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 ======The Sydney Bushwalker.====== ======The Sydney Bushwalker.======
  
-Amonthly ​bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bushwalker, The N.S.W. Nurses'​ Association Rooms "Northcoe ​Building",​ Reiby Place, Sydney.+A monthly ​bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bushwalker, The N.S.W. Nurses'​ Association Rooms "Northcote ​Building",​ Reiby Place, Sydney.
  
 Box. No. 4476, G.P.O. Sydney. 'Phone 843985. Box. No. 4476, G.P.O. Sydney. 'Phone 843985.
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 | | |Page| | | |Page|
 |December General Meeting|J. Brown| 2| |December General Meeting|J. Brown| 2|
-|Social Notes For Januray| | 4|+|Social Notes For January| | 4|
 |The Kosciusko State Park|M. Dunphy| 5| |The Kosciusko State Park|M. Dunphy| 5|
 |Day Walks| |10| |Day Walks| |10|
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 Now the President announced that prospective members who may be hampered by the lack of test walks would have a time extension to April. However if leaders believed that their walk was of test standard, they may write to Committee seeking its acceptance for prospectives in their party. Now the President announced that prospective members who may be hampered by the lack of test walks would have a time extension to April. However if leaders believed that their walk was of test standard, they may write to Committee seeking its acceptance for prospectives in their party.
  
-The Presidont ​also pointed out that the magazine was having a lean time for contributors and appealed for stronger support. In relation to Federation'​s Insurance proposals, he said that there was not yet concrete scheme for consideration by Clubs.+The President ​also pointed out that the magazine was having a lean time for contributors and appealed for stronger support. In relation to Federation'​s Insurance proposals, he said that there was not yet concrete scheme for consideration by Clubs.
  
 Ron Knightley pointed to a pair of ice axes and 2 sets of crampons donated by a retired mountaineer,​ Phil Humphreys, and then proposed a series of motions covering use of the equipment. Broadly it provided that gear would be available to members of the Aust. Section of the N.Z.A.C. as well as all Club members, that the maximum period of hire be 8 weeks, and that hiring charges be 10/- for an ice axe or crampons used overseas and 5/- in Australia. A deposit of 10/- should be sought on gear hired, and S.B.W. members could book 8 weeks ahead, members of N.Z.A.C. six weeks ahead. The last motion, that hirers be not required to make good loss or damage in reasonable circumstances,​ brought quite a deal of debate, but was carried, as was a separate proposal that the Club obtain suitable straps for the crampons. Alan Rigby proposed sending a letter of appreciation to the donor. Ron Knightley pointed to a pair of ice axes and 2 sets of crampons donated by a retired mountaineer,​ Phil Humphreys, and then proposed a series of motions covering use of the equipment. Broadly it provided that gear would be available to members of the Aust. Section of the N.Z.A.C. as well as all Club members, that the maximum period of hire be 8 weeks, and that hiring charges be 10/- for an ice axe or crampons used overseas and 5/- in Australia. A deposit of 10/- should be sought on gear hired, and S.B.W. members could book 8 weeks ahead, members of N.Z.A.C. six weeks ahead. The last motion, that hirers be not required to make good loss or damage in reasonable circumstances,​ brought quite a deal of debate, but was carried, as was a separate proposal that the Club obtain suitable straps for the crampons. Alan Rigby proposed sending a letter of appreciation to the donor.
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 Alan Rigby'​s name on the social programme is always a welcome sight. Since many club members have been to the Centre and many others anticipate a visit, "​Central Australia"​ on 19th January should see a large crowd in the Club room. Alan Rigby'​s name on the social programme is always a welcome sight. Since many club members have been to the Centre and many others anticipate a visit, "​Central Australia"​ on 19th January should see a large crowd in the Club room.
  
-"​Samoa"​ as presented by Alex and Jean Burton on 26th January, will bo another good reason for a night out at the Club. Their recent visit to the south seas will be unfolded by movie and slides. Already we have enjoyed their travels to distant isles and we now look forward to another pleasant interlude.+"​Samoa"​ as presented by Alex and Jean Burton on 26th January, will be another good reason for a night out at the Club. Their recent visit to the south seas will be unfolded by movie and slides. Already we have enjoyed their travels to distant isles and we now look forward to another pleasant interlude.
  
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 The NSW Federation of Bushwalking clubs, established in 1930 to consolidate and regulate bushwalking formed its own Conservation Bureau in 1938. Thereafter it pursued a parallel path with the NPPA council and added weight to the conservation drive. The requirements of practical users of the scenic bushland were recognised by the authorities and several new parklands wore established. The NSW Federation of Bushwalking clubs, established in 1930 to consolidate and regulate bushwalking formed its own Conservation Bureau in 1938. Thereafter it pursued a parallel path with the NPPA council and added weight to the conservation drive. The requirements of practical users of the scenic bushland were recognised by the authorities and several new parklands wore established.
  
-In the period 1933-1946 the NPPA Council worked with all speed most of the time in touch with Surveyor General H.B. Mathaws ​and his officers; the Department of Lands was well aware of the conservation efforts of this and other societies and gave a great deal of sympathetic help to what was recognised as a continuing campaign for the public good. However during the war years and the following period of rehabilitation the Department was unable to assist or entertain parkland projects as surveyors could not be spared to investigate them. The Snowy Indi scheme was an exception as it had important aspects for government.+In the period 1933-1946 the NPPA Council worked with all speed most of the time in touch with Surveyor General H.B. Mathews ​and his officers; the Department of Lands was well aware of the conservation efforts of this and other societies and gave a great deal of sympathetic help to what was recognised as a continuing campaign for the public good. However during the war years and the following period of rehabilitation the Department was unable to assist or entertain parkland projects as surveyors could not be spared to investigate them. The Snowy Indi scheme was an exception as it had important aspects for government.
  
 When the situation eased the bushwalking conservation movement was resumed on a greater scale than before, there being a marked increase in the number of Clubs and other conservation societies. In fact the feeling for the conservation of bushland and wildlife had developed to an extraordinary extent. The scientific bodies were taking notice of the park schemes being initiated and formulated, and gave moral support to some of them. Some conservation societies had supported NPPA Council schemes from the beginning notably the Wildlife Preservation Society, the Parks and Playground Movement and The Rangers League. When the situation eased the bushwalking conservation movement was resumed on a greater scale than before, there being a marked increase in the number of Clubs and other conservation societies. In fact the feeling for the conservation of bushland and wildlife had developed to an extraordinary extent. The scientific bodies were taking notice of the park schemes being initiated and formulated, and gave moral support to some of them. Some conservation societies had supported NPPA Council schemes from the beginning notably the Wildlife Preservation Society, the Parks and Playground Movement and The Rangers League.
  
-Included in thc several projects of the NPPA Cnuncil ​was one entitled a "​Snow-Indi National Park or Primitive Area", unique to the extent that it comprised about a million acres of Snow highland of both NSW and Victoria. The tract of country extended from Grey Mare Bogong, Gungartan, Black Jack and Big Byabo on the eastern side extending to a line joining Deddick, Mt. Lienster and Mt. Pinnabar. This scheme was initiated between 1930 and 1943 by Myles J. Dunphy of the Mountain Trails Club. Tours of inspection were made and information filed for the time when it could be formulated, but a tentative was laid down which designedly did not include valuable grazing lands on its northern and eastern environs. With other parkland projects and studies of erosion ​ana bushfire damage in various parts of the State it was exhibited at two annual Bushland Exhibitions in the Blaxland Galleries hold by the Rangers League - about 1935. These schemes for large parklands were viewed by thousands of persons and created a great deal of interest, judged from questions asked on the spot.+Included in the several projects of the NPPA Council ​was one entitled a "​Snow-Indi National Park or Primitive Area", unique to the extent that it comprised about a million acres of Snow highland of both NSW and Victoria. The tract of country extended from Grey Mare Bogong, Gungartan, Black Jack and Big Byabo on the eastern side extending to a line joining Deddick, Mt. Lienster and Mt. Pinnabar. This scheme was initiated between 1930 and 1943 by Myles J. Dunphy of the Mountain Trails Club. Tours of inspection were made and information filed for the time when it could be formulated, but a tentative was laid down which designedly did not include valuable grazing lands on its northern and eastern environs. With other parkland projects and studies of erosion ​and bushfire damage in various parts of the State it was exhibited at two annual Bushland Exhibitions in the Blaxland Galleries hold by the Rangers League - about 1935. These schemes for large parklands were viewed by thousands of persons and created a great deal of interest, judged from questions asked on the spot.
  
-NPPA Council men and other bushwalkers continued to carry out numerous pack carrying expeditions of upwards of two weeks durtion ​to procure first hand knowledge about potential parklands. ​Somo of these were the Blue Mountains National Park, Snow Indi National Park, Beecroft Peninsula (Jervis Bay) reserves, Warrumbungles National Park. The only way to accomplish these objectives was to make the work a collaboration effort of the team internally and a community effort externally. The team needed freedom to act as it thought best. During its long existence this voluntary unhampered direction and conduct of work proved successful. By 1950 the number of major parklands had increassd ​substantially since the MTC and SBW supporters began their initial Garrawarra Park campaign in 1933.+NPPA Council men and other bushwalkers continued to carry out numerous pack carrying expeditions of upwards of two weeks duration ​to procure first hand knowledge about potential parklands. ​Some of these were the Blue Mountains National Park, Snow Indi National Park, Beecroft Peninsula (Jervis Bay) reserves, Warrumbungles National Park. The only way to accomplish these objectives was to make the work a collaboration effort of the team internally and a community effort externally. The team needed freedom to act as it thought best. During its long existence this voluntary unhampered direction and conduct of work proved successful. By 1950 the number of major parklands had increased ​substantially since the MTC and SBW supporters began their initial Garrawarra Park campaign in 1933.
  
 In 1944 NPPA Council decided it was time to straighten out Snowy Indi Scheme in preparation for submission when the opportunity arose after the war but events were precipitated by action taken at a higher level. Statements in the Press and elsewhere made it plain that many activities concerning the water rights of three states were involved - water catchment, irrigation, Murray and Snowy River flows, electric power generation, sheep and cattle grazing, forestry and probably mining. Also recreations such as summer motoring, winter sports, recreational walking trail riding, fishing and nature study. Scientists also had their interests. The extent of the productive activities was alarming, it seemed that matters of recreation, scenic wilderness might be trampled underfoot. It was felt that the time was opportune to show there existed a strong body of opinion in favour of reserving a large area of the Snowy Mountains in its wilderness state. Investigations continued. In 1944 NPPA Council decided it was time to straighten out Snowy Indi Scheme in preparation for submission when the opportunity arose after the war but events were precipitated by action taken at a higher level. Statements in the Press and elsewhere made it plain that many activities concerning the water rights of three states were involved - water catchment, irrigation, Murray and Snowy River flows, electric power generation, sheep and cattle grazing, forestry and probably mining. Also recreations such as summer motoring, winter sports, recreational walking trail riding, fishing and nature study. Scientists also had their interests. The extent of the productive activities was alarming, it seemed that matters of recreation, scenic wilderness might be trampled underfoot. It was felt that the time was opportune to show there existed a strong body of opinion in favour of reserving a large area of the Snowy Mountains in its wilderness state. Investigations continued.
  
-On 8.4.43 officers of the Department of Lands verbally advised the NPPA to submit its Snow Indi Scheme in June. Intensive work was caried ​out on letters, appendices and maps. Dated 14.6.43 ​tho scheme was lodged with the Department and copies delivered to the Premier, W.J. McKell, to the River Murray Commission and other statutory bodies as well as to the walking and parks bodies. The Government appointed a committee to investigate certain matters deemed to have precedence over public recreation interests.+On 8.4.43 officers of the Department of Lands verbally advised the NPPA to submit its Snow Indi Scheme in June. Intensive work was carried ​out on letters, appendices and maps. Dated 14.6.43 ​the scheme was lodged with the Department and copies delivered to the Premier, W.J. McKell, to the River Murray Commission and other statutory bodies as well as to the walking and parks bodies. The Government appointed a committee to investigate certain matters deemed to have precedence over public recreation interests.
  
 The Department arranged a meeting between M.J. Dunphy and Messrs. Harnett and Barrie for 3.8.43. The Select Committee explained aspects of the matter very clearly and gave the NPPA spokesman a good hearing. The discussion was continued on the following day when several senior Lands Department officers joined in. The emergent facts and matters were - The Department arranged a meeting between M.J. Dunphy and Messrs. Harnett and Barrie for 3.8.43. The Select Committee explained aspects of the matter very clearly and gave the NPPA spokesman a good hearing. The discussion was continued on the following day when several senior Lands Department officers joined in. The emergent facts and matters were -
    
-  - The committee said at once they were not interested in the proposed parkland across the border in Victoria, and said that dual control could not be considered (thus the two state unique feature was cast out without further comment. As a mattor ​of fact the NPPC had never advocated dual control had rather envisaged the area in Victoria as a primitive area administered by the Department of Lands Victoria.)+  - The committee said at once they were not interested in the proposed parkland across the border in Victoria, and said that dual control could not be considered (thus the two state unique feature was cast out without further comment. As a matter ​of fact the NPPC had never advocated dual control had rather envisaged the area in Victoria as a primitive area administered by the Department of Lands Victoria.)
   - Legislation would be brought down to reorganize the grazing leases, covering practically the whole area to preserve the considerable revenue derived from lease rents or tenders.   - Legislation would be brought down to reorganize the grazing leases, covering practically the whole area to preserve the considerable revenue derived from lease rents or tenders.
   - Water conservation.   - Water conservation.
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 What has been recorded here deals with facts and circumstances bearing on the beginnings of a great State Park which, because of inherent complications and diverse even conflicting interests will always be a compromise area no matter how wise its administration,​ it would be impossible to please everyone who has an interest in the place. What has been recorded here deals with facts and circumstances bearing on the beginnings of a great State Park which, because of inherent complications and diverse even conflicting interests will always be a compromise area no matter how wise its administration,​ it would be impossible to please everyone who has an interest in the place.
  
-In conclusion, as some adknowledgement ​of the excellence of the original two state scheme an earnest effort should be made to induce the authorities in Victoria to set up a primitive park on their side of the border, entirely separate from the proposed large national park on the highlands further southwards.+In conclusion, as some acknowledgement ​of the excellence of the original two state scheme an earnest effort should be made to induce the authorities in Victoria to set up a primitive park on their side of the border, entirely separate from the proposed large national park on the highlands further southwards.
  
 22nd December, 1965. 22nd December, 1965.
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 |January 30|Engadine - Woronora River - Lake Eckersley - Heathcote. 7 miles. A visit to the Northern portion of the Heathcote Primitive Area. This section of the Woronora River is rocky and could involve a rock scramble. Excellent swimming at Lake Eckersley. Train: Ring leader at B0961 Extension 3077 for departure time. Tickets: Heathcote return @ 5/6. Map: Heathcote Primitive Area or Port Hacking Tourist. Leader: Jim Calloway.| |January 30|Engadine - Woronora River - Lake Eckersley - Heathcote. 7 miles. A visit to the Northern portion of the Heathcote Primitive Area. This section of the Woronora River is rocky and could involve a rock scramble. Excellent swimming at Lake Eckersley. Train: Ring leader at B0961 Extension 3077 for departure time. Tickets: Heathcote return @ 5/6. Map: Heathcote Primitive Area or Port Hacking Tourist. Leader: Jim Calloway.|
-|Febuary ​6|Waterfall - Heathcote Creek - Heathcote. 8 miles. Another excursion into the Heathcote Primitive Area. There are several good swimming holes along Heathcote Creek. An ideal walk for new members. Train: 8.50 a.m. Cronulla train Central Electric Station to Sutherland, change at Sutherland for rail motor to Waterfall. Tickets: Waterfall return @ 6/-. Map: Heathcote Primitive Area or Port Hacking Tourist. Leader: Ern Farquhar.|+|February ​6|Waterfall - Heathcote Creek - Heathcote. 8 miles. Another excursion into the Heathcote Primitive Area. There are several good swimming holes along Heathcote Creek. An ideal walk for new members. Train: 8.50 a.m. Cronulla train Central Electric Station to Sutherland, change at Sutherland for rail motor to Waterfall. Tickets: Waterfall return @ 6/-. Map: Heathcote Primitive Area or Port Hacking Tourist. Leader: Ern Farquhar.|
 |February 13|Waterfall - bus to Governor Game Lookout - Thelma Ridge - Era Beach - Mt. Bulgo - Bald Hill - Otford. 10 miles. After a short sharp descent to Era Beach, there should be ample time for surfing. Then right through the Garrawarra Primitive Area to the panorama at Bald Hill. Suitable for new members. Train: 8.20 a.m. Cronulla Train Central Electric Station to Sutherland. Change at Sutherland for rail motor to Waterfall. Tickets: Otford return @ 8/- plus 2/- bus fare Waterfall - Governor Game Lookout. Map: Port Hacking Tourist. Leader: David Ingram.| |February 13|Waterfall - bus to Governor Game Lookout - Thelma Ridge - Era Beach - Mt. Bulgo - Bald Hill - Otford. 10 miles. After a short sharp descent to Era Beach, there should be ample time for surfing. Then right through the Garrawarra Primitive Area to the panorama at Bald Hill. Suitable for new members. Train: 8.20 a.m. Cronulla Train Central Electric Station to Sutherland. Change at Sutherland for rail motor to Waterfall. Tickets: Otford return @ 8/- plus 2/- bus fare Waterfall - Governor Game Lookout. Map: Port Hacking Tourist. Leader: David Ingram.|
  
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 From skin divers camping by their chosen spot to alpinists at their mountain top, from the walker, canoeist and cyclist to the car camper and round the world traveller more people than ever before took Paddy Made camping equipment on their adventures and travels. From skin divers camping by their chosen spot to alpinists at their mountain top, from the walker, canoeist and cyclist to the car camper and round the world traveller more people than ever before took Paddy Made camping equipment on their adventures and travels.
  
-Perhaps someone told them Paddy Made gear is best, it has been used by more ponrle ​longer than any other and is really reliable.+Perhaps someone told them Paddy Made gear is best, it has been used by more people ​longer than any other and is really reliable.
  
 Take a good tip from people who know. Take a good tip from people who know.
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 For all your specialised camping gear call on For all your specialised camping gear call on
  
-Paddy Pallin Pty.Ltd.,+Paddy Pallin Pty. Ltd.,
  
 1st Floor, Cnr. George and Bathurst Sts., Sydney. 262685. 1st Floor, Cnr. George and Bathurst Sts., Sydney. 262685.
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-=====Propsecting ​The Japanese Alps.=====+=====Prospecting ​The Japanese Alps.=====
  
 By Marie Byles. By Marie Byles.
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 It was good to breathe the high mountain air once again. I sat for a long while looking over the long white scree slopes and dreamed of what I would have done twenty, thirty, forty years ago. The climb up was exhilarating but the climb down was rather exhausting. One kind young man came back to keep an eye on me until I reached the bottom again. I wonder did he belong to the Search and Rescue Section! Most of the walkers and climbers wore heavy, rubber-soled canvas boots, which probably slipped less on the rolling pebbles than my own stout rubber-soled sandals. It was good to breathe the high mountain air once again. I sat for a long while looking over the long white scree slopes and dreamed of what I would have done twenty, thirty, forty years ago. The climb up was exhilarating but the climb down was rather exhausting. One kind young man came back to keep an eye on me until I reached the bottom again. I wonder did he belong to the Search and Rescue Section! Most of the walkers and climbers wore heavy, rubber-soled canvas boots, which probably slipped less on the rolling pebbles than my own stout rubber-soled sandals.
  
-Over the forest of deciduous trees and conifers rose not only the rocky mountains, but also an active volcano which smoked realistically from time to time remirding ​one of when it had erupted, formed a large lake and left the trees to drown in it.+Over the forest of deciduous trees and conifers rose not only the rocky mountains, but also an active volcano which smoked realistically from time to time reminding ​one of when it had erupted, formed a large lake and left the trees to drown in it.
  
 It is hard to compare the beauties of mountains I have seen in so many countries. The Japanese Alps rise seven thousand feet above the inns and hostels along the rivers and would provide strenuous enough scrambles to suit the toughest, while the camera can find pictures wherever it looks, whether in the creeper-entwined forests or on the open white stony banks of the rivers. It is hard to compare the beauties of mountains I have seen in so many countries. The Japanese Alps rise seven thousand feet above the inns and hostels along the rivers and would provide strenuous enough scrambles to suit the toughest, while the camera can find pictures wherever it looks, whether in the creeper-entwined forests or on the open white stony banks of the rivers.
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 The Japanese Alps are not for the young Australian who thirsts for snow and ice for there is neither in summer, and in winter they are inaccessible for skiing. But they do call to the middle-aged Bushwalker whose search is mainly for beauty. And they are a superb example of how an over-populated country can none the less afford to have wilderness areas untouched by the axe. The forests are of mixed evergreen and deciduous trees, and among the latter is the lovely silver birch which loses its bark in rings so that you think some vandal must have tried to ring-bark it. The floor of the lower forest consists predominantly of a dwarf bamboo which would make impossibly slow-going without a track. But tracks abound, and likewise excellent maps (in Japanese, of course). At least I suppose they were excellent if one judged by the seriousness with which the trampers would pour over them - just as __we__ used to do. The Japanese Alps are not for the young Australian who thirsts for snow and ice for there is neither in summer, and in winter they are inaccessible for skiing. But they do call to the middle-aged Bushwalker whose search is mainly for beauty. And they are a superb example of how an over-populated country can none the less afford to have wilderness areas untouched by the axe. The forests are of mixed evergreen and deciduous trees, and among the latter is the lovely silver birch which loses its bark in rings so that you think some vandal must have tried to ring-bark it. The floor of the lower forest consists predominantly of a dwarf bamboo which would make impossibly slow-going without a track. But tracks abound, and likewise excellent maps (in Japanese, of course). At least I suppose they were excellent if one judged by the seriousness with which the trampers would pour over them - just as __we__ used to do.
  
-If you are thinking of going to Kamikochi I should recommend October when the trees flame with orange red and gold. You could avoid the language difficulty if you took your tent and camped beside the rushing river, either taking food with you or buying it at the shops attadhed ​to the rest houses and inns. But it would be a little cold to bathe in the river in October, and you would miss the joy of the Japanese communal bath, always steaming hot, which is a delight all on its own. On the whole I should recommend Gosenjaku Lodge. I think they were as sorry as I when the time came to say goodbye, and I don't think they would be so afraid of the next foreigner especially if I lent you my little two-way dictionary which I bought just before I left Japan!+If you are thinking of going to Kamikochi I should recommend October when the trees flame with orange red and gold. You could avoid the language difficulty if you took your tent and camped beside the rushing river, either taking food with you or buying it at the shops attached ​to the rest houses and inns. But it would be a little cold to bathe in the river in October, and you would miss the joy of the Japanese communal bath, always steaming hot, which is a delight all on its own. On the whole I should recommend Gosenjaku Lodge. I think they were as sorry as I when the time came to say goodbye, and I don't think they would be so afraid of the next foreigner especially if I lent you my little two-way dictionary which I bought just before I left Japan!
  
-Later on I visited the mountain resort of Koya San, the headquarters of the Shingon Buddhist Sect. It abounds in lovely temples around which always grow the tall dark crytpameria and cyprus trees. It was exactly the right time to see the deciduous trees in all their autumn glory, and it was exactly ​thc right day to see them at their best, for it was very dull and rainy. The tall dark trees rose above the sombre grey-roofed temples, and from the ground beneath leapt up the silent flames of orange gold and red. It was uncanny. The little Olympus Pen F Japanese camera (for which I willingly give a free advertisement) took the best pictures I have ever taken, but even it could not portray that weird fantastic fairyland. You must see it to believe it possible.+Later on I visited the mountain resort of Koya San, the headquarters of the Shingon Buddhist Sect. It abounds in lovely temples around which always grow the tall dark crytpameria and cyprus trees. It was exactly the right time to see the deciduous trees in all their autumn glory, and it was exactly ​the right day to see them at their best, for it was very dull and rainy. The tall dark trees rose above the sombre grey-roofed temples, and from the ground beneath leapt up the silent flames of orange gold and red. It was uncanny. The little Olympus Pen F Japanese camera (for which I willingly give a free advertisement) took the best pictures I have ever taken, but even it could not portray that weird fantastic fairyland. You must see it to believe it possible.
  
 The mountains of Japan have left behind the memory of people with hearts of gold to match their golden gingko trees. I should like to visit them again but I should prefer to wait for another life so that I could scramble among their rocky peaks. The mountains of Japan have left behind the memory of people with hearts of gold to match their golden gingko trees. I should like to visit them again but I should prefer to wait for another life so that I could scramble among their rocky peaks.
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 Later I acquired and rigged by own sailing dinghy and spent all my spare time at sea, taking special care to be out in the middle of winter and in particularly violent storms, which were always more interesting and could offer faster sailing. By this time I had learned that one of my uncles, although a good sailor, used to go to snowy places and indulge in a mysterious sport called "​step-cutting",​ (This was in the early 1930's when the general use of crampons had not yet been adopted in New Zealand), but this was not much talked of in the family. Later I acquired and rigged by own sailing dinghy and spent all my spare time at sea, taking special care to be out in the middle of winter and in particularly violent storms, which were always more interesting and could offer faster sailing. By this time I had learned that one of my uncles, although a good sailor, used to go to snowy places and indulge in a mysterious sport called "​step-cutting",​ (This was in the early 1930's when the general use of crampons had not yet been adopted in New Zealand), but this was not much talked of in the family.
  
-The dinghy, with her rigging and on a wheeled cradle, weighed about 250 lbs. and had to be pulled home up a mile of extremely steep hill from the water after each day's sailing. At the age of 16 I got a job as a truck driver with a survey team who were mapping some unmapped bits of New Zealand; the job involved little driving and a lot of carrying heavy loads, on foot, through rough country. Heavy packing was dead easy after years of practice dragging the boat up hill and I began to enjoy the bush at once. At the University I naturally joined the tramping clubs and began to go to the ice mountains for climbing. Shiften points out that mountaineering and sailing are very similar while his climbing companion, Tilman, although saying little, currently spends about half of every year sailing the Arctic seas. The transfer from one of these sports ​tn the other is easy and barely noticeable.+The dinghy, with her rigging and on a wheeled cradle, weighed about 250 lbs. and had to be pulled home up a mile of extremely steep hill from the water after each day's sailing. At the age of 16 I got a job as a truck driver with a survey team who were mapping some unmapped bits of New Zealand; the job involved little driving and a lot of carrying heavy loads, on foot, through rough country. Heavy packing was dead easy after years of practice dragging the boat up hill and I began to enjoy the bush at once. At the University I naturally joined the tramping clubs and began to go to the ice mountains for climbing. Shiften points out that mountaineering and sailing are very similar while his climbing companion, Tilman, although saying little, currently spends about half of every year sailing the Arctic seas. The transfer from one of these sports ​to the other is easy and barely noticeable.
  
-In the 1940's much of New Zealand'​s mountain country was virtually unexplored and many major peaks were still unclimbed. With Bob Cawley'​s climbing parties I went into this country with the climbing gear of the day; spiky stiff hemp rope, clinkered boots, waist-high axe, Eckenstein crampons, oilskin parka. No slings, karabiners or pitons had been heard of and our loads were adcordingly ​lighter.+In the 1940's much of New Zealand'​s mountain country was virtually unexplored and many major peaks were still unclimbed. With Bob Cawley'​s climbing parties I went into this country with the climbing gear of the day; spiky stiff hemp rope, clinkered boots, waist-high axe, Eckenstein crampons, oilskin parka. No slings, karabiners or pitons had been heard of and our loads were accordingly ​lighter.
  
 Our first virgin summit was reached after a week's travel on snow and ice, with 90 lb. packs, in country where only two parties had ever been before, camping in the new-fangled snow-caves. We were stopped half way up our peak by a horrific bergschrund with a narrow shaky bridge and a 15 ft. overhanging ice-wall above it. Self-levitation with two axes got us up this and soon afterwards we were faced with some 300 ft. of rock. Our technique on rock, at this stage, was to scramble up as best we could winding the rope around outcrops where available; fortunately on this occasion we were able to cut steps up a steep couloir of rotten ice, bombarded by stones, and avoid the 300 ft. of mod. diff. grade rock interspersed by broad ledges. On the way down, we cut an ice-bollard at the bergschrund and roped down it. I was last man down and on arriving at the lower lip gave the rope a tug to free it on the bollard. The bollard flew off and hit me square on the head! We were involved in a small harmless avalanche on the way down - in those days there seemed to be more avalanches than now and the summer climbing season was colder, snowier and later. Or could it be that our equipment and techniques have improved? Our first virgin summit was reached after a week's travel on snow and ice, with 90 lb. packs, in country where only two parties had ever been before, camping in the new-fangled snow-caves. We were stopped half way up our peak by a horrific bergschrund with a narrow shaky bridge and a 15 ft. overhanging ice-wall above it. Self-levitation with two axes got us up this and soon afterwards we were faced with some 300 ft. of rock. Our technique on rock, at this stage, was to scramble up as best we could winding the rope around outcrops where available; fortunately on this occasion we were able to cut steps up a steep couloir of rotten ice, bombarded by stones, and avoid the 300 ft. of mod. diff. grade rock interspersed by broad ledges. On the way down, we cut an ice-bollard at the bergschrund and roped down it. I was last man down and on arriving at the lower lip gave the rope a tug to free it on the bollard. The bollard flew off and hit me square on the head! We were involved in a small harmless avalanche on the way down - in those days there seemed to be more avalanches than now and the summer climbing season was colder, snowier and later. Or could it be that our equipment and techniques have improved?
  
-By 1949 I had joined one of the small groups which had acquired pre-war English books on rock-climbing and were trying to use the techniques described in them. The next year I came to Australia and found that climbing was looked on in the bushwaiking ​clubs as a criminal activity. Although the local sandstone frightened me, and still does, I naturally got involved in the early efforts to popularise the sport among bushwalkers,​ and to teach people how to use simple belaying techniques and to abseil. Some memorable early climbs followed - the first rock-climbing Instructional of the Sydney Bushwalkers,​ which included an ascent of Kanangra Walls, some of the classical climbs at Glenbrook, various first ascents in the Castle area, Glen Davis, Ettrema and the Kowmung. None of these were of great diffficulty, but they were long climbs and enjoyed by large parties of bushwalkers who, a year or two earlier, would have been trotting along tracks with good clothes in their packs to wear home in the train. Now they were headed for bigger and steeper country, in old cars or in the one-and--only Puttmobile, and from them perhaps have sprung some of the present generation of climbers.+By 1949 I had joined one of the small groups which had acquired pre-war English books on rock-climbing and were trying to use the techniques described in them. The next year I came to Australia and found that climbing was looked on in the bushwalking ​clubs as a criminal activity. Although the local sandstone frightened me, and still does, I naturally got involved in the early efforts to popularise the sport among bushwalkers,​ and to teach people how to use simple belaying techniques and to abseil. Some memorable early climbs followed - the first rock-climbing Instructional of the Sydney Bushwalkers,​ which included an ascent of Kanangra Walls, some of the classical climbs at Glenbrook, various first ascents in the Castle area, Glen Davis, Ettrema and the Kowmung. None of these were of great difficulty, but they were long climbs and enjoyed by large parties of bushwalkers who, a year or two earlier, would have been trotting along tracks with good clothes in their packs to wear home in the train. Now they were headed for bigger and steeper country, in old cars or in the one-and--only Puttmobile, and from them perhaps have sprung some of the present generation of climbers.
  
 In 1956 I visited Zermatt with three English climbers and found that the famous Swiss Alps were no more difficult or fearsome that New Zealand after all. In 1956 I visited Zermatt with three English climbers and found that the famous Swiss Alps were no more difficult or fearsome that New Zealand after all.
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 from N.Z.A.C. from N.Z.A.C.
196601.txt ยท Last modified: 2016/07/22 00:14 by tyreless