very steep. Lower down the snow became firmer and we traversed along a snow shelf on the Haast Glacier. When we came to a rock spur (From the Dixion Ridge) which cut this shelf we were forced into a steep snow couooir. We belayed carefully down this section, ​cimbing ​in the time between gusts of wind.+As we neared Governor Col. the wind hit us and this was made worse by the bad snow conditions - the dreaded wind slab. Down several hundred feet on the other side we fought against the wind, climbing carefully across the treacherous snow. At one stage Gerry - 14 stone, plus heavy pack - got blown completely off the ground at the same time that Duncan got blown off his feet. Fortunately the slope was not very steep. Lower down the snow became firmer and we traversed along a snow shelf on the Haast Glacier. When we came to a rock spur (From the Dixion Ridge) which cut this shelf we were forced into a steep snow couloir. We belayed carefully down this section, ​climbing ​in the time between gusts of wind.
  
 When a gust of wind came we would fall on our ice axes and hold on as the wind stung our faces with small particles of ice. The couloir ended over a cliff and we were forced to traverse loose rocks to gain further snow slopes above a large shrund. This lead us to easier slopes which we traversed to the Haast Ridge. The weather was now getting worse and we were glad to be down to the safety of the easier slopes. As we strolled down these we watched peculiar shaped clouds roll across the Tasman Valley. We soon reached Haast Hut (7,000 ft) and continued on down the scree and rubble of the Haast Ridge to the Tasman Glacier. Good time was made over the ice of the Tasman and we arrived at Ball Hut (3,600 ft) just in time to catch the bus back to the Hermitage. When a gust of wind came we would fall on our ice axes and hold on as the wind stung our faces with small particles of ice. The couloir ended over a cliff and we were forced to traverse loose rocks to gain further snow slopes above a large shrund. This lead us to easier slopes which we traversed to the Haast Ridge. The weather was now getting worse and we were glad to be down to the safety of the easier slopes. As we strolled down these we watched peculiar shaped clouds roll across the Tasman Valley. We soon reached Haast Hut (7,000 ft) and continued on down the scree and rubble of the Haast Ridge to the Tasman Glacier. Good time was made over the ice of the Tasman and we arrived at Ball Hut (3,600 ft) just in time to catch the bus back to the Hermitage.
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-=====Rescue - New Sealand ​Style.=====+=====Rescue - New Zealand ​Style.=====
  
 Peter Cameron. Peter Cameron.
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 The accident occurred early Tuesday morning. A rope of three - two blokes and a girl - had left Empress Hut (8,400 ft.) to climb Mt. Jellicoe (9,400 ft.) About 200 ft. from the summit Gus and Bev were blown off their feet and started to proceed in a downward direction.... Fortunately they were held, but Bev sustained a bad leg and couldn'​t climb, Gus a sore skull. The other climber, Dave by name, made them comfortable - cup of tea, a BEX and a good lie down style - and then set off to sound the alarm by Park Board 2-way radio. By this time the weather was really bad - rain and mist and snow and wind and fog and foul weather as well. But Dave set off alone to return with sleeping bags for his friends. The accident occurred early Tuesday morning. A rope of three - two blokes and a girl - had left Empress Hut (8,400 ft.) to climb Mt. Jellicoe (9,400 ft.) About 200 ft. from the summit Gus and Bev were blown off their feet and started to proceed in a downward direction.... Fortunately they were held, but Bev sustained a bad leg and couldn'​t climb, Gus a sore skull. The other climber, Dave by name, made them comfortable - cup of tea, a BEX and a good lie down style - and then set off to sound the alarm by Park Board 2-way radio. By this time the weather was really bad - rain and mist and snow and wind and fog and foul weather as well. But Dave set off alone to return with sleeping bags for his friends.
  
-About the same time a rescue party of six, headed by Jenkinson - of S.R.C. and Eli de Beaumont fame - set off up the Hooker Valley to Empress Hut. On arrival at Empress they surveyed the situation and realised that the face rescue equipment would probably be needed. This was stored near Christchurch and was rushed down to Mt. Cook by plane. Also lined up was a helicopter - a small, privately owned BELL type fitted with superchargers so that it could operate at 19,000 ft. and land confortably ​at 10,000 ft. A second party was leaving Tuesday evening for Hooker Hut with food supplies. The third party was to leave on Wednesday morning with food and the winch gear.+About the same time a rescue party of six, headed by Jenkinson - of S.R.C. and Eli de Beaumont fame - set off up the Hooker Valley to Empress Hut. On arrival at Empress they surveyed the situation and realised that the face rescue equipment would probably be needed. This was stored near Christchurch and was rushed down to Mt. Cook by plane. Also lined up was a helicopter - a small, privately owned BELL type fitted with superchargers so that it could operate at 19,000 ft. and land comfortably ​at 10,000 ft. A second party was leaving Tuesday evening for Hooker Hut with food supplies. The third party was to leave on Wednesday morning with food and the winch gear.
  
 Wednesday morning revealed that the reason Dave had not returned from the injured climbers was because he had fallen into a schrund and hurt his back - he lay there all night braving cold and snow and sleet. However Wednesday was fine but windy. Bruce Jenkinson led the first rescue party up to Dave, made him comfortable and then proceeded towards Gus and Bev. The helicopter tried to fly in a medical man and two others. However the wind was too fierce and they had to be set off about halfway to the rescue scene. Wednesday morning revealed that the reason Dave had not returned from the injured climbers was because he had fallen into a schrund and hurt his back - he lay there all night braving cold and snow and sleet. However Wednesday was fine but windy. Bruce Jenkinson led the first rescue party up to Dave, made him comfortable and then proceeded towards Gus and Bev. The helicopter tried to fly in a medical man and two others. However the wind was too fierce and they had to be set off about halfway to the rescue scene.
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 That afternoon an air drop was made by a Cessna flying 2,500 ft. above the neve of the Hooker Glacier. Unfortunately the stretcher and the tent went into the ice-fall but the food landed conveniently near the hut. That afternoon an air drop was made by a Cessna flying 2,500 ft. above the neve of the Hooker Glacier. Unfortunately the stretcher and the tent went into the ice-fall but the food landed conveniently near the hut.
  
-Late that afternoon things were really moving. ​ Gus and Bey were lowered by cable to a more comfortable site and Dave was brought down to the neve by stretcher. Shortly after, the wind dropped and the helicopter came in and took him to hospital. Diagnosis was a broken back!+Late that afternoon things were really moving. ​ Gus and Bev were lowered by cable to a more comfortable site and Dave was brought down to the neve by stretcher. Shortly after, the wind dropped and the helicopter came in and took him to hospital. Diagnosis was a broken back!
  
 Twenty-three in a 6-bed hut meant somebody had to sleep outside that night. Fortunately it was fine. Twenty-three in a 6-bed hut meant somebody had to sleep outside that night. Fortunately it was fine.
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 It would appear that bushwalkers have one common purpose, and that is to spend their weekends, holidays, and indeed most of their spare time away in the wilderness, as far from the comforts and luxuries of our modern civilization but they completely disregard the benefits afforded by the technological and scientific advances of our day and age. All cooking is done over primitive campfires, and utensils are of the most rudimentary nature. It is barely conceivable that today there can exist such wanton disregard for modern conveniences like Porta-Gas stoves and Esky coolers. It would appear that bushwalkers have one common purpose, and that is to spend their weekends, holidays, and indeed most of their spare time away in the wilderness, as far from the comforts and luxuries of our modern civilization but they completely disregard the benefits afforded by the technological and scientific advances of our day and age. All cooking is done over primitive campfires, and utensils are of the most rudimentary nature. It is barely conceivable that today there can exist such wanton disregard for modern conveniences like Porta-Gas stoves and Esky coolers.
  
-All food is carried on the back of the walker in a pack or rucksack, in which clothing, bedding and shelter are also stowed. These rucksacks, which may be anything up to one hundred pounds in weight when full, present quite a ridiculous, and almost laughable sight te the observer, when seen on the back of the wearer.+All food is carried on the back of the walker in a pack or rucksack, in which clothing, bedding and shelter are also stowed. These rucksacks, which may be anything up to one hundred pounds in weight when full, present quite a ridiculous, and almost laughable sight to the observer, when seen on the back of the wearer.
  
 Once equipped, and burdened down with the weight of the rucksack, the bushwalker will set out on foot to travel incredible distances along tracks or even across trackless terrain. Where there is no marked route, the way will be negotiated with the aid of appropriate maps and a compass, but in any case, the route is planned so as to steer clear of any semblance of civilization,​ which may account for the fact that these people are relatively unheard Of outside their own circles. Once equipped, and burdened down with the weight of the rucksack, the bushwalker will set out on foot to travel incredible distances along tracks or even across trackless terrain. Where there is no marked route, the way will be negotiated with the aid of appropriate maps and a compass, but in any case, the route is planned so as to steer clear of any semblance of civilization,​ which may account for the fact that these people are relatively unheard Of outside their own circles.
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 Marie Byles is a name in the Club that is known to both new and old members. We are very fortunate to be having a visit from Marie on March 23. She will be presenting "​Introducing the Japanese Alps" and concluding with "The Sacred Hills of Burma" where the feet of white man have never trod before. Marie Byles is a name in the Club that is known to both new and old members. We are very fortunate to be having a visit from Marie on March 23. She will be presenting "​Introducing the Japanese Alps" and concluding with "The Sacred Hills of Burma" where the feet of white man have never trod before.
  
-We all know the skill that Don Read possesses both as a photographer and commentator. We remember his "Pilgraim's Way" with a great deal of satisfaction and look forward to his "​Waterways of England"​ on March 30.+We all know the skill that Don Read possesses both as a photographer and commentator. We remember his "Pilgrim's Way" with a great deal of satisfaction and look forward to his "​Waterways of England"​ on March 30.
  
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 ===Wanted.=== ===Wanted.===
  
-Four second hand sleeping bags. Please ring Patricial ​Todhunter on 841565.+Four second hand sleeping bags. Please ring Patricia ​Todhunter on 841565.
  
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 +=====Natural History - Ten Weeks To Winter.=====
 +
 +W. Gillam.
 +
 +With the Walks Secretary'​s permission there will be a series of ski weekends during the winter. There was one on the programme last winter; to fill a gap in an otherwise complete program. The time between the appearance of the program and the weekend was very short and a lot of people who showed interest were not able to make adequate plans in time. The weekend was possibly the last when the more accessible areas could be skied and the snow was certainly not the best. This year be prepared.
 +
 +The weekends will be shown as three-day affairs because I have a three-day weekend once a month. Do not let this deter you. If you can only manage a two day trip and suitable transport can be arranged, come along. The trip down is very long, about seven or eight hours so ideally there should be at least two drivers in each car and you should leave as early as possible on Friday afternoon. You will need the car to take you from the camp at Sawpit to the snow. If there has been overnight snow, chains will be essential - you can go up later in the day when the ploughs and buses have slushed up the road but this is time wasted. Hire the chains before you go. Ski hire can be arranged at Smiggins. This saves carting very bulky skis in say a Mini but there can be delays at the snow while you wait in line to be fitted - the gear late in the season is not always the best. Paddy'​s Cooma store will stay open late on Friday nights, until around eleven or later if advised and skis can be returned late, after hours on Sunday or Monday. Paddy will return your deposit by post. If you can give Paddy, in Sydney, your normal shoe size and height it will facilitate matters. Boots are the most important item; poor or ill fitting ones can cripple you for the weekend. Make sure they fit comfortably over the thickness of socks you will be wearing and that they don't pinch the front of your shins. They are heavy and you can't move your heel as in normal walking, but this is normal and does not matter at the right time, when you are on skis. Cost of hiring last year was $2.50 a day for skis, boots and stocks, with a deposit of $10.00.
 +
 +Waterproof pants are the only item of clothing you must have. Ordinary slacks can be waterproofed for 50 cents at a dry cleaners. Unless you are very flush or insist on being elegant at all times ski-pants aren't necessary. A wide elastic strap tacked on to go under the instep is advisable. It stops cold shins if the pants creep up and covers the socks. Socks should go under the cuffs - if they are outside the cuffs they get wet from the snow and, by capilliary attraction the water creeps down to your feet. Waterproof gloves are better than mittens and are advisable. Until you gain confidence you will be embracing the snow fairly often. Your seat will get wet if it is not waterproof and your hand will freeze while fixing bindings. Snow will brush off jumpers and parkas so these not be completely waterproof. Take say two more jumpers and warm shirts than you would on an ordinary winters walk, the same for socks and a warm cap or beanie. You won't be cold when you are skiing. Air mattresses are desirable but not essential; a hot water bottle helps. Sun glasses of some kind are essential, those with side guards are the best. I like straight lenses, snow goggles with their curved lenses give me the feeling that I am skiing in a hole. This has a disastrous effect on my balance. Check if you are affected in this way before you buy a pair. Sunburn cream is also a must.
 +
 +If you are as fit as most normal walkers you won't have too many aches from skiing. You can't be going on the lifts the first weekend so all your uphill is from your own efforts. If you can do push-ups they will help strengthen your upper arms for side stepping and herring bone. The only other muscle groups to come in for some agony are those around the ankle and shin. The muscle and tendon above the heel are extended and those along the shin are compressed in the "​forward lean" position. When you walk normally your heel leaves the ground first. Your skis prevent this. Exercise by standing barefoot, facing a wall, feet together. Keeping your back straight, bend your knees until they touch the wall; don't lift your heel. Watch out - it hurts.
 +
 +The pattern of instruction followed is the New Austrian Ski Technique. This is now universally taught by professional instructors so that if skiing is for you it is possible to carry straight on from the instruction you will receive. Skiing books are notoriously bewildering. The Austrian book is somewhat less difficult in that the technique of ski is reduced to a graceful austerity based on "​linked traverses"​.
  
-NATURAL HISTORY ​ 
-TEN 77ES TO WINTER. 
-7. Gillam. 
-With the Walks Secretary'​s permission there will be a series of ski weekends during thc winter. There was one on the programme last winter; to fill a gap in an otherwise complete program. The time between the appearance of the program and the weekend was very short ana a lot of people who showed interest were not able to make adequate plans in time. The weekend was possibly the last when the more accessible areas could be skied and the snow was certainly not the best. This year be prepared. 
-The weekends will be shown as threeday affairs because I have a threeday weekend once a month. Do not let this deter you. If you can only manage a two day trip and suitable transport can be arranged, come along. The trip down is very long, about seven or eight hours so ideally there should be at least two drivers in each car and you should leave as early as possible on Friday afternoon. You will need the car to take you from the camp at Sawpit to the snow. If there has been overnight snow, chains will be essential ​ you can go up later in the dasr when the ploughs and buses have slushed up the road but this is time wasted. Hire the chains before you go. Ski hire can be arranged at Smiggins. This saves carting very-bulky skis in say a Mini but there can be delays at the snow while you wait in lino to be fitted ​ the gear late in the season is not always the best. Paddy'​s Coama store will stay open late on Friday nights, until around eleven or later if advised and skis can be returned late, after hours on Sunday or.Monday. Paddy will return your deposit by post. If you can give Paddy, in Sydney, your normal shoe size and height it will facilitate matters. Boots are the most important item; poor or ill fitting ones can cripple you for the weekend. Make sure they fit comfortably over the thickness of socks you will be wearing and that they don't pinch the front of your shins. They are heavy and you can't move your heel as in normal walking, but this is normal and does not matter at the right time, when you are on skis. Cost of hiring last year was $2.50 a day for skis, boots and stocks, with a deposit of $10.00. 
-Waterproof pants are the only item of clothing you must have. Ordinary slacks can be waterproofed for 50 cents at a dry cleaners. Unless you are very flush or insist on being elegant at all times skipants aren't necessary. A wide elastic strap tacked on to go under tlae instep is advisable. It stops cold shins if the pants creep up and covers the socks. Socks should go under the cuffs  if they are outside the cuffs they get wet from the snow and, by capilliary attraction the water creeps 
-16. The Sydney Bushwalker March; 1966 
-down to your feet. Waterproof gloves are better than mittens and are advisable. Until you gain confidence you will be embracing the snow fairly often. Your seat will Get wet if it is not waterproof and your hand will freeze while fixing bindings. Snow will brush off jumpers and parkas so these not be completely waterproof. Take say two more jumpers and warm shirts than you would on an ordinary winters walk, the same for socks,and a warm cap or beanie. You won't be 
-Gold when you are skiing. Air mattresses are desirable but not essential; a h ot watbr bottlo-holps. Sun glasses of some kind are essential, those 
-with side guards are the best. I like straight lenses, snow goggles with their curved lenses give me the feeling that I am skiing in a hole. This has a disastrous effect on my balance. Check if you are affected in this way before you buy a pair. Sunburn cream is also a must. 
-If you are as fit as most normal walkers you wont have too many aches from skiing. You conit be going on the lifts the first weekend so all your uphill is from your own efforts. If you can do push-ups they will help strengthen your upper arms for side stepping and herring bone. The only other muscle Groups to come in for some agony are those around the ankle and shin. The muscle and tendon above the heel are 
-extended and those along the shin are compressed in the "​forward lean" 
-position. When you walk normally yowheel leaves the Ground first. Your skis prevent this. Exercise by standing barefoot, facing a wall, feet 
-together. Keeping your back straight, bend your knees until they touch the wall; don2t lift your heel. Watch but it hurts. 
-The pattern of instruction followed is the Now Austrian Ski 
-Technique. This is now universally taught by professional instructors 
-so that if skiing is for you it is possible to carry straight on from 
-the instruction you will receive. Skiing books are notoriously bewildering. The Austrian book is somewhat loss difficult in that the technique of ski is reduced to a graceful austerity based on "​linked traverses"​. 
 "What are linked traverses?"​ "What are linked traverses?"​
-On a slope there are-two basic directions - along the contour which brings your skis horizontal; and the fall line at right angles to the contour and which is the fastest way down the slope. When your skis are on the traverse it is as though you were standing on a step; for comfort and ease your upper foot would be forward with the knee slightly bent and most of your body weight would be on the lower foot. Both feet will be horizontal. Try this on the nearest step. If your Skis lie on the snow surface your feet will not be horizontal so bite the upper edges of the skis into the snow until your feet are flat. Your knees will now point uphill altering the centre of Gravity of the system.. -lith knees uphill 
-March; 1966 The Sydney Bushwalker 17. 
-turn your body towards the valley and lean out towards the valley until you feel an easy balance over the skis. Push off with your stocks and you are skiing traverses. In one direction. If you lean out further your skis will swing uphill and you will slow down. If you lean uphill your skis will swing downhill. Oh, bitter day, and you will end up in the fall line going faster, And faster. 
- ​Obviously then, the fall line is the critical obstacle. You 
-can't traverse in the one direction all day  you run out of slope 
-and snow. The simplicity of the Austrian system is that to turn onto the other traverse you place your body in the position you will take up 
-when you get onto the other traverse, lean uphill and your momentum 
-will carry you round, clean across the fall line onto the next traverse. 
-Step this way for your thirty dollar ski pants. Last year 12 out 
-of 14 new recruits could master all the steps leading to linked traverses 
-in one three day week:nO. They were safe on the snow and could improve frbm there on. There wasn't a muscle strain in the whole lot. 
-THY CARRY A TENT? 
-IC M. 
-In fact, why sleep out at all? Most of us, surely, rejoice in 
-good beds at home. However, Bushwalkers being what they are, cursed 
-with the instincts but not blessed with the physique of nomads, some sort of covering must be devised to protect them during the night hours. 
-The problem arises how to combine the greatest possible shelter with the least possible weight. 
-Tents, it would seem, have always been a thorn in the side of wandering humanity. Glancing through the pages of history, we find King David declaring bitterly ​ doubtless after a night in a leaky 
-camp  that he would tather eke out a miserable existence in a church porch than dwell in a tont. 
-Shakespeare likewise ssams to have had a rough spin under canvas and refers to 'the tent that searches to the bottom of the worst' ​ meaning either that drove him to the depths of despair or that the whole tottering structure sank in the mud. 
-Then we all know the nineteenth century gentleman who had such trouble With his moving (i e. collapsing) tent that he had to pitch it afresh each night. 
-18. The Sydney Bushwalker March, 1966 
-All this of course was in the bad old days before a Real 
-Tent Maker - breathe his initials, pp - brought comfort to mankind. 
-The most successful of his predecessors appears to have been a 
-Mr. 0. Jacob. Many years B.C. one Dalaam, most known in connection with an ass, exclaimed eostaticallys "How goodly are thy tents, O. Jacob!"​ thereby establishing that tentmaker'​s reputation forever. 
-Omar, of course, made tents: and see how subtly that profession 
-warped his mental outlook. A sceptics a cynic. Aren't we all, Where tents are concerned? 
-To make the best of a bad job, why not dispense with the tent 
-and use a waterproof sleeping-bag instead? The hardy trampers in 
-New Zealand, that moist but lovely land, sleep thus unscathed. The 
-bag, complete with hood and furnished with eyelets for lashing the opening together, accommodates self and pack. Its advantages are 
-many. Its weight, lbs. surely compares favourably with that of 
-any tent. One is assured of the utmost privacy, retiring like a snail 
-into the shell. It is essentially a one-man affair; sharing is 
-impossible. One can wear it by the campfire and keep the draught off 
-the spine, and during the night it can be turned lightly and easily 
-to catch, or avoid, the prevailing wind. Again, sack-racers find 
-it invaluable. "But what" the carping critic asks, "About disrobing 
-for the night?"​ With the well-trained camper this difficulty does not arise. He sleeps in everything he has with him. 
-Finally, the bag, unlike the tent, is simple to fold. One often hears it said "they fold their tents like the Arabs" - but how do the Arabs fold their tents? The accepted method is to take 
-one corner in the left teeth (all Bush 7alkers should see that they 
-have a few left) and rotate rapidly in a clockwise direction, shouting in a loud voice and at stated intervals: "​Abracadabra!"​ The result will be either strangulation or success. 
  
 +On a slope there are two basic directions - along the contour which brings your skis horizontal; and the fall line at right angles to the contour and which is the fastest way down the slope. When your skis are on the traverse it is as though you were standing on a step; for comfort and ease your upper foot would be forward with the knee slightly bent and most of your body weight would be on the lower foot. Both feet will be horizontal. Try this on the nearest step. If your skis lie on the snow surface your feet will not be horizontal so bite the upper edges of the skis into the snow until your feet are flat. Your knees will now point uphill altering the centre of gravity of the system.. With knees uphill turn your body towards the valley and lean out towards the valley until you feel an easy balance over the skis. Push off with your stocks and you are skiing traverses. In one direction. If you lean out further your skis will swing uphill and you will slow down. If you lean uphill your skis will swing downhill. Oh, bitter day, and you will end up in the fall line going faster, And faster.
 +
 +Obviously then, the fall line is the critical obstacle. You can't traverse in the one direction all day - you run out of slope and snow. The simplicity of the Austrian system is that to turn onto the other traverse you place your body in the position you will take up when you get onto the other traverse, lean uphill and your momentum will carry you round, clean across the fall line onto the next traverse.
 +
 +Step this way for your thirty dollar ski pants. Last year 12 out of 14 new recruits could master all the steps leading to linked traverses in one three-day weekend. They were safe on the snow and could improve from there on. There wasn't a muscle strain in the whole lot.
 +
 +----
 +
 +=====Why Carry A Tent?=====
 +
 +K.M.
 +
 +In fact, why sleep out at all? Most of us, surely, rejoice in good beds at home. However, Bushwalkers being what they are, cursed with the instincts but not blessed with the physique of nomads, some sort of covering must be devised to protect them during the night hours. The problem arises how to combine the greatest possible shelter with the least possible weight.
 +
 +Tents, it would seem, have always been a thorn in the side of wandering humanity. Glancing through the pages of history, we find King David declaring bitterly - doubtless after a night in a leaky camp - that he would rather eke out a miserable existence in a church porch than dwell in a tent.
 +
 +Shakespeare likewise seems to have had a rough spin under canvas and refers to 'the tent that searches to the bottom of the worst' - meaning either that drove him to the depths of despair or that the whole tottering structure sank in the mud.
 +
 +Then we all know the nineteenth century gentleman who had such trouble with his moving (i.e. collapsing) tent that he had to pitch it afresh each night.
 +
 +All this of course was in the bad old days before a Real Tent Maker - breathe his initials, pp - brought comfort to mankind. The most successful of his predecessors appears to have been a Mr. O. Jacob. Many years B.C. one Balaam, most known in connection with an ass, exclaimed ecstatically:​ "How goodly are thy tents, O. Jacob!"​ thereby establishing that tentmaker'​s reputation forever.
 +
 +Omar, of course, made tents: and see how subtly that profession warped his mental outlook. A sceptic: a cynic. Aren't we all, where tents are concerned?
 +
 +To make the best of a bad job, why not dispense with the tent and use a waterproof sleeping-bag instead? The hardy trampers in New Zealand, that moist but lovely land, sleep thus unscathed. The bag, complete with hood and furnished with eyelets for lashing the opening together, accommodates self and pack. Its advantages are many. Its weight, 1 1/2 lbs. surely compares favourably with that of any tent. One is assured of the utmost privacy, retiring like a snail into the shell. It is essentially a one-man affair; sharing is impossible. One can wear it by the campfire and keep the draught off the spine, and during the night it can be turned lightly and easily to catch, or avoid, the prevailing wind. Again, sack-racers find it invaluable. "But what" the carping critic asks, "About disrobing for the night?"​ With the well-trained camper this difficulty does not arise. He sleeps in everything he has with him.
 +
 +Finally, the bag, unlike the tent, is simple to fold. One often hears it said "they fold their tents like the Arabs" - but how do the Arabs fold their tents? The accepted method is to take one corner in the left teeth (all Bush Walkers should see that they have a few left) and rotate rapidly in a clockwise direction, shouting in a loud voice and at stated intervals: "​Abracadabra!"​ The result will be either strangulation or success.
196603.txt · Last modified: 2016/07/27 04:16 by tyreless